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delts145
Sep 24, 2009, 12:14 PM
$139 million commuter parkway begins. Route 92 project will include commuter lanes

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705332049/Route-92-project-will-include-commuter-lanes.html

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/midres/1833743.jpg
Gov. Gary Herbert "kicks off" the UDOT state Route 92 project on Wednesday.

By Laura Hancock
The Deseret News

Here's the deal about living in northern Utah County: The towns are not exactly dotted along the freeway.

If you're a resident of, say, Eagle Mountain or Alpine, you've got a good drive to get to Interstate 15 — anywhere from five or 10 to 15 or more miles.

And as northern Utah County has become more populated, commuting along two-lane highways has become even more difficult. On the west side of the interstate, the Utah Department of Transportation is building Pioneer Crossing, which goes from Redwood Road in Saratoga Springs through Lehi to I-15 in American Fork, to relieve congestion.

And on Wednesday, UDOT and dignitaries kicked off a $139 million project to expand state Route 92. With completion expected in the summer of 2011, it will affect residents in Lehi, Alpine, Highland and Cedar Hills.

"For a lot of old timers, they like the rural-feel feeling" that the hamlets in northern Utah County provided, said Rep. John Dougall, R-American Fork. "But our community is changing."

Between 2000 and 2008, the area gained about 50,000 new residents, said J. Kent Millington, member of the Utah Transportation Commission, which prioritizes projects for UDOT.

Lehi's population has increased from 19,000 to 50,000. Highland's has increased from 8,000 to 16,000. Alpine's has increased from 7,000 to 10,000. Cedar Hills' has increased from 3,000 to 10,000, Millington said.

Most of the growth is internal, as Utah County has a high birth rate, said Gov. Gary Herbert, who formerly served on the Utah County Commission.

Herbert believes the project will help revitalize the Utah economy as contractors hire crews to expand the road.

"People will have an opportunity to purchase goods and services as that $139 million ripples throughout the economy," Herbert said. "And that affects all of us."

The project involves adding one lane to Route 92 in each direction, plus adding one "commuter lane" in each direction. The highway now has one lane in each direction, plus a turn lane in the middle.

The commuter lanes will be adjacent to, but separate from, the highway. The idea is to keep traffic in the commuter lanes moving. They will not have stoplights and will merge on and off the freeway ramps and various city streets. UDOT Executive Director John Njord does not know yet if the speeds of the commuter lanes will be faster than the regular highway.

In some places, the commuter lanes will run under city streets, such as at 1200 West in Lehi, or over city streets, such as at 1200 East in Highland. In some places, the east- and westbound commuter lanes will run next to each other, almost like a mini-highway next to a larger highway. At other places, the eastbound commuter lane will run adjacent to the eastbound highway lanes, and the westbound commuter lane will run adjacent to the westbound highway lanes, almost like a frontage road next to a freeway.

Cool Video Link: www.udot.utah.gov/sr92/.

The idea of the commuter lanes developed on UDOT drawing boards, as engineers scratched their heads about how to move people to the freeway fast. "We just kind of created it on our own," Njord said. "We've got some really great engineers."

UDOT will also build two sections of asphalt trail to connect with existing or planned trails in the area. Utah County and the four cities have trails in their master plans.

"In our environmental work, we found recreational users use SR-92 frequently," said Dan Avila, UDOT deputy program director, referring to commuting cyclists, parents with strollers and in-line skaters.

UDOT plans for cyclists to use the shoulder, which will be wider than most shoulders, at 8 feet. Car lanes are 12 feet wide, Avila said.

With a trail system adjacent to Legacy Parkway and now Route 92, Avila said, people have been saying at public hearings UDOT holds before beginning a highway project that they want recreation opportunities.

"We recognize transportation is not just moving cars," he said.

..

Orlando
Sep 24, 2009, 6:13 PM
:previous: Another government bailout of sprawl.:koko: More tax money to help those who decided to live so far from major transportation corridors. Booo!

goldcntry
Sep 24, 2009, 7:34 PM
If there's going to be a bridge, and I'm of mixed feelings on one, might as well make it nice/interesting/unique to look at... ...so, here's a little bit of my ideas...

The Utah Lake bridge would utilize stacked-stone skin in native rock colors with lots of coated, weather resistant iron and copper details. Four wide lanes of traffic with occasional bulge-outs for clearing accidents, etc would allow for regular non-stop traffic flow. Light rail would also cross on the south side of the bridge with a wide pedestrian walk/bike/run area completing the south side.

A special floating marina & water park could be situated somewhere in mid-span, accessible only by pedestrian or light rail; no car traffic. Self contained restrooms could be positioned at strategic points. The bridge would feature all solar-powered lighting and an Iconic copper-clad drawbridge in mid-lake.

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m126/goldcntry/clipart/UtahBridge1.jpg
http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m126/goldcntry/clipart/UtahBridge2.jpg

Just a thought...

Happy Valley Freak
Sep 25, 2009, 10:47 PM
If there's going to be a bridge, and I'm of mixed feelings on one, might as well make it nice/interesting/unique to look at... ...so, here's a little bit of my ideas...

The Utah Lake bridge would utilize stacked-stone skin in native rock colors with lots of coated, weather resistant iron and copper details. Four wide lanes of traffic with occasional bulge-outs for clearing accidents, etc would allow for regular non-stop traffic flow. Light rail would also cross on the south side of the bridge with a wide pedestrian walk/bike/run area completing the south side.

A special floating marina & water park could be situated somewhere in mid-span, accessible only by pedestrian or light rail; no car traffic. Self contained restrooms could be positioned at strategic points. The bridge would feature all solar-powered lighting and an Iconic copper-clad drawbridge in mid-lake.

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m126/goldcntry/clipart/UtahBridge1.jpg
http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m126/goldcntry/clipart/UtahBridge2.jpg

Just a thought...

:tup: I like this a hell of a lot better than that gigantic overpass they proposed! It's very interesting. and It'll be something iconic and unique to the the area. If they're gonna put something across the lake, make it beautiful, and make it compliment the natural scenery. :)

Orlando
Sep 29, 2009, 6:33 PM
I believe this was mentioned in previous posts, but here is more information about the Pleasant Grove Hotel. I wish this was in downtown Provo. This is another reason why Ogden has a better downtown than Provo.

300 room Pleasant Grove Hotel to resume construction.

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa5279/is_20090914/ai_n35707900/

Wasatch_One
Sep 29, 2009, 7:13 PM
:previous:
Provo is getting its convention center and there is a rumor that Marriott may be rebuilding its property on Center St next to the CC and increase it's height from 9 to 12 stories. It is also rumored that a second hotel will be built in close proximity to the downtown cc (Hilton?)

I like Ogden's downtown, a lot. From an historic architectural standpoint, it beats Provo hands down, however, Provo has more business development happening currently with the recent 7 story Wells Fargo Center and 9 story Zions Bank FC. Supposedly, through a private/public (city helping) partnership, the University tower will break ground within the next year or two and will be an 11 story office building and adjoining condos. At that point, I think Provo's downtown really starts to take off and would be second to DT SLC in the state of Utah.

Provo has the momentum.

SLC Projects
Sep 29, 2009, 7:13 PM
:previous:
Ten-stories? I thought it was going to be Nine-stories? I counted Nine floors on the latest rendering. :shrug:

TonyAnderson
Sep 29, 2009, 9:04 PM
:previous:
Provo is getting its convention center and there is a rumor that Marriott may be rebuilding its property on Center St next to the CC and increase it's height from 9 to 12 stories. It is also rumored that a second hotel will be built in close proximity to the downtown cc (Hilton?)

I like Ogden's downtown, a lot. From an historic architectural standpoint, it beats Provo hands down, however, Provo has more business development happening currently with the recent 7 story Wells Fargo Center and 9 story Zions Bank FC. Supposedly, through a private/public (city helping) partnership, the University tower will break ground within the next year or two and will be an 11 story office building and adjoining condos. At that point, I think Provo's downtown really starts to take off and would be second to DT SLC in the state of Utah.

Provo has the momentum.

I agree somewhat. Still, there's a lot more to a downtown than just office buildings. Ogden, especially along the 3 block stretch of 25th street, has way more going on - cafe's, restaurants, etc. They also have things going on all the time at the city building and amphitheater area. It can be quite a vibrant place. That's where Provo needs to improve.

delts145
Sep 30, 2009, 12:44 PM
Perhaps, some of the Provo leadership needs to get past the assumption that downtown/urban living is somehow inherently sub-standard or a little less than morally ideal.

delts145
Sep 30, 2009, 12:47 PM
Corridor open house set for Wednesday

LEHI — Residents can learn more about the Mountain View Corridor project at 2100 North at an open house Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. at the Lehi Legacy Recreation Center, 123 N. Center.

Brief project presentations will be given at 6:30 and 7:30 p.m.

The Mountain View Corridor will run along the western side of Salt Lake and Utah counties — from Interstate 80 to Lehi Main Street. A side project is the creation of 2100 North in Lehi, which will connect Redwood Road to the 1200 West exit of Interstate 15.

"There's a partial existing road, and we're going to take that existing road and extend it out to Redwood Road," Utah Department of Transportation spokesman Scott Thompson said.

At the open house, the public can learn about construction, schedules, detours and impacts.

Construction on the corridor will begin in November.

— Laura Hancock, The Deseret News

delts145
Sep 30, 2009, 1:02 PM
Paper company looks to expand in Utah County


http://www.heraldextra.com/news/local/article_dc5c58ee-d6d4-557b-8327-e6188ead63ab.html

A privateley held paper products company from New York may be close to announcing plans to come to Utah County, bringing up to 250 jobs in its initial build-out...

...The Project, when fully built out, is expected to create between 1000 and 1250 jobs...

What makes Utah attractive is its location as a distribution point for the company, access to rail and Interstate 15, a strong labor force, and available land and other resources, he said...

...The potential of having a paper products company in southern Utah County is also atracting several other businesses to locate there, including a natural resources company and a manufacturer, Ellertson said.

.

TonyAnderson
Oct 1, 2009, 2:46 AM
Perhaps, some of the Provo leadership needs to get past the assumption that downtown/urban living is somehow inherently sub-standard or a little less than morally ideal.

With the new Zion's downtown, Convention Center, and probably additional hotel in the works, and perhaps University Tower, and the fact that Provo is getting pretty filled out, I could see it start to develop more residential downtown as it will have become a much more dynamic place.

delts145
Oct 3, 2009, 12:08 PM
Leaders remain mum on rumored Utah County plant

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705333828/Leaders-mum-on-Utah-Co-plant.html

PROVO — County leaders maintained their silence Thursday regarding an apparently planned paper plant for southwestern Utah County, while calling a press conference to instead explain how the area has been planned for future growth.

Up to 750,000 people could someday live in the Goshen Valley now accessed by U.S. 6 and state Route 68, Utah County Commissioner Larry Ellertson said...

.

Orlando
Oct 5, 2009, 5:17 AM
Someone please kill this idea fast! Someone please tell these unwise citizens that they can't expect the government to bail them out!

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705333815/Bridge-debate-creates-waves.html

Boiseguy
Oct 5, 2009, 6:07 AM
the bridge across utah lake to support sprawl is the most absurd thing I've ever seen...
If you don't like your 90 minute commute.. move to provo
I realize the wasatch front is disconnected in many ways due to natural terrain.. but seriously.. this is ridiculous.. the cost of a bridge could build numerous urban projects in provo orem...

the comparisons between ogden and provo are interesting.. I've expressed my opinions in the past that ogden is by far the one with real potential.. and this is a prime example.. Provo may be getting more businesses and jobs but projects like this bridge actually being considered shows to me they have no interest in creating a dense urban fabric.. they simply wish to accomodate the status quo(sprawl) in order to support the new businesses

delts145
Oct 5, 2009, 12:37 PM
Hopefully the public opinion trend toward continuation of the restoration and protection of the Lake will keep building. This attitude by certain developers that because a million people will someday occupy the Cedar Valley and therefore the bridge is a no brainer, shows nothing but narrow mindedness and probably a lot of self serving profit potential for their development companies.

There is more than enough room for growth south of Provo to support a vibrant and impressive CBD in Provo itself. I don't argue the point that Cedar Valley will grow, but it should be planned in such a way as to be connected with a more natural hub, such as Eagle Mountain and Saratoga Springs themselves, or even Lehi, NOT PROVO!

I would definitely consider living on the West side of Utah Lake. The view lots and lakeside lots are stunning. But, if I were to take a job in Provo, no one should feel compelled to accomodate me because of my commute. If I take a job in Provo then I should live in Provo, or at the very least, somewhere to the immediate south, such as Springville or Spanish Fork, where there is a large amount beautiful views and affordable housing. It's like a big DUH. This is simply developers with visions of big profits dancing in their greedy heads.

Each day some 4 to 6 health care workers visit our home in order to assist in taking care of my Father. Almost all of these professionals live in the Saratoga Springs/Eagle Mountain area. There only complaint is being taken care of, and that is to accomodate the traffic in and around the immediate area. This means better access to I-15 and various surface streets in their immediate surroundings. Not one of them feels compelled to have easier access to Provo. All of their work is in the North Utah Valley/South Salt Lake Valley area.

I realize that city leaders in Provo and Orem are going to have to be a little more creative with their commercial growth plans for the future, without a direct bridge across Utah Lake. But the attractive living of Utah Valley is greatly enchanced for the future, if we treat Utah Lake with the utmost respect for it's potential beauty, not by scarring it with a disgusting overpass.

Would we put a freeway through Little Cottonwood Canyon, so that Heber Valley developers can have a heyday with their new found easy access to Salt Lake Valley???

If the population of Cedar Valley becomes so big that a corridor UNDER the Lake makes sense, then so be it. Let's think about that point for the future, when a tunnel would be justified. Until then, our concern should be how to continue restoring Utah Lake to it's true potential. Utah Valley should continue to reach for it's potential as arguably one of a handful of the most beautifully located metroscapes in the world, not the easiest ways to profit off of and consequently despoil it's beauty. CEO's and their high tech minnions should want to live in Utah Valley because of it's incredible beauty, not because they can live in Cedar Valley and commute to Provo.


You don't have to be a tree hugger or a card carrying environmentalist to realize that an overpass is out of place here.
http://www.willieholdman.com/images/large/100370106410.jpg

Boiseguy
Oct 5, 2009, 3:38 PM
:previous: Great post.. couldn't agree more

urbanboy
Oct 7, 2009, 10:58 PM
Utah County looks to Goshen Valley for extra space

or better yet:

The "LDS" mormon church along with it's followers in Government positions and UDOT (of course) promote unethical sprawl for financial gain:

...The development plan, which the county drafted in co-operation with the Mountainland Association of Governments and the Utah Department of Transportation, encompasses 60,000 acres on the west side of Utah Lake. If the area were in Salt Lake County, it would stretch from North Temple Street in Salt Lake City down to Draper.
About one-third of the property is owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which operates welfare farms. County officials say the church fully supports the development efforts, which simplifies the process as there are fewer landowners to deal with.

http://www.sltrib.com/slc/ci_13505691

Looks like the "Green" and "Sustainable" in the City Creek Center concept was a PR campaign after all. :hell:

Future Mayor
Oct 7, 2009, 11:20 PM
I'm not necessarily defending it, but with the location of the proposed new manufacturing facility included in that planning area. It will provide a community to live and work for those that work at the plant or in support businesses.

Yes I know someone will argue that the new manufacturing facility could be built somewhere else, but that is the site the manufacturer wanted because it has certain characteristics that they demanded in a site.

The manufacturing facility will employ upwards of 1500 individuals if I am not mistaken and will be a clean facility. While it will manufacture paper type products it will be post refinement manufacturing and the "raw" materials will be shipped in on-time manufacturing mostly by train.

Again I am not arguing for or against said master plan, but with the facility it is providing housing opportunities for those that will be employed there, reducing the impact on other streets and reduce emissions due to less travel. And while it is in essence a new town or population center the lay out of the plan is very much along the lines of new urbanism and includes an extensive trail system, extensive transit system(UTA has been involved with the planning efforts as well) and has several commercial nodes that promote walkability.

Dealing myself with the issues of attempting to effectively and ethically create a master plan for a yet to be developed area, while promoting preservation and open space efforts, transit and transportation needs, retail needs, while not taking away rights of property owners I can see why the county is on board in a sense because planning with one or two property owners is so much easier and the property owner sees the big picture (like Kennecott land) as opposed to each property owner only seeing their 1 acre or 10 acre universe.

Orlando
Oct 8, 2009, 12:20 AM
Utah County looks to Goshen Valley for extra space

or better yet:

The "LDS" mormon church along with it's followers in Government positions and UDOT (of course) promote unethical sprawl for financial gain:

Looks like the "Green" and "Sustainable" in the City Creek Center concept was a PR campaign after all. :hell:

Please don't shout like this. And, please don't exaggurate or generalize against the LDS church. I understand what you are upset about, and I believe that there are a lot in the LDS church in Utah, who do not understand the adverse affects of sprawl. The LDS church does not get into environmental or political policies at church. I do know, since I am LDS, that they believe that it is everyone's responsibility 'to be good stewards of the land'. Some just don't understand or have the education regarding the specifics of what that means. And, it doesn't mean that the LDS church as a whole is greedy and environmentally unfriendly either. I do symphathize with what you are saying, and would want to do something to deter this bad spread of development regardless of who owns the land.

urbanboy
Oct 8, 2009, 12:35 AM
Please don't shout like this. And, please don't exaggurate or generalize against the LDS church. I understand, what you are upset about, and I believe that there are a lot in the LDS church in Utah, who do not understand the adverse affects of sprawl. The LDS church does not get into environmental or political policies at church. I do know, since I am LDS, that they believe that it is everyone's responsibility 'to be good stewards of the land'. Some, just don't understand or have the education regarding the specifics of what that means. And, it doesn't mean that the LDS church as a whole is greedy and environmentally unfriendly either. I do symphathize and would want to do something to deter this bad spread of development regardless of who owns the land.


I wasn't shouting, I always use size 5 font for article titles. The second title was my own interpretation, although, I can see how you might of thought I was shouting instead.

TonyAnderson
Oct 8, 2009, 1:28 AM
Please don't shout like this. And, please don't exaggurate or generalize against the LDS church. I understand what you are upset about, and I believe that there are a lot in the LDS church in Utah, who do not understand the adverse affects of sprawl. The LDS church does not get into environmental or political policies at church. I do know, since I am LDS, that they believe that it is everyone's responsibility 'to be good stewards of the land'. Some just don't understand or have the education regarding the specifics of what that means. And, it doesn't mean that the LDS church as a whole is greedy and environmentally unfriendly either. I do symphathize with what you are saying, and would want to do something to deter this bad spread of development regardless of who owns the land.

Well, Utah Valley is growing like crazy. Either sprawl or create a Chinese like city I guess.

WeST
Oct 8, 2009, 1:40 AM
Urbanboy you are a piece of work as usual. Can people imagine the out cry if the Mormon Church refused to sell the land because they were against urban sprawl? Can you imagine if they did that will multiple land holdings over the last 100 years? Sure UB would be singing their praises (in that area), but there would be many thousands, if not millions, decrying how the church is pushing their agenda on others. People would demand that the cities take it through imminent domain, so that they can grow as they wish.

i-215
Oct 8, 2009, 5:09 AM
UH oh .....

Time for Cool Whip Man again!

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l183/utradioguide/cool.jpg

i-215
Oct 8, 2009, 5:11 AM
In other news .... um....

The big bank building on University Avenue is looking snappy. I drove by it the other day and it looks nearly finished. Really adds to Provo's skyline. If Provo has a skyline, that is.

goldcntry
Oct 8, 2009, 2:56 PM
ummm... a horizon-line perhaps?? :sly:

i-215
Oct 8, 2009, 3:24 PM
Well the worst thing that could happen is if a developer dropped a 30-story in. It would dwarf the rest of the view. I suppose NuSkin already does that some. If we could get about 5-6 more of these bank-sized buildings (7 stories, etc) then I think it'd begin to look quite balanced and nice.

TonyAnderson
Oct 8, 2009, 8:15 PM
ummm... a horizon-line perhaps?? :sly:

It's kind of a L-line - everything's on Center Street and University Ave. The new convention center however, won't be on either of those streets.

http://www.tutorialmega.com/pictures/zions26.jpg

Orlando
Oct 10, 2009, 4:01 PM
This is a children's museum that will be built at Thanksgiving Point.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2612/3997697827_79ef3557f1_o.jpg

http://www.ffkr.com/#boards/museum_of_curiosity

Wasatch_One
Oct 14, 2009, 4:18 PM
Timp Harley-Davidson in Lindon files Ch. 11 bankruptcy

http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/editorial/5/a1/568/5a1568a7-f1bd-5579-95e0-9c8b8164560e.image.jpg?_dc=1255501553
The Daily Herald

http://www.heraldextra.com/business/local/article_4442e458-f2c3-5dcd-badb-d464fdced575.html

Grace Leong - Daily Herald | Posted: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 12:30 am

The owner of Timpanogos Harley-Davidson in Lindon filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection to stall an acrimonious legal battle over millions of dollars in alleged unpaid debts to several lenders including Nu Skin founder Blake Roney.

Tupelo Investments LLC, which owns the 60,000 square-foot Lindon motorcycle dealership and a motorcycle-themed restaurant called Marley's at 555 S. Geneva Road, filed for bankruptcy last month to avoid transferring the dealership to the lenders, which include Roney's investment group, Scrub Oaks LLC; Walter "Charlie" Openshaw; McKell & Associates; and RRD Investment Co.

In bankruptcy court documents, the lenders claimed the bankruptcy filing was made "in bad faith" and that Timpanogos Harley-Davidson owner David Tuomisto reneged on an agreement to transfer the dealership to them after getting bailout assistance to keep the dealership's assets from being seized and its business shut down by another lender, Harley-Davidson Credit Corp.

Court filings show the list of creditors include: Harley Davidson Credit, which is owed $4.3 million; Monarch Recreation Sales is owed $760,922; Scrub Oaks is owed $400,000; the Utah State Tax Commission is owed $151,363; and millions more owed to hundreds of other businesses and individuals.

"I was one of the investors in Scrub Oaks that approved the $400,000 loan to Dave so he can try to save the place," Roney said Tuesday. "Dave's my friend. Between the dream of the building, which he spent all of his money on, and the bad economy, it was just a collision that didn't work."

Tuomisto declined comment on the bankruptcy filing and the lawsuits. But Rick Story, the Lindon dealership's general manager said several offers have been made to acquire it.

Potential buyer Joe Timmons, owner of Salt Lake City-based Intermountain Harley-Davidson Co., declined to comment on the status of the buyout.

"Timmons has an offer on it with a contingency," Story said. "There are four other offers by local people attempting to get the franchise. The building is so unique that it doesn't make sense to have anything but a Harley-Davidson dealership in it."

Tuomisto's financial problems began mounting after his company, Timpanogos Fruit Growers Association, ran into problems finishing the Lindon dealership, which he blamed on substantial cost overruns resulting from fraud committed by his original contractor.

To make its construction deadline, Tupelo, in court documents, said it had to help Fruit Growers finance the completion of the building, instead of making payments to its lender, Harley-Davidson Credit.

But Fruit Growers later defaulted on its loan obligations to Far West Bank, causing the bank to foreclose on the Lindon building in June. A month later, Tuomisto sued the bank in Fourth District Court in American Fork.

In spring this year, Tuomisto began negotiations to sell the dealership and the restaurant to the lenders after defaulting on $3.12 million in loans to them and after foreclosure proceedings on the building began. But talks stalled, and only resumed in June when Tuomisto turned to the lenders again for bailout assistance after Harley-Davidson Credit sued to shut down the dealership and seize its assets, forcing him to agree to pay $400,000 by July 8 to settle the suit.

According to court documents, the lenders were initially reluctant to "throw good money after bad," but later agreed to help Tuomisto if he agreed to finish negotiations to sell the dealership and the restaurant.

But Tuomisto, after benefiting from the bailout, on Sept. 1, tried to back out of transferring the dealership allegedly by lying to the manufacturer Harley-Davidson Motor Co. that the lenders had terminated the transfer, and then filing for bankruptcy two days later after being threatened with a lawsuit by the lenders, according to attorneys for the lenders.

Tuomisto, in court documents, argued that the sale agreement "undervalues" Tupelo's assets, which include the Harley-Davidson dealership, inventory, service center, and parts department, a Harley-Davidson merchandise store, a restaurant, an outdoor safety-riding course, as well as the Marley brand and the Timpanogos Harley-Davidson brand.

He said he believes the company can "obtain superior value for its estate through either continued operation of its business, or through a sale or equity investment."

Attorneys for Harley-Davidson Credit are suing to dismiss Tupelo's bankruptcy which they say was filed "in bad faith" to nullify the sale to the lenders, and the dispute between the lenders and Tupelo is now the subject of an adversary proceeding in bankruptcy court.

They alleged that Tupelo's petition is "not to protect the company as a going concern, but to give Tuomisto "greater leverage to negotiate a personal buyout or employment contract for his own personal benefit."

They also alleged concerns that much of Tupelo's financial reporting has been "contradictory and inaccurate" and that its revenues are "significantly below budgeted projections, and that there will be continuing losses and diminution of the estate."

SLC Projects
Oct 14, 2009, 4:42 PM
:previous:
That sucks. So they were open for what.....a year?

delts145
Oct 15, 2009, 12:54 PM
A bridge too far? Proposed Utah Lake span stirs debate

By Donald W. Meyers
The Salt Lake Tribune

http://images.travelpod.com/users/alifebeinglived/3.1252857598.utah-valley-with-utah-lake-in-the-background.jpg
travelpod.com

Orem » While construction could begin as soon as next year on a nearly eight-mile-long bridge across Utah Lake, environmental groups and politicians are lining up for and against the undertaking.

Conservative state Sen. Margaret Dayton supports the bridge's construction but it's opposed by the Sierra Club's Western Regional Director Marc Heileson, who doesn't see bridging Utah Lake as a solution to Utah Valley's growth and traffic problems. The environmentalist fears it would become a "feeding tube for sprawl."

Heileson told participants in the Utah Lake Symposium the solution is to encourage mass transit systems to extend out to Eagle Mountain and Saratoga Springs.

"Do we want balanced and sustainable growth or a bridge to nowhere?" Heileson asked a crowd of more than 100 people assembled Wednesday at Utah Valley University's library for the symposium.

Heileson spoke during a presentation on a traffic proposal for the lake.

Dayton, R-Orem, said Heileson's plan wouldn't fly with her constituents, who prefer large backyards rather than common areas in their neighborhoods. Lots would be smaller in a more walkable community, which is favored by Heileson.

Utah Lake Crossing, Inc., a private company, has proposed building the bridge between Saratoga Springs and Orem's 800 North to allow people to avoid a traffic chokepoint on Lehi's Main street. The company plans to finance the project through tolls.

The bridge's cost is unknown.

Construction could start in 2010. No federal environmental review is needed because it's proposed on state land.

Instead, that job falls to the state's Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands. The division has begun reviewing the plan, and eventually the Utah Lake Commission will weigh in on it, said Dave Grierson, the division's sovereign lands director.

The public comment period closes Oct. 25, but there will be hearings Oct. 29 in Provo and Nov. 11 in Saratoga Springs.

Sam Rushforth, Utah Valley University's dean of science and health, said Utah Lake Crossing was invited to Wednesday's meeting but declined.

"We were kind of hoping to have both sides of the issue here today," Rushforth said.

Michael Mills, the state's June sucker-recovery coordinator, said a Utah Lake Crossing representative said his group wants its public participation limited to the state application process.

Heileson said the bridge would further continue to add to suburban sprawl and traffic problems, and trigger a downward spiral into gridlock and pollution. The solution: Encourage development around transportation hubs such as FrontRunner stations and develop mass transit to reach out from there to serve walkable communities. He said it is already happening in Salt Lake County's Daybreak development.

Heileson said it would be more practical than expecting Eagle Mountain residents to drive around 7,700-foot-tall Lake Mountain to reach a toll bridge on the lake.

Reed Price, executive director of the Utah Lake Commission, said the group did not anticipate this project coming up so soon and the lake's master plan does not address the subject. According to the group's Web site, they could eventually take a position on the bridge.

How to comment,
In person » 6 p.m. Oct. 29, Room 2500, Utah County Health and Justice Building, 151 S. University Ave. in Provo

There will also be a public meeting from 6-8 p.m. Nov. 11 at Saratoga Shores Elementary School in Saratoga Springs.

By mail » Utah Lake Bridge Crossing,

c/o Dave Grierson,

Forestry, Fire and State Lands

P.O. Box 145703,

Salt Lake City, Utah 84114-5703.

Existing toll may show demand for toll bridge across lake

http://www.heraldextra.com/news/local/article_7c328d37-9266-5ca5-a902-ffdefd79c8b0.html

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b7/Utah_Lake_prove_map.jpg/407px-Utah_Lake_prove_map.jpg
wikipedia.org

.

Orlando
Oct 15, 2009, 5:18 PM
:previous: Please kill this idea fast!:whip:

urbanboy
Oct 15, 2009, 6:12 PM
This proposed bridge is not a solution, it will only further the problem and create more gridlock. Can you imagine what would happen to I-15 where these two roads would meet? Also, this will only promote uncontrollable growth, of which Eagle Mountain, Saratoga Springs, and Utah County as a whole is unprepared for, likely ending up as a sprawled mess. Transit oriented walkable communities is a real solution.

delts145
Oct 16, 2009, 11:16 AM
I-15 bridge set for installation

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705337066/I-15-bridge-set-for-installation.html

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/midres/1950750.jpg
Illustration shows the diverging diamond interchange UDOT is building in American Fork. (Udot)

...But it's not just any bridge. The new American Fork Main Street bridge over I-15 will be the longest and heaviest concrete bridge in the state.

The precast girders, or support beams, are 192 feet long. It will weigh 4,356 tons...

...Installation of the bridge will be such a process that UDOT is ready for spectators. People may watch on Friday night and Saturday morning. Parking will be available at the park-and-ride lot southwest of the freeway. A flagger will be posted to help spectators enter a viewing area beginning at 9:30 p.m. Friday.

"Seating will not be provided," a UDOT notice says. "Please dress warmly."...

.

jtrent77
Oct 17, 2009, 4:04 AM
Cool photo concept...although I hope the bridge will be wide enough to encompass the upcoming expansion of the freeway (since the freeway shown is the current width and not the upcoming width)

Wasatch_One
Oct 17, 2009, 6:13 AM
I am pretty sure they have taken that into consideration already... I sure its part of the freeway plan... it just needed to be done sooner than the actual I-15 reconstruction

delts145
Oct 17, 2009, 10:51 AM
Yeah, I noticed that too. It's a pretty obvious oversight on the part of those that produced the rendering. The remake and expansion of the freeway itself through that area will follow in the very near future.

VelvetElvis
Oct 17, 2009, 4:06 PM
A bridge across Utah Lake is a horrible idea. Madison, WI is surrounded by 2 lakes, neither of which is quite as big as Utah Lake, and they have found no reason to build a bridge straight across either of those bodies. The natural, geographic boundaries in that area have helped create a great urban experience for a city its size. Madison is about the same size as Provo metro and Boise metro but the urban experience there is on a level all its own. There are large, growing populations on the opposite sides of the lakes, but that hasn't forced them to build a bridge! This isn't just an environmental issue, it is also an incredible waste of money. Someone's brother-in-law must stand to make a lot of money from this thing. Ridiculous...

SLC Projects
Oct 17, 2009, 4:58 PM
"American Fork Bridge Moving"
ml9v6M-mlPM
I was there last night from around 11:30 to 1:00 this morning. While I was there the bridge was over the freeway, but crews were having a hard time and the wheels kept sinking in the dirt. A few times the bridge had to back up and then move forward again. This went on for about an hour. But here is a video I put together of what I got. It moves very slowly so you will need to look at a object {the spot lights in the background or the workers standing} to see it move. Enjoy. :tup:

delts145
Oct 24, 2009, 1:14 PM
A bridge across Utah Lake is a horrible idea. Madison, WI is surrounded by 2 lakes, neither of which is quite as big as Utah Lake, and they have found no reason to build a bridge straight across either of those bodies. The natural, geographic boundaries in that area have helped create a great urban experience for a city its size. Madison is about the same size as Provo metro and Boise metro but the urban experience there is on a level all its own. There are large, growing populations on the opposite sides of the lakes, but that hasn't forced them to build a bridge! This isn't just an environmental issue, it is also an incredible waste of money. Someone's brother-in-law must stand to make a lot of money from this thing. Ridiculous...


Ditto to that Velvet. Very good points about Madison!

delts145
Oct 24, 2009, 1:19 PM
Road makeover is ahead of schedule

http://www.sltrib.com/closeup/ci_13610760

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site297/2009/1021/20091021__uco_springvilleroad_1022~1_GALLERY.jpg
Traffic passes under a new bridge as construction work progresses recently on a reconstructed 400 South interchange in Springville. (Jim Urquhart / The Salt Lake Tribune)

...At this point, barring any major construction delays, UDOT officials look to re-open the road and unveil a new freeway interchange with a week to spare before Black Friday -- the day after Thanksgiving and the Christmas shopping season's unofficial first day...

...The $89 million project required closing down 400 South between Main Street and 1750 West to have work done in the time frame. ...

.

delts145
Oct 27, 2009, 10:49 AM
Hearing set on Utah Lake bridge proposal

PROVO — What do you think about the Utah Lake bridge proposal? Who decides whether it will go through? How will the bridge affect you?

The Utah Lake Commission will hold a public hearing at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Utah County Health and Justice Building (151 S. University Ave.), Room 2500, to discuss these types of questions and more concerning a possible bridge over Utah Lake. The bridge would connect 800 North in Orem to just north of Pelican Point in Saratoga Springs.

There will be presentations on the bridge proposal and the process it must go through with an opportunity for public comments.

The Utah Lake Commission will make a recommendation to the Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands as to whether or not the proposal should be granted and thus would like to hear any comments the public may have.

For more information about the proposal or the meeting, go online to www.utahlakecommission.org.

— Sara Lenz

.

delts145
Oct 29, 2009, 12:02 PM
I took a drive on Redwood Rd. Monday. The new stretch between Bangerter and Lehi/Saratoga's Commercial junction is a huge improvement now. They're definitely going to need this expansion, especially with the advent of the new NSA Center. Kind of strange how that little stretch going through Riverton's old Main is still the old country two laner. Anyone know how long Riverton will be able to keep it that way? It's kind of charming, but I was wondering what kind of back up in traffic it creates, especially during rush hours.

I found this article below almost amusing. Another little interesting development in the history of this weird Midtown Village Project. :haha: :shrug:

Midtown Village gets new business tenant


http://www.heraldextra.com/business/local/article_565dc435-16c2-5c10-999d-79f46f25cd13.html

http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/editorial/9/6d/4e0/96d4e03d-4bb4-580c-ad33-ccb0eeca147f.image.jpg?_dc=1256799702
Mario Ruiz/Daily Herald

.

Orlando
Oct 29, 2009, 5:46 PM
:previous: And, what does this have to do with Market Station??

TonyAnderson
Oct 29, 2009, 6:20 PM
I'm sure he meant Midtown Village. Interesting story. Midtown Village looks so close to being finished - such a shame with all the legal battles.

Orlando
Nov 2, 2009, 7:28 PM
:previous: That was just a bad location for that. People who want density prefer it because of walkable proximity to urban lifestyle amenities, ie. resatuurants, cafes, bars, shops, galleries, etc. With this location you have to drive on State Street, which is haphazard random strip mall stuff, to get anywhere.

Orlando
Nov 2, 2009, 7:30 PM
The first ever LEED certified school building will be built in Pleasant Grove. It will have solar panels, and virtual & hands-on education/discovery about the building and the environment/world.

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa5279/is_20091019/ai_n39392724/?tag=content;col1

StevenF
Nov 2, 2009, 11:49 PM
:previous: That was just a bad location for that. People who want density prefer it because of walkable proximity to urban lifestyle amenities, ie. resatuurants, cafes, bars, shops, galleries, etc. With this location you have to drive on State Street, which is haphazard random strip mall stuff, to get anywhere.

it may be a bad location now but if it is finished and other projects like it are built around it, then the other things will be put in to make it a better location.

i-215
Nov 3, 2009, 2:33 AM
Still a bad location. Read Jane Jacobs. Something like that needs to be in an area with small, walkable blocks ... not suburban Megablocks.

We get the worst of both worlds ... a terrible location for an urban setting, and the destruction of one of our major north-south car arterials to boot!

At minimum, Put the urban on Orem Blvd instead.

SLC Projects
Nov 3, 2009, 5:32 PM
it may be a bad location now but if it is finished and other projects like it are built around it, then the other things will be put in to make it a better location.

:previous:
That's what I have been kind of hoping as well. Maybe in 5-10 years this area will improve then what it is now. :tup:

shakman
Nov 3, 2009, 6:02 PM
You have to start somewhere and somehow. Starting is always the difficult part.

Boiseguy
Nov 3, 2009, 9:07 PM
you have to start somewhere, but before you can start throwing up dense urban living options, there needs to be attractions and sense of place in that area BEFORE you start throwing big money into residential units.
An area needs to be an attraction first to drive demand for living there.. So if you're trying to sell urbanity in the realestate market.. urbanity better already be there in some form or another. this is where the city needs to get on board...

i-215
Nov 3, 2009, 11:52 PM
Fine, I'm bursting to say this ... so I will.

Midtown Village is the biggest SCAM Orem's fallen for, to boot. This development is nothing more than somebody's strip mall, with an apartment that violated a whole bunch of city code slammed on top.

How does a developer get city help, all the variances in the world they want, and good P.R.? Easy. Label their stupid development as "new urbanism" or "smart growth."

This isn't smart growth. There isn't ANYTHING smart about it. 100% of the people living there will drive. It's a terrible location for urbanization. It's on a MAJOR state highway, with semi-limited access (in terms of signals). Good luck getting UDOT to agree to add an extra light or two mid-block on US-89. Ain't gonna happen. We tried very hard to get a pedestrian signal on US-189, after a BYU student died. In the end they just erased our crosswalk. UDOT told us they were more interested in adding a median wall with a fence to prevent jaywalk/crosswalk fatalities. As UDOT should! There's a place for accessibility and a place for mobility. A state highway is a place for mobility!

You don't put a center of future urbanism on a state highway. That's really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, stupid.

This isn't urbanism. This isn't smart growth. This is a developer who just wanted variances to put WAY more units on his piece of property than zoning allowed. If we're going to allow any dummy who stamps his site plan "new urbanism" provisional zoning, what's the point of zoning?

Oh well. Serves him right. Went bankrupt and now Orem's eyesore is the city's punishment for not sticking to their own municipal code.

Hopefully when the city eventually builds it's REAL downtown area, it'll choose a smarter site, with a smarter site plan. Preferably by a rail stop and away from a major arterial.

Phew! Glad to get that off my chest.

kpexpress
Nov 6, 2009, 7:56 PM
Fine, I'm bursting to say this ... so I will.

Midtown Village is the biggest SCAM Orem's fallen for, to boot. This development is nothing more than somebody's strip mall, with an apartment that violated a whole bunch of city code slammed on top.

How does a developer get city help, all the variances in the world they want, and good P.R.? Easy. Label their stupid development as "new urbanism" or "smart growth."

This isn't smart growth. There isn't ANYTHING smart about it. 100% of the people living there will drive. It's a terrible location for urbanization. It's on a MAJOR state highway, with semi-limited access (in terms of signals). Good luck getting UDOT to agree to add an extra light or two mid-block on US-89. Ain't gonna happen. We tried very hard to get a pedestrian signal on US-189, after a BYU student died. In the end they just erased our crosswalk. UDOT told us they were more interested in adding a median wall with a fence to prevent jaywalk/crosswalk fatalities. As UDOT should! There's a place for accessibility and a place for mobility. A state highway is a place for mobility!

You don't put a center of future urbanism on a state highway. That's really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, stupid.

This isn't urbanism. This isn't smart growth. This is a developer who just wanted variances to put WAY more units on his piece of property than zoning allowed. If we're going to allow any dummy who stamps his site plan "new urbanism" provisional zoning, what's the point of zoning?

Oh well. Serves him right. Went bankrupt and now Orem's eyesore is the city's punishment for not sticking to their own municipal code.

Hopefully when the city eventually builds it's REAL downtown area, it'll choose a smarter site, with a smarter site plan. Preferably by a rail stop and away from a major arterial.

Phew! Glad to get that off my chest.

Well said! I agree. Orem is such a crazy place; endless stripmalls and unwalkable neighborhoods completely disconnected from the regional context.

I used to live at Timpview Village on State near the Library, and I felt like I lived in the most walkable part of the city and would walk often to the library, stores, parks, etc. The funny thing is that whenever someone found out that I lived there, they would ask if its ghetto. I think there is an interesting stigma in Orem about walkable neighborhoods and urban density; it's such a auto-oriented town....and the traffic is horrible.

I hope that people in UT county will embrace urban density and rethink the idea of "new urbanism" (new isolationism).

TonyAnderson
Nov 6, 2009, 8:05 PM
Fine, I'm bursting to say this ... so I will.

Midtown Village is the biggest SCAM Orem's fallen for, to boot. This development is nothing more than somebody's strip mall, with an apartment that violated a whole bunch of city code slammed on top.

How does a developer get city help, all the variances in the world they want, and good P.R.? Easy. Label their stupid development as "new urbanism" or "smart growth."

This isn't smart growth. There isn't ANYTHING smart about it. 100% of the people living there will drive. It's a terrible location for urbanization. It's on a MAJOR state highway, with semi-limited access (in terms of signals). Good luck getting UDOT to agree to add an extra light or two mid-block on US-89. Ain't gonna happen. We tried very hard to get a pedestrian signal on US-189, after a BYU student died. In the end they just erased our crosswalk. UDOT told us they were more interested in adding a median wall with a fence to prevent jaywalk/crosswalk fatalities. As UDOT should! There's a place for accessibility and a place for mobility. A state highway is a place for mobility!

You don't put a center of future urbanism on a state highway. That's really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, stupid.

This isn't urbanism. This isn't smart growth. This is a developer who just wanted variances to put WAY more units on his piece of property than zoning allowed. If we're going to allow any dummy who stamps his site plan "new urbanism" provisional zoning, what's the point of zoning?

Oh well. Serves him right. Went bankrupt and now Orem's eyesore is the city's punishment for not sticking to their own municipal code.

Hopefully when the city eventually builds it's REAL downtown area, it'll choose a smarter site, with a smarter site plan. Preferably by a rail stop and away from a major arterial.

Phew! Glad to get that off my chest.

I'm really starting to think you don't like Midtown Village.

esirhgih
Nov 6, 2009, 8:46 PM
Well said! I agree. Orem is such a crazy place; endless stripmalls and unwalkable neighborhoods completely disconnected from the regional context.

I used to live at Timpview Village on State near the Library, and I felt like I lived in the most walkable part of the city and would walk often to the library, stores, parks, etc. The funny thing is that whenever someone found out that I lived there, they would ask if its ghetto. I think there is an interesting stigma in Orem about walkable neighborhoods and urban density; it's such a auto-oriented town....and the traffic is horrible.

I hope that people in UT county will embrace urban density and rethink the idea of "new urbanism" (new isolationism).

I'm just glad that they went out of business before they started similar messes in Clearfield and Ogden as originally planned.

Orlando
Nov 6, 2009, 8:56 PM
Fine, I'm bursting to say this ... so I will.

Midtown Village is the biggest SCAM Orem's fallen for, to boot. This development is nothing more than somebody's strip mall, with an apartment that violated a whole bunch of city code slammed on top.

How does a developer get city help, all the variances in the world they want, and good P.R.? Easy. Label their stupid development as "new urbanism" or "smart growth."

This isn't smart growth. There isn't ANYTHING smart about it. 100% of the people living there will drive. It's a terrible location for urbanization. It's on a MAJOR state highway, with semi-limited access (in terms of signals). Good luck getting UDOT to agree to add an extra light or two mid-block on US-89. Ain't gonna happen. We tried very hard to get a pedestrian signal on US-189, after a BYU student died. In the end they just erased our crosswalk. UDOT told us they were more interested in adding a median wall with a fence to prevent jaywalk/crosswalk fatalities. As UDOT should! There's a place for accessibility and a place for mobility. A state highway is a place for mobility!

You don't put a center of future urbanism on a state highway. That's really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really, stupid.

This isn't urbanism. This isn't smart growth. This is a developer who just wanted variances to put WAY more units on his piece of property than zoning allowed. If we're going to allow any dummy who stamps his site plan "new urbanism" provisional zoning, what's the point of zoning?

Oh well. Serves him right. Went bankrupt and now Orem's eyesore is the city's punishment for not sticking to their own municipal code.

Hopefully when the city eventually builds it's REAL downtown area, it'll choose a smarter site, with a smarter site plan. Preferably by a rail stop and away from a major arterial.

Phew! Glad to get that off my chest.

AMEN! Though, I actually think they thought they had good intentions, but erred in their judgement of placing this on a major non-urban thoroughfare. Their needs to be an urban plan that integrates these developments before something like this is built.

SLC Projects
Nov 7, 2009, 5:22 PM
I'm just glad that they went out of business before they started similar messes in Clearfield and Ogden as originally planned.

:previous:
The one in Ogdan would of looked ok. It would of been downtown so it would of worked. But didn't they already broken ground on the one up in Clearfield before they went under?

TonyAnderson
Nov 7, 2009, 8:05 PM
Yeah 'Falcon Village' I think it's called? Part of that's broken ground, I'm not sure if it's the same developers, but it's a much larger project and involves using underutilized military space for private business offices as well as residential and commercial.

esirhgih
Nov 9, 2009, 4:29 PM
Yeah 'Falcon Village' I think it's called? Part of that's broken ground, I'm not sure if it's the same developers, but it's a much larger project and involves using underutilized military space for private business offices as well as residential and commercial.

These are two separate projects.

Falcon Hill is an aerospace research park on the east side of I-15.
Here is a link to more info.:
http://www.clearfieldcity.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=490&Itemid=130

Midtown Village at Legend Hills is (was) a project by the same group that developed the now abandoned property in Orem. They had also proposed locations in Ogden and Clearfield. The Clearfield location would have been at the corner of University Park Blvd. and UT-193. They did break ground in Nov. 2007 (ceremonially, no actual earthwork took place) and then things started to unwind. There is still a trailer and broken sign / rendering at the site but nothing has happened there for at least 2 years and the project is dead.
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/695227892/Mixed-use-development-to-rise-soon-in-Clearfield.html

delts145
Nov 14, 2009, 12:22 PM
I'm seeing allot of commercial construction activity at the Commercial Corner of Highland City lately. This corner for those of you not familiar would be at the major state hwy's of 92 and Alpine Hwy Junction(74), not too far from the entrance to Am. Fork Canyon. It looks like construction on the Newport Sports Club is fianlly getting underway. I'm pretty excited about this Gym as it will be very well equipped and so convenient for the area.

Also, seeing allot of activity on the big remake of Highway 92, which is going to be a first in design for Utah. I think, even the entire U.S. has only another one in Texas quite like it.

Recap on the Newport Sports Club facility:

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/midres/6078616.jpg
An artist's rendering depicts the Newport Sports Club.

The 90,000 square foot athletic club will offer a full array of fitness and wellness programs for the entire family, including indoor and outdoor pools, three NCAA/NBA regulation basketball courts, five volleyball and two racquetball courts, training areas for soccer and football, batting cages, spinning, cardio and free weights, yoga, a full-service day spa, child care, student academic center, golf fitness, restaurants, retail shops, a VIP Lounge, media room, concessions and spectator viewing areas.

Principals in Newport Sports & Fitness LC are Frank Tusieseina, a veteran of the sports and entertainment industries who moved to Highland from California roughly two years ago; Tom Hulbert, a principal with Thomas Fox Properties, the Salt Lake City firm that is developing Highland Marketplace; and Mike Morley, a principal at M-13 Construction, the Springville-based company that will build Newport Sports Club.

"We call ourselves the next generation of fitness sports clubs," Tusieseina said. "No other club will offer all that the Newport Sports Club does for the active lifestyle of today's family, sports enthusiasts of all ages and levels and focused training of our future collegiate and professional athletes."

Unlike conventional fitness centers, Newport, slated to open next summer, will be the first Utah fitness facility to offer comprehensive athletic programming, skills training and performance conditioning by top athletes and coaches in a state-of-art training center.

Top athletes offering programs at Newport Sports Club will include former Utah Jazz player Thud Bailey, BYU All-American and NFL player Jason Buck, BYU baseball All-American Murphy Su'a and current BYU men's head volleyball coach Shawn Patchell.

"I came here specifically from Redondo Beach to develop this concept because the land was cheaper here," Tusieseina said. "The other unique thing was in order to make this model work you need a lot of athletes, and even though I come from an area where there are probably more than a million people in our little neck of the woods, and there are barely a million and a half people between Salt Lake and Utah counties, the families are much larger here in terms of kids and their involvment in sports is through the roof. So this whole concept of marrying fitness and sports was to try to engage the entire family. So much money and time is spent on our kids, we wanted to afford them the opportunity to have training available to them. If we're going to expect our kids to aspire to be Olympic athletes and Divison One athletes, we certainly should be ready to train them even while they're in their youth."

Another factor behind the development of Newport was the fact that Thomas Fox Properties was unable to secure a large grocery tenant for Highland Marketplace, as originally planned, due to a Highland City ordinance that mandates businesses be closed on Sundays.

"He [Hulbert] couldn't get a grocery store for the life of him," Tusieseina said. "So we got together about four or five months ago and a fitness center can handle not being open on Sunday without a problem."

Memberships in Newport are currently available but pricing is still being determined. Even without a membership, Tusieseina said, the general public will be able to enjoy the facility on weekends, when the club will often host baseball, basketball and other sports tournaments.

Tusieseina said the message he would most like to impart to the community is that Newport will house an academic center designed to help guide children and their families toward being good citizens.

"We're really focused in on getting these young kids and their families to understand what it takes to prepare their kids for college in the event that they're not going to make it in the pros, or even to college," he said. "We want them to be good citizens. We'll do a lot of mentoring, a lot of life lessons as they relate to being a student athlete. We want to shepherd the parents, who are spending an enormous amount of money on investing in their kids in sports, but you should pay attention to the citizens they'll become and how they can serve their community. We want the current collegiate athletes to come and mentor the younger kids, not only from [the Highland areal but we hope to bring some kids in from the west side and the inner city of Salt Lake and have them mentored in that environment and help them change their lives as well."

James Williams & Associates, Salt Lake City, designed Newport. Tusieseina said financing for the project was no obstacle, even in these credit-crunch times, because Thomas Fox Properties had funding in place for the entire 186,000 square foot Highland Marketplace more than a year ago.

.

jedikermit
Nov 14, 2009, 12:45 PM
That behemoth looks like a mess. I'm sorry they're putting it in beautiful Highland.

Neuroguy
Nov 14, 2009, 2:46 PM
Top athletes offering programs at Newport Sports Club will include former Utah Jazz player Thud Bailey, BYU All-American and NFL player Jason Buck, BYU baseball All-American Murphy Su'a and current BYU men's head volleyball coach Shawn Patchell.


Thud Bailey huh? Wonder if that was a freudian slip regarding the way he played. :haha:

delts145
Nov 14, 2009, 9:39 PM
That behemoth looks like a mess. I'm sorry they're putting it in beautiful Highland.

Well, an aerial of the roof is probably not the best angle. One thing I noticed again this morning when I was over in that area, the foot print will have to be considerably different than the rendering would imply. Remember, that rendering is from 2007. Since then there have been several bussinesses built on the perimeter of that site. Even now there is new construction of shops and restaurants. I think we'll probably see a configuation somewhat different than the rendering.

delts145
Nov 27, 2009, 12:30 PM
Massive pipeline dig starts Monday

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705347263/Massive-pipeline-dig-starts-Monday.html

SPRINGVILLE — Construction of a massive pipeline to carry Colorado River water to the Salt Lake City area begins Monday, when crews start digging up 400 East.

The year-long project is part of the federal Central Utah Project Completion Act.

A 60-inch-tall, 2/3-inch-thick flexible steel pipe will run 8 feet to 12 feet under the full length of the street, a main Springville artery. The pipeline will eventually tie into the Provo Reservoir Canal, which in turn delivers water to the Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District facility and the Metropolitan Water District of Salt Lake and Sandy, said spokeswoman Chris Finlinson of the Central Utah Water Conservancy District, headquartered in Orem...

.

delts145
Dec 2, 2009, 1:00 PM
Economy slows, stalling projects in Utah Valley


Development » Target says it will build independently.

By Don Meyers
The Salt Lake Tribune

Provo » They were meant to be boons to their communities' economy, creating jobs and generating taxes.

But with the country still in a recession, the Southgate Center and Duncan Aviation repair facilities in Provo, and the Frank Gehry-designed The Point in Lehi have either stalled or been scaled back.

"Both [Provo] projects are moving forward in terms of lease agreements," said A. Paul Glauser, Provo's redevelopment director. But the recession has stalled construction.

Duncan Aviation, a Nebraska-based company that specializes in servicing corporate and private jets, announced in October 2008 that it was going to build its regional repair center at Provo Municipal Airport, including a 620,000-square-foot repair hangar. It is also expected to create more than 650 new jobs in the next 15 years and generate $22 million in new state tax revenue.

State, county and city officials said it was a feather in Utah's cap to win Duncan's business.

Glauser said Duncan -- which recently announced it will service Bombardier aircraft in Provo in August -- will open, but on a smaller scale. He said Duncan plans to operate with 21 people in a hangar space it will rent from Million Air, an airline that operates a small terminal at the Provo airport.

"They have been delayed by the economy," Glauser said, "but they will go ahead." The city was expected Tuesday night to approve a lease for land at the airport for Duncan's hangar.

Bill Prochazka Duncan's executive vice president and general manager, said the company is ready to build in Provo, as soon as the economy turns around for the corporate jet market. He said the company evaluates economic conditions quarterly to determine if it can move ahead with the Provo project.

But the recession isn't the only issue. Prochazka said the industry was hurt by the public backlash against corporate jets after automobile company executives flew in private planes to Washington to plead for a bailout.

"That probably did as much damage to the industry, with the misunderstanding, as the economic factors," Prochazka said. He said it was not fair to blame the aviation industry for the conduct of car executives.

While Duncan is slowly moving forward, Southgate is on hold for the most part, Glauser said.

Southgate, to be built on part of The Reserve at East Bay golf course, was unveiled in 2007. The city has already realigned part of the course to accommodate the development, and the city and The Boyer Co., the developer, have worked to clean up the former city landfill at the site.

But the 684,000-square-foot retail/office complex was stalled by the credit crunch, Lew Swain, a Boyer Co. partner earlier said. Plus, the company had to wait on Target, one of its retail anchors, to decide on when to move ahead. The Boyer Co. is The Salt Lake Tribun e's landlord in The Gateway.

Glauser said Target is planning to start work on its store independently of the rest of the project. He said the company indicated it is still coming to Provo, even as it cancels other projects around the country.

Attempts to contact Target were not successful.

In Lehi, developer Brandt Andersen proposed The Point, an upscale project featuring a 12,000-seat arena, a lake for wakeboarding, a five-star hotel, shopping center, offices and housing on 85 acres across Interstate 15 from The Factory gym where his D-League NBA team practices.

Lehi created a new zoning classification to accommodate Andersen's project, and Andersen retained architect Frank Gehry, known for his Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles and the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, to design the project.

Jamie Davidson, Lehi's city administrator, said a year ago Andersen began working through the process of developing a master plan for the project. He said Anderson was asked to submit 15 items, but only five have been turned in so far.

"I would imagine the current state of the world and the economy has slowed things down for them," Davidson said.

He anticipates that there will be some review of the plans to see if the project as proposed can still work in 2010 or later. He said there is no set timetable at this point.

Attempts to contact Andersen were not successful. A secretary in his office said he was busy preparing for the Flash's season opening.

..

delts145
Dec 10, 2009, 11:31 AM
Southern Metro - I-15 expansion barreling south

$1.7B project will extend from Lehi to Spanish Fork

by Marc Haddock
of the Deseret News

http://www.tutorialmega.com/pictures/provo50.jpg
by TonyAnderson

Utah County received an early Christmas present Wednesday — plans for 24 miles of good road, 10 rebuilt or refurbished freeway interchanges and 55 rebuilt or restored bridges.

The Utah Department of Transportation announced that the Utah County I-15 corridor expansion will extend from Lehi's Main Street to Spanish Fork's Main Street, adding two lanes in both directions to the existing freeway, and the project will be completed two years earlier than planned...

Construction will begin in the spring and should be completed by December 2012.

Provo River Constructors, a consortium of contractors and engineers, beat out two other groups for the $1.7 billion project in a fixed-price, best-design bidding process that resulted in a deal for the state, according to project director Dal Hawks.

"All along, we felt confident that we could afford to build a project from American Fork to the Provo Center Street interchange," Hawks said. "These proposals really did what we hoped. All three did an excellent job. We think we picked a contractor who proved the very best possible value for the state."

Hawks said the Provo River proposal is driver friendly, fast and will deliver a superior road surface.

For one thing, Provo River plans to keep existing freeway lanes open throughout the construction process, easing fears that the project could create massive traffic jams.

"They made some very good strategies for maintaining traffic flow," Hawks said.

For another, the consortium will use concrete pavement designed to last 40 years.

"This project is quality throughout," said Heather Barnum, the corridor expansion project's spokeswoman. "This is above the 20-year or 30-year product that we had expected. It will improve the state's investment."

Barnum said the economic downturn worked for the stateby creating a favorable bidding environment.

"We asked the bidders to tell us what they could give us within the budget given by the Legislature," she said. "They came back with more than we supposed we could get."

The project is designed to meet travel demands on the 24-mile stretch through 2030.

The Provo River consortium is headed by Fluor Corp., Ames Construction, Ralph L. Wadsworth Construction and Wadsworth Brothers Construction.

Other companies bidding on the project included one led by Kiewit Western and one led by Flatiron Constructors, Skanska USA and Zachry Construction.


Highlights of the project include:

- Two additional travel lanes in both directions from Lehi's Main Street to U.S. 6, and one additional lane from U.S. 6 to 6800 South in Spanish Fork.

- An extension of the express lane from University Parkway in Orem to Spanish Fork in both directions.

- A rebuild of seven freeway interchanges, with modifications to another three, and the replacement or widening of 55 aging bridges, including the Sam White's Lane Bridge near American Fork, which was torn down after it was hit by a truck in November 2008.

- A pedestrian overpass to Utah Valley University across University Parkway in Orem.

- Provo's Center Street interchange will remain open during construction.


Bonus miles for biggest Utah freeway job

http://www.sltrib.com/news/ci_13961321

Reconstruction of Interstate 15 in Utah County will provide traffic relief all the way from Lehi south to Spanish Fork instead of stopping in Provo as expected, the Utah Department of Transportation announced Wednesday.

..

urbanboy
Dec 13, 2009, 1:08 AM
Widening a freeway to relieve congestion is like loosening your belt to relieve obesity. This just makes more room for more traffic/fat.

jtrent77
Dec 13, 2009, 2:42 AM
Widening a freeway to relieve congestion is like loosening your belt to relieve obesity. This just makes more room for more traffic/fat.

I'm sorry but that analogy doesn't work at all, if it did then we should be killing people so that we don't have as much congestion. With more growth comes more travelling both by car as well as by public transit--neither will be able to ever take every single person.

TonyAnderson
Dec 13, 2009, 10:15 AM
You can still gain fat even with a tight belt - at some point the belt would just snap.

i-215
Dec 13, 2009, 6:20 PM
Widening a freeway to relieve congestion is like loosening your belt to relieve obesity. This just makes more room for more traffic/fat.

You went to the U, didn't you? :haha: I heard one of your professors when he came down as a guest lecturer, and he said that exact quote. (Then again, he also believed it was evil to drive for basically any reason at all).

My counter: Kids outgrow clothes. ;)

Induced demand is a lot like Reaganomics. Does it actually happen? Frontrunner with its park and ride lots will also induce demand, too, for that matter. Induced demand happens, but less than you suspect. Especially as de-centralization occurs more and more, providing people work closer to home.

SLC Projects
Dec 13, 2009, 7:32 PM
:previous:
Is it a sin to be fat? Is it a sin to widen a freeway?

i-215
Dec 13, 2009, 7:37 PM
If a NY subway train is crowded everyday, it's important to never increase frequency. That would encourage more people to travel away from the city's core into the periphery, causing sprawl into NJ and Long Island.

Increasing subway frequency is like increasing the frequency you eat Subway's. It makes you fat! :)

urbanboy
Dec 14, 2009, 5:17 AM
:previous:
Is it a sin to be fat? Is it a sin to widen a freeway?

Sin implies the existence of god and satan. :koko:

urbanboy
Dec 14, 2009, 5:21 AM
The "freeway" in zurich is 3 lanes in each direction at most, and there is hardly ever congestion. The reason? They have other modes of transportation that are more efficient at moving large groups of people from place to place.

John Martin
Dec 14, 2009, 5:35 AM
Guess what, we're not in Zurich.

urbanboy
Dec 14, 2009, 5:46 AM
Guess what, we're not in Zurich.

:previous:

And your not Jesus, so stop trying to be like him!

No, just kidding, I don't even think Jesus existed. But hopefully you get my point. :haha:

Perhaps we can implement those things that make zurich's transportation system so efficient, in order to improve our own system.

i-215
Dec 14, 2009, 8:10 AM
Guess what, we're not in Zurich.

Yeah Urbanboy, we're in Salt Lake City! :haha:

And this is my cultural heritage:

http://i96.photobucket.com/albums/l183/utradioguide/heston.jpg

Don't discriminate against my cultural values! :yes: :yes: :yes:

urbanboy
Dec 14, 2009, 8:15 AM
:previous:

I thought this was your cultural heritage:

http://www.mountainsofstone.com/images/Handcart%20Covered.jpg :haha:

SLC Projects
Dec 14, 2009, 5:26 PM
Sin implies the existence of god and satan. :koko:

:previous:
But yet you make it sound that it's bad to be Fat. And that anyone who drives on the freeway is evil. :koko:

urbanboy
Dec 14, 2009, 6:28 PM
:previous:
But yet you make it sound that it's bad to be Fat. And that anyone who drives on the freeway is evil. :koko:

theistic religion does not have a monopoly on morals.

Regardless, we need to stop giving the auto industry a monopoly on transportation by funding all their infrastructure without funding other modes too. We should be building as many rails, bicycle lanes, sidewalks etc. as we do roads.

TonyAnderson
Dec 14, 2009, 6:53 PM
For there being no right and wrong or anything more than this short life there's a lot of worry over such minute things as freeway expansion ;) This life is your last life right, enjoy it, stop worrying about if a freeway is used more than a rail line.

urbanboy
Dec 14, 2009, 7:33 PM
For there being no right and wrong or anything more than this short life there's a lot of worry over such minute things as freeway expansion ;) This life is your last life right, enjoy it, stop worrying about if a freeway is used more than a rail line.

I want to improve the quality of life for all. Why should a belief in god or an afterlife have anything to do with that? If you need to rely on these beliefs to encourage you to be a good person, then it's probably best you just go on believing. I however, don't need theism to tell me what is good and what is bad. It's not that black and white anyway, there are many shades of gray. To me, having a multitude of modes for travel is like a shade of gray. We can have cars too, although the impact on public health should be considered, but their infrastructure shouldn't be implemented any faster than the infrastructure of alternate modes.

shakman
Dec 14, 2009, 8:48 PM
Improving the quality of life is a struggle that we must endure everyday in order to better position our future generations.

I recently saw a documentary on the crumbling US Infrastructure on The History Channel. It was horrific to see how degrading our infrastructure has become. It has become so due to people thinking "bandaide" or "not my problem". Sometimes, due to various situations, bandaides are needed, but they should not be the solution. Unfortunately they are sometimes viewed as the solution and leave it up to the next generation to deal with.

The question should be what is really a temporary fix or what is better.

SLC Projects
Dec 14, 2009, 10:06 PM
theistic religion does not have a monopoly on morals.

Regardless, we need to stop giving the auto industry a monopoly on transportation by funding all their infrastructure without funding other modes too. We should be building as many rails, bicycle lanes, sidewalks etc. as we do roads.

:previous:
I do believe that alot of cities have already and have been adding all those other infrastructure. Just take a look at all the new light rail projects going on right now. With all the new road projects I'm starting to see more and more bicycle lanes to the side. You got the Jordan River Parkway plus all the other trails. And as for sidewalks....well you can find those everywhere just about. :yes:

I do agree Freeways and roads shouldn't be the only infrastructure, but you keep talking as is freeways is the only way to get around.

TonyAnderson
Dec 14, 2009, 10:48 PM
I agree, I was expressing sarcasm because you turned what someone said into a religious idea. I think any fairly intelligent person recognizes the use of the word sin as a synonym of wrong. So he was asking if it was wrong to want to drive a car, or drive on a freeway. It's not a religious issue.

I also think the idea of 'widening freeways causes more congestion' is inaccurate. I think the cause-effect relationship is the opposite. Widening freeways doesn't cause more people to drive on them. More people driving on them causes them to be widened.

The debate and challenge is figuring out if that'll work, if we want it, if we can support it, and at what point, if any, is it too much?

urbanboy
Dec 14, 2009, 11:02 PM
I agree, I was expressing sarcasm because you turned what someone said into a religious idea. I think any fairly intelligent person recognizes the use of the word sin as a synonym of wrong. So he was asking if it was wrong to want to drive a car, or drive on a freeway. It's not a religious issue.

I also think the idea of 'widening freeways causes more congestion' is inaccurate. I think the cause-effect relationship is the opposite. Widening freeways doesn't cause more people to drive on them. More people driving on them causes them to be widened.

The debate and challenge is figuring out if that'll work, if we want it, if we can support it, and at what point, if any, is it too much?


The Triple Convergence

Stuck in Traffic (1992), pp. 27-29, by Anthony Downs





"Nearly every vehicle driver normally searches for the quickest route, one that is shorter or less encumbered by obstacles (such as traffic signals or cross-streets) than most other routes. These direct routes are usually limited-access roads (freeways, expressways, or beltways) that are faster than local streets if they are not congested. Since most drivers know this, they converge on such 'best' routes from many points of origin.

The problem is that during the peak travel hours on weekdays, so many drivers converge on these 'best' routes that they become overloaded, particularly in metropolitan areas. Traffic on them eventually slows to the point where they have no advantage over the alternative routes. That is, a rough equilibrium is reached, which means that many drivers can get to their destinations just as fast on other roads. At times, the direct road may become even slower than alternative streets, and some drivers eager to save time will switch to them. Soon rough equality of travel times on both types of route is restored at the margin. The opposite happens if travel becomes slower on alternative streets than on the expressway.

Such observations can be made about this equilibrium situation: (1) it tends to recur, because most drivers develop habitual travel patterns; (2) during equilibrium each limited-access road is carrying more vehicles per hour than each normal city street or arterial route because it has more lanes, more direct routing, and fewer obstacles; (3) many drivers time their journeys to miss these periods because they do not like to waste time in heavy traffic; and (4) at the peak of equilibrium, traffic on most expressways is crawling along at a pace far below the optimal speed for those roads, as explained below. Now suppose that the limited-access route undergoes a vast improvement -- its four lanes are expanded to eight. Once its carrying capacity is increased, the drivers using it move much faster than those using alternative routes. But this disequilibrium does not last long because word soon gets around that conditions on the expressway are superior.

In response, three types of convergence occur on the improved expressway: (1) many drivers who formerly used alternative routes during peak hours switch to the improved expressway (spatial convergence); (2) many drivers who formerly traveled just before or after the peak hours start traveling during those hours (time convergence); and (3) some commuters who used to take public transportation during peak hours now switch to driving, since it has become faster (modal convergence).

The triple convergence causes more and more drivers to use the improved expressway during peak hours. Therefore its traffic volumes keep rising until vehicles are once again moving at a crawl during the peak period. This outcome is almost inescapable if peak-hour traffic was already slow before the highway was improved. If traffic is going faster than a crawl on this direct route at the peak hour, its users will still get to their destinations faster than users of city streets, which are less direct and more encumbered by signals and cross-streets. Total travel times on these two types of paths will only become equalized if the limited-access roads are so overloaded that vehicles on them are moving at slower speeds than those on normal streets. Triple convergence creates just such an effect during peak hours...

...In any event, expanding roadway capacity does not fully eliminate peak-hour traffic congestion, or even reduce the intensity of traffic jams during the most crowded periods -- although those periods will be shorter. In fact, it is almost impossible to eradicate peak-hour traffic congestion on limited-access roads once it has appeared within a nonshrinking community. In theory, such congestion could be eliminated only if the capacity of those roads were increased to the extent that they could carry every single commuter simultaneously at the peak minute at, say, 35 miles per hour or faster. In nearly all metropolitan areas, that is impossible. Therefore, expansions of road capacity -- no matter how large, within the limits of feasibility -- cannot fully eliminate periods of crawling along on expressways at frustratingly low speeds."

http://www.walkablestreets.com/triple.htm

Erector
Dec 14, 2009, 11:11 PM
To compare Utah Valley to Zurich is a weak analogy. Zurich has used and maintained the existing rail and transit lines for some 100 plus years. The model's and efficientcies has changed, the actual track and right of ways have existed for many decades. For the most part I think that Utah cities are making some remarkable planning strides as compared to metro areas of similar size throughout the western US.

I wonder what you, UB, see as an actual solution that the rest of us do not see. Light rail and bullet trains are inevitable, but too costly at this time due to a relatively small populace and a conservitive culture. What do you forsee that can be done now that isn't in the planning stages? Front Runner is going to Payson, active farming will make purchasing right of ways Westward into the Cedar Valley a cost extrardinare, but the planning is in progress. Hopefully a bridge across Utah Lake is not a part of that planning however.

What I am saying is that efficent mass transit is always the goal, but to put off freeway expansion to quicken a cultural shift in transit will only kill industry and business, something that I can ill afford. In the mean time help is on its way.

urbanboy
Dec 14, 2009, 11:17 PM
I think one solution is to create an urban growth boundary, and implement extensive and efficient systems of alternate modes of transportation throughout our existing footprint, and create more TODs (transit oriented developments) with higher densities.

I disagree with your idea that freeway congestion will kill businesses. I actually think it would help businesses along alternate routes.

Erector
Dec 14, 2009, 11:36 PM
I think one solution is to create an urban growth boundary, and implement extensive and efficient systems of alternate modes of transportation throughout our existing footprint, and create more TODs (transit oriented developments) with higher densities.

I disagree with your idea that freeway congestion will kill businesses. I actually think it would help businesses along alternate routes.

I have no problem with Urban growth boundries. The problem is that it must be done by a county mandate. And how do you legally tell farmer Joe in Mosida Orchards that sorry, but your property exceeds a 12 mile radius from downtown so your SOL on selling it for developmental gains. It wouldn't hurt my feelings if we did however, because it would eventually force vertical housing, which most on this board support in our downtowns anyway.

About freeway congestion, if you drive into LA nowaday's and you first get into San Berardino, or any other city for that matter, what do you see? Industry, tilt-up buildings, CMU buildings 3 stories high, why do you ask? good question, it's because of the ease of putting a product on the road, (freeway's), and by-passing congestion. Alot of that contributes to urban spawl.

UTPlanner
Dec 15, 2009, 5:29 PM
The article that was quoted by Urbanboy is a very interesting section of a novel that is well written, though it is consistently a fairly single sided argument. The important part of what was quoted was this section,

"...In any event, expanding roadway capacity does not fully eliminate peak-hour traffic congestion, or even reduce the intensity of traffic jams during the most crowded periods -- although those periods will be shorter. In fact, it is almost impossible to eradicate peak-hour traffic congestion on limited-access roads once it has appeared within a nonshrinking community. In theory, such congestion could be eliminated only if the capacity of those roads were increased to the extent that they could carry every single commuter simultaneously at the peak minute at, say, 35 miles per hour or faster. In nearly all metropolitan areas, that is impossible. Therefore, expansions of road capacity -- no matter how large, within the limits of feasibility -- cannot fully eliminate periods of crawling along on expressways at frustratingly low speeds."

I believe that Mr. Downs is correct that we, "...cannot fully eliminate periods of crawling along expressways at frustratingly low speeds." But it is difficult to argue that that interstate system of this country does not generally operate extremely efficiently. The delivery of goods and services in a timely manner all over this country is based on that fact. The majority of the interstate system is not plagued by traffic problems.

The personally operated automobile is not going to disappear. Any time I take my neices and nephews to a game or go for a weekly trip to the grocery store, I certainly am grateful for my vehicle. As planners, we need to find a way to adapt to that fact and not just lament the dissapearance of local rail systems. There can be well designed developments that do not reject the fact that much of the traffic will arrive by car.

This state needs a huge infusion of mass transit...and it's getting one. It is not enough but it will continue to grow and as the percentage of travelers on mass transit grows so will the system.

shakman
Dec 15, 2009, 7:45 PM
Very interesting article indeed. Good read; Good find.

Utah's mass transit infusion is much greater than most major metropolitan areas than I can think of. It is definitely something to be proud of. I see Utah as a model of being proactive to meet traffic demands. Unfortunately the area I live in, people complain about traffic, but there is always some reason why it cannot be fixed. (i.e. NIMBY's, funding, various municipal governments that cannot get along... ...the list goes on.)

Of course I do not live in Utah, so I am stating the above by what I read on this forum and other relavent documents. Chime in if I stated anything that is incorrect.

i-215
Dec 16, 2009, 2:52 AM
:previous:

I thought this was your cultural heritage:

http://www.mountainsofstone.com/images/Handcart%20Covered.jpg :haha:

Nope. I'm pretty sure my heritage is a Charlton Heston proudly waving a Toyota key.


I think one solution is to create an urban growth boundary, and implement extensive and efficient systems of alternate modes of transportation throughout our existing footprint, and create more TODs (transit oriented developments) with higher densities.

I disagree with your idea that freeway congestion will kill businesses. I actually think it would help businesses along alternate routes.

Urban Growth Boundary = Bad, impossible to ever pass through the legislature, even controversial in Portland! Remember a little ballot prop called Oregon Measure 37 (which I voted 'yes' on, by the way)? The honest truth is Utah doesn't need a growth boundary because we develop differently than wetter climates. In Utah the city tends to "grow" fairly uniformly outward. We don't have "estate sprawl" like they have in Oregon, where any dummy with money can toss a well into the ground and build their nice 4000 sq foot mini-mansion on 5 acres, right next to 20,000 other 5-acre mansion owners who had the same idea. Oregon has some of the world's most fertile farmland, which is worth preserving. Utah is highland prairie. I'm sorry, but they could cover Tooele County with cheap Ivory homes for all I care. It ain't scenic. And anything that is scenic is already federally owned (and generally federally protected).

T.O.D.s = Good, if they are done right. A T.O.D. will never be successful through penalizing other types of development. It needs to be done through positive incentives, like less-restrictive height limits, higher densities, etc. If what anti-sprawl people say is true ("people only buy low density because that is all zoning offers") then these developments should sell themselves without any internal incentives or external penalties.

Congestion = Both. Despite L.A.'s reputation as a freeway-mecca, there are still huge blocks that lack proper high-speed access. Try going west on Wilshire from the Miracle Mile to the 101 at dinner time. Awful. If L.A. put in an underground big-dig to bypass Wilshire, I'd probably spend more money at restaurants along there because I can actually access them. Nothing says "forget it, I'm staying in tonight" like arterial gridlock. I'd support both an underground expressway and subway 100%. There's a balance we need to meet, and rarely do the scales tip too far in the direction of "not enough local traffic."

delts145
Dec 19, 2009, 1:20 PM
Sign of the times: Fresh Market


http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/midres/2244078.jpg
Workers install permanent sign on a Fresh Market store, which used to be Albertsons, in Lehi, Friday. Salt Lake-based Associated Food Stores Inc. purchased most of the state's Albertsons from Minneapolis-based SuperValu Inc. Thirty-four former Albertsons stores opened under the Fresh Market name last month. Associated Foods was able to hire all 2,700 people who worked at Albertsons.

related: Idaho chain Ridley's Family Markets to buy 2 Orem Albertsons stores

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705352559/Idaho-chain-to-buy-Orem-Albertsons.html

OREM — Ridley's Family Markets, a family-owned supermarket chain based in Twin Falls, has agreed to purchase the two Albertsons stores in Orem from Minneapolis-based Supervalu Inc., Ridley's announced in a news release Friday...

.

urbanboy
Dec 19, 2009, 9:36 PM
:previous:
The Albertson's on 2nd South in downtown is now a Fresh Market too.

Orlando
Dec 20, 2009, 1:11 AM
I think one solution is to create an urban growth boundary, and implement extensive and efficient systems of alternate modes of transportation throughout our existing footprint, and create more TODs (transit oriented developments) with higher densities.

I disagree with your idea that freeway congestion will kill businesses. I actually think it would help businesses along alternate routes.

I agree. Though, I admit I don't know everything about Urban Growth Boundaries. This I do know, the Urban Growth Boundary in Portland maintains its control by water rights. I think this would work in favor in Utah. The further out you develop from existing infrastucture, the more you should pay, etc.

anyiliang
Dec 20, 2009, 3:27 AM
The "freeway" in zurich is 3 lanes in each direction at most, and there is hardly ever congestion. The reason? They have other modes of transportation that are more efficient at moving large groups of people from place to place.

So if you are trying to compare Zurich to Utah County lets see them side by side. But I think we should compare Canton of Zurich for a better understanding since we are comparing Utah County instead of individual cities.

Canton of Zurich Population:
Population 1,307,567
Density 1,959 /sq mi
Area 668 sq mi
# of Freeways - 7
3 of the freeways inside the city of Zurich boarders.

Utah County Population:
Population 530,837
Density 184 /sq mi
Area 2,141 sq mi
# of Freeways - 1

So I guess I can understand why Zurich has no congestion. They have more freeways then Utah county does.

TonyAnderson
Dec 20, 2009, 6:20 AM
Lol, they have more freeways than the state of Utah.

i-215
Dec 20, 2009, 7:05 AM
So if you are trying to compare Zurich to Utah County lets see them side by side. But I think we should compare Canton of Zurich for a better understanding since we are comparing Utah County instead of individual cities.

Canton of Zurich Population:
Population 1,307,567
Density 1,959 /sq mi
Area 668 sq mi
# of Freeways - 7
3 of the freeways inside the city of Zurich boarders.

Utah County Population:
Population 530,837
Density 184 /sq mi
Area 2,141 sq mi
# of Freeways - 1

So I guess I can understand why Zurich has no congestion. They have more freeways then Utah county does.

I'd be interested in comparing the number of freeway lane-miles. I bet Zurich still wins, though.