PDA

You are viewing a trimmed-down version of the SkyscraperPage.com discussion forum.  For the full version follow the link below.

View Full Version : CHICAGO | General Developments



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 [11] 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 311 312 313 314 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 373 374 375 376 377 378 379 380 381 382

the urban politician
Apr 24, 2007, 2:58 PM
The part I'm a bit excited about is in bold:

http://www.globest.com/news/891_891/chicago/160031-1.html
Four 50-Story Apartment Towers Trade for $470M
By Gina Kenny Email this story | Printer-friendly | Reprints

Presidential Towers(Read more on the multifamily market.)
CHICAGO-Waterton Residential, an affiliate of Chicago-based Waterton Associates LLC, has purchased the Presidential Tower apartment complex from the Pritzker family. The four 50-story apartment towers are located on a 5.8-acre lot surrounded by Madison, Des Plaines, Monroe and Clinton streets. Waterton purchased the property for approximately $470 million, says Mark Stern, senior vice president of acquisitions for Waterton. Stern said he could not disclose a cap rate.

The four towers have a total of 2,346 apartments with studio, convertible, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units. About 7% of the units are currently vacant, Stern tells GlobeSt.com. The average rent for the apartments is $1,300 with an average size of 655 sf, Stern says. Approximately 10% of the units are furnished corporate rentals and guest suites.

The towers also have a five-story parking garage with 1,159 spaces and more than 100,000 sf of commercial space. There are a variety of retailers in the building including a 20,000-sf health club, salon, florist, dentist, grocery store, restaurants, dry cleaner and coffee shop. Potbelly’s Sandwich Shop recently signed a 10-year lease, Stern says. The lease was signed before the sale to Waterton, he says. Stern could not disclose the lease rate.
The apartment towers were completed in 1986. The Pritzker family gained control of the Presidential Towers when they were about to be foreclosed in 1995. The towers have not had significant improvements done to them since the building was constructed, Stern says. Renovations are planned to the apartment units such as upgrades to the flooring and lighting and new appliances and renovations to the bathrooms and kitchens. Stern would not disclose an estimate for the renovations. Renovations will also be done to the lobby and other common areas, the parking garage and the retail and commercial area.

“When Presidential Towers was built, it was really built as a self-contained village,” Stern says. Many of the retailers do not have street access. “Twenty years later, the West Loop has changed so much. We are going to come in and really open up the retail and make it more street friendly.”

The company also purchased two other properties in Chicago in the past year; 1 E. Delaware Place in Chicago, a 36-story apartment complex from Archstone in the city’s Gold Coast neighborhood at the corner of North State Street and East Delaware Street, and the 399-unit River North Park Apartments in Chicago in May 2006 from Archstone.

Marcu
Apr 24, 2007, 3:05 PM
If the LaSalle sale to BoA goes through, I'll be moving my accounts elsewhere. I know other people that are going to do the same.

Jesus, anybody but BoA!

I just don't get it. When ABN, a Dutch bank, bought up Lasalle we were all complaining that those evil foreigners are coming in and buying up our assets, stealing our jobs, and killing our institutions. Now that an American bank wants to buy Lasalle from ABN, or make it "American" again if you will, we are again complaining. Is this just a matter of fearing what we don't know? Forgetfulness?

And to make things even more interesting, we are now begging a Scottish bank to come in and buy up Lasalle so that an American bank can't get it.

AJphx
Apr 24, 2007, 5:37 PM
oh well, I guess I was wrong about LaSalle (post from pages back). Although its mainly due to ABN AMRO being bought.

BofA will completely merge LaSalle. But there is still a chance for LaSalle to remain independent and hq'ed in Chicago if Royal Bank of Scotland bids for it and wins. However, RBS already owns a US bank, Citizen's Bank based in Providence. So it would still be a chance that LaSalle would be merged under Citizens, but it could also be the other way around with LaSalle remaining, or they both remain seperate.

AJphx
Apr 24, 2007, 6:29 PM
I just don't get it. When ABN, a Dutch bank, bought up Lasalle we were all complaining that those evil foreigners are coming in and buying up our assets, stealing our jobs, and killing our institutions. Now that an American bank wants to buy Lasalle from ABN, or make it "American" again if you will, we are again complaining. Is this just a matter of fearing what we don't know? Forgetfulness?

And to make things even more interesting, we are now begging a Scottish bank to come in and buy up Lasalle so that an American bank can't get it.
No. And what you said has nothing at all to do with the real issue.

First, considering that was ABN bought LaSalle in 1979, I doubt many people in this forum even had an opinion or knowledge of it then, so it is irrelevant. If they did, it certainly wasn't because "foreigners" were buying it, but because Chicago was losing a local, independent bank.

What people want is whats good for Chicago. Which would be LaSalle, independent, with its hq in Chicago, (which is better for Chicago's economy) and the local connection that brings civic investment. Under ABN/AMRO, thats how it operated as an indirect subsidiary. It wasn't renamed or merged, it remained independent as the US operations.

Under BofA, LaSalle will be entirely merged, chicago will lose the corporate heaquarters, and will lose much of the LaSalle civic contributions. However, if LaSalle is taken by Royal Bank of Scotland instead, there remains a chance for it to stay an independent Chicago bank like it was under ABN-AMRO before. (and possibly become an even larger bank if RBS's US bank, Citizens, is merged into it)

That is it, simply enough. There is no American-foreign issue here or whatever else you may be trying to imply.

Alliance
Apr 24, 2007, 11:00 PM
Wait, so now I am confused. Is there actually a bid war between BofA and RBS? I thought the BofA merger was just short of official.

brian_b
Apr 25, 2007, 12:49 AM
^^^

It has nothing to do with nationality and everything to do with me not liking BoA.

sentinel
Apr 25, 2007, 1:10 AM
Wait, so now I am confused. Is there actually a bid war between BofA and RBS? I thought the BofA merger was just short of official.

It's not a done deal just yet, because the Royal Bank of Scotland was ready to buy it out (which would then have expanded their Chicago Charter One operations) but the Barclay's/BofA deal swept in and (perhaps prematurely) announced that their deal was approved which is not true because there is still a lot of share-holder, Board in-fighting, a very tangled web AND the fact that it would also need to have regulatory approval as well if and only if the Barclay's deal is approved by by all of ABN and their board, and I believe that the Royal Bank of Scotland will definitely put up a fight for this, they won't let this pass so easily into Barclay's hands.

Alliance
Apr 25, 2007, 3:44 AM
Excellent. GO RBS!

hoju
Apr 25, 2007, 4:38 AM
According to Crain's, an RBS takeover would be even worse in terms of bloodletting of chicago area jobs because the price paid would be that much higher to beat the B of A bid. I am as emotionally invested as the rest of you when it comes to retention of our homegrown companies, but perhaps this is a fight we won't win no matter the owner. Besides, another article in the Trib made the point that the increased competition B of A would offer to Chicago area banking would mean good things for the former customers of LaSalle. Perhaps the trickle down benefit of easier access to money flow would be just as much a boon for the regional economy. I am not sure, but I am just hoping that B of A retains its civic commitments like sponsoring the marathon. I think they will feel compelled to do these things anyways, since they are trying to expand their footprint in Chicago, and civic involvement obviously grants one a favorable reputation in our town.

hoju
Apr 25, 2007, 5:21 AM
An article in the Chicago Reader about uproar over a zoning change for an 8-story proposal in bucktown. Browsing the comments, it doesn't seem like anyone bothered to ask what the big deal was about having an 8-story building near one of the busiest intersections in the city. Anyone familiar with this 8-story proposal for 1600 N Milwaukee?

http://blogs.chicagoreader.com/politics/

On April 17 voters in the 32nd Ward went to the polls to choose between incumbent Ted Matlak and challenger Scott Waguespack in the aldermanic runoff election.

The very next day a zoning lawyer sent letters to Bucktown residents letting them know of a zoning-change proposal that, if passed by the City Council, would allow a developer to build an eight-story, 51-unit mixed-use condo complex with 248 parking spaces on the 1600 North block of Milwaukee, just north of the Coyote Building. The condo complex would be one of the tallest buildings in the area and, as word spreads, residents are up in arms.

According to the notification sign posted at 1632 N. Milwaukee, the zoning-change application was filed on April 11, almost a full week before the election. Matlak ought to have known about it--as a matter of routine the zoning committee immediately notifies aldermen of proposals in their wards.

For his part, Michael Moran, cofounder of Preservation Chicago, doubts that the letter's timing was coincidental. "I believe they purposefully waited until after the election," says Moran. "If the zoning change surfaces before the election, it's going to be a big issue and Matlak has to take a stand."

One of the main reasons Matlak was even in a runoff was because voters were upset at him for not keeping them abreast of requested zoning changes until it was too late to mount an opposition, as happened with the Artful Dodger (PDF). If the announcement was indeed delayed purposely, it wasn't enough to help him: Matlak lost to Waguespack, with 49.26 percent of the vote to his 50.74 percent.

The letter was signed by Frederick Agustin, a partner of in the law firm of James Banks, one of the most prominent zoning lawyers in town and the nephew of 36th Ward alderman William Banks, chair of the zoning committee. According to Agustin's letter, the applicant is a company called 1600 North, Inc., located at 1000 N. Milwaukee.
Neither Matlak, his press spokeswoman, Rebekah Brooks, nor Agustin returned calls for comment.

Waguespack says he will ask alderman Banks to hold off on approving the change until the area's two leading organizations, the Bucktown Community Organization and the Wicker Park Committee, get to hold public hearings about it. "I haven't had a chance to see the proposed building; I just learned about it myself," says Waguespack. "I'd hope they wouldn't try to push it through."

There's at at least one council zoning committee and one full City Council meetings before Waguespack gets sworn in on May 21. After Matlack won, Waguespack told reporters "we took out the machine." In the next few weeks, we'll see if the machine gets in one last jab.

honte
Apr 25, 2007, 5:32 AM
^ Matlak, good riddance!

aaron38
Apr 25, 2007, 1:16 PM
Fire Breaks out in Old Post Office Building
CHICAGO---- Fire broke out Tuesday in a ventilation system in the city's vacant former post office where a movie crew had been filming scenes for an upcoming ''Batman'' sequel, sending black smoke billowing.
District Fire Chief Jose Santiago said insulation inside the ''very old ventilation system'' caught fire shortly before 11:30 a.m., and had nothing to do with the filming. There were no injuries, he said.
''It looked a lot worse than it really was,'' Santiago said. The fire was contained to the 16th-floor ventilation shaft in the 17-story building, and most of the flames were extinguished by a sprinkler system, fire department officials said.
http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/355286,fire042407.article


I don't know, my conspiracy meter just twitched a notch. A couple vacant Sullivan buildings burn down, and now there's a fire in the Post Office's "very old ventilation system". So now there's smoke and water damage, which would lend support for the demolition plan.

Maybe fans of the athletic club should keep an eye out on that building...

the urban politician
Apr 25, 2007, 1:36 PM
51-unit mixed-use condo complex with 248 parking spaces

^ My interest in this project ended upon reading that.

More unnecessary parking in a city that seriously needs to rethink its way of getting around

aaron38
Apr 25, 2007, 1:50 PM
More unnecessary parking in a city that seriously needs to rethink its way of getting around

It's 10 feet from an El station, and that's 5 spaces per unit! Yeah, that's crazy.

VivaLFuego
Apr 25, 2007, 2:05 PM
That parking ratio is absolute insanity. I wish at least some of those spaces (perhaps 150) would be sold as monthly park-n-ride spaces for the L).

"one of the tallest buildings in the area".....right, except for the even-taller coyote building next door!

alex1
Apr 25, 2007, 3:35 PM
An article in the Chicago Reader about uproar over a zoning change for an 8-story proposal in bucktown.

8 story is completely in-scale for this neighborhood IMO (as long as it fits in snug at street level). The neighborhood has a need for more housing and higher density developments can do the two things us urban lovers crave (1) more street vitality and (2) support better services (stores, clubs, cafes, restaurants...).

Busy Bee
Apr 25, 2007, 3:37 PM
It's 10 feet from an El station, and that's 5 spaces per unit! Yeah, that's crazy.

That sounds crazy because it may not be the case. I'm not sure we know enough about this proposal to know that there is not a public garage component here ala the garage at the Vic condos. If there is a public parking component than that would account for the absurd unit/parking space ratio. We'll see.

forumly_chgoman
Apr 25, 2007, 5:14 PM
^^^^Are there renders available for this 8 story building......the 248 parking I just have to think is in error....unless as someone else has mentioned maybe there is a parking garage attached

ANyhow...8 stories is not an unreasonable height at all along a busy commercial corridor such as Milwaukee........hell this area used to be just desolate

VivaLFuego
Apr 25, 2007, 5:59 PM
Hopefully we hear about the community meetings for the 8-story Bucktown project so some pro-density voices can be heard....WickerPark/Bucktown will soon be as bad at Hyde Park or Gold Coast in terms of entrenched NIMBYism with deep pockets.

hoju
Apr 25, 2007, 6:26 PM
I made a comment on the Reader website about the 8-story proposal and how it is perfectly in scale for a very busy and vibrant intersection. Here were some responses. Mostly the same veiled NIMBY bullshit:

My comment:
Can anyone tell me what is so bad about an 8 story building near one of the cities busiest and most vibrant intersections? We do live in a city that invented the skyscraper after all.

Reponses:
-Can you tell me what is so bad about delaying a zoning decision until the community has had an opportunity to review the proposed development and its impact on its neighbors and the traffic pattern at such a vibrant intersection?
-is there a lack of skyscrapers in Chicago? plenty of unsold units downtown, in extremely vibrant and busy areas and intersections.
contrary to the mantra of the developer/flipper crowd, we do NOT want to be like Manhattan in Chicago.

Some of you all should go comment on that board so there is some indication to these people that not everyone wants to live in a car-dependent suburb within the city.

VivaLFuego
Apr 25, 2007, 7:25 PM
^ Delaying the decision to review plans: that's fine. I mean, we don't want an 8-story garbage development. But it could be a great development and add much needed residential and commercial space to the local market, and further improve the economics of the area. Plus, Milwaukee Ave. north of North Ave. gets pretty quiet quick, so it could improve that.

Marcu
Apr 25, 2007, 7:37 PM
It never seizes to amaze me how Manhattan is constantly thrown out as something "we don't want to become" at every one of these types of meetings. Since when did Manhattan become such a horrible place?

Busy Bee
Apr 25, 2007, 9:50 PM
^A combination of Manhattan and Paris densities should be our model.

the urban politician
Apr 26, 2007, 2:12 AM
CBP to the rescue?

Latoso
Apr 26, 2007, 3:41 AM
We definitely don't want Chicago to be like Manhattan... their NIMBYs actually have clout! ;)

denizen467
Apr 26, 2007, 6:07 AM
According to Crain's, an RBS takeover would be even worse in terms of bloodletting of chicago area jobs because the price paid would be that much higher to beat the B of A bid.
I've been looking for commentary on this, and haven't found it anywhere. Is there a way you could post or describe the article? Did Crain's say there was no chance RBS would rename its US operations "LaSalle" or move the Citizens HQ to Chicago?

I mean, Citizens HQ currently is in Providence for crying out loud. Being within striking distance of NYC may be nice, but for day to day use it doesn't really come to mind as a location you'd want for your headquarters. It also may be closer to the UK but the air connections aren't as good.

hoju
Apr 26, 2007, 6:31 AM
There wasn't any extended discussion about RBS's strategy or US headquarters or anything. It was just one statement that if Bank of America is planning on reducing costs so heavily and cutting staff, RBS may be even more likely to do that, given that they would have to pay even more for LaSalle to beat B of A's bid. I would love to get the citizens HQ in chicago, but either way, it sounds like we will lose a lot of area jobs.

SamInTheLoop
Apr 26, 2007, 1:16 PM
There wasn't any extended discussion about RBS's strategy or US headquarters or anything. It was just one statement that if Bank of America is planning on reducing costs so heavily and cutting staff, RBS may be even more likely to do that, given that they would have to pay even more for LaSalle to beat B of A's bid. I would love to get the citizens HQ in chicago, but either way, it sounds like we will lose a lot of area jobs.


To me that sounds very counterintuitive - I think the amount of cuts would have much more to do with the strategies (and differences between) that b of a and rbs would likely employ, rather than an additional upfront premium being paid - my assumption is based on the fact that one would think there would be less overlap with an rbs takeover than b of a.........

alex1
Apr 26, 2007, 1:17 PM
I mean, Citizens HQ currently is in Providence for crying out loud. Being within striking distance of NYC may be nice, but for day to day use it doesn't really come to mind as a location you'd want for your headquarters. It also may be closer to the UK but the air connections aren't as good.

Providence is much much closer to Boston than to nYc. 45-50 minutes vs 4 hours. Logan airport is some 40-45 minutes away. The patriots play 25-30 minutes away.

It's not a horrible location and any corporate headquarter can draw talent from two of the best schools in the world (Brown and RISD).

Via Chicago
Apr 26, 2007, 4:17 PM
LaSalle attracts new suitor
Parent firm ABN Amro at center of takeover fight
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0704250840apr26,1,6424523.story

By Becky Yerak
Tribune staff reporter
Published April 26, 2007

It was a modest purchase by Royal Bank of Scotland Group PLC standards.

In February, seeking to beef up its Chicago presence, RBS' U.S. business paid about $180 million for Lisle-based GreatBanc Inc., a bank holding company with 10 Chicago-area branches. Soon after, 40 percent of GreatBanc workers were told they were getting pink slips, and plans got under way to retire the GreatBanc name in favor of Charter One, one of RBS' two key U.S. brands.

Could the same scenario repeat itself at LaSalle Bank if RBS bags the city's No. 2 bank?

LaSalle, which early this week appeared on the verge of being bought by Charlotte-based Bank of America Corp., now has RBS as a suitor as well.

On Wednesday RBS teamed with two other European banks to bid $98.5 billion for LaSalle's Dutch parent, ABN Amro Holding NV, in what's shaping up as the financial-services industry's biggest takeover battle. Their offer tops a joint deal announced Monday that had Barclays PLC buying ABN, and Bank of America stepping in to take LaSalle for $21 billion.

RBS already has a significant U.S. presence through its Providence, R.I.-based Citizens Financial Group, which does business primarily under two names: Citizens Bank and Charter One. The unit has more than 1,600 offices and more than 26,000 employees in 13 states, covering New England, the Mid-Atlantic and the Midwest.

With about 130 Chicago-area branches, Charter One had Chicago-area market share of 2.8 percent as of June 30, 2006, according to the latest figures available from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

Combined with LaSalle, which has about 140 Chicago-area branches, Charter One would have market share of 16.9 percent, surpassing market leader JPMorgan Chase.

The deal would give Charter One a stronger presence in mid-market commercial lending, a LaSalle strength in its key markets of Chicago and Detroit. LaSalle operates 260 branches in Indiana and Michigan.

Banking industry observers expect Charter One, like Bank of America, to cut LaSalle jobs. Bank of America has said LaSalle's name would be dropped in favor of its brand, which has more national sweep, but the moniker's chances of survival might be slightly better under Charter One ownership.

That is because it was only three years ago that RBS bought Charter One, which at the time was headquartered in Cleveland. Meanwhile, the LaSalle name has a 67-year history in Chicago.

Charter One representatives referred calls to Citizens, which declined to comment on the future of the LaSalle name or workers.

But a Citizens spokeswoman on Wednesday confirmed that Charter One is in the process of changing the name of GreatBanc branches to Charter One. That deal expands Charter One's presence in Chicago, Skokie and Evanston and provides entry into the towns of Olympia Fields, Chicago Heights, Frankfort, Cary and Algonquin.

When that deal closed in February, Charter One announced it would lay off 100 of GreatBanc's 250 workers in May, according to a published report. It said it would not retain GreatBanc's back-office jobs and would close its former Lisle headquarters.

As for the future of the LaSalle name, one banking industry observer doesn't think there's room for both LaSalle and Charter One in Chicago.

"I don't know if they want to compete against themselves, with two names in a market," said George Morvis, chief executive of Financial Shares Corp., a Hinsdale-based marketing consulting firm. "I'd say in Chicago it should be one name, and I'm not sure which name, but my guess would be Charter One because they are the buyer."

Regardless of what happens to the LaSalle name under Bank of America or Charter One, "whoever acquires LaSalle is going to get out their liposuction machine and cut out the fat," Morvis said.

LaSalle is well known for its support of Chicago's art community, as well as its sponsorship of the Chicago Marathon.

In its annual report, Citizens highlighted one of its key Illinois charity initiatives as "Making Music Matter," which supports local not-for-profit groups by raising money at summer concerts.

Charter One also has partnered with the Greater Chicago Food Depository to distribute donated food throughout a network of 600 Illinois pantries, soup kitchens and shelters. It also provided funding for 3,000 additional boxes of food.

denizen467
Apr 27, 2007, 5:21 AM
Providence is much much closer to Boston than to nYc. 45-50 minutes vs 4 hours. Logan airport is some 40-45 minutes away. The patriots play 25-30 minutes away.

It's not a horrible location and any corporate headquarter can draw talent from two of the best schools in the world (Brown and RISD).
Of course; spacially, Providence is basically Boston's Joliet - it's an exurb of Boston. But that is mostly irrelevant to MBAs and other finance types, for whom NYC is the center of everything.

Logan is at least 45-50 minutes when there's no traffic (and you're not dodging falling ceiling panels in the Big Dig), compared with 15 minutes to ORD from downtown. As far as RISD goes, it's hard to see how a bank headquarters benefits from being near a design school.

Anyway my real point was that these people would get out of Providence to enjoy themselves only a couple of times a month, whereas with an HQ in Chicago you can go out every night, get wasted and just take a cabs everywhere, etc., and generally enjoy the richness of life in a world city. Providence's sole advantage is that it's between 1 and 3 hours from where you really want to be.

forumly_chgoman
Apr 27, 2007, 6:22 AM
Of course; spacially, Providence is basically Boston's Joliet - it's an exurb of Boston. But that is mostly irrelevant to MBAs and other finance types, for whom NYC is the center of everything.

Logan is at least 45-50 minutes when there's no traffic (and you're not dodging falling ceiling panels in the Big Dig), compared with 15 minutes to ORD from downtown. As far as RISD goes, it's hard to see how a bank headquarters benefits from being near a design school.

Anyway my real point was that these people would get out of Providence to enjoy themselves only a couple of times a month, whereas with an HQ in Chicago you can go out every night, get wasted and just take a cabs everywhere, etc., and generally enjoy the richness of life in a world city. Providence's sole advantage is that it's between 1 and 3 hours from where you really want to be.

15 minutes from DT to ORD.......what are you driving the frickin space shuttle....I don't think so.....even if there is NO traffic.....door to door 30 min absolute minimum

Latoso
Apr 27, 2007, 6:48 AM
With no traffic I've actually driven it in 15 minutes. Then again I always drive 75 mph whenever possible.

VivaLFuego
Apr 27, 2007, 2:16 PM
Yeah, travel times to O'hare are abuot 17 - 60 minutes depending on traffic. I've only ever experienced times under 25 minutes at night, when business travelers aren't traveling anyway.

Alliance
Apr 27, 2007, 2:22 PM
15 minutes from DT to ORD.......what are you driving the frickin space shuttle....I don't think so.....even if there is NO traffic.....door to door 30 min absolute minimum

I've done it in 15 min....:shrug: No traffic of course, late at night, going 75. It can happen.

Chicago3rd
Apr 27, 2007, 6:46 PM
I've done it in 15 min....:shrug: No traffic of course, late at night, going 75. It can happen.


In a cab 17 minutes....after 10 p.m. one very lucky night.

alex1
Apr 27, 2007, 7:10 PM
Of course; spacially, Providence is basically Boston's...

Providence is a fine place to house a headquarters. It's relatively close to a major international airport, it's progressive, cheaper and the educational institutions are top notch.

RISD is a major asset to area headquarters, agencies or what not. I was accepted there and at Yale and the top reasons why I almost chose it was the working relationship between the city and school in finding fresh sustainability concepts for the city.

is it the most dynamic city? no. But some people don't look for the most dynamic city when choosing a place to live.

There's no law that says all major banking operations must be placed in our nation's best cities. Heck, Birmingham, AL is up to their throats in banking headquarters.

Chicago's best hopes at becoming a banking center for headquarters lies in a huge corporate relocation. Doesn't look like Northern will live too far into the future without it selling out.

Alliance
Apr 27, 2007, 7:35 PM
Chicago's best hopes at becoming a banking center for headquarters lies in a huge corporate relocation.

or a CBOT/CME merger...

*prays for merger*

alex1
Apr 27, 2007, 7:48 PM
^chicago is already a global financials center. CBOT/CME merger would help cement that but it certainly wouldn't make it a banking center in regards to headquarters.

forumly_chgoman
Apr 27, 2007, 8:59 PM
15 minutes from DT to ORD.......what are you driving the frickin space shuttle....I don't think so.....even if there is NO traffic.....door to door 30 min absolute minimum

^^^^Ok not to be off topic or anything......but read carefull what I said....door to door.....that is from the time you leave the door of your apt / condo to the time you walk in the terminal......15minutes no way in hell


taking La salle and chicago as a starting point....I said DT.....technically this isn't it is actually closer to Ohare.....but whatever......it is about 17 1/4 miles to ORD....now assuming you start your clock the second you start your car at the corner of Lasalle and Chicago you have to AVERAGE roughly 69 miles per hour for the ENTIRE trip.....you have to get to the Ohio feeeder and then onto the kennedy....assuming you stop your clock the minute you pass under the welcome to ohare (nice pic or Richey Daley smilin at you) then MAYBE, MAYBE....given essentially deserted streets, no cops etc......but I still find claims of 15 minutes to highly incredulous.....to AVERAGE 69 miles / hour through an urban enviroment for a distance of nearly 20 miles is tough, very tough to do.

I know everyone wants to claim they can drive like Mario ANdretti or Jimmie Johnson.....but you run up against reality


OK ......I am done arguing and my OT rant is over.....since this really has nothing to do with development I fully expect my and all the other related speed racer rants to be summarily executed :twoguns: :dead:

firstcranialnerve
Apr 28, 2007, 12:40 AM
Providence is much much closer to Boston than to nYc. 45-50 minutes vs 4 hours. Logan airport is some 40-45 minutes away. The patriots play 25-30 minutes away.

It's not a horrible location and any corporate headquarter can draw talent from two of the best schools in the world (Brown and RISD).

Sure, but lets think of possibilities. Univ. of Chicago, School of the Art Institute, Columbia College, Northwestern University all at the doorstep. That's a far better deal in immediate educational institutions.

Latoso
Apr 28, 2007, 8:21 AM
^^^^Ok not to be off topic or anything......but read carefull what I said....door to door.....that is from the time you leave the door of your apt / condo to the time you walk in the terminal......15minutes no way in hell

It can be done, and it has been done. Just because you haven't or can't doesn't limit the rest of us who don't take our eyes off of the goal. You apparently take your eyes off, which is why you see the obstacles. :fruit:

forumly_chgoman
Apr 28, 2007, 9:26 AM
It can be done, and it has been done. Just because you haven't or can't doesn't limit the rest of us who don't take our eyes off of the goal. You apparently take your eyes off, which is why you see the obstacles. :fruit:

GO GO GO....GO GO Speed Racer.......nah never mind


I always liked his older brothet racer X...racer X kicjed speed racer's A es es



HAPPY PICKIN'

the urban politician
Apr 28, 2007, 1:38 PM
^ Are you drunk or something?

alex1
Apr 28, 2007, 4:56 PM
Sure, but lets think of possibilities. Univ. of Chicago, School of the Art Institute, Columbia College, Northwestern University all at the doorstep. That's a far better deal in immediate educational institutions.

what's up with this need to compare everything? it's tired and irrational.

I'm just stating that Providence is a fine place for coporate headquarters. For anyone who attends Brown or some other school (or no school) and lays down their roots to build up a business and home, there's no reason to even consider chicago (or nYc, sanFran, boston, dallas, atlanta...) if that's where their hearts are. Providence has BIG TIME resources. Especially in regards to higher learning.

sorry steely. My rant is done. inappropriate place.

Latoso
Apr 28, 2007, 8:39 PM
GO GO GO....GO GO Speed Racer.......nah never mind


I always liked his older brothet racer X...racer X kicjed speed racer's A es es

Maybe so, but older brother racer x missed his flight! ;)

denizen467
Apr 28, 2007, 11:36 PM
what's up with this need to compare everything? it's tired and irrational.

I'm just stating that Providence is a fine place for coporate headquarters.
...
Providence has BIG TIME resources. Especially in regards to higher learning.
Because this is one of those threads where we compare Chicago to other cities, especially because corporate relocations figure so large in how a city "generally develops".

If we were talking about relocating the hq of Procter & Gamble or Johnson & Johnson, then yes, RISD and its "fresh sustainability concepts" would be simply delightful to have.

However, we are talking about a bank; the ego-driven finance types they need to attract as employees want Manhattan, and when one of those cocky MBAs finds out s/he can't get that job in Manhattan, they're going to be comparing Providence to Charlotte, Chicago, and other places. Nobody's saying Providence is devoid of good features; we're just saying it doesn't stack up to Chicago.

Bank One moved HQ from Columbus to Chicago, despite Ohio State being such a fabulous institution of higher learning. Now RBS/Citizens would have to make a choice between firing people and giving up offices/leases in Chicago, or doing the same in Providence. The choice is clear to most of us, but of course the current management in Providence may be loathe to undertake a relocation and could influence the final judgment made by RBS, so this is probably an uphill battle for us. Still, it's interesting to debate.

If only RBS people were reading all this...

alex1
Apr 29, 2007, 12:34 AM
:rollseyes:

forumly_chgoman
Apr 29, 2007, 8:59 AM
^ Are you drunk or something?
Yea

and thankfully SD or someone else deleted my other ridiculous posts last night


.....sorry for that

...a suggestion to all too much Pinot Noir and posting on SSP do not mix :cheers:

LoyolaBeachView
Apr 29, 2007, 11:47 AM
April 29, 2007
Chicago 2016 Delegation Begins Lobbying in China
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Work the hotel lobby. Meet and greet. And, especially, listen and learn.

That was the essence of Chicago’s first foray into international Olympic circles since being picked as the United States candidate for the 2016 Summer Games.

“It’s been very constructive to be here,” Patrick Ryan, chairman of the Chicago committee, said last Thursday. “We made some new relationships and learned a lot about the whole process.”

Ryan led an eight-person Chicago delegation at the SportAccord convention in Beijing, one of the largest gatherings of sports industry leaders in the world. More than 1,000 delegates were on hand at the Shangri-La Hotel, including senior International Olympic Committee members, sports federation leaders, television executives and corporate sponsors.

The trip came less than two weeks after the United States Olympic Committee chose Chicago over Los Angeles as America’s 2016 bid city. It was the start of a long process that will culminate with the International Olympic Committee’s selection of the host city in 2009.

The Chicago team also included the executive director Mike Conley, a former Olympic triple-jump champion, and the operations chief Doug Arnot. In addition, the United States Olympic Committee sent a top-level delegation that included its chairman, Peter Ueberroth, and the international affairs experts Bob Ctvrtlik and Robert Fasulo.

“People are very aware that Chicago will be presented as an applicant city,” Ryan said. “It was quite well known among the general population. But, clearly, people have to get to know the Chicago team and learn a lot more about Chicago. Being here clearly demonstrates our desire to bring amateur sport to Chicago.”

The Chicago bid follows New York’s humbling fourth-place finish in the voting for the 2012 Summer Games, which were awarded to London. This time, a United States candidate shapes up as a strong contender — if not the favorite — in a field that should include Madrid, Rio de Janeiro, Rome, Tokyo and Prague.

“People don’t have in-depth knowledge of our bid, but they are aware of the tough bid competition we went through in the U.S.,” Ryan said.

Anita DeFrantz, an American member of the international committee, said some delegates asked her why the United States committee did not pick Los Angeles, or why New York did not run again, adding that Chicago’s candidacy had received mostly positive reactions so far.

“I think there’s an interest, there’s an openness,” she said. “It’s different. It’s new.”

One of the focal points of the Beijing conference was the race for the 2014 Winter Games. The three finalists — Sochi, Russia; Pyeongchang, South Korea; and Salzburg, Austria — lobbied furiously at the last major meeting before the I.O.C. vote in Guatemala City on July 4.

“We realized we should keep a low profile and not intrude on the 2014 bidding,” Ryan said.

Ryan paid particular attention to last Wednesday’s public presentations by the 2014 bid cities. Each had 15 minutes to pitch its case to a packed assembly with speeches and videos, a sort of dress rehearsal for the final presentations to the full international committee session in Guatemala.

“It was interesting to see the important emphasis on government participants and the varied approaches to legacy,” Ryan said. “It was interesting to see the range of people on the podium.

“We also saw the importance of technology,” he added, referring to the technical glitches that delayed some of the presentations.

Ryan did not expect to be at the Guatemala meeting. The I.O.C. restricts appearances and activities by bid hopefuls until the deadline for submission of formal applications on Sept. 15.

By the time of the 2016 Olympics, 20 years will have passed since the last Summer Games in the United States (Atlanta 1996). Geography also favors North America after Summer Games in Australia (Sydney 2000), Europe (Athens 2004), Asia (Beijing 2008) and Europe (London 2012).

Luciano Barra, a longtime international sports administrator from Italy who has been involved in numerous bids and helped run the 2006 Turin Winter Games, views Chicago as the early favorite.

“It’s the first time we see a candidature from the U.S. which is presented in a way that is not just a private business,” he said. “This is the first time we see something close to what is expected.”

But political issues invariably come into play, too. The Bush administration’s unpopularity abroad apparently did not help New York’s bid for 2012.

“The international status of the U.S. government and its policies will always be a factor,” Ryan said. “We’ll have a change of administration. Even if people are critical of the U.S. government administration and its policies, I believe Americans are respected and well liked as a people. I don’t get any anti-Americanism.”

Chicago has a key ally in Ueberroth, who organized the 1984 Los Angeles Games.

“I’ve watched Chicago in these very early steps and they’re doing it just right,” he said. “They’re meeting with people and trying to learn — win or lose — how they can submit a bid that is responsive to the international movement.

“The whole process works very well for a city if they do it right. In this case, they’re humble, they’re walking the halls, they’re meeting a lot of people. I think the leadership has understood.”

Alliance
Apr 29, 2007, 3:32 PM
Lots of good news in there...lets keep reworking that bid.

the urban politician
Apr 30, 2007, 1:27 AM
There's already a Chicago 2016 Olympics thread, guys

kalmia
Apr 30, 2007, 2:21 AM
what's up with this need to compare everything? it's tired and irrational.

I'm just stating that Providence is a fine place for coporate headquarters. For anyone who attends Brown or some other school (or no school) and lays down their roots to build up a business and home, there's no reason to even consider chicago (or nYc, sanFran, boston, dallas, atlanta...) if that's where their hearts are. Providence has BIG TIME resources. Especially in regards to higher learning.

sorry steely. My rant is done. inappropriate place.

Washington is Oregon's Canada

firstcranialnerve
Apr 30, 2007, 7:20 AM
what's up with this need to compare everything? it's tired and irrational.

I'm just stating that Providence is a fine place for coporate headquarters. For anyone who attends Brown or some other school (or no school) and lays down their roots to build up a business and home, there's no reason to even consider chicago (or nYc, sanFran, boston, dallas, atlanta...) if that's where their hearts are. Providence has BIG TIME resources. Especially in regards to higher learning.

sorry steely. My rant is done. inappropriate place.

Someone suggested moving the headquarters to Chicago. It seemed as if you were trying to bolster the perception of Providence in response to that. I merely provided reasoning that backed the moving proposal. I think comparatively there are major advantages to be had by moving the hq to Chicago. Maybe i'm a bit cynical, but the fact people have 'hearts' in Providence may not be enough. Several huge companies have moved here, and for them its about the quality of business AND quality of life. A lot of people at the bank may have gone to school at 50 different colleges for all i know, not just Brown and *ahem* RISD (banking?). These cats have shareholders to answer to and 'heart' and alma mater don't cut it with a lot of those scallywags.

VivaLFuego
Apr 30, 2007, 2:00 PM
Someone suggested moving the headquarters to Chicago. It seemed as if you were trying to bolster the perception of Providence in response to that. I merely provided reasoning that backed the moving proposal. I think comparatively there are major advantages to be had by moving the hq to Chicago. Maybe i'm a bit cynical, but the fact people have 'hearts' in Providence may not be enough. Several huge companies have moved here, and for them its about the quality of business AND quality of life. A lot of people at the bank may have gone to school at 50 different colleges for all i know, not just Brown and *ahem* RISD (banking?). These cats have shareholders to answer to and 'heart' and alma mater don't cut it with a lot of those scallywags.

Moving a headquarters costs alot of money, too (speaking of answering to shareholders). I mean things like quality of life and talent pool are key factors in long term profitability in a location, but alex1 was simply pointing out that Providence isn't a bad location in either of these regards.

I mean in any merger, the acquiring firm would assess the combined employment and physical asset situation and the decision would probably make itself, no politics/preferences required.

simcityaustin
May 3, 2007, 4:06 PM
Dutch court halts LaSalle Bank sale
Ruling opens up possibility for rival bid(Reuters) — A Dutch court ruled on Thursday that ABN Amro must freeze its $21 billion sale of U.S. unit LaSalle to Bank of America, opening up the possibility of a rival bid for the Netherlands' biggest bank.

In a related deal to the LaSalle sale, British bank Barclays is offering, with ABN management's blessing, 63.26 billion euros ($86 billion) for ABN.

But a consortium of three banks led by Royal Bank of Scotland is willing to pay more as long as LaSalle remains part of ABN.

Dutch shareholder group VEB, which asked Amsterdam's commercial court for an injunction against the LaSalle sale, argued the deal acts as a "poison pill" making rival bids for ABN difficult.
The court said while it was the decision of ABN Amro's management to sell LaSalle, the deal should be put to shareholders.

ABN could face claims from Bank of America, in addition to a $200 million penalty if the LaSalle deal is not closed. There is, however, a "go-shop clause" that allows ABN to seek higher bids for LaSalle until Sunday, May 6.

I have a friend that works as an analyst for LaSalle. This whole deal is just bad news for him. He's pretty much losing his job no matter what.

forumly_chgoman
May 4, 2007, 4:22 PM
Was wondering if anyone here is familiar w / 1720 S Michigan. Specifically, 2bds / 3bds, some of these seem to have nicw outdoor balconies / terraces.

Website doesn't quote prices....anyone here have an idea or know the range?

Mr Roboto
May 4, 2007, 6:18 PM
^I think for two bedrooms its about $310-330k, 11-20 floors up. It looks like it will be a pretty cool building and assessments are ok (about $300). Still pretty expensive for me and the lady, but decent for the area and lower than the lofts conversions and museum park, or anything else farther north. One thing I didn;t like was it will have exposed concrete in the units and hallways (from seeing 1620 next door).

spyguy
May 4, 2007, 10:01 PM
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chi-070503uofc,1,2131506.story?coll=chi-news-hed

U. of. C. gets $35 million gift for art center

By Charles Storch
Tribune staff reporter
Published May 3, 2007, 11:17 PM CDT

A Chicago investment banker and his family are giving $35 million to the University of Chicago for a planned $100 million arts center that is to serve the campus and its South Side neighbors.

The gift by David and Reva Logan and their family is one of the larger single donations made to the U. of C. and is the biggest earmarked for the arts there, the university said Thursday.

University President Robert Zimmer said the donation "will enable us to proceed with the building in an expeditious way." He said the center, eyed for the south end of the campus, is expected to be a "transformative facility" for the school, widely known as a bastion for Nobel Prize-winning research in economics and science.

The Center for the Creative and Performing Arts is to be named for the octogenarian couple, who met while attending the U. of C.

David Logan received his undergraduate and law degrees there. Reva Logan delayed her education because of their marriage but later completed her degree at Roosevelt University and became a teacher.

David Logan is managing partner of Chicago-based Mercury Investments. He also is a stalwart advocate for the arts in Illinois and was on the Illinois Arts Council from 1976 to 2006. His wife's family also has been active in the arts: Her brother Allan Frumkin was a prominent gallery owner here and in New York. The couple collect photography and artists' illustrated books.

David Logan said he and his family approached the U. of C. about the donation. He said he was asked whether they would like to fund a theater or some other piece of the center. He replied that he wanted to do something far more ambitious.

He said he was making the gift for his wife, who is in declining health, and in memory of his mother. David Logan's mother wanted her son, who grew up in the Humboldt Park neighborhood and used to pal around with Saul Bellow, to go to the best school possible.

"I have been amazed at what I have been able to do in philanthropy and work," he said. "It's a great tribute to America."

In addition to the arts, the Logans have donated to education, religious, scientific, journalism and community causes here and around the country.

The arts center has been proposed for a site at 60th Street and Ingleside Avenue. It would be south of the Midway Plaisance and on the same block as the Midway Studios, where sculptor Lorado Taft once worked.

It is to include a multipurpose performance hall, three small theaters, music practice rooms and a recording studio and will serve students, faculty and Hyde Park residents.

Five prominent architectural teams are vying for the commission, and one is to be selected later this spring, Zimmer said. The center is expected to be completed in 2011.

spyguy
May 4, 2007, 10:02 PM
http://www.suntimes.com/business/370502,CST-FIN-poetry04.article

Poem's verses of fortune
REAL ESTATE | With Lilly backing, poetry group closes on prime home

May 4, 2007
BY DAVID ROEDER droeder@suntimes.com

Hog Butcher for the World, Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat, Home to a Place where People who like Poetry can Meet.

Pardon the desecration of Carl Sandburg's lines, but it is inspired by a literary turn in the Chicago real estate market. Poetry has bought property, and will put up a building. The Muse is news.

Chicago's Poetry Foundation, which publishes the 95-year-old Poetry magazine, has closed on the purchase of the southwest corner of Dearborn and Superior for $6.7 million. The site includes two small buildings and a parking lot, which the foundation plans to replace with a "national home" for the art it celebrates.

"We certainly hope the building will reflect our vision, which is to give poetry a greater presence in our society," said foundation spokeswoman Anne Halsey.

It could also become a testament to Chicago's role in the national culture. Harriet Monroe founded Poetry magazine in 1912, giving a platform to writers before they became famous, and getting under the skin of Easterners who couldn't imagine anyone on the prairie thinking refined thoughts.

Banish the thought that rhyme and reason are missing in Chicago's construction boom.

Where did Poetry get the money? Alas, think drugs.

Ruth Lilly, in her 90s and an heiress to the Eli Lilly and Co. drug fortune, in 2002 began lavishing money on the foundation's forerunner. She never attached strings and, judging by ensuing litigation, seldom followed the rituals of estate planning.

The gift, paid as an annuity, has a present value of $175 million, Halsey said. It is intended to ensure Poetry can publish in perpetuity, and has helped the foundation launch conferences and readings locally and around the country.

It also caused an intellectual imbroglio among people who thought the windfall would change the foundation, and cause it to champion a populist style of composition that they detest. Others were upset that the foundation took the trustee of Lilly's estate to court, seeking damages when a loss in the value of Eli Lilly stock cut the size of the bequest.

Two courts in Indiana treated the foundation's complaint like it was doggerel, and handed down rejection slips. In March, the Indiana Supreme Court declined to issue its own review.

Halsey said the issue has been put aside, and that the foundation remains grateful for Lilly's support. The goal is to have the building open by 2010, she said.

U.S. Equities Realty, a firm well versed in the Chicago market, advised Poetry in the transaction. Halsey said the foundation is interviewing architectural firms, and hopes to pick one this summer.

The job is small but with epic aspirations. The foundation is mandating an ecologically friendly building that translates some of poetry's enduring spirit into glass and steel. Halsey said the project will include a garden, a reading room, and free access to the foundation's collections that are now in the Newberry Library. She compared it to New York's Poets House.

The property was acquired from owners affiliated with a law firm Serpico, Novelle & Petrosino, that has offices there.

So yes, it was poets negotiating a land deal with lawyers. There's enough material there for a poem of Wordsworthian scale, or maybe a grand opera.

http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/1554/050407poetryjpg20070503tc2.jpg

forumly_chgoman
May 5, 2007, 12:11 AM
^^^^Nice find and good luck to poetry magazine

lets hope their architectural tastes are as intrepid their literary when they were helping to launch the careers of Ezra Pound, TS Eliot , and J Joyce

I wonder what the scale will be....my bet 15 - 20 stories

honte
May 5, 2007, 12:59 AM
Aw, that's a real bummer. One of those buildings is the "Moana" building - you see it when you come out of the Whole Foods underground parking garage. It's a terracotta beauty with original wood windows some beautiful neoclassical detailing. Not to mention the crystal globe spelling "Moana" near the parapet.

It would be great if somehow they could save that one and building on the parking lot and nasty PoMo-ized building to the north. It seems like a small org. like Poetry could make use of the small Moana building for something creative.

the urban politician
May 5, 2007, 3:21 AM
^ I felt the same way that it would be an unnecessary loss of a nice looking building. I hope we're gaining some significant height for this useless demolition

Chi_Coruscant
May 6, 2007, 3:24 PM
In case you didn't know:
http://www.newcityskyline.com/ColumbiaCollegeStudioGang.html

Columbia College has selected Gang Studio as an architect for a new media production center. The proposed center will be located at southwest corner of 16th/State. Gang Studio beat 29 firms all over the country for this project. Congrats to Jeanne Gang and her team.

alex1
May 6, 2007, 4:01 PM
Gang has come a long way from Rotterdam to where she is now. it's been a joy seeing her succeed and grow.

Chicago Shawn
May 6, 2007, 7:16 PM
In case you didn't know:
http://www.newcityskyline.com/ColumbiaCollegeStudioGang.html

Columbia College has selected Gang Studio as an architect for a new media production center. The proposed center will be located at southwest corner of 16th/State. Gang Studio beat 29 firms all over the country for this project. Congrats to Jeanne Gang and her team.

Awesome news!

sentinel
May 6, 2007, 11:23 PM
Awesome news!

Any renderings of their proposal yet?

Marcu
May 7, 2007, 6:01 AM
From http://www.siteselection.com/issues/2007/may/topGroups/




The Windy City – the No. 1 metro in America in corporate facility projects last year – was second in jobs with 10,138 and second in investment at $5.05 billion. World Business Chicago launched a new Web site last year that includes interviews with Chicago's top C- suite executives, interactive maps, an events calendar and new photos of the city.
World Business Chicago played a pivotal role in convincing HSBC North America Holdings Inc. to relocate and expand in the area, adding 2,400 employees and 440,000 sq. ft. (40,876 sq. m.). IMS Companies LLC added 400 workers and 255,000 sq. ft. (23,690 sq. m.); James McHugh Construction Co. announced a $112- million investment; and Blue Cross/Blue Shield is creating enough space to nearly double its occupancy to 8,000 by adding 24 floors to its downtown location, at a cost of $270 million.

Alliance
May 8, 2007, 6:11 AM
In case you didn't know:
http://www.newcityskyline.com/ColumbiaCollegeStudioGang.html

Columbia College has selected Gang Studio as an architect for a new media production center. The proposed center will be located at southwest corner of 16th/State. Gang Studio beat 29 firms all over the country for this project. Congrats to Jeanne Gang and her team.


:cool:

Gang really needs to design a supertall for us.

nomarandlee
May 8, 2007, 10:30 AM
http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/374798,CST-FIN-zone08.article

Zoning merger in works?
CITY | Chief might be one who led 'crash pad' crackdown

May 8, 2007
BY FRAN SPIELMAN City Hall Reporter/fspielman@suntimes.com

Mayor Daley is exploring the possibility of merging the city's Zoning Department with the Planning and Development Department and putting the new superagency in the hands of Zoning Administrator Patty Scudiero, City Hall sources said Monday.

The proposed merger would elevate the status of Scudiero, a longtime aide to Zoning Committee Chairman William Banks (36th). She marshalled crackdowns against illegal conversions and "crash pads" near Midway Air-port.

As zoning administrator -- and as a project manager in the Planning Department before that -- Scudiero forged a close working relationship with Lori Healey, the former planning chief now serving as Daley's 11th chief of staff.

Healey is in the process of reshaping the mayor's cabinet and filling six vacant or interim positions. Since her appointment, speculation has run rampant in anticipation of the latest round of musical chairs and a possible downsizing of city government.

The proposal to create a superagency comprised of Zoning and Planning and Development could be the biggest change of all.

At a time when Chicago is vying to host the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, it would merge a $17.9-million-a-year, 129-employee agency that oversees planning and land use with a $2.5-million-a-year, 41-employee department charged with implementing zoning changes, policing zoning violations and enforcing Chicago's newly revamped zoning code.

"It would be a very positive move. It would create more speed and cohesiveness dealing with . . . development issues," Banks said.

"I've never favored the idea over the years, but that doesn't mean it's not a good idea now. In the past, the departments were more independent and didn't work as closely as Zoning and Planning do now. A lot of that had to do with the personalities involved."

Not everyone was gung-ho about the merger.

Ald. Tom Allen (38th), who has crusaded against illegal conversions in his Northwest Side ward, expressed concern zoning crackdowns would get short-shrift if Zoning and Planning are combined.

The Zoning Department has 11 inspectors responsible for the entire city, a level aldermen call "woefully inadequate." Because of illnesses and injuries, they're down to nine.

"Zoning inspectors are important in the Bungalow Belt. I wouldn't want them to get swallowed up by a think-tank, which the Planning Department is. The bigger the department, the less control and the harder it is to maneuver -- just like the federal bureaucracy," Allen said.

Ald. Walter Burnett (27th) added, "Planning people go out in the field. They've got to deal with the community and the alderman on what the community wants and build up economic development. Zoning deals specifically with the zoning code. It would take something from one of them if you put them together."

Although Scudiero's expertise is on the zoning side, Banks said he has no doubt that his former aide could handle the mega-department.

"She's been involved in the concept of zoning and planning and for many, many years -- right on the front lines. She attended every zoning meeting I had. She is very knowledgeable with regard to these issues," said Banks, who hired Scudiero to work part-time while she was still in high school.

the urban politician
May 10, 2007, 4:27 AM
http://www.chicagojournal.com/main.asp?SectionID=25&SubSectionID=55&ArticleID=2995&TM=1397.395
5/9/2007 10:00:00 PM Email this article • Print this article
Neighbors kill seven-story condo plan
Flores adds Walgreens site into proposed historic district

By TIMOTHY INKLEBARGER
Staff Writer


Following neighborhood opposition to a seven-story condominium on the 1300 block of Milwaukee, 1st Ward Alderman Manny Flores says he's sending the proposal back to the drawing board.

Flores also said the parcel of land that currently houses a Walgreens drugstore on the corner of Wolcott and Milwaukee will be included in the proposed Milwaukee Avenue Historic District. The district, which runs roughly between Paulina and Damen, was given preliminary approval last week by the Landmarks Commission, setting in motion a number of aesthetic guidelines for rehabs of existing buildings and new construction.

At a community meeting in late April, neighbors almost unanimously rejected the proposal by Chicago-based Preferred Development to construct a 79-foot-tall building with 81 units and 153 parking spaces.

"There is no support for the project," Flores said. "Some [neighbors] were dead set against it, and then there was a real concern about the size."

In order to build the massive structure, the project would have required a significant zoning increase. But with the approval of the historic district, the developer also will have to follow guidelines set forth by the city's Landmarks Division. Although the Walgreens is included in the historic district it is not considered an historic structure that contributes to the district. Preferred Development still could demolish the building-a proposition most neighbors welcome-but the development would have to stay within the scale of the existing two- and three-flat buildings.

The current B1-2 zoning allows for a 50-foot-tall building with 32 units.

"If [the developers] would ever ask for some type of city privilege or benefit like those under consideration, then they are going to have to continue with the same [public] process," Flores said.

He said he hopes the developers engage the community if they build under the current zoning.

Craig Norris, chairman of the Wicker Park Committee's zoning subcommittee, said it is in the best interest of the neighborhood to include the building in the landmark district. He added that the modern "glass-box" proposal is not a "cutting-edge" design.

"The landmark ordinance says that scale and density have to be respected, and the current zoning on Milwaukee is four stories," Norris said.

modkris
May 10, 2007, 8:26 AM
Typical...one of the city's most vibrant streets, Milwaukee Avenue, in one of the densest, most walkable parts of town can't handle a seven story building? And the horror that it was a glass box! There are so many modernist single family homes going up near by you'd think someone would have seen the benefit of something modern there. Wicker Park is supposed to be our largest concentration of creative types but the NIMBY patrol is in full force making such a huge uproar over what could have been a great use of space.

VivaLFuego
May 10, 2007, 2:10 PM
B1-2 zoning for that parcel is a disgrace. Who's going up against the wall for that one?

This is such an underutilized plot too, isn't this the dinky Walgreens with a surface parking lot?

forumly_chgoman
May 10, 2007, 5:19 PM
Typical...one of the city's most vibrant streets, Milwaukee Avenue, in one of the densest, most walkable parts of town can't handle a seven story building? And the horror that it was a glass box! There are so many modernist single family homes going up near by you'd think someone would have seen the benefit of something modern there. Wicker Park is supposed to be our largest concentration of creative types but the NIMBY patrol is in full force making such a huge uproar over what could have been a great use of space.

No the true creative, bohemian types were mostly priced out of wicker park years ago.....it has been turning into Lincoln Park west for sometime.


though I detest this type of nimbyism....i have to admit I was not a huge fan of the proposal as executed....the height I had no problem with.....I know I'll take a beating for this, but I am not as big as a "glass" fan as many on this board are. I would prefer a 7 story building that harkened back perhaps to the 20's or 30's....perhaps it would not been seen as as disruptive


also that amount of parking ---at least on its face ---appears to be absurd

Chicago Shawn
May 10, 2007, 6:53 PM
B1-2 zoning for that parcel is a disgrace. Who's going up against the wall for that one?

This is such an underutilized plot too, isn't this the dinky Walgreens with a surface parking lot?

Yes, and two blocks from an 8 story building with no parking, and about 3 blocks from the 12 story Coyote. Of course, both of which could never be built in this nieghborhood today because of the high concentration of Fucktard NIMBYs, even though these buildings are part of the landmark district they love so much.

VivaLFuego
May 10, 2007, 8:08 PM
Yes, and two blocks from an 8 story building with no parking, and about 3 blocks from the 12 story Coyote. Of course, both of which could never be built in this nieghborhood today because of the high concentration of Fucktard NIMBYs, even though these buildings are part of the landmark district they love so much.

Don't forget the 20+ story Noble Square Co-op highrise less than 2 blocks away, either :)

I hope the developer ends up building a 4-story building to the lot line in every dimension, with exactly 1 spot per unit or whatever the smallest amount allowed by zoning is. And might as well make it as sinfully ugly as possible, too, to spite the community (a nice random pattern with those various cartoon colored yellow, purple and blue bricks that are popping up in infill around town, and definitely some insulting 'historic' details like mini-faux-collonades). Which developer is it, and does anyone have contact info for them? I'd like to send them words of encouragement, that some people actually do like the concept of high-density development in markets that can support it....

Marcu
May 10, 2007, 11:00 PM
House rejects idea of Blagojevich tax plan



May 10, 2007

(AP) — The Illinois House overwhelmingly rejected the idea of a massive new business tax proposed by Gov. Rod Blagojevich, although the governor tried to portray Thursday's vote as a positive.
Not a single lawmaker voted for the $7.6 billion tax, while 107 voted against it.

But before the vote, Blagojevich made a surprise request of lawmakers: Vote no.

He said House members should reject the resolution as a signal that they think it's too soon to take a firm position on the tax.

Lawmakers of both parties scoffed at his request, calling it an attempt to put a positive spin on what would otherwise have been a clear-cut defeat for his plan.

Republicans displayed signs saying "'No means no,' governor!" Only one lawmaker, a close ally of Blagojevich, suggested the vote was not a referendum on the proposal itself.

House Speaker Michael Madigan, D-Chicago, for the first time took a clear public position on the proposed gross receipts tax.

"The gross receipts tax is a regressive tax," Madigan said. "There is a passthrough to the ultimate consumer. Many times those people are the least able in our society to take on additional costs."

VivaLFuego
May 11, 2007, 12:44 AM
Maybe next year, some groups can come to Springfield already prepared to discuss a state constitutional amendment that would allow for imposition of a graduated income tax. The clear solution is to raise the income tax, but obviously certain people on the left don't like the idea of a tax that has the same rate for everyone (of course, a flat income tax IS NOT a flat consumption tax, so it's not really regressive, it actually is 'flat', but, whatever) so they are unlikely to increase it from its relatively low level.

Or, perhaps, there's some politics involved. It could yet be dealt with this year. The reason I say this is, there is still the "overtime" session that follows the end of the regular session (May 31). In overtime, I think any new laws require a supermajority to pass, instead of a simple majority. What does that mean? Well, before May 31, a tax increase, if passed, could do so on a party line vote; i.e. Democrats could vote to increase taxes while Republicans all vote against it, the tax passes, and voila, the Republicans campaign in future years about how those Taxocrats are screwing you, the upstanding citizen of Illinois. So, it seems fully plausible that the Democrats (led by someone like Mike Madigan, who incidentally is expecting his daughter, a Democrat, to run for Governor in the near future) are consciously putting off any -real- discussion of a new revenue package to pay for the essentials until after May 31, so that it has the fingerprints of both Democrats and Republicans on it, thereby taking that issue away from the Republicans at the next election.

Of course, this makes some logical sense for the Democrats, if their only concern is their self-interest as opposed to that of their constituents; if there is a budget deadlock and a crisis ensues, each party can blame it on eachother and ultimately, everyone currently in office will be hurt. If something does pass in overtime, the Democrats can claim the benefits while at the same time, many Republicans would lose the tax increase as a campaign point.

Playing a personal power game of chicken at the expense of the well-being of your constituents? All in a day's work for a politician.

bnk
May 11, 2007, 2:13 AM
House rejects idea of Blagojevich tax plan

May 10, 2007

(AP) — The Illinois House overwhelmingly rejected the idea of a massive new business tax proposed by Gov. Rod Blagojevich, although the governor tried to portray Thursday's vote as a positive.
Not a single lawmaker voted for the $7.6 billion tax, while 107 voted against it.

."

:banana:

Thank god.

the urban politician
May 11, 2007, 2:50 AM
^ I can't believe how stubborn Blago is. But then again, there really is no good solution to this problem. Somebody's gonna have to pay

Marcu
May 11, 2007, 3:43 AM
^ I can't believe how stubborn Blago is. But then again, there really is no good solution to this problem. Somebody's gonna have to pay

There is a solution. A progressive income tax boosting rates to 5% or even 6% for income over 200k. But Blago is, as you said, too stubborn.

the urban politician
May 11, 2007, 2:57 PM
http://www.suntimes.com/classifieds/homes/homelife/380356,HOF-News-
Uptown on the way up
DEVELOPMENT | New residents change flavor of neighborhood

May 11, 2007
BY CELESTE BUSK cbusk@suntimes.com
Like most Chicago lakefront neighborhoods, Uptown is no stranger to redevelopment. And, like its neighbors Lake View to the south, Edgewater to the north and Lincoln Square/North Center to the west, Uptown is no stranger to controversy as homebuyers have moved into new condos and houses, displacing long-time renters.

For years, this anxiety had a name all its own: Wilson Yard.

What's up in Uptown?
You may know it as the home of the Green Mill, but Uptown lays claim to plenty more good stuff.

Wilson Yard is the former site of a CTA maintenance facility on the west side of Broadway, between Wilson and Montrose. The project's housing component was the subject of heated debate. Like its far north neighbor Rogers Park, for years Uptown was known for its social services agencies and subsidized housing. The longtime alderman -- Helen Shiller, an independent firebrand on the City Council -- had worked to bring a Target retailer and affordable housing development to the site.
But newer, relatively wealthier residents wanted a different flavor of retail there, one that would blend better with the artsy feel of the historic architecture and their vision of the neighborhood. And they have been actively fighting for a different approach to developing the site.

"There are a number of people who live here who are tremendously committed to the community," said John Holden -- who owns a vintage two-flat, is a block club president, and has lived in the neighborhood for 15 years. "They spend untold hours at community meetings. This adds to Uptown and hopefully will help its future," Holden said.

As of this writing, that dispute is over with a whimper if not a bang. Construction begins in July on Shiller's plans for a $140-million development on the Wilson Yard site that calls for a 180,000-square-foot Target, 30,000 square feet of smaller retail and 168 units of affordable housing.

The rental component at Wilson Yard is a 98-unit high-rise apartment building, according to its developer Peter Holsten of Holsten Real Estate Development. Units in that building will be sold to seniors with incomes equivalent to 60 percent of the area median income, or $35,000, for a household of one. Another 78 units will be available for rental to those earning 60 percent of the area median income, or $50,000 for a household of four. The development includes 700 parking spaces.

"This affordability range can qualify instructors at Truman College, police officers and public school teachers," Holsten said. Other plans call for a new Aldi store, which is set to open June 2.

"The retail space is planned to include restaurants, a coffee shop and a bank," Holsten said. At least 100 parking spaces will be available for the smaller retail and general public use. Construction on the Target store is scheduled for June, and the development is scheduled to be completed within 22 months.

To pre-empt big-box sidewalk blight, the Target and other retail stores will front Broadway, while the housing will primarily front Montrose. "The facade of the existing one-story terra cotta building at the northwest corner of Montrose and Broadway will be restored or replicated to the greatest extent possible given the condition of the terra cotta material," Holsten explained.

With the Wilson Yard controversy behind it, Uptown -- bounded roughly by Irving Park Road, Foster Avenue, Lake Michigan and Clark Street -- still has lots of housing, although today far fewer rentals and many more condos. New research by the Center for Urban Research and Learning at Loyola University shows that Uptown had 512 large apartment buildings in 1989; it lost 219 (43 percent) by 2004.

Luring the new-home buyers, residents say, are the area's lakefront location, shopping, restaurants and good transportation.

"There are a lot of signs of development all over the neighborhood." Uptown resident Holden said. "And, of course, obviously Uptown's location is fantastic. It's five blocks from the lake -- about five minutes by bike."

Another Uptown attraction is its vintage architecture. "We have three landmark districts here," Holden said. "I'm an architecture freak, and we have some beautiful buildings here."

A theater district centered at Broadway, Lawrence and Racine is working toward revival, slowed somewhat by lagging plans for the 4,500-seat Uptown Theater.

The Chicago landmark building, built in 1925, was the crown jewel in the Balaban and Katz theater chain and the focus of the Uptown entertainment district in the '20s. Another historic music hall, the Aragon Ballroom, is still a flourishing live music venue. The Riviera Theatre, a formerly elegant movie palace, now hosts rough and tumble rock acts from all of over the world. Jazz showcase the Green Mill Lounge has reinvented itself Sunday nights with its poetry slams. And Uptown's cultural edge is emerging at the Kinetic Play-ground, the namesake for the legendary '60s club where stars like Jimi Hendrix played.

Nevertheless, Holden said there have been a number of issues over the years regarding public safety. He points to the L stop at Wilson and Broadway, which has been a community eyesore for decades.

Holsten, the Wilson Yard developer, says plans are under way to remove the blight from the L stop. The architecturally significant structure will be completely restored on the outside and completely new on the inside.

"It will be brand, spanking new, so more people will use it," Holsten said. "The more people, the lesser the crime." That project is expected to be completed by early next year. he said.

"I'll believe that when I see it," Holden said. "There have been so many plans over the years for that station and nothing has happened. But if it does happen, that would be great," he said. "But right now, the L stop is very intimidating and is a place where vagrants loiter. It's gotten a little better in recent years, but I still avoid that station," Holden said.

There's so much going on in this neighborhood it's hard to capture it all. Uptown consists of several smaller upscale residential enclaves, including the historic landmark districts. These include the Hutchinson Street District (a city landmark district), the Sheridan Park Historic District (a national landmark district), Buena Park Historic District (a national landmark district), Clarendon Park and Margate Park. Each of these landmark districts has its own homeowners association.

"The fact that we have three historic districts is a big draw," said Joyce Dugan, president and chief executive officer of the Uptown Chicago Commission, an economic development corporation. "People are interested in historic preservation, and we have some very attractive older housing.

"Also," Dugan said, "there has been a huge resurgence of people interested in city life and wanting to live closer to downtown. And, Uptown is only about a half-hour to the Loop or Millennium Park, so people are coming here."

Many students who attend Truman College live in the area. Springing up nearby the college's Wilson Avenue address are cafes, coffee houses and lounges. One harbinger of the changing neighborhood is a Nick's bar, a northern cousin to the popular Lincoln Park watering hole.


Ethnic influences
Uptown is home to people from many parts of the world, and exhibits influences from many cultures. Argyle Street, from Sheridan to Broadway and spilling onto Broadway features an exceptional selection of Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, Laotian, French Vietnamese and Cambodian ethnic restaurants and bakeries.
The Clark Street Corridor -- running north from Montrose to Foster avenues on the western edge of Uptown -- also is undergoing a rebirth with new condominiums, retail and restaurants.

"Spilling north from the Graceland West neighborhood into East Ravenswood and West Uptown, growth in the Clark Street Corridor is being sparked by the sale of new upscale condominium developments," said Susie Kanter, sales associate for Rubloff Residential Properties.

Another revitalization catalyst is the completed $24.3-million Phoenix at Uptown Square, a mixed-use condominium and retail developments on Broadway, just south of Lawrence in the heart of Uptown.

The former Goldblatt's department store now hosts 37 lofts and new-construction condominiums, and 41,000 square-feet of retail space, including a Borders Books and Music store at Broadway and Racine.

"Home shoppers looking for everything from affordable condos and rental apartments to posh lofts and Queen Anne mansions can take their pick at the diverse housing stock in the Uptown neighborhood," noted Paul Hardej, president of Metropolitan Development Enterprises, which is developing the ambitious Rainbo Village on the 2-plus-acre site of the former Rainbo roller rink at 4836 N. Clark.

Situated on the border of historic Uptown and Andersonville neighborhoods, Metropolitan's Rainbo Village is a condominium development drawing first-time buyers.

"Soft loft condominiums have been the draw for young, urban buyers at Rainbo Village," Hardej said. "We have diversity here. People from Uptown, Andersonville and Lake View are upgrading from rental to ownership.

Rainbo Village is home to 127 soft loft condominiums, duplexes and town houses as well as 15,000 square feet of retail space. Open, soft-loft floor plans with spacious 10-foot ceilings are the earmark of Rainbo Village's Kinetic Lofts, a collection of 88 loft condominiums in two five-story buildings. Homes will be built around a courtyard garden that features stone pieces from the original Rainbo facade.

bnk
May 11, 2007, 5:06 PM
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0705111042may11,0,192872.story?coll=chi-business-hed
Landmark building sale irks architect
Gehry decries investors' plans for Inland Steel tower
Advertisement


By Susan Diesenhouse
Tribune staff reporter

May 11, 2007

Nearly two years ago, some investors used the star power of renowned architect Frank Gehry to help them buy the Inland Steel Building with plans to update the landmark structure and preserve its unique character.

Now those investors are trying to sell it -- much to his dismay.

"When you buy a landmark, you have a responsibility," Gehry said Thursday. "It upsets me that these guys are taking the easy way out. To just dump it on the market isn't responsible."

In August 2005 a group of investors that included Harvey Camins paid $44.5 million for the building, and Gehry wound up with roughly a 3 percent stake without putting any money into the deal.

"I'm sorry he feels that way," Camins said. "We bought the building as a real estate investment and because we all love it. But the market is such today that we must explore a sale."

Sale prices have jumped 19 percent in the past 12 months in the downtown office market, and it's tempting for property owners to take advantage of the fabulous run-up in real estate values.

But Gehry got involved in the purchase because the 19-story building at 30 W. Monroe St., finished in 1958, is an historical and architectural landmark and one of his favorites.

He's angry and disappointed that a cherished structure is on the block, its fate uncertain.

"I am not taking advantage of the market. I got into this to save the building," Gehry said. "I don't want to be linked to such opportunism.

"It's one of my favorite buildings, and the only reason it was sold to someone like me was to preserve it," added Gehry, who has become famous for structures that include the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, and the Jay Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park.

The building is expected to sell for about $55 million and is being marketed by Eastdil Secured.

"We've invested $2 million to upgrade the corridors, bathrooms," said Camins. "We brought the lobby back to its original luster and installed a new security desk. We've been aggressively marketing it, but Chicago is recovering from a very tough market."

In 2005 the building had a 2 percent vacancy rate, but its largest tenant, Mittal Steel, has since moved out and the structure is now 19.3 percent vacant, according to CoStar Group Inc., a real estate research firm.

Despite that problem, the first downtown office designed by Skidmore Owings and Merrill LLP is likely to fetch a handsome price.

The recent rapid appreciation of downtown office property is set to accelerate even more in coming weeks when the Chicago portfolio of the former Equity Office Properties Trust is sold, said Dan Fasulo, research director for New York-based Real Capital Analytics.

"Chicago is on everyone's radar," Fasulo said. "The EOP sale will reset the average sale price higher than it is today."

But for Gehry, who said he might receive about $240,000 from a sale, price isn't the issue.

"It's an important building," Gehry said of the first skyscraper to be built with a steel-and-glass cladding and column-free interior space, and on steel pilings rather than on concrete.

For 50 years, Gehry has admired what was once the headquarters of Inland Steel. In 2005, then-owner St. Paul Travelers Cos. wasn't interested in selling until it learned that Gehry was among the suitors.

"I thought they would update it in the spirit of the design and that I'd help bring it up," Gehry said Thursday of his ownership group.

He said he thought the new owners had a vision of how to market it and rent the space, but "apparently they didn't."

Once the building is sold, Gehry added, "I hope someone sensitive to historic buildings buys it and I'll donate my profits to charity, the Hereditary Disease Foundation."

sentinel
May 11, 2007, 5:14 PM
^^ I agree with Gehry on this issue 110%, the original developer (like most apparently in present-day Chicago) is clueless when it comes to design, effective design and how relevant and crucial good design is to being able to market, build, sell a building. The original developer that got Gehry involved in this obviously didn't know how to market this building properly and now it's future is far from certain.

honte
May 12, 2007, 4:57 AM
^ Yes, but it's worth noting that the Inland Steel is already a protected City Landmark. I think the idea of "saving the building" is a bit extreme. But I really loved having Gehry's name attached to the building, and I was hoping he'd get to do a little work around there, as he said. Bummer.

To pre-empt big-box sidewalk blight, the Target and other retail stores will front Broadway, while the housing will primarily front Montrose. "The facade of the existing one-story terra cotta building at the northwest corner of Montrose and Broadway will be restored or replicated to the greatest extent possible given the condition of the terra cotta material," Holsten explained.

Wow, thanks TUP. That just made my day. This was one of the little buildings that really makes Chicago's neighborhoods what they are. Unfortunately, however, it was far too small and "insignificant" for any preservation group to fight for without being made a laughing-stock. Great news!

ardecila
May 12, 2007, 6:00 AM
FYI, the existing building is called the Azusa Building. Whether that's the original name, I don't know.

the urban politician
May 14, 2007, 5:19 AM
http://egov.cityofchicago.org/city/webportal/portalContentItemAction.do?BV_SessionID=@@@@0893503688.1179119475@@@@&BV_EngineID=cccdaddklmdkfhdcefecelldffhdfhg.0&contentOID=536952796&contenTypeName=COC_EDITORIAL&topChannelName=Dept&blockName=Planning+And+Development%2FI+Want+To&context=dept&channelId=0&programId=0&entityName=Planning+And+Development&deptMainCategoryOID=

De LaSalle project to incorporate Pickford Theater

School expansion will incorporate 1912 auditorium at 35th and Michigan

The remains of a historic South Side theater will be given new life with the City Council approval of Mayor Richard M. Daley's ordinance authorizing the sale of city-owned land to De La Salle Institute for the creation of a new academic building and auditorium.

The development plan calls for the property at 3445-59 S. Michigan Ave. and 100-114 E. 35th St. to be combined with the school's existing parking lot for the construction of a four-story, 100,000-square-foot academic building containing classrooms, laboratories, and school offices.

It also preserves the remaining elements of the Pickford Theater by utilizing the shell and surviving interior terra cotta in the construction of a new theater and auditorium. Built in 1912, the Pickford Theater was one of the first movie and performance theaters for Bronzeville entertainers.


"By preserving the remains of this theater, a new generation will have a greater understanding and appreciation of its history and its importance," said Mayor Daley.

The new building will include approximately 7,000 square feet of ground floor retail along 35th Street. Once completed, the project is expected to create 30 permanent full and part-time jobs.

A pedestrian bridge over Michigan will connect the new building with the Clark Building on the existing campus and allow students to safely access both locations without impacting the flow of vehicular traffic.

The building will seek LEED certification and incorporate green design elements into its construction including a green roof on both the building and pedestrian bridge. Construction of the new academic building is expected to cost $19.25 million. The city acquired the property in 2003 through condemnation and is assisting the project with a reduction in the sale price.

VivaLFuego
May 14, 2007, 2:21 PM
^ Cool project

honte
May 14, 2007, 4:35 PM
Yep. Another victory, even if it is just the facade.

VivaLFuego
May 14, 2007, 5:20 PM
Yep. Another victory, even if it is just the facade.

It said interior terra cotta detailing as well, no?

honte
May 14, 2007, 6:24 PM
Yes, true. I'm not sure what they mean by that, though.

I'm guessing it's mostly going to be a complete interior demo, but I'm not complaining. It sounds like there isn't too much of the interior left in any case.

Marvel 33
May 15, 2007, 5:43 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v608/Marino33/Nightshotsmallerimage.jpg

This should probably go in the Under 12 floors Chicago boom rundown but I couldn't find it so here is an article regarding the One11 W. illinois.

Here is a link for a larger image:

http://www.newcityskyline.com/One11WIllinoisUnderConstruction.html

One11 W. Illinois offers office space with perks

Tuesday, May 15, 2007
By Kelly Matlock

Chicago, IL, US (NCS)The Alter Group is developing one of downtown Chicago’s first and only vertical subdivision office buildings. Now under construction at 111 West Illinois, the 10-story River North building offers businesses 227,604 square feet of Class A-to-own space for 40 percent the cost of premier skyscrapers.

The building “offers users the unique opportunity to be a single-floor user with expansion options in a Class A product. Other potential users include a boutique hotel with dedicated entrance and lobby, a white-tablecloth restaurant and retail space,” said Matthew A. Ward, senior vice president of the Alter Group.

Also marketed as One11 W. Illinois, the tower was designed by Martin Wolf, FAIA, senior principal at Solomon Cordwell Buenz & Associates. Wolf is known for hand drawing his architectural designs in an age when the majority of architects rely on computer technology. He has been principal architect behind other Chicago projects including 50 East Chestnut, 340 On the Park and Mandarin Oriental Chicago, as well as residential projects in San Diego and Slovakia and the FBI field office in Maryland.

“Part of what makes architecture so interesting is that each project is a different problem and each problem has a different solution,” Wolf says. “Some people don’t like to think of architecture as art so much as workmanship, but you can really make any piece of architecture, even a high-rise or a power plant, look appealing with the right kind of architecture.”

With 111 West Illinois, Wolf incorporated a number of sustainable and “green” features as well as significant technological capabilities. These include 10 watts/psf of electricity capacity, ample cable and fiber optic capacity, a variable-air volume HVAC system that allows after hours heating and cooling, energy-efficient low-e glass, a high-efficiency air-handling system, telecommunications room that accommodates multiple fiber carriers, dual power grids and an automatic transfer switch to promise an uninterrupted power supply.

Large windows offer panoramic views and welcome in an immense amount of sunlight to heat and light the building, therefore reducing energy costs. Two rooftop decks will provide a dramatic space for corporate events.

The building will be anchored by Erikson Institute, one of the nation’s leading graduate schools dedicated to the education of child development professionals, which will occupy about 75,000 square feet and be served by a separate entrance, with its own address of 451 North LaSalle. The new campus will be double the size of its current campus leased space at 420 North Wabash Avenue, and will accommodate the school’s tremendous growth; student enrollment has doubled in the past five years.

“This incredible new space is the result of an intensive four-and-a-half year study and search to identify the best location to suit Erikson’s unique needs,” said Erikson trustee Virginia Bobins, who helped lead the search process with U.S. Equities Realty.

The new campus will offer additional high-tech classrooms and seminar spaces with high ceilings and natural light. A significant expansion for the Edward Neisser Library and Learning Center will double the holdings space of Erikson’s current library and include a computer training room, an information commons room and group study rooms. The new Herr Research center for Children and Social Policy will enjoy increased space. Additional space will be dedicated for specialized clinical activities, and more amenities for students and staff will include kitchen and lounge areas, student lockers and teaming rooms.

Erikson Institute can attest to the major tax advantages that 111 West Illinois offers, with long-term appreciation and stable occupancy costs.

“A key factor in the decision to purchase rather than lease space was the tax-exempt financing and future real estate tax exemption Erikson will receive from owning,” said Geoff Euston, senior vice president of U.S. Equities Realty. “These economic incentives afforded Erikson the ability to purchase almost double the amount of space it currently leases and at a much lower cost than leasing comparable space.”

Completion is expected in early 2008, and Erikson faculty, staff and students plan to move in just before fall semester in August 2008.

ih8spires
May 15, 2007, 7:21 PM
On the south side of the Chicago River just east of Wabash, there is a barge with some heavy equipment and some maroon painted beams or something. I was wondering if anyone knew what might be going on. I am hoping it has something to do with the platform that make up the river walk.
Also, there are some men and a truck at the site for the Witt Hotel. So, at least there is some activity there.

BVictor1
May 16, 2007, 1:34 AM
http://www.chicagoreader.com/features/stories/ourtown/070511/urbanlab/

Close Deep Tunnel

http://www.chicagoreader.com/features/stories/ourtown/070511/urbanlab/urbanlab.jpg

http://www.chicagoreader.com/features/stories/ourtown/070511/urbanlab/urbanlab2.jpg

Sarah Dunn and Martin Felsen and a model of their proposed water treatment and recycling system

A. Jackson
World Water Crisis Forum
When Thu 5/17, 7 PM
Where DePaul University Museum, 2350 N. Kenmore
Info 773-325-7506 or museums.depaul.edu

The architects at Bridgeport’s UrbanLab have a better plan.
By Harold Henderson
May 11, 2007

IF CHICAGO CONTINUES to think big when it comes to water, there may be hope for us as the fresh stuff starts to run out. As every schoolchild knows, in 1900 the city reversed the flow of the Chicago River to re­direct pollution away from Lake Michigan. Now, after several decades of labor, the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District is finishing up the Deep Tunnel project, the underground network of tunnels where combined sewage and storm water overflows are stored before treatment. Both works were designed to keep Chicagoans’ waste out of their drinking water, and both are world-class engineering feats.

Sarah Dunn and Martin Felsen of the Bridgeport architectural firm UrbanLab have an idea that might outdo both. They envision a self-contained system that would take water from Lake Michigan, use it, and then run it through a natural treatment system dispersed throughout the city before returning it to its source. We could turn the Chicago River back around and use the Deep Tunnel for new subway lines. This closed-loop water system could set an example of water reuse to the world, as increased demand makes water ever scarcer. Unmake no little plans?

The idea came about in one frenzied week last November, when Dunn, Felsen, and a handful of others worked 16-hour days and pulled a couple of all-nighters at UrbanLab to prepare for a contest sponsored by the History Channel to promote its Engineering an Empire series. The channel gave select architects in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles seven days to come up with a design for their city 100 years from now, something that “like the marvels of past civilizations, would have the staying power to endure for centuries to come.”

UrbanLab’s proposal won the Chicago round and went on to beat the New York and LA winners for the $10,000 top prize. The model they built will go on display at the Museum of Science and Industry June 8, along with the other finalists and the other Chicago entries. Growing Water: Chicago in 2106, their 67-page book illustrating their project, is available from lulu.com.

Dunn and Felsen propose that the city switch over to a decentralized all-natural water treatment and recycling system that would double the city’s parkland. A series of 50 “eco-boulevards” spaced every half mile from Rogers Park to Roseland would run east-west from Lake Michigan to the subcontinental divide between the Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins at about Harlem Avenue—thin green ribbons running across the city that would replace pavement with green space, greenhouses, and wetland for the treatment of waste and storm water.

Each eco-boulevard would jut out into Lake Michigan and end in a man-made peninsula to accommodate solar arrays, wind turbines, and geothermal wells to power the treatment processes. “Terminal Parks” would mark the eco-boulevard’s western extremes. These large green spaces would be surrounded by residential and work complexes to accommodate returnees from the outer suburbs, who by 2106 will have moved back closer to town to obtain running water.

That’s right: Felsen and Dunn are among those who see a future in which freshwater is “the new oil” and the Great Lakes region—already the third-largest economy in the world—could be the new Saudi Arabia; the Great Lakes contain 20 percent of the earth’s freshwater. As water becomes an expensive commodity, sprawl may become unaffordable, if not illegal: suburban households west of the Great Lakes drainage basin will have to sink deeper and deeper wells to reach groundwater as it’s depleted. An early warning comes from Campton Township, just northwest of Saint Charles in Kane County, which in 2004 initiated an unusually thorough study of its groundwater resources by the U.S. Geological Survey. The USGS found that two deep aquifers in the northern part of the township are being used faster than they replenish.

Under UrbanLab’s plan, eco-boulevards would ultimately replace the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District’s seven centralized water treatment plants with natural processes involving various bacteria, small organisms, and wetland plants—“living machine” systems in the phrase trademarked by Living Designs Group, a firm in Taos, New Mexico, that focuses on “ecologically engineered natural wastewater treatment and reclamation systems.” Wastewater from a few blocks along, say, Cermak Road would be piped to a series of greenhouses along a nearby eco-boulevard. Inside it would pass through vats of microbes and other organisms that break down waste, much as is done on a larger scale in the MWRD plants. Storm water would be collected separately from wastewater (something cities like Atlanta and Minneapolis have already managed to pull off) and then filtered and cleaned aboveground in small or intermittent streams and wetlands along the eco-boulevard. Ideally, gray water—used water not containing human waste—would be dealt with separately too, but that’s not part of UrbanLab’s design at this point. It’s a vision, not a blueprint, that would take different forms in different neighborhoods.

How would all this happen? Gradually. Eco-boulevards wouldn’t require spending billions all at once, evolving instead over generations. The process might start with something as simple as the city offering incentives for how south-side brownfields are redeveloped: just as developers can add “bonus” floors to a building if it has a green roof, they might get a similar bonus for separating rainwater and wastewater and routing them to a nearby eco-boulevard installation.

Such a project would require a certain fixity of purpose not often displayed by political bodies. But Dunn and Felsen think that just as parks raised land values and attracted developers in the 19th century, the prospect of green parkland within a quarter mile of every property in Chicago might be sufficient incentive to keep things moving. And what better occasion to jump-start their proposal than the 2016 Olympics, where a housing complex that cleaned its own used water and returned it to Lake Michigan might show the world a thing or two?

On May 17 at the DePaul University Museum, Dunn and Felsen will have eight minutes to sketch their scheme as part of a panel discussion on the “world water crisis” sponsored by Global Green USA, an affiliate of Mikhail Gorbachev’s Green Cross. Joining the discussion will be Debra Shore, commissioner of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District; Thomas Murphy, former head of DePaul’s Environmental Science Program; and Joe Deal, assistant to Mayor Daley for water initiatives. Things could get interesting, since Green Cross steadfastly opposes the commodification of water, and UrbanLab’s proposal assumes that water will soon become not just a commodity, but a very expensive one.

Loopy
May 16, 2007, 1:40 AM
Lubavitch Center for Jewish Life.

This project is under construction at the South-West corner of Clark and Chestnut.

There seems to be an unfortunate discrepency between the renderings shown on the Center's website and the sign at the construction site.

The building seems to have transformed itself from a mini Guggenheim to Double-Wide trailer.


Website http://www.centerforjewishlife.com/
http://img381.imageshack.us/img381/9283/centerforjewishlife4jv.jpg

Construction Sign
http://img517.imageshack.us/img517/7320/p1140031qt8.jpg

Loopy
May 16, 2007, 1:57 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v608/Marino33/Nightshotsmallerimage.jpg

I don't remember seeing those projecting sunscreens on the early renders of the Erickson Institute. I like this building. It reminds me of two of my favorites:

This is one of my favorite buildings, built in the mid 1970's, in Madison, Wisconsin when I lived there:

http://img113.imageshack.us/img113/9830/dafh8mp.png

The projecting empty frame edge on the front is cool . Helmut Jahn got a lot of accolades for doing this same thing many years later in his Kranzler Eck building on the Ku'damm in Berlin:

http://img130.imageshack.us/img130/6954/kranzlereck3xc.jpg

bnk
May 16, 2007, 2:05 AM
http://www.chicagoreader.com/features/stories/ourtown/070511/urbanlab/

Close Deep Tunnel

http://www.chicagoreader.com/features/stories/ourtown/070511/urbanlab/urbanlab.jpg

http://www.chicagoreader.com/features/stories/ourtown/070511/urbanlab/urbanlab2.jpg

Sarah Dunn and Martin Felsen and a model of their proposed water treatment and recycling system

A. Jackson
World Water Crisis Forum
When Thu 5/17, 7 PM
Where DePaul University Museum, 2350 N. Kenmore
Info 773-325-7506 or museums.depaul.edu

The architects at Bridgeport’s UrbanLab have a better plan.
By Harold Henderson
May 11, 2007

o e.

A neat idea that won an award. But...

I just skimmed this article but does it mention any use for the current, almost finished, multi billion dollar Deep Tunnel project? Hopefully more that an expensive wine cellar or mushroom farm.

:shrug:

VivaLFuego
May 16, 2007, 2:22 AM
Lubavitch Center for Jewish Life.

This project is under construction at the South-West corner of Clark and Chestnut.

There seems to be an unfortunate discrepency between the renderings shown on the Center's website and the sign at the construction site.

The building seems to have transformed itself from a mini Guggenheim to Double-Wide trailer.


Website http://www.centerforjewishlife.com/
http://img381.imageshack.us/img381/9283/centerforjewishlife4jv.jpg

Construction Sign
http://img517.imageshack.us/img517/7320/p1140031qt8.jpg

I haven't seen any progress on the site in probably 9 months, I wonder if they ran out of money...the design changes also suggest some value engineering.

honte
May 16, 2007, 4:34 AM
Loopy, yeah, Jahn was the first thing that came to mind when I saw the Erikson. Halo, a little closer to home, was the one I thought of...

Do you know the architect of the Madison building? It's quite nice. Please PM me if you like, since this is straying off topic.

ardecila
May 16, 2007, 4:37 AM
A neat idea that won an award. But...

I just skimmed this article but does it mention any use for the current, almost finished, multi billion dollar Deep Tunnel project? Hopefully more that an expensive wine cellar or mushroom farm.

:shrug:

Subways. Of course, any subways in the Deep Tunnels would follow approximately the same paths as the Blue Line (O'Hare Branch) and the Orange Line, so right now, we have no need for subways here. But once 10 million people move into the city to get water, we just might need them.