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delts145
Nov 8, 2008, 1:07 PM
More setbacks for proposed Utah Lake Bridge

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/287675/17/

Public funding will likely be cut for the Utah Lake causeway but a private group may be interested in pursuing the project.
http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=159063&g2_serialNumber=2

delts145
Nov 8, 2008, 1:14 PM
UDOT will use new interchange in American Fork

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/287674/

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=159150&g2_serialNumber=1

...The design is relatively new for the U.S., though they have been using this interchange technology in Europe...
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RFPCME
Nov 9, 2008, 3:04 AM
LOL, Ya know, that's probably true. I think Highland probably has the largest collection of kids per capita under the age of ten, so you're probably right.

Anyway, for those who might be interested in the building itself. The beige you see in the pic is not stucco. It's actually a very fine, cut stone. :D

Delts: Cut stone? Really? I hope so. Nice to see that someone is actually putting money into pubic buildings. One of my pet peeve's is the crappy public buildings that have been built for the last 40 years or so. Some how we got off track and started figuring that if we skimped on public buildings, we could save the tax payers money. Horse hockey! We build under-sized, cheap crap that we all have to stare at for 30 or 40 years, then can't wait to knock down because they non-functional eyesores. If we did it right in the first place, we would all have something to be proud about, would last a least twice as long, would be much more serviceable, and wouldn't hurt our eyes when we looked at them. The Borg Cube in SLC in another example of a cheap, probably disfunctional, eyesore in the making.:yuck:

delts145
Nov 9, 2008, 12:39 PM
:previous:

Yeah, I think they acquired a portion of the same stone lot that is being used on the new Draper LDS Temple and the new Records Library Downtown.

delts145
Nov 9, 2008, 1:02 PM
A toll cause way across Utah Lake?

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705261709,00.html

http://www.willieholdman.com/images/large/100370106410.jpg

...A private venture such as Utah Crossing Inc. could be interested in building a toll causeway across Utah Lake if the state can straighten out rules for required environmental studies.

urbanboy
Nov 9, 2008, 8:11 PM
Local boaters, hunters and environmental advocates have opposed a bridge or causeway. The Utah Chapter of the Sierra Club says the idea should be scrapped altogether, calling it a land development scheme that would forever mar the lake's ecosystem.

You bet it is a development scheme!!!! :hell:

I don't feel one bit sorry for the commuter, they chose to live way out there!

delts145
Nov 12, 2008, 1:15 PM
$2.6 billion rebuild set for I-15 in Utah County - 2 east-west roads and interchange included

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705262391,00.html

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2341/1942721877_43557e8f07_o.jpg
by Ken Lund http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1312/1021465839_5e74b04f5a_o.jpg&imgrefurl=http://flickr.com/photos/kenlund/1021465839/&h=1200&w=1600&sz=93&hl=en&start=17&usg=__5Rd2iUU7orzrMCb1-2onLL3jgoM=&tbnid=0n5tPRBEmtg0zM:&tbnh=113&tbnw=150&prev=/images%3Fq%3DI-15%2BUtah%2Bcounty%26gbv%3D2%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG


The Utah Department of Transportation is gearing up for a massive, $2.6 billion reconstruction project involving 20 miles of I-15 in Utah County...

With 20 percent of the state's population, Utah County is expected to grow at a faster rate than other parts of the state...

Reconstruction will result in additional travel lanes along I-15, plus the rebuilding or modification of 11 freeway interchanges and the replacing of 55 aging bridges.

Ten years ago, when I-15 in Salt lake County was reconstructed for the 2002 Olympics, UDOT first widened portions of I215 and Redwood Road. "A part of it is providing alternative options,"...

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delts145
Nov 12, 2008, 2:13 PM
Freeway interchange design brings French flair to Lehi/Am. Fork

http://www.sltrib.com/ci_10961061

Highway engineers soon will introduce Utah motorists to a French connection - an innovative interchange that, for the span of a freeway bridge, will mean driving on the left side of the road...

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site297/2008/1112/20081112__Road-DDI-Lehi.gif

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delts145
Nov 13, 2008, 3:45 PM
Financers get extra month on Orem project

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705262560,00.html

Orem - The banks involved in financing the Midtown Village will have an additional month to meet and consider their options on completion of the project...


Pics by Swilsomnc http://flickr.com/photos/swilsonmc/1886043659/sizes/o/in/set-72157601204122449/
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2384/1886874180_8ace133ec6_o.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2016/1886043659_93074972dd_o.jpg

Midtown Related:

Clearfield Midtown project files Ch.11

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/287879/

While I like the building arrangements of the Clearfield and Orem Midtowns, I am seriously uneasy about the design finish and materials treatment that they would apply. I think they are very unattractive and in poor taste, particularly for a project that is suppose to be upscale. I think these developers have shown a lack of judgement on many levels.

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RFPCME
Nov 14, 2008, 4:11 AM
Any rumblings from anywhere concerning The Point? I've been searching the internet tonight and cannot find anything since a post over on the Gehry project thread. It's been 6 weeks and not a peep from anywhere. A lot has happened in those 6 weeks as well.

i-215
Nov 16, 2008, 11:37 PM
Shh.... Can you keep a secret?

This may (I haven't confirmed it) be the site for the first Wasatch Front location of a prominent California eating chain ... :yes:

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l183/utradioguide/untitled-5.jpg

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l183/utradioguide/100_1307.jpg

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l183/utradioguide/100_1304.jpg

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l183/utradioguide/100_1303.jpg

I'll give you a hint. There would be Utah's second one, if the rumor is true.

wrendog
Nov 17, 2008, 12:00 AM
It's true. That's exactly where I have been told it will be. My source is a lawyer for said company and he heard if from the CEO.

jtrent77
Nov 17, 2008, 12:51 AM
This location seems like it should be about right--afterall, probably one of the main motivating factors to get In-N-Out into the Wasatch Front area was Chadders which In-N-Out sued a year or so ago, and I assume they just decided, well shoot, if a copycat is making so much on this venture, why don't we just come in ourselves. And since Chadders is just down the street from the proposed location...

Wasatch_One
Nov 17, 2008, 2:02 AM
I hate when things go to the suburbs... haha

wrendog
Nov 17, 2008, 2:26 AM
^^^^^ don't worry, there's one planned for Prorem as well. :)

urbanboy
Nov 17, 2008, 4:51 AM
What about SLC?

SLC Projects
Nov 17, 2008, 5:03 AM
Is that in Lehi?

Happy Valley Freak
Nov 17, 2008, 5:16 AM
Is that in Lehi?

nah, it's in American Fork. :whip:

i-215
Nov 17, 2008, 6:22 AM
What about SLC?

I hope so. I think if they got one over on the east side that served Downtown and the U (maybe along 4th South), they'd do some rockin' business.

i-215
Nov 17, 2008, 6:23 AM
^^^^^ don't worry, there's one planned for Prorem as well. :)

Any hint as to what empty piece of ground I ought to keep my eye on?

delts145
Nov 17, 2008, 11:25 AM
It's kind of funny that there putting it so close to Chadders.

Wasatch_One
Nov 17, 2008, 5:58 PM
It's kind of funny that there putting it so close to Chadders.

Oh, I'm quite confident that was a strategic move. :)

delts145
Nov 17, 2008, 7:06 PM
LOL, Agreed, definately strategic and also amusing.

Wasatch_One
Nov 17, 2008, 7:09 PM
I wouldn't be surprised if they put In-N-Out in Provo/Orem somewhere near EZ Take Out...

delts145
Nov 17, 2008, 7:16 PM
Wasatch, you were going to take some pics today. If you haven't already, could you get a pic of the snow-gates building that poodle said is next for restoration? He said that's where the bagel shop is.

poodledoodledude
Nov 17, 2008, 8:39 PM
delts-- the snow gates building doesn't have that ugly 60's retro look on the facade. it's REALLY nice now, and will only look better when they get finished with it. i hope wasatch takes some good pics of it for you. i think once you see it, you'll go: OHHHH!!

anyway, i hear JARED jewelers is building on the south west side of the university mall in orem. this is good news, if you like jewelry. seems like orem is becoming the murray of utah valley, and provo, because it's going UP in building size is becoming the salt lake of utah valley. also, who was it that mentioned a christensen's steak house is coming to the zions building? or is it christopherson's? don't remember. i think it's on the growprovo.com website.

poodledoodledude

poodledoodledude
Nov 17, 2008, 9:02 PM
one more thing-- the university mall...

this thing is a unique animal all its own it seems. it's the biggest retail development in orem. let's face it.

mervyns is going OUT. kohls said if they would've known, they would have moved into that spot where mervyns would be leaving. i really think they were bummed about this. it was just a few weeks before they learned about the mervyns situation. i think kohls would have been perfect there.

one person, after reading the daily herald, hoped they would get a neiman marcus or saks there in the spot...

i LAUGHED!!! :haha: this is ridiculous. i KNOW nordstrom is REALLY struggling in that location. i have many friends that work there, and they are thinking that nordstrom might leave after their alotted lease. don't know when, but, i wouldn't be surprised to see nordstrom go...especially in this valley. i KNOW i will NEVER see a RICH store like that go into univ mall. if they are not in slc, they won't be starting in provo/orem!!

granted, riverwoods started some nice stores in utah -- and chose provo first. abercrombie was the FIRST utah store there. the only reason they are not in univ mall is because general growth properties (provo towne centre owners) threatened legal action against them. come to find out abercrombie has a legal relationship with general growth properties and they will ONLY go in GGP malls-- that is why provo towne centre has hollister. they are owned by the same company. so, abercrombie stays at riverwoods. gap/banana republic don't have that relationship with either owner of any mall, so they could leave riverwoods and go to univ mall with nordstrom. victorias secret and bath and body works are also owned by the same company, and you often times see them in the same malls! usually across from one another! the reason why provo has a BIG victorias secret is because JPRealty had a relationship with victorias secret. they had NONE in the valley, other than riverwoods and decided to add a frangrance shop next door. so far, this "frangrance shop" is the ONLY one in the valley! smart move.

after working for dillards for a few years doing display/visual work, one thing i've learned about utah people is this: they are CHEAP!!

dillards, in provo towne centre is also struggling, but are able to diversify enough to keep their doors open. so, i for SURE don't see a niemans or a saks going in. i am pretty sure we'd see them go to slc first. just like nordstrom did.

anyway, what do you all think about the new stores/restaurants next to univ mall and by the new theatres? i hope they are successful. do you have any idea as to what is going in?? any restaurants we have in the valley already?

how will this compare to the ones provo towne wants to build EAST of the mall between the chevron gas station and the small strip mall where seagull book/citibank/subway are located? they, too, want a small district like this-- similar to the one east of the mayan/theatre complex in sandy....

anyway, what do you all think? :shrug:

poodledoodledude

poodledoodledude

Future Mayor
Nov 18, 2008, 5:31 AM
Abercrombie doesn't go into just GGP malls. There is an Abercrombie at the Gateway and that is still owned and managed by Boyer.

delts145
Nov 18, 2008, 11:15 AM
New company means more jobs for Utah -
Merger » Decho absorbs Mozy of Pleasant Grove

http://www.sltrib.com/business/ci_11009111

Utah will benefit from about 100 new jobs as Mozy Inc. of Pleasant Grove is absorbed into a new company that was announced Monday.

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delts145
Nov 18, 2008, 12:46 PM
Resident's protest stalls FrontRunner

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/288787/17/

FrontRunner South construction may be delayed two to four weeks because of residents concerned about traffic in the area of the commuter rail's proposed station at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi...

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poodledoodledude
Nov 18, 2008, 10:52 PM
Abercrombie doesn't go into just GGP malls. There is an Abercrombie at the Gateway and that is still owned and managed by Boyer.


that is because GGP and boyer have a working relationship, and there are many different owners of malls in the salt lake valley. GGP and woodbury have no such relationship, so abercrombie would have to go to the nearest GGP mall in utah valley.

poodledoodledude

delts145
Nov 20, 2008, 1:49 PM
Eagle Mountain's already substantial boundaries to become larger.

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705264392,00.html

Eagle Mountain to annex land

EAGLE MOUNTAIN — City leaders are taking steps to annex land on the west side all the way to Fairfield, while separately turning more agriculture land into commercial uses.
Also, the City Council on Tuesday approved the land use document and master development plan that regulates how a 364-home community in the northeast section of the city will be developed. The nearly 40 acres is to be annexed from Saratoga Springs.

Dubbed Scenic Mountain, the development is to have nearly 10 homes per acre...

Aerial view of Cedar Valley and one of many sections of expanding Eagle Mountain
http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1198/1394005787_17691b73c6_b.jpg
by the Schmidt Family

Eagle Mtn's scenic vistas
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3077/2587405148_703c945da1_b.jpg
by the Schmidt family

Pic of White Hall area, also part of aggressive annexation agenda
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2247/2132961553_fac2870001_b.jpg
by mkweaver01

Cedar Valley, Eagle Mountain is predicted by many to become Utah's future most populas city.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3018/2934543069_020e711c40_o.jpg
by tophera

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urbanboy
Nov 20, 2008, 11:28 PM
:previous:

NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I know, so dramatic. Seriously, this is beautiful land though, why not keep it rural and channel future growth to areas of existing infrastructure? That is the logical thing to do, it saves land for agriculture, it saves Tax dollars, and taxes wont need to be raised in order to build and maintain new infrastructure. Instead, the current tax dollars should go towards maintaining already existing infrastructure and implementation of smarter, more efficient modes of transportation. The closer we all live to each other, the closer our beautiful country lands will be to everyone. Sometimes people like the solace of the country, building up these areas make the country less accessible.

i-215
Nov 21, 2008, 1:31 AM
:previous:

NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I know, so dramatic. Seriously, this is beautiful land though, why not keep it rural and channel future growth to areas of existing infrastructure? That is the logical thing to do, it saves land for agriculture, it saves Tax dollars, and taxes wont need to be raised in order to build and maintain new infrastructure. Instead, the current tax dollars should go towards maintaining already existing infrastructure and implementation of smarter, more efficient modes of transportation. The closer we all live to each other, the closer our beautiful country lands will be to everyone. Sometimes people like the solace of the country, building up these areas make the country less accessible.

I actually agree with you, urbanboy. Although I believe growth out that way is inevitable, I think it's 30 years too early.

I mean, even Tooele has plans for water and an EIS for a new mid-valley freeway. Cedar Valley has "nothing" on the books yet. We'll end up with the world's largest subdivision, with no network grid of streets, or easements for commuter rail.

delts145
Nov 22, 2008, 1:43 PM
So true, It wasn't that many years ago that Northern Utah Valley was very rural. Now the talk is of where the new Smith's Marketplace, credit union or Walgreens will be placed. Where is the new gym or tennis club being built? What was once rural, is now city. Rural areas such as Southern Utah Valley and Southwestern Utah and Salt Lake Valley, Nephi, Heber Valley, Cedar Valley, Tooele County, Cache Valley, Morgan Valley and Summit's rural days are numbered.

delts145
Nov 22, 2008, 1:51 PM
UDOT to demolish Pleasant Grove bridge

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/289533/17/

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=160994&g2_serialNumber=2
Vehicles traveling on I-15 pass under the Sam White Lane overpass on Friday, November 20, 2008 in Pleasant Grove. The overpass is scheduled for demolition on Sunday morning at 1 a.m. The interstate will be taken down to one lane both ways at 10 p.m. on Saturday and closed completely from 1 a.m. to 7 a.m. on Sunday.

.

i-215
Nov 22, 2008, 4:34 PM
So true, It wasn't that many years ago that Northern Utah Valley was very rural. Now the talk is of where the new Smith's Marketplace, credit union or Walgreens will be placed. Where is the new gym or tennis club being built? What was once rural, is now city. Rural areas such as Southern Utah Valley and Southwestern Utah and Salt Lake Valley, Nephi, Heber Valley, Cedar Valley, Tooele County, Cache Valley, Morgan Valley and Summit's rural days are numbered.

Question for anyone who might know: Is Ceder Valley part of the Federal Land Survey block system? If so, I don't feel so worried about growth.

To explain, when the growth sprawled into West Valley, it simply filled these 1/2 miles by 1/2 mile blocks. That meant subdivisions had a boundary and couldn't become a big bowl of spaghetti like Eagle Mountain is right now. It also is transit and car friendly because blocks make it easier to add LRT later, and long straight roads are easy to navigate.

Future Mayor
Nov 22, 2008, 8:11 PM
It is estimated that by 2050 Brigham City to Nephi will all be considered Urban. As we can see with northern Utah Valley, that is obviously happening.

StevenF
Nov 24, 2008, 4:50 AM
So true, It wasn't that many years ago that Northern Utah Valley was very rural. Now the talk is of where the new Smith's Marketplace, credit union or Walgreens will be placed. Where is the new gym or tennis club being built? What was once rural, is now city. Rural areas such as Southern Utah Valley and Southwestern Utah and Salt Lake Valley, Nephi, Heber Valley, Cedar Valley, Tooele County, Cache Valley, Morgan Valley and Summit's rural days are numbered.

I live in Rural Cache Valley and you can keep all your city things to yourself. I love the small town I moved to a year ago and no I didn't build a new home I purchased an older home with 2/3 of an acre. why build when you can find wonderful older homes and not waste land with new ones taking up my rural bliss.

delts145
Dec 2, 2008, 1:11 PM
Eagle Mountain could one day have 200 parks

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705267144,00.html

EAGLE MOUNTAIN — Tucked away on the west side of Utah Lake, this city could become the home of more than 200 parks by the time it reaches its buildout of some 190,300 residents-plus.

... Their plan includes four kinds of parks — from 97 "pocket parks" of half an acre to an acre in size within walking distance of every home, 83 neighborhood parks, 25 community parks and four regional parks of at least 20 acres each in size...

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SLC Projects
Dec 2, 2008, 5:23 PM
http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=160994&g2_serialNumber=2


:previous:
I got to drive under this overpass the other day. It was weird seeing that haft of it is missing. The West haft of it have been turn down but the East side is still standing. Or at least that's how it was on Friday.

delts145
Dec 2, 2008, 5:25 PM
Same here Projects. It was weird, but cool to see.

delts145
Dec 4, 2008, 12:28 PM
Commission lays out plan to revitalize Utah Lake

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705267912,00.html

LEHI — Utah Lake could one day be restored to its former grandeur under a draft master plan that was unveiled for public consideration Wednesday night.
And, for the most part, dozens of community members said they were on board with Utah Lake Commission's priorities, which include eradicating invasive species, such as carp, promoting the proliferation of June sucker populations and constructing a continuous trail system around Utah Lake...


..."It's a great natural resource for the state of Utah," Reed said. "And ... it could become an economic engine if managed properly."

...The draft master plan focuses on five long-term approaches to restore, revitalize and preserve Utah Lake: recreation, transportation, land use and shoreline protection, natural resources and public facilities. The plan specifies it will support efforts to reduce carp populations and phragmites and the June Sucker Recovery Implementation Program.
Marc Heileson, southwest regional representative for the Sierra Club, said he's impressed to see so many government agencies taking a holistic approach... to weighing the future of Utah Lake. But he said he's concerned the draft master plan doesn't have "teeth to it," especially if developers want to build a causeway over the lake — something the plan does not address....

http://freelargephotos.com/000559_l.jpg
by Roy Tennant

.

delts145
Dec 5, 2008, 2:27 PM
Recession may change retail landscape across America

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705268150,00.html

While cautioning that the current economic woes will last at least a couple of "ugly" years before there's a recovery, the leader of Zions Bancorp.'s wealth-management arm said Thursday that the longterm ramifications of the downturn will "reshape the topography" of American retail.
George Feiger, chief executive officer of Contango Capital Advisors Inc., said Americans, strapped with credit troubles and struggling to repay debt, will consume less in the future. As a result, the country will need 10 percent to 15 percent less retail space, such as strip malls and department stores, and a corresponding decrease in the number of retail employees, warehouses and delivery and support systems.

"If you take this in, all of the sudden you'll realize, apart from its other ramifications, the whole landscape of America you've driven through to get here — the shopping malls, the department stores, the restaurants — all of this was essentially based on credit, on consumer credit, being able to consume 70 percent of GDP instead of 60 percent of GDP," ...

related: Sears Grand closing in American Fork

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/291230/18/

Sears Holding Corp. is closing its Sears Grand store in American Fork - one of 22 underperforming store closures it recently confirmed - as retailers nationwide battle one of the worst consumer spending environments on record...

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wrendog
Dec 5, 2008, 4:56 PM
Bout time that Sears Grand closed down. There is never a soul in that store.

delts145
Dec 5, 2008, 5:32 PM
I've noticed that too Wren. Seems like every time I pass by and check out the parking lot, it's empty.

i-215
Dec 5, 2008, 10:23 PM
I always scratched my head when I saw a Sears Grand. I only went into it once (and it was the Jordan Landing store), and I wasn't really that impressed.

SLC Projects
Dec 5, 2008, 11:26 PM
I never even know there was more then one Sears Grand store here in the state. I just thought the one at the Jordan Landing was the only one.
I went to that store a few times. It looked like just another store to me. Nothing big.

i-215
Dec 7, 2008, 6:03 AM
Update on the "mysterious" American Fork restaurant ....

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l183/utradioguide/100_1389.jpg

I'm beginning to get a little skeptical. It's starting to look more like a mini-mall than a place one would drive in (cough) (cough) and out (wheeze) of the drive-thru. What'yall think?

SLC Projects
Dec 7, 2008, 7:19 AM
Update on the "mysterious" American Fork restaurant ....

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l183/utradioguide/100_1389.jpg

I'm beginning to get a little skeptical. It's starting to look more like a mini-mall than a place one would drive in (cough) (cough) and out (wheeze) of the drive-thru. What'yall think?

:previous:
I notice that too last week when my family and I was driving on 1-15. I pointed that site out to them telling them that I heard that site is where a In and out could be, but then I was thinking to myself "that doesn't look like that is going to be a In & Out" :shrug:

wrendog
Dec 7, 2008, 6:43 PM
that is obviously not the in n out. There is lots of land behind it where other joints will pop up. My source who works for the city of Lehi said a Texas Roadhouse was to be built at this site and an in n out was to be built up by Cabelas. I'm getting conflicting reports. :)

delts145
Dec 8, 2008, 12:15 PM
Just for the record ...

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l183/utradioguide/100_1387.jpg

Here's a photo of the "half-of-the-Sam-White-Bridge." (As well as the hood of my car). It should disappear this weekend. Well, the half-a-bridge ... not the hood of my car. (If that disappeared, I wouldn't be happy).

.

delts145
Dec 8, 2008, 12:37 PM
Residents encouraged by plan for Utah Lake -
Draft proposal » Restoring the waterway would also make way for recreation on and around it.

Lehi » When Gail Gibson was a child, Utah Lake was a happening place.

People would fish or visit the shoreline resorts, he recalled. Some couples would go out for dinner and dancing on some of the show boats that plied the lake, with band music wafting across the water.

"Back in the 1930s, '40s and '50s, it was the gem of Utah County," Gibson, an American Fork resident said. "Now we all live near the lake, but do nothing with it."...

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site297/2008/1207/20081207__wkd_utahlake_1208~P1.jpg
Rick Cox, project manager for URS Corp., and Annette Harris of Saratoga Springs discuss the restoration of Utah Lake during an open house to discuss the proposed lake master plan. (Donald W. Meyers / The Salt Lake Tribune)

.

delts145
Dec 16, 2008, 11:56 AM
Eagle Mountain wins challenge against Census Bureau

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705270712,00.html

...The census estimated the city's population for 2007 at 17,832. Pili dug in and backed up his claim with additional housing data. The Census then adjusted the population estimate to 19,890.

When the city incorporated 12 years ago it had just 250 people.

"It has grown so inordinately quickly," Jackson said, adding that "the Census Bureau is extremely conservative."

When Pili challenged Census estimates in 2006, it adjusted the count from 12,232 to 17,391, resulting in a 30 percent increase in sales tax revenues, or about $400,000. The 2007 increase gave the city an additional $200,000 from state sales tax coffers...

.

Ronald-Dregan
Dec 17, 2008, 5:47 AM
Makes you wonder how many other mistakes they have made in the past :(

And the worst part is they did it twice in a row....

Come on man

delts145
Dec 21, 2008, 2:23 PM
Annexation will double land mass of Payson

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705271832,00.html

...The farmland under consideration would double the land mass of Payson and stretch to the Elk Ridge and Salem city limits. It would allow a variety of housing, from low density country homes to upper end estates and a more intense high density housing, parks, ballfields and a landscaped corridor along state Route 198 with meandering sidewalks. It would also include a commercial village.

The plan would protect a long-standing, 400-acre orchard belonging to the Ray Allred family. However, other smaller or "hobby" farms may not enjoy the same protection...

delts145
Dec 25, 2008, 12:58 PM
Orem extends loan on Midtown Village

http://www.sltrib.com/news/ci_11303241

...The City Council unanimously voted Tuesday to renew the $3.6 million short-term loan that was set to expire today, for 45 more days. City Manager James Reams said Key Bank, which is handling the loan, didn't want to rush a long-term financing plan through during the holidays...


Wanted: Renters for Midtown Village

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/293324/

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=117455&g2_serialNumber=2
Mario Ruiz/Daily Herald

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Future Mayor
Dec 28, 2008, 7:28 PM
Annexation will double land mass of Payson

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705271832,00.html

...The farmland under consideration would double the land mass of Payson and stretch to the Elk Ridge and Salem city limits. It would allow a variety of housing, from low density country homes to upper end estates and a more intense high density housing, parks, ballfields and a landscaped corridor along state Route 198 with meandering sidewalks. It would also include a commercial village.

The plan would protect a long-standing, 400-acre orchard belonging to the Ray Allred family. However, other smaller or "hobby" farms may not enjoy the same protection...

Looks like I'm going to have my hands full planning this area.

Wasatch_One
Dec 28, 2008, 10:51 PM
Plan it well! :tup:

I think from a beauty standpoint, the south end of Utah Valley has a ton of potential, especially Payson! With its authentic old downtown and all the land banking up against the mountains.

Congrats Future Mayor!

delts145
Jan 8, 2009, 1:30 PM
Very much agree Wasatch.This is a critical time for the general Payson/Santaquin area. Also, the more growth experienced at the southern end of Utah Valley can only benefit Provo's claim as an anchor hub. It's the growth of places like the southern end, expansion of Provo's airport and completion of commuter rail and the I-15 rebuild, that will have major impact on the growth and vibrancy of Downtown Provo.

Future Mayor, it can't be stressed enough what an important role you could play at this critical time in the growth of the southern metro, including issues as critical as the future of one of America's truely great urban lakes. I'm very excited for you, and this opportunity your being given.

delts145
Jan 8, 2009, 1:37 PM
Pleasant Grove State Street work begins in one week

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/295071/1/

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=166642&g2_serialNumber=2
DAVIS ARCHIBALD/Daily Herald - The intersection of Main Street and State Street in Pleasant Grove on Friday, December 26, 2008.


After years of waiting for the Pleasant Grove State Street underpass to be widened, residents have just 365 teeny-tiny days to go.

The street shut off on Monday between Main Street and 200 South for about a year. The underpass is a notttorious botteneck during rush-hour traffic...

.

delts145
Jan 8, 2009, 1:39 PM
..

Plan it well! :tup:

I think from a beauty standpoint, the south end of Utah Valley has a ton of potential, especially Payson! With its authentic old downtown and all the land banking up against the mountains.

Congrats Future Mayor!

^^^

Very much agree Wasatch.This is a critical time for the general Payson/Santaquin area. Also, the more growth experienced at the southern end of Utah Valley can only benefit Provo's progress as an anchor hub. It's the growth of places like the southern end, expansion of Provo's airport and completion of commuter rail and the I-15 rebuild, that will have major impact on the growth and vibrancy of Downtown Provo.

Future Mayor, it can't be stressed enough what an important role you could play at this critical time in the growth of the southern metro, including issues as critical as the future of one of America's truely great urban lakes. I'm very excited for you, and this opportunity your being given.

.

Wasatch_One
Jan 18, 2009, 1:56 AM
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/296384/17/

Friday, 16 January 2009
Federal stimulus money not enough to fund I-15 work Print E-mail
Joe Pyrah - Daily Herald

The massive federal stimulus bill that was introduced in the U.S. House on Thursday isn't going to be enough to pay for Interstate 15 expansion through Utah County.
Based on formulas used to dole out road money, Utah is likely to get around $200 million.

"Because it's such a smaller amount than we had hoped for, it becomes much more difficult to put it on one thing," said Nile Easton, spokesman for the Utah Department of Transportation.

The I-15 project between American Fork and Spanish Fork weighs in at more than $2.5 billion and was slated to be started this year. It's the No. 1 priority project for the state, but the collapsing economy forced UDOT to freeze all projects not under contract and wait for the Legislature to assess the financial situation.

"It's going to be an interesting two or three months," Easton said of finding out what the actual federal stimulus will be as well as what state lawmakers will do.

State lawmakers aren't counting on anything from the federal government and will budget accordingly.

"We don't spend money we don't have," said Rep. Becky Lockhart, R-Provo.

They also don't know what kind of restrictions are going to come with stimulus money. Can they use it to bond? What types of roads can it be used on?

"It would be wonderful to get it with no strings. But that's wishful thinking," Lockhart said.

Easton said that while the amount may be less than desired, the formula -- based on miles of road and the number of vehicles traveling -- has worked in the past.

"You've got to have some kind of way to do it fairly, and that one is proven," he said.

Wasatch_One
Jan 18, 2009, 2:03 AM
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/296430/

Saturday, 17 January 2009
Salem Hills High School named best new school building Print E-mail
Janice Peterson - Daily herald

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=169942&g2_serialNumber=2

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=169939

Nebo School District's first new high school building since the 1960s was honored recently as the best new K-12 school building of 2008 for the region.
The Intermountain Contractor magazine, one of 11 regional McGraw-Hill Construction publications, selected Salem Hills for the honor. The publication also gave a Merit Award for Utah Valley University's new library building in the higher education category and named the Utah State Capitol restoration the Project of the Year.

Brad Fullmer, editor of Intermountain Contractor, said a panel of judges was impressed with the overall design and concept of the school, which features several large "cloud" structures below the ceiling throughout the building.

"There are a lot of great school projects in our region, and certainly this is one that stood out for its design," he said.

Fullmer said there were several winners for the Utah and Idaho region in other categories, and the Utah State Capitol project will move on to a national competition.

Sean Wright, vice president of the school's designer, MHTN Architects Inc., said the award is a big honor for the school, which was one of several submitted for consideration. Wright said a panel of judges critiqued each building, looking for excellence in both construction and design.

One aspect of the school that may have had an impact on the judges' decision is the school's use of space. Wright said architects worked hard to include spaces that could be used for a variety of purposes, including hanging artwork, practicing drama or just gathering together.

"The plan is very unique," he said. "There's a lot of community space."

Wright said architects also focused on making a safe space for students to learn. He pointed out the sharp corners and dark spaces in many older schools, which give bullies a place to lurk. Salem Hills uses plentiful windows and strategic design to make spaces transparent and free-flowing, he said. Aside from safety, Wright said the windows are intended to make the school a more pleasant learning environment as well.

"It's hard to be engaged in a prison cell," he said.

As someone who has been a member on the judges' panel in the past, Wright said the cost efficiency of the school was likely a factor as well. Nebo School District can be proud of the effort they made to have a modern design at a low price, he said. While two schools of similar size are being built in the state at approximately $70 million apiece, Salem Hills was built for only $36 million.

"Salem Hills is a very good facility for an outstanding price," he said. "It's very efficient in systems, in layout, in materials."

Ann Anderson, principal of Salem Hills, said the award is exciting for the school, and the designers did an excellent job. She said the ceilings and their unique cloud structures are well done.

"The ceiling structures that they've done are some of the more unique things I've ever seen," she said.

Students are excited to be in the new facility as well and enjoy the out-of-the-ordinary design. The windows in the building are arranged in a way that shows off the architecture of the school.

"For us, we're just really excited because the building is absolutely beautiful," Anderson said.

Wasatch_One
Jan 18, 2009, 2:53 AM
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/295849/17/

Thursday, 15 January 2009
Utah County FrontRunner commuter rail expansion on track
Print E-mail
Ace Stryker - Daily Herald

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=169459&g2_serialNumber=2
MARIO RUIZ/Daily Herald
Union Pacific and UTA crews unloaded 10 1660 foot steel rails in Lehi for the UTA Frontrunner rail system Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2009. The third-of-a-mile long continuous welded rails weighing more than 31 tons were brought to Utah from a plant in Pueblo County, Colorado.


While recessionary concerns threaten to reduce or close government projects across the state, a planned commuter rail extension into Utah County is rolling along just fine.
"As far as budget cuts go, that is not an issue," said Carrie Bohnsack-Ware, spokeswoman for Utah Transit Authority, which is heading up the FrontRunner endeavor. "We are plowing ahead at full steam -- pun intended."

The FrontRunner South project will connect the new railway from its Salt Lake Central Station to an intermodal center at 600 South in Provo, with stops along the way in Orem, Vineyard, American Fork, Lehi, Draper, Sandy and Murray. It's part of UTA's $2.2 billion FrontLines 2015 program, a series of commuter and light rail projects funded by federal and local authorities. The expansion is well under way and could be open "if everything goes well" in 2012, said project manager Steve Meyer, though it's unclear what the final cost will be.

"There isn't an easy answer because of several factors," he said. "There are over 300 individual parcels of right-of-way that we're in the process of acquiring."

But it's more than that, Meyer said. Along the way, existing Union Pacific track must be moved, utility lines must be relocated, bridges must be built -- all of which depends on parties outside of UTA's control. He said it's a safe bet the final price tag will be significantly higher than FrontRunner North's, which topped $600 million for an equal length of track -- 44 miles -- between Salt Lake City and Ogden.

"That was good practice up north," said Meyer, who also managed the first half of the project. "This is the real deal."

The biggest difference between the two legs is the number of structures needed to make the southern route work, he said. The northern segment required just two bridges. The southern part looks to require at least 60 structures, including bridges, boxes and irrigation. Construction is already under way for a bridge over the American Fork River, and brush clearing and grading is being done at other spots along the future line.

"This year's going to be a big year for us to get a lot of work done," Meyer said. "We're dependent upon those third parties to get some of that work done to open up the corridor."

Utah County's FrontRunner stations will be positioned along the Interstate 15 corridor at high-population nexuses: Thanksgiving Point in Lehi, the new Main Street interchange in American Fork, the old Geneva site in Vineyard, west of Utah Valley University in Orem, and at University Avenue and 600 South in Provo. The Vineyard station won't open with the others, but will be added as the county continues to grow, Meyer said.

The Orem and Provo stations will be part of larger "intermodal centers" that will also offer commuters an option to finish their trips on special "bus rapid transit" lines. The buses are designed to move rapidly through city streets to popular stops such as Brigham Young University. It's all part of a larger plan to make it possible for county residents to leave their cars behind and be able to access faraway destinations -- like the Salt Lake International Airport, EnergySolutions Arena or the University of Utah -- using public transportation, said Gary McGinn, Provo's director of community development.

"That'll be a major link," he said. "Once we have that backbone of good, reliable bus rapid transit service in our city, then we can have more local bus service branching off that spine into other areas of our city."

McGinn said Provo's intermodal center is scheduled to open concurrently with FrontRunner South.

When FrontRunner opens, travel from Provo to Ogden -- the line's terminal points -- should take just under two hours, Meyer said. But it may not stop there: There are discussions about extending the line as far south as Nephi, with additional stops in Springville and Payson, and as far north as Brigham City. He said Springville has already picked a site, and Payson has created a transit-oriented zone in preparation for future expansion.

"That 120 miles encompasses about 80 percent of the state's population," Meyer said. "That'd be the spine of the Utah transportation corridor."

• Ace Stryker can be reached at astryker@heraldextra.com.

Wasatch_One
Jan 20, 2009, 4:04 AM
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/296533/17/

Sunday, 18 January 2009
UDOT plan would demolish new $1.5M animal shelter
Print E-mail
Caleb Warnock - DAILY HERALD

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=169303&g2_serialNumber=2
MARK JOHNSTON/Daily Herald

Saying it is the least expensive option, UDOT is making plans to tear down the new, $1.5 million North Utah Valley Animal Shelter, should the economy ever unthaw.
Having considered all other options, construction of the Vineyard Connector will require the land the shelter is on, even though the shelter was just completed in 2006, Scott Thompson of UDOT confirmed to the Daily Herald.

Because of the frozen global economy, animals at the shelter won't be moved anytime soon. The Vineyard Connector is "on hold due to current economic conditions" according to a UDOT Web site dedicated to the project, and the state "will not move ahead with construction until funding issues are resolved. ... We expect to know more by the end of the legislative session in March."

"It means we don't do anything at this point," Thompson said. "We haven't purchased anything or had any need to move them. Until we know the project has the green light, nothing is going to change for them at the shelter."

Tug Gettling, director of the shelter, said he is aware of UDOT's plans.

"We're not jumping to any conclusions," Gettling said. "We are not really too concerned about it at this point."

How is it that no one stopped north county cities from spending $1.5 million three years ago to build the shelter, when the land was needed for the Vineyard Connector?

"I don't now if I have an answer for that," Thompson said. "I don't know if everyone knew what was happening."

UDOT is not sure how much it will cost the state to replace the shelter.

"We don't have a price," Thompson said. "We were starting to put a preliminary number on what it would cost, and then everything was put on hold."

Thompson said the state tried hard to miss the shelter as it designed the new road, but found that other routes would have been even more expensive.

"It became the least expensive," he said.

The state has already had discussions with the nearby waste transfer station, which has agreed to let the state purchase land for a new shelter once the existing shelter must be torn down.

Located in Lindon, the North Utah Valley Animal Shelter opened in January 2006, replacing an aging shelter owned by Orem. Four times larger than the old shelter, the Lindon facility was built to hold about 190 cats and 120 dogs.

Utah County paid for the construction of the new shelter and is leasing it to a special service district -- comprising communities north of Provo -- for $1 a year. Cities pay a fee to take animals to the shelter. Animals that are not adopted are euthanized.

For information on the Vineyard Connector, visit www.udot.utah.gov/vineyard. For information on the north county animal shelter, visit www.nuvas.org.

Future Mayor
Jan 20, 2009, 4:19 AM
That is simply poor planning by Mountainland Association of Governments and by the City of Lindon. Lindon should have zone that area for the vineyard connector and preserved that corridor. MAG is now pretty visionary with working with cities to preserve corridors, maybe their current stance is a result of this issue or maybe Lindon simply did nothing to preserve that potential corridor.

i-215
Jan 20, 2009, 6:02 AM
It's this type of thing that made me introduce the I-415 proposal on the other thread.

Corridor preservation is key!

urbanboy
Jan 20, 2009, 6:22 AM
Why not plant a vineyard instead of the connector. :cool:

Future Mayor
Jan 20, 2009, 3:40 PM
If you can afford to buy the property, plant a vineyard and make it profitable or even come close to breaking even, go right ahead. Yes I agree that there needs to be local food production, but by saying they shouldn't build the connector you are contradicting things you have said in the past.

You have stated that there is plenty of space left to infill on the east side of Utah Lake so they don't need to build west of it. If they plant a vineyard there, it will not only eliminate some of the space for that infill, but will not provide the remaining infill any transportation options.

I know I know, you are going to say transit could help that out. I am a huge proponant of transit and know that it can benefit communities greatly, but some people simply want to drive a car and being in a democracy not a socialist/communistic country, we can't tell them they are not allowed that option.

So which is it, provide more infill housing options on the east side of Utah Lake or plant a vineyard, eliminating that land for residents and corridor use, and forcing development to the west side of the lake?

delts145
Jan 21, 2009, 12:35 PM
Contractor begins construction on Pioneer Crossing

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/296669/17/

Eagle Mountain and Saratoga Springs residents can breathe a collective sigh of relief.

Work began Tuesday on an alternative east-west route for motorists to get in and out of those cities and to access interstate 15. Ground-breaking for the Pioneer Crossing project was held Tuesday afternoon...

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=170470&g2_serialNumber=2
Craig Dilger/Daily Herald


.

poodledoodledude
Jan 21, 2009, 11:31 PM
If you can afford to buy the property, plant a vineyard and make it profitable or even come close to breaking even, go right ahead. Yes I agree that there needs to be local food production, but by saying they shouldn't build the connector you are contradicting things you have said in the past.

You have stated that there is plenty of space left to infill on the east side of Utah Lake so they don't need to build west of it. If they plant a vineyard there, it will not only eliminate some of the space for that infill, but will not provide the remaining infill any transportation options.

I know I know, you are going to say transit could help that out. I am a huge proponant of transit and know that it can benefit communities greatly, but some people simply want to drive a car and being in a democracy not a socialist/communistic country, we can't tell them they are not allowed that option.

So which is it, provide more infill housing options on the east side of Utah Lake or plant a vineyard, eliminating that land for residents and corridor use, and forcing development to the west side of the lake?

sounds to me like urbanboy was just trying to be funny...."planting a vinyard" and all at the vinyard connector site....i didn't read into it too much, although i laughed and thought the comment was funny!!
...future mayor, how goes the new job??

poodledoodledude

Future Mayor
Jan 21, 2009, 11:40 PM
You are probably right, I did notice the implied comical nature of it, but I assumed, considering the source that it was meant to be serious.

The new job is going well, there are definitely plenty of challenges and opportunities as a planner in a smaller community which will inevitable grow in the next 5-30 years. There is definitely a chance to help guide the community with smart growth principals, and provide a path for development that everyone will be proud of.

The commute sucks sometimes though.

delts145
Jan 22, 2009, 12:55 AM
Refresh my memory Future Mayor. Are you living in the Draper area now or Salt Lake proper?

delts145
Jan 22, 2009, 12:31 PM
Eagle Mountain adds acres to its annexation plan

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705279437,00.html

...The amendment to the Eagle Mountain Annexation Policy Plan includes 3,091 acres in the Pole Canyon area west of Eagle Mountain between Cedar Fort and Fairfield, including the White Hills subdivision of some 100 homes.

The 5,660 acres to be removed from the boundary plan includes property that Saratoga Springs and Fairfield annexed into their towns...

- Pole Canyon and Lewiston Peak at the south end of the Oquirrh mountains, Utah
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2176/2132987581_40e7851987_b.jpg
by mkweaver01

.

delts145
Jan 22, 2009, 12:39 PM
Highlanders dig in heels on new Town Center concept

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705279354,00.html

HIGHLAND — A city plan to turn the remaining 13 acres of Town Center land into a master-planned downtown with four-story buildings met with some resistance Tuesday during a public meeting with the City Council.

The new plan would allow a mix of commercial and residential structures with 35-foot-tall townhouses and stores and shops reaching 50 feet. Apartments could reach as high as 56 feet...

Alpine Country Club/Golf Course - Highland, Utah
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/74/180288290_febfb27db8_b.jpg
by Janoid

Future Mayor
Jan 22, 2009, 2:42 PM
Refresh my memory Future Mayor. Are you living in the Draper area now or Salt Lake proper?

I'm currently living in Cottonwood Heights, but will be moving back to SLC proper in April, and I am working in S. Utah county. Yes I am one who is choosing to commute through many communities, but that is because I am a city boy at heart and need that balance of city (personal) and small town (work) life.

delts145
Jan 22, 2009, 7:10 PM
Totally understand Future Mayor, though I would hate that long commute every day.

urbanboy
Jan 22, 2009, 9:57 PM
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2176/2132987581_40e7851987_b.jpg
by mkweaver01

.

I think this land will look better untouched than covered in subdivisions. Hopefully the Eagle Mountain is annexing this land so they can keep it as open space.

delts145
Jan 29, 2009, 2:01 PM
Lehi city to lose three historic buildings

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/297603/17/

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=171801&g2_serialNumber=2
Ashley Franscell/Daily Herald
A historic building in Lehi is being torn down because of a roof collapse Wednesday, January 28, 2009 on Center Street in Lehi. The building is one of three that the city is demolishing

.

Urban_logic
Jan 30, 2009, 6:40 PM
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/295849/17/

Thursday, 15 January 2009
Utah County FrontRunner commuter rail expansion on track
Print E-mail
Ace Stryker - Daily Herald

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=169459&g2_serialNumber=2
MARIO RUIZ/Daily Herald
Union Pacific and UTA crews unloaded 10 1660 foot steel rails in Lehi for the UTA Frontrunner rail system Wednesday, Jan. 14, 2009. The third-of-a-mile long continuous welded rails weighing more than 31 tons were brought to Utah from a plant in Pueblo County, Colorado.


While recessionary concerns threaten to reduce or close government projects across the state, a planned commuter rail extension into Utah County is rolling along just fine.
"As far as budget cuts go, that is not an issue," said Carrie Bohnsack-Ware, spokeswoman for Utah Transit Authority, which is heading up the FrontRunner endeavor. "We are plowing ahead at full steam -- pun intended."

The FrontRunner South project will connect the new railway from its Salt Lake Central Station to an intermodal center at 600 South in Provo, with stops along the way in Orem, Vineyard, American Fork, Lehi, Draper, Sandy and Murray. It's part of UTA's $2.2 billion FrontLines 2015 program, a series of commuter and light rail projects funded by federal and local authorities. The expansion is well under way and could be open "if everything goes well" in 2012, said project manager Steve Meyer, though it's unclear what the final cost will be.

"There isn't an easy answer because of several factors," he said. "There are over 300 individual parcels of right-of-way that we're in the process of acquiring."

But it's more than that, Meyer said. Along the way, existing Union Pacific track must be moved, utility lines must be relocated, bridges must be built -- all of which depends on parties outside of UTA's control. He said it's a safe bet the final price tag will be significantly higher than FrontRunner North's, which topped $600 million for an equal length of track -- 44 miles -- between Salt Lake City and Ogden.

"That was good practice up north," said Meyer, who also managed the first half of the project. "This is the real deal."

The biggest difference between the two legs is the number of structures needed to make the southern route work, he said. The northern segment required just two bridges. The southern part looks to require at least 60 structures, including bridges, boxes and irrigation. Construction is already under way for a bridge over the American Fork River, and brush clearing and grading is being done at other spots along the future line.

"This year's going to be a big year for us to get a lot of work done," Meyer said. "We're dependent upon those third parties to get some of that work done to open up the corridor."

Utah County's FrontRunner stations will be positioned along the Interstate 15 corridor at high-population nexuses: Thanksgiving Point in Lehi, the new Main Street interchange in American Fork, the old Geneva site in Vineyard, west of Utah Valley University in Orem, and at University Avenue and 600 South in Provo. The Vineyard station won't open with the others, but will be added as the county continues to grow, Meyer said.

The Orem and Provo stations will be part of larger "intermodal centers" that will also offer commuters an option to finish their trips on special "bus rapid transit" lines. The buses are designed to move rapidly through city streets to popular stops such as Brigham Young University. It's all part of a larger plan to make it possible for county residents to leave their cars behind and be able to access faraway destinations -- like the Salt Lake International Airport, EnergySolutions Arena or the University of Utah -- using public transportation, said Gary McGinn, Provo's director of community development.

"That'll be a major link," he said. "Once we have that backbone of good, reliable bus rapid transit service in our city, then we can have more local bus service branching off that spine into other areas of our city."

McGinn said Provo's intermodal center is scheduled to open concurrently with FrontRunner South.

When FrontRunner opens, travel from Provo to Ogden -- the line's terminal points -- should take just under two hours, Meyer said. But it may not stop there: There are discussions about extending the line as far south as Nephi, with additional stops in Springville and Payson, and as far north as Brigham City. He said Springville has already picked a site, and Payson has created a transit-oriented zone in preparation for future expansion.

"That 120 miles encompasses about 80 percent of the state's population," Meyer said. "That'd be the spine of the Utah transportation corridor."

• Ace Stryker can be reached at astryker@heraldextra.com.

Can't wait!! :boogy: :dancing: :banana:

delts145
Feb 18, 2009, 12:38 PM
North County Boulevard to expand in A.F.

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/300137/17/

The Mountainland association of Governments has approved using $6.5 million to purchase land to eventually expand the road, which is 1100 East in American Fork, to two lanes in each direction, plus a turning lane...

View north from new 1100 East route & American Fork Hospital. New boulevard will run in a north/south direction from I-15 to the city of Alpine
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2236/1548762101_1471c75edc_b.jpg
by J.D.'s view

.

Wasatch_One
Feb 25, 2009, 8:58 PM
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/300902/

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=109605&g2_serialNumber=2

Photo: MARIO RUIZ/Daily Herald

Tuesday, 24 February 2009
Vineyard power plant to double in size, output, owners say
Michael Rigert - DAILY HERALD

Vineyard's anticipated residential growth may have stalled because of last year's mortgage crisis and a still-sputtering national economy, but that doesn't mean development isn't coming to the town west of Orem.
At the town's Feb. 4 Planning Commission meeting, Bob Looper, president of Summit Vineyard, a partner in the $330 million Lake Side Power Plant, submitted plans for the multi-million dollar construction of the second phase of the natural-gas-fired turbine plant. The plant's applications for conditional use permits and site plan approval will come before the Vineyard Town Council during its meeting Thursday.

The Lake Side Power Plant is part of a network that provides power to 1.6 million people in Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Oregon, Washington and California.

The Vineyard site, located on 20 acres of former Geneva Steel property, was initially conceived and developed with the second stage to be part of the original construction, or as a planned expansion, he said.

"It's really a duplicate of phase one," Looper said.

Looper didn't cite an official price tag for the planned doubling in size and electrical power input of the plant that currently generates an average of 535 megawatts -- enough power to serve about 500 typical homes per day.

In a 2008 draft report from Rocky Mountain Power, the cost for phase two of the project was estimated at $630 million, not including the cost of the land or preparing the site. Pacificorp, which owns Rocky Mountain Power, is a partner in the project.

Vineyard town clerk Dan Wright added that material costs have risen significantly since the initial plant became operational in September of 2007.

"Obviously, funding for a large project like this is very difficult to come by," Looper said.

It has not been decided yet when construction on phase two of the Lake Side plant would begin, he said.

Plant officials said previously that the Vineyard location and a plant in Mona were potential expansion sites due to the growing demand for electricity along the Wasatch Front and in the Intermountain Region.

Looper said though phase two of the Lake Side plant is of a similar design, technology has gotten more efficient resulting in a phase two turbine that would be at least 5 percent more energy efficient than the one currently operating at the plant.

He added that as in phase one of the plant's construction, company officials would again aim to use 50 percent of the phase two project labor force from the local area.

"Overall it took one million hours of labor," Looper said.

David Robbins, chairman of the Vineyard town Planning Commission, said commissioners unanimously forwarded a favorable recommendation to the town council regarding Looper's application for a conditional use permit and site plan approval for phase two.

"It's already zoned for that use, there's one up and running and we'll welcome a second [phase]," he said.

A phase two of the plant would generate some revenue for the town in property tax and building permits, Robbins said. He said the plant's officials and owners have been good neighbors.

Robbins said a few neighbors had complained of the plant's steam plume blocking the sun during the winter months. There were also concerns about how the proposed expansion would impact a trail that runs through the communities of Orem, Lindon and Vineyard. Plant officials have agreed to allow the trail to continue across the property, he said.

"I don't think it's a bad thing," Robbins said, citing the area's need for electric power and the plant's comparatively clean and environmentally friendly operation in comparison to former industries on the same soil.

"I said, 'Go back 30 years when I was a kid, and look at what the steel plant put on into the air,'" Robbins said.

Wasatch_One
Feb 25, 2009, 9:02 PM
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/300965/17/

American Fork prepares for Frontrunner project
Barbara Christiansen - Daily Herald

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=174936&g2_serialNumber=2
Photo: By Barbara Christiansen
Farmington city manager Max Forbush points out the area around his community's FrontRunner station to Ken Baldwin, chairman of American Fork's Planning and Zoning Commission. Members of the commission, the City Council and city staff took a ride on the FrontRunner Saturday and spoke with Forbush and other Farmington officials about potential development in American Fork, near that city's commuter rail station.

American Fork -- American Fork is on track for the FrontRunner commuter rail project.

FrontRunner service started last April between Salt Lake City and Ogden, and there are plans to extend it south to Provo and eventually Payson. It is a high-speed commuter rail system with minimal stops, which helps it maintain the high speed.

The FrontRunner station in American Fork is planned for the west side of Interstate 15, at approximately 200 South.



To help the city prepare for that station and the possibility of transit-oriented development, which is expected to be constructed around the station, UTA invited members of the city staff, Planning and Zoning Commission and City Council to ride FrontRunner Saturday from Salt Lake City to Ogden. Along the way, they stopped in Farmington and spoke with some of the officials of that city to get some insights into the process.

"The city manager in Farmington said the original developer was actually a speculator," said Planning Commission Chairman Ken Baldwin. "He bought most of the property up, so it came in one ownership. He sold it. With a single developer, it gives you a chance of getting what you want for coordinated development."

Although having a single developer is not the case in American Fork, Baldwin said there were some similarities between the Farmington station and the one planned here. Both are on the other side of the freeway from what could be considered the area's main attractions. In Farmington it is Lagoon; in American Fork it is The Meadows. Those situations created problems, he said.

"We're going to have a real problem trying to figure out how to get what we want," he said. "For example, we need some kind of pedestrian connection between the park and ride and The Meadows. Who's going to pay for it?"

In Farmington, there is an elevated walkway between the station on the east side of the tracks and the parking lot. It includes elevators for the handicapped. Baldwin said he was told it cost $4 million.

"The one we need would become at least double that," he said. "The FrontRunner station itself is pretty well determined by where the tracks are. The support facilities for the station will be the responsibility of the city, getting traffic in and out, lights where they are needed. That is not included in their plans. They just basically say, 'Here it is. We're providing you a service -- figure out how to use it.'"

Baldwin said that despite the unknown and problems that need to be worked out, he is pleased with the service.

"I agree it can be a very positive thing for the community if it's developed right," he said. "The encouraging part, it will have a positive effect for people living in American Fork in that it will provide additional employment opportunities. If we can get appropriate development, it will provide both housing and support facilities."

City Councilman Ricky Storrs said he could see the potential for FrontRunner helping American Fork, but he said the development nearby may not happen immediately.

"I could really see how it could help with our traffic situation," he said. "I could see something like the development planned for Farmington happening on a smaller scale here. I don't know how soon it would be with the economy the way it is."

Baldwin said he expected the Planning Commission would address the issue, possibly within the next month.

"It's sort of like looking at Oz," he said. "It has great potential. How you're going to do it is left for the scriptwriters."

Transit-oriented development usually includes high-density housing, often mixed with commercial and office space. American Fork has had individuals making an initial contact about putting high-density housing in the vicinity of the station, but most have not addressed other things that go along with it.

"If you have high-density housing, schools and churches have got to be provided if you are going to have a good feeling for the development," Baldwin said. "Otherwise, you have people who don't have anything to bring them together." Baldwin said that could cause some problems, such as an increase in crime.

"When Wal-Mart moved, the police got 10 times the calls to the new than they had at the old one," he said. "The new one isn't 10 times as big. Just a little impersonalization makes a lot of impact what the city has to do to provide services."

He said there were many things that make up a community, and that the city needed to take those into consideration.

"Just because you have a transit hub doesn't mean you have all the structure in place for a community," he said. He explained those include churches, schools and shopping, along with ready access to police and fire protection, and amenities such as the library and fitness center.

Baldwin said the concept has potential, but it will take a great deal of effort and money to bring it to fruition.

"I know if we increase the population density, we increase almost astronomically the concerns about providing the services, so that what develops will have the same feel as the rest of A.F. as a community," Baldwin said. "That's my major concern, pure and simple."

J.H. Hadfield of the city's Engineering Department said that UTA was beginning the construction process for the station.

"They are in the process of bringing in utilities and fill," he said. "We're pretty much committed to support them. It is serviced by a county road and we will have to figure out how to provide fire protection." He said that narrow county road would need to be improved to handle the traffic.

delts145
Feb 25, 2009, 11:34 PM
Looper didn't cite an official price tag for the planned doubling in size and electrical power input of the plant that currently generates an average of 535 megawatts -- enough power to serve about 500 typical homes per day.

500 hundred homes! That can't be right. It seems to me it would be more like 5000 homes.

WeST
Feb 26, 2009, 8:29 AM
500 hundred homes! That can't be right. It seems to me it would be more like 5000 homes.

Yeah Delts your right that must be a misprint. It would have to be at least 50,000 homes. Estimates vary widely so news stories are very unreliable.

delts145
Mar 18, 2009, 1:11 PM
Speaking of trends, I happened to pass by the soon-to-open Walmart at Cedar Hills, which is adj. to Highland and Alpine. I was shocked at what I saw. This is probably the most attractive Walmart I've seen yet, and hopefully it will set a much higher bar. I'm hoping that the Walmart replacing the ugly old K-mart at the top of the east bench will take its cues from this one in Cedar Hills. My only change for this new Walmart would be that it is attractive enough that additional floors should have been considered as residential. I really think that there would have been a market for it in that area. Particularly with young couples and seniors.

You're talking to an all-out anti-Walmart activist here, but I am glad to see that they are finally starting to alter designs to fit into local architecture. I think the main reason I hate Walmart (beside building over ancient historic sights in Mexico, ruining entire economies in Central America, denying hundreds of thousands of hours of breaks/lunches to employees, etc, etc) is how they will just invade a small town and overrun the local economy. When you look at Target, they build in urban and suburban areas (seriously, have you ever seen a Target in a rural area?) Then, when Walmart does invade such a town, they build a white and blue box that toally clashes with the town. I am glad to see that they are fixing this. I understand that the area you speak of is suburban, so that's good. I'm glad they're not killing another helpless small town. I just hate how Walmart competes with small businesses - Target competes with other big boxes. Walmart is like the nasty 6th grader who beats up the little, helpless kindergarteners. Target, on the other hand, picks fights with fellow 6th graders.

I passed by the Cedar Hills Walmart yesterday as well. I was blown away. It looks really nice!

Someone better get a picture of that walmart.

:previous:

Here is a construction pic:

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=169273&g2_serialNumber=2

and here are the plans:

http://www.cedarhills.org/images/walmart2elevation.jpg

^^^
I had remembered posting those renderings in the past, but they don't do the actual project justice. That was one of the reasons I was so surprised, "the actual building was much nicer than the rendering."

That would be a much better walmart design, but it's still a walmart. :yuck:

it's better than the one on 300 W 1300 S. :yuck: :yuck:

By like a BILLION times.

WalMart will always feel like a WalMart no matter how it looks (IMO). :yuck:

It's okay, I guess.. kind of just looks like an Albertsons to me.

Like I said, that rendering is pretty sucky compared to the completed project. This Walmart is much nicer than a typical Albertsons.

Eww, I know! It feels like you're in a factory (big, bright flood lights, no ceiling hinding the rafters, endless as far as the eye can see). I have only been inside a Walmart a few times in my life (only purchased something twice ;)), but from my experience, it has been a negative experience. I like how when you go into a Target, it feels like a store. It's attractively colored and decorated, they always have a ceiling, things are better organized. I remember going to a Walmart trying to find something and finding like-items in about 5 sections of the store. I was completely baffled as to which section would have the item I was looking for. Then, when you go into a Target, there are a few things you can't find there - making you go to another store. Some people don't like this, but I do because it doesn't hog all the business like one store I know of (*caugh*Wal*caugh*Mart*caugh). It makes it so a Target can flourish at less expense to sorounding stores and makes the store smaller and more managable to find stuff. Then, as I mentioned earlier, it doesn't invade a neighborhood and destoy local businesses. Just look at SL County - In West Jordan, there is the Redwood store inside a typical suburban strip-mall, the Jordan Landing Store sorounded by big-boxes; in South Jordan, there is the store in The District which is sorounded by big boxes; there's the Fort Union Store sorounded by lots of big-box shopping centers; then there's the Sandy Store at a mall and also sorounded by big-boxes. Total, there are 5 stores (2 Supers, 3 smaller stores). How many Walmarts are there in the same County? I couldn't count them either. I bet there are less payday-loan centers than Walmarts in SL County.

..

delts145
Mar 18, 2009, 1:25 PM
:previous:

Seriously guys, this Walmart is a Hell of allot more attractive than your typical Walmart, or "Target" for that matter. It actually reminds me of one of these new chic assisted living centers, LOL. Don't even pay attention to that rendering they released previously. I guess if someone at flickr or the forum doesn't photograph it soon, I'm going to have to take a pic myself. I purposely made a detour yesterday in order to take a closer look at it. It wasn't open yet, but I parked and walked around it, examining the luxury home-style brick and all of the design elements that make it kind of a shocking surprise. It's amazing what a bull-headed city council and residents can do when Walmart wants a location and the city forces their will as a prerequisite. All cities in Utah should take notice. I am impressed with the obvious level of taste of certain members of this Cedar Hills Council. I would like to know, who on the city was the primary driving force in forcing such a huge change with this Walmart's design.

delts145
Mar 18, 2009, 1:31 PM
At last, Cedar Hills welcomes Wal-Mart

http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,705291526,00.html

CEDAR HILLS — After lengthy negotiations and a city referendum, Wal-Mart will open its doors at 8 a.m. Wednesday.

The grand opening of the medium-sized store signifies the end of a yearlong struggle between the world's largest retailer and Cedar Hills, which held the big-box giant to high building standards and halted previous negotiations because city officials didn't like some of the store's items and store hours.

But when a majority of voters in the small Utah County city rejected a provisional 2005 city ordinance that would ban stores from operating on Sunday and selling beer, it ripened the city's commercial appeal. Wal-Mart renegotiated and broke ground on the store last spring, but not before agreeing to follow strict city codes on the store's appearance...


.

shakman
Mar 18, 2009, 3:12 PM
I am not gasping over the renderings of WalMart. Just WalMart itself.

delts145
Mar 18, 2009, 5:34 PM
^^^
It has been pointed out countless times by numerous forumers that they depend on the lower price points of innumerable products, which can be purchased at Walmart. When the couples of 4 or more children are watching every penney in these difficult economic times, a Walmart can be a very important ingredient in saving the family budget.

Myself, I try to memorize which market dependably offers the best price on which product. I tend to shop and purchase the same realm of products each month. Between the running specials of Walmart, Smiths, Harmons, Macy's, Kohler's, etc. I am usually able to get a complete selection of excellent deals, whether it's produce, poultry, toilettries, or whatever.

Future Mayor
Mar 18, 2009, 6:03 PM
I'm always happy to change to focus off Wal-Mart. I have noticed on my horrendous daily (4 days) commute that there are several interchanges that are being rebuilt and expanded, namely the American Fork Main St, Harts has closed, and also the Springville interchange. The Springville interchange is being doubled in width and is being built as a single point urban interchange, like those along the I-15 rebuild, and University Ave in Orem.

John Martin
Mar 18, 2009, 11:51 PM
Oh wow, I had no idea that the walmart was that close to completion. I'll try and check it out some time. If it really is brick all the way around, it should look pretty good. Is it much different on the inside? That's all I'd really like to change... I don't expect much from a walmart but it seems like it would be appropriate for them to step up the ante. Costco is a warehouse, and I like that, but walmart is just way too generic. White, ugly, tile floors, black carpet, chrome racks, black somewhat modern signs, there is absolutely nothing impressive or even slightly interesting about a walmart. I just go there to get groceries on occasion, otherwise I'd just go to Albertsons which isn't really any less politically scandalous.

I suppose I should go to The Store and The Store Too more often, those are my local grocery stores anyway.

delts145
Mar 19, 2009, 12:28 AM
^^^
John, Today was their grand opening, so I dropped in on my way back from the gym. The exterior really is impressive. I don't think I've ever seen a grocery store with quite as many angles, breaks and pop outs. I even noticed some copper gutters and trim on the roof, and ironwork railings at the garden center. The interior ceiling is the expected white steel grid, but the flooring treatments and displays were more like the newer Harmons or Smiths Marketplace. While there seemed to be everything I would need, it wasn't quite as big of a monster inside as a supercenter. There seemed to be more focus and less warehouse volume. Also, the bakery was a pleasant shock. It was definitely a big cut above the typical. I'm being really strict right now with my workouts and diet, but I did sample a few things, and the taste and quality was excellent and very surprising. Also I talked extensively with the bakery manager, who is a local Highlander. She said they were aiming to be on the same level of quality as the new Kneaders in Highland. Anyway, overall it was a much more positive feel and experience than what I'm use to at a typical Walmart. It had much more of a community 'this is my hometown pride' feel to it.

delts145
Mar 19, 2009, 12:51 PM
Cedar Hills - Facing The Future

Here's an interesting article, which appeared in the January Herald. It kind of gives a little insight into the mindset of this interesting town leadership


C.H. to quell traffic after store openings

...Cedar Hills is historically a small bedroom community. Residents have used the roads of the city to go to church, go to school, and to get out of town to do errands. But all that is about to change this spring when Wal-Mart opens...

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php%3Fg2_view%3Dcore.DownloadItem%26g2_itemId%3D169273%26g2_serialNumber%3D2&imgrefurl=http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/296257/&usg=___ovycjR3K7c-Etiso1Kz5Z1EzB4=&h=386&w=580&sz=210&hl=en&start=7&tbnid=FP5h-YwVfISElM:&tbnh=89&tbnw=134&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dwalmart%2Bcedar%2Bhills%2Butah%26gbv%3D2%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=169273&g2_serialNumber=2
Construction continues on the new Wal-Mart on Cedar Hills Drive in Cedar Hills Tuesday, Jan. 13, 2009.

Note: Also noticed now that it is completed, the pitched roof is covered in thick slate tiles, and trimmed with a generous amount of copper troughs and channels.

delts145
Mar 24, 2009, 1:51 PM
Prep work in Lindon green-lighted for UTA commuter rail

http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/303802/17/

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=131340&g2_serialNumber=2
Utah Transit Authority General Manager John Inglish introduces the UTA FrontRunner engine train that will serve Utah County beginning in 2012 during a groundbreaking ceremony in Lehi.

Lindon City Council members have cleared a path for the Utah Transit Authority to start construction on city property for the FrontRunner commuter rail project.

.

delts145
Apr 2, 2009, 10:36 AM
Huge paper plant in the works in south Utah County

http://deseretnews.com/article/705294516/Huge-paper-plant-in-the-works.html

ELBERTA — A new Utah County zone that allows for growth including industrial, commercial, office and residential may have an early taker with a huge paper factory...

...They wanted it shovel-ready by April," Utah County Planning Commission chairman Dean Miner said...

http://pics2.city-data.com/city/maps6/clt6543.png

...Once online it would employ as many as 1,000 to 1,200 people, Ellertson said. Initially it would begin with 400 hires.

.

Urban_logic
Apr 3, 2009, 5:30 AM
http://www.heraldextra.com/content/view/300902/

http://2008.heraldextra.com/gallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=109605&g2_serialNumber=2

Photo: MARIO RUIZ/Daily Herald

Tuesday, 24 February 2009
Vineyard power plant to double in size, output, owners say
Michael Rigert - DAILY HERALD

Vineyard's anticipated residential growth may have stalled because of last year's mortgage crisis and a still-sputtering national economy, but that doesn't mean development isn't coming to the town west of Orem.
At the town's Feb. 4 Planning Commission meeting, Bob Looper, president of Summit Vineyard, a partner in the $330 million Lake Side Power Plant, submitted plans for the multi-million dollar construction of the second phase of the natural-gas-fired turbine plant. The plant's applications for conditional use permits and site plan approval will come before the Vineyard Town Council during its meeting Thursday.

The Lake Side Power Plant is part of a network that provides power to 1.6 million people in Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Oregon, Washington and California.

The Vineyard site, located on 20 acres of former Geneva Steel property, was initially conceived and developed with the second stage to be part of the original construction, or as a planned expansion, he said.

"It's really a duplicate of phase one," Looper said.

Looper didn't cite an official price tag for the planned doubling in size and electrical power input of the plant that currently generates an average of 535 megawatts -- enough power to serve about 500 typical homes per day.

In a 2008 draft report from Rocky Mountain Power, the cost for phase two of the project was estimated at $630 million, not including the cost of the land or preparing the site. Pacificorp, which owns Rocky Mountain Power, is a partner in the project.

Vineyard town clerk Dan Wright added that material costs have risen significantly since the initial plant became operational in September of 2007.

"Obviously, funding for a large project like this is very difficult to come by," Looper said.

It has not been decided yet when construction on phase two of the Lake Side plant would begin, he said.

Plant officials said previously that the Vineyard location and a plant in Mona were potential expansion sites due to the growing demand for electricity along the Wasatch Front and in the Intermountain Region.

Looper said though phase two of the Lake Side plant is of a similar design, technology has gotten more efficient resulting in a phase two turbine that would be at least 5 percent more energy efficient than the one currently operating at the plant.

He added that as in phase one of the plant's construction, company officials would again aim to use 50 percent of the phase two project labor force from the local area.

"Overall it took one million hours of labor," Looper said.

David Robbins, chairman of the Vineyard town Planning Commission, said commissioners unanimously forwarded a favorable recommendation to the town council regarding Looper's application for a conditional use permit and site plan approval for phase two.

"It's already zoned for that use, there's one up and running and we'll welcome a second [phase]," he said.

A phase two of the plant would generate some revenue for the town in property tax and building permits, Robbins said. He said the plant's officials and owners have been good neighbors.

Robbins said a few neighbors had complained of the plant's steam plume blocking the sun during the winter months. There were also concerns about how the proposed expansion would impact a trail that runs through the communities of Orem, Lindon and Vineyard. Plant officials have agreed to allow the trail to continue across the property, he said.

"I don't think it's a bad thing," Robbins said, citing the area's need for electric power and the plant's comparatively clean and environmentally friendly operation in comparison to former industries on the same soil.

"I said, 'Go back 30 years when I was a kid, and look at what the steel plant put on into the air,'" Robbins said.

Ewwww!!! :yuck: :yuck: :yuck:

I know, it is needed for the electricity it provides. I just hope we can get off these discusting dirty fuels over next couple decades or so.

:previous:

Seriously guys, this Walmart is a Hell of allot more attractive than your typical Walmart, or "Target" for that matter. It actually reminds me of one of these new chic assisted living centers, LOL. Don't even pay attention to that rendering they released previously. I guess if someone at flickr or the forum doesn't photograph it soon, I'm going to have to take a pic myself. I purposely made a detour yesterday in order to take a closer look at it. It wasn't open yet, but I parked and walked around it, examining the luxury home-style brick and all of the design elements that make it kind of a shocking surprise. It's amazing what a bull-headed city council and residents can do when Walmart wants a location and the city forces their will as a prerequisite. All cities in Utah should take notice. I am impressed with the obvious level of taste of certain members of this Cedar Hills Council. I would like to know, who on the city was the primary driving force in forcing such a huge change with this Walmart's design.

Wow, it does sound nice. Too, bad my reservations/hatred for the company is greater than my desire to go and see it... :jester:

I have actually worked myself into a position where I can't go into Walmart even if I wanted to. After all my harsh diatribes against Walmart to my friends and family, it would be most embarrasing to be seen in one :D

delts145
Apr 3, 2009, 1:55 PM
Ewwww!!! :yuck: :yuck: :yuck:

I know, it is needed for the electricity it provides. I just hope we can get off these discusting dirty fuels over next couple decades or so.

Wait a minute now, I understood this was a natural gas facility. Granted, natural gas is not renewable, but at least it's relitively very clean, and far better than many other options. At least as far as clean energy, for the largest amount of customers served bang. I consider Natural Gas as a huge improvement over coal, or even the new, "cleaner coal," especially for that location. I wish we could all just convert our vehicles to CNG as quickly as possible.

Wasatch_One
Apr 3, 2009, 5:16 PM
:previous:

It is a natural gas plant.

And there is a $3,000 tax credit from the state for anyone buying a CNG vehicle that hasnt already received the credit. If I were to buy one, my company would pay an additional $2K toward it. haha, yeah... I haven't bought one yet though. However I drive a car that gets 32 hwy 26 city... so not too bad, yet.