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delts145
Apr 4, 2007, 12:16 PM
Cedar Hills council OKs Wal-Mart
By Steve Gehrke

The Salt Lake Tribune
Article Launched: 04/04/2007 01:15:11 AM MDT


CEDAR HILLS - A sign on the southwest corner of an open field at 4800 W. Cedar Hills Drive reads "shopping center coming soon" - and the City Council voted Tuesday night to make it so.
The council gave preliminary approval to a Wal-Mart site plan after nearly five years of controversy, which at one point sent the mega-retailer packing. But Wal-Mart representatives returned in December 2006 with renderings of a smaller, more attractive store for round two: a four month struggle to bring what some are praising as "the nicest Wal-Mart in Utah," but others are decrying it as the thousand-pound gorilla in the bedroom community.
Wal-Mart spokeswoman Karianne Fallow said she was relieved with Tuesday's preliminary approval.
"It's been a long process," Fallow said. "We're pleased with the council's decision and hope we can continue to work with the city and serve our customers."
More than 100 residents attended Tuesday's public hearing, which provided a more two-sided representation than former council meetings where a bulk of residents had spoken against the store. Many still opposed the big-box retailer, questioning potential increases in their community's traffic, noise and crime. One resident carried a sign that read "make it smaller," but supporters came clad in Wal-Mart buttons and chided the council for dragging its feet.
"We are a bedroom town now. We need to wake up and get some revenue coming in," resident Sherm Barney said. "My wife says to go get a bottle of milk, and I have to go to American Fork [about six miles away]. That shouldn't be. How many towns are isolated like we are?"
Opponents, largely composed of residents who live near the commercially zoned proposed site, urged the city to require more of Wal-Mart and make a decision on behalf of the residents, not those who want to build in their city.
"We're trying to make sure we, to a reasonable standard, mitigate the impacts that come with commercial development," Councilman Jim Perry said. "There's no way to pretend it won't have impact because it will."
sgehrke@sltrib.com

i-215
Apr 4, 2007, 11:13 PM
Meh, it's Cedar Hills. I don't see any problems with Wal-Marts in suburbia. I do worry when they're near "old town" areas.

delts145
Apr 5, 2007, 12:10 PM
:previous:

Yeah, I live in this vicinity, and have followed this particular development with interest. The location is excellent and this specific Wal Mart and accompanying plaza will have a definite design that is in keeping with the ambiance of the area. Also it will definately be much more convenient for the northern communities of Cedar Hills,Highland,Alpine,Northeast A.F.,and Manila.

From this mornings Deseret News.

Cedar Hills Wal-Mart gets go-ahead

Residents express mixed opinions at council meet

By Amy Choate-Nielsen
Deseret Morning News
CEDAR HILLS — If nothing else, residents of Cedar Hills have stamina, as some 30 people proved at Tuesday night's City Council meeting.

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/3995793.jpg
Deseret Morning News Graphic The group, which dwindled from an original crowd of about 150, lingered at Cedar Ridge Elementary School long enough for the City Council to grant preliminary approval to a proposed — and somewhat opposed — new Wal-Mart.
The controversial decision came at 10:45 p.m., after hours of public debate about Wal-Mart's sound and traffic impacts. But some residents stayed until 11:30 p.m., when council members gave additional approval to the rest of the commercial subdivision that will surround the store.
Tuesday's meeting was the second of two late-night public hearings in which residents expressed mixed opinions about the proposed 132,000-square-foot Wal-Mart. The previous meeting ended at about 1 a.m. with a handful of residents still in the audience — and no decision.
"These issues are neither fun nor simple," said City Councilman Eric Richardson at Tuesday's meeting. "This is a complex review. Our actions are based on findings on fact, not on emotion or what we want, but off of what the facts are."
Although the issue has proven to be a heated one between residents who disagree, Tuesday's meeting ended flatly with no cheers or jeers, just disappointment for those who oppose the store.
Those who voiced support for the store, some wearing buttons that said, "Wal-Mart Supporter," said they are in favor of developing a larger tax revenue for the city.
"When we moved here we thought, surely, as the sign (on 4800 West) says, 'Shopping center coming soon,' it was just a matter of time until we got a grocery store in this city," said Shirley Condie, a Cedar Hills resident who has lived in the town for two years. "Now we have the opportunity to have a store that will provide ... many kinds of things. You will never be able to satisfy everyone. We need this store, we need the tax base. Let's not lose it."
Residents who opposed the store said they were concerned about the size of the building and the impact that having a Wal-Mart in the community could have.
"I think you should vote no," Cedar Hills resident Darren Simons told council members before they made a decision. "We don't have enough information to truly know that we're going to protect our children. I don't like driving 10 minutes (to get to another Wal-Mart), but if driving 10 minutes means it will be safe for our kids to walk across the street, then I'd be happy to drive 10 minutes."
Although the store received approval for its site plan, council members set some limitations on the approval. According to city recommendations, the store will be required to be quiet between 7 p.m. and 8 a.m. The store also agreed to help with traffic mitigation measures on the surrounding roads by installing speed bumps where necessary.
According to Wal-Mart consultant and project engineer Shel MacPherson, the store is willing to follow the guidelines to gain community support.
"We believe this development will offer economic vitality to this community, but Wal-Mart cannot succeed without the community's support," MacPherson said.
The store, which would be located at 4800 West and Cedar Hills Drive, must now receive a conditional-use permit for the location and final site plan approval before construction can begin.

wrendog
Apr 5, 2007, 2:12 PM
Also it will definately be much more convenient for the northern communities of Cedar Hills,Highland,Alpine,Northeast A.F.,and Manila.


Manila? isn't that in Daggett County? I live in N. Utah County and have never heard of a Manila up in Highland/Alpine area

delts145
Apr 5, 2007, 3:39 PM
Manila is the city and bench area running from Pleasant Grove on the south to Cedar Hills on the North.

SmilingBob
Apr 5, 2007, 7:22 PM
Manila is the city and bench area running from Pleasant Grove on the south to Cedar Hills on the North.

Thank goodness for the sign and church or no one would know where it is.

thanks Delts145

SmilingBob
Apr 5, 2007, 8:12 PM
Meh, it's Cedar Hills. I don't see any problems with Wal-Marts in suburbia. I do worry when they're near "old town" areas.


Not a fan of the 'evil empire'.

delts145
Apr 5, 2007, 10:47 PM
Thank goodness for the sign and church or no one would know where it is.

thanks Delts145

LOL..........:haha:

SLC Projects
Apr 5, 2007, 11:00 PM
We don't need any more Walmarts. :yes:

SmilingBob
Apr 5, 2007, 11:22 PM
We don't need any more Walmarts. :yes:

:tup: my thoughts exactly. :tup:

I could spend days writing about the destruction of America via Wal-Mart.

poodledoodledude
Apr 5, 2007, 11:25 PM
HI GUYS!!! i'm NEW to the group! for YEARS i thought i was the ONLY person that cared what was going up and coming down in this valley. many nights have i picked apart the collective brains of mayors and council members for ANY information on new things coming into the cities in utah valley!

at any rate, it's good to know i'm NOT alone! i stumbled across the website just by chance and i've been waiting for DAYS to get approved so i could join!

couple of things:

the building originally to be built downtown that was 13 stories owned by the boyer company that was announced like 10 years ago fell through--partly because the office space was NON-EXISTANT at the time, AND, the courthouse was talking with the city and state to buy the land the 13 story was to be built on. so, the sale fell through and the state now owns the land...hence the proposed 'plan' to expand the courthouse.

also, the hotel planned for riverwoods a few years back EXCEEDED the height requirment for the city in that neighborhood, and the developer--hammon's of all people--approached orem city and asked them to build the 'orem plaza hotel' originally planned to be 8 stories tall. they were going to tear down the power plant by the provo canyon and build, but the soil was too much to clean up, so they scrapped it. also, provo city told the developer to build a hotel in downtown provo to compete with the marriott, but it was srapped because the hotel vacancies were HIGH during the 90's, and it would have been too risky of a development.

also, i heard through the 'grapevine' that the same developers that developed the wells fargo center in downtown provo ALSO own the land that the hotel roberts was once on...plans are in the works to have a 12-15 story office tower built at the site. my guess is they are negotiating with three amigos restaurant to buy the property and go from there. three amigos may even be in the tower on the lower level. not sure about all this, but it would be AWESOME for provo to get a building that big for downtown!!!!!

i'll keep you all posted.
in the mean time, i live in provo, 33 year old crazy single male that LOVES development here in the valley. i have read EVERY post, so it's good meeting you all.

i also hope the zions building plans downtown and the expansion of the wells fargo center go without a hitch!

i've got some friends in the city admin, so i'll keep you posted if i can say anything about stuff...

until then--
ciao!

poodledoodledude
"be the change you wish to see in the world."

i-215
Apr 6, 2007, 1:17 AM
Welcome to the board poodledoodledude.... man that's hard to spell correctly.

wrendog
Apr 6, 2007, 2:25 AM
awesome poodle dude! There have been rumblings in the paper about new towers in DT Provo, but nothing concrete. If what you say is true and that a 12-15 story tower is in the works at the Hotel Roberts site, that is fantastic! woohoo!

I-15
Apr 6, 2007, 4:34 AM
awesome poodle dude! There have been rumblings in the paper about new towers in DT Provo, but nothing concrete. If what you say is true and that a 12-15 story tower is in the works at the Hotel Roberts site, that is fantastic! woohoo!

:banana: :banana: :banana:

That would be awesome!!!!

SLC Projects
Apr 6, 2007, 11:49 AM
Welcome poodledoodledude,

Things are looking up for Provo. Let's hope that downtown will get that 12-15 story tower. :tup:

delts145
Apr 6, 2007, 12:43 PM
Poodledoodledude, you've got to tell us how you came up with the name some time. Big welcome and especially great to have another Utah Valley fan on the forum. ALL OF THE WASATCH FRONT RULES !!!

delts145
Apr 6, 2007, 1:00 PM
Saratoga Springs

SS wants freeway

CATHY ALLRED - North County Staff
City leaders of Saratoga Springs want a freeway at 2100 North and aren't afraid to ruffle a few Lehi feathers to voice their preference.

The City Council has unanimously passed a resolution March 20 announcing the city's official decision on the Mountain View freeway alternatives in north Utah County. A letter was to have been drafted this weekand, with a copy of the resolution attached to it, sent on to UDOT.

"I think the freeway connection is vital," Mayor Tim Parker said. "From the traffic flow point of view it is the best of the two alternatives I think."

He and his council are asking Saratoga Springs residents to become proactive, contacting legislators to ask for support of the freeway alternative that cuts through Lehi just south of Thanksgiving Point and the Meadow Pointe planned community.

They are also asking residents to participate in public hearings and open houses and to alert other neighbors to support the 2100 North alternative.

Parker said he believes the freeway is necessary for "the smooth and efficient flow of regional traffic" through north Utah County.

"Northwest Utah County is going to become like Orem and Provo combined," Parker said. "We need to think about the people who are not here yet."

The 2100 North alternative is part of a study being done by UDOT to determine the pathway of the Mountain View Corridor project. Initially UDOT had focused on south Lehi for an east-west freeway at 1500, 1900 or 2100 South streets. Saratoga Springs leaders didn't want the 2100 South alternative since it cut into the city's Loch Lommond subdivision.

The Saratoga Springs City Council approved the 2100 North resolution supporting UDOT's alternative at 2100 North for a freeway as the "least disruptive to existing and future development," and having the least amount of environmental impact while being the most affordable and practical for the traffic demands.

"The hard part about all of this is the impact to the people who are in its path," Parker said. "It's a very difficult thing."

Lehi City leaders have come out in support of its master transportation plan which doesn't allow for additional freeways in their city. They are protesting the 1500 South, 1900 South and 2100 North freeway alternatives and want to see UDOT approve tree-lined boulevards at those sites instead.

"They are all nice and good but I don't think they are tied into reality," said Saratoga Springs council member Denise Kelly, who attended the Citizen's Road Rally in Lehi March 14 and heard the Lehi council and mayor's view on freeways crossing their city.

delts145
Apr 6, 2007, 1:05 PM
Spanish Fork

Sp. Fork to add nearly 500 acres PDF
JEREMY DUDA - Daily Herald

As Spanish Fork's population continues to grow, its city limits may see some substantial expansion soon as well.

A group of landowners submitted a petition to the city requesting that it annex 479 acres of mostly vacant land on Spanish Fork's east side. If approved, the annexation would add nearly one square mile to the city -- room for untold numbers of homes for the thousands of new residents Spanish Fork is expecting to move in over the next several years.

"There's a lot of land and people want to build new homes here," said Mayor Joe Thomas. "And you're going to see a lot more. There's annexation petitions right and left."

The 2000 Census listed Spanish Fork as having 20,246 residents. Today that number is nearly 30,000, and the city has issued enough building permits to accommodate another 10,000. By 2050, the city's population is expected to be nearly 56,000, according to Spanish Fork's Web site.

Most of the city's recent annexations and new subdivisions have been in this area, near 400 North and 1500 East, according to Assistant City Manager Seth Perrins. The adjacent city land is zoned residential, meaning that is likely what will go up if the land annexed.

The city will not be able to annex the entire parcel until it redraws its growth boundary, though. The city cannot annex land outside the boundary, which rubs through the 479 acres, but discussions to move the line are already underway. All things considered, it may be as long as three months before the annexation request is approved.

The ball is rolling, with a public comment period now underway. Protests must be from people who live within a half mile of the proposed annexation and they must be submitted to the city and the Utah County Boundary Commission by May 16.

Location, location, location is an old saying in the real estate business, and the location of the 479 acres may make it a prime area for new houses. The area will be near the site of Maple Mountain High School, which will open in fall 2009 to serve students from parts of Spanish Fork and Mapleton.

Several months ago, the City Council and Planning Commission met to discuss which areas the city would focus on for new growth, and the area near the high school was deemed one of the top priorities.

Jesse Conway of LEI Consulting Engineers, who is representing the 20-plus landowners who submitted the petition, said he is still talking with the city about what will be permitted on the land if it is annexed. But there's no doubt that the new high school is driving growth, and new residents who move to the area for the high school will need homes.

"With the high school and everything there's a lot of stuff that's out that way," Conway said.

Along with potential zoning designations, Conway and the landowners are discussing utilities. Water, sewer and electricity services will need to be added if developers are going to start building heavily on the land.

"It's really, really, really preliminary in the process," Conway said.

delts145
Apr 6, 2007, 1:11 PM
Alpine

Wasatch Front enclave to add even more beauty to it's idealic setting

Alpine spruses up city with old-fashioned street lights


ALICE OSBORNE - North County Staff
In the next few months Alpine residents will enjoy the soft glow of new, turn-of-the-century styled street lights. The lights are going in from the roundabout, up and down Main Street, to 200 North, just outside Carmela's Reception Center.

The project is moving forward in two phases. The first phase places the lights at the round-about, going north, to the Main Street and Canyon Crest bridges, where the glass bulbs will sit atop all bridge posts. The second phase, to proceed as money allows, will be completed with lights continuing up Main Street from the bridge to end at 200 North.

Phase one is almost complete, with five lights currently in place -- four surrounding the round-about entrance onto Main Street and a sample light on the north side of Legacy Park at Center Street, just across from City Hall.

"This style was chosen for its quaint, old-fashioned feel. We hope citizens will find these lights add to Alpine's small-town charm, and that they'll like the homey ambience they give Main Street," city councilwoman Kimberly Bryant said.

Scott Jorgensen, manager of The Junction just opposite the round-about, said he feels these lights do add charm.

"And we like the added safety they give the area. Light is always a good thing." he said.

Bryant explained that the lights are designed to increase street safety as they shine down on the street, but not directly onto homes. Another goal was to find a style that would compliment existing architecture.

"The City Council has been extremely cautious and fiscally responsible in pursuing this project. UDOT has contributed some money, and we're looking at the feasibility of an 'Adopt-a-Light' program for additional funding to complete the job," Bryant said.

Teri Jerman, a realtor for Pine Valley Realty summed it up.

"Community street lighting is one piece of a complex mosaic that makes Alpine such a great place to live," she said. "It's this consistent attention to details that helps maintain Alpine's desirability."

jedikermit
Apr 6, 2007, 1:44 PM
Yeah, welcome Poodle!

I felt the same way when I found this place--I always thought I was the only one desperately searching newspapers for new projects and sketching out possible skylines on my homework and the backs of napkins. Good to find a place like this.

Great news about Provo--hopefully we'll hear something concrete on that soon.

wrendog
Apr 6, 2007, 2:41 PM
The 2100 North alternative is part of a study being done by UDOT to determine the pathway of the Mountain View Corridor project. Initially UDOT had focused on south Lehi for an east-west freeway at 1500, 1900 or 2100 South streets. Saratoga Springs leaders didn't want the 2100 South alternative since it cut into the city's Loch Lommond subdivision.


Guess who lives in the Loch Lomond subdivision? That's right. Me.


2100 N! 2100 N! 2100 N!

i-215
Apr 6, 2007, 3:12 PM
How built up is the area around 2100 North? If I remember right it was supposed to be a master-planned community, but it never got built. From what I can tell it's free and clear.

wrendog
Apr 6, 2007, 3:48 PM
I think I read that with the 2100 N alignment, only 20 or so houses would have to come down. With 1900 S alignment (the one that affects me), they would have to tear down 100 or so..

BuiLDing GuRL
Apr 6, 2007, 4:17 PM
We don't need any more Walmarts. :yes:

I'm not a fan of Wal-Marts either but if these communities that come together to protest the Wal-Marts being built would actually NOT shop there once they are up we wouldn't have so many of them.

poodledoodledude
Apr 6, 2007, 4:47 PM
hello guys...

yes, the history of my handle go WAY back.
i had a poodle for 17 years, i have a 'doodle' because i'm a 'dude'
get it?? LOL :)

anyway, i like the ring of it..just rolls off the tongue like butter!

anyway, went by the arbor on the avenues in NE Provo by riverwoods. things are coming along smoothly. i'm glad they are at LEAST more than 3 stories tall. wish they were TALLER, but hey, i can't complain..

poodledoodledude

poodledoodledude
Apr 6, 2007, 4:55 PM
just drove by the provo towne centre mall and noticed some dirt has been moved by a big back hoe thingy...next to the bajios...any news? i haven't heard anything as of yet...

UPDATE: just talked with my buddy bryant at chevron about the new restaurants (like 4 of them). the developers wanted it to be a walking area similar to the one up by the mayan in sandy...

bad news...still in lawsuits--:( not sure if it's between GGP or Provo City, or the old hotel....i'll keep you posted if i find out anything...

poodledoodledude
'be the change you wish to see in the world.'

wrendog
Apr 6, 2007, 5:33 PM
4 new restaurants? sweet.. hopefully at least a couple of those four will be new to the area restaurants too..

poodledoodledude
Apr 6, 2007, 10:58 PM
Target in Provo??
well, they were actually looking at land in east bay across from the post office (North of it) in the vacant lot there. the land, however was too small for their liking. also, the neighbors weren't willing to sell, so the plan fell through.

boy, is sure seems provo has a TON of things 'fall through' don't know if this is 'normal' or if it just seems like provo can't get it together...

??

poodledoodledude
'be the change you wish to see in the world.'

delts145
Apr 7, 2007, 12:31 AM
Alpine

Wasatch Front enclave to add even more beauty to it's idealic setting

Alpine spruses up city with old-fashioned street lights


ALICE OSBORNE - North County Staff
In the next few months Alpine residents will enjoy the soft glow of new, turn-of-the-century styled street lights. The lights are going in from the roundabout, up and down Main Street, to 200 North, just outside Carmela's Reception Center............... "


Took the afternoon off to check out a few things around the Valley. First drove through Alpine. Made me kick myself again for procrastinating my picture taking. Anyway, the new but old style lighting on Main is really cool. Also a ton of new projects on a very old-style scale. Office buildings that look turn of the century,bridges that look like something from Europe etc.

Poodle,speaking of restaurants noticed a new "Chadders" going in at the big Meadowlands over in American Fork. Anyone heard of Chadders before? Also took a drive over to Eagle Mountain and Saratoga Springs to see what all the fuss has been about with the new highways. Wren,I was dumbstruck!!! There are thousands of homes either just completed,or being built. Everywhere you look,huge swaths of land are being developed, not just a lot here and there. I was especially struck by all the construction underway over on the other side of the lake. Luxury homes and gated type communities right up to the shoreline. Wow, those people are going to have some valuable real estate in ten years. The views of the Wasatch and Lake were incredible. And the homes continued on the other side of the highway, right on up the bench to the edge of the mountain. Thousands of new residential units. No wonder there is so much noise about highways in and around Lehi. Main Street Lehi reminded me of traffic in Manhattan,without the skyscrapers.

poodledoodledude
Apr 8, 2007, 4:01 PM
hey delts....no, i've never heard of chadders before...maybe it's a local restaurant similar to ottavios?? i mean, from the outside ottavios looks like it's from a big city too--but it's home grown in provo...

Dillard's may be looking into moving to the meadow's in AF too--it would be their FIRST detached store! don't know where it would go, but someone said it may go next to kohl's...

also, i think what they are building next to bajios near the provo towne centre mall may be a carl's junior...not sure on that, but heard it through the grapevine...

(speaking of grapevines, my little vinyard seems to have been overgrown with weeds...i hear one thing from someone in the loop, and it either falls through, OR it's COMPLETELY inaccurate half the time....sounds like i've got to 'tend' to my vinyard a bit more often than i have been doing....LOL )

wrendog
Apr 8, 2007, 6:26 PM
hey poodledude.. what do you hear about the huge mall up by cabelas that was supposed to be opened by next year? the sign still says Forest City Development, but it's not listed anymore on Forest City's website..

kpexpress
Apr 9, 2007, 7:46 AM
Well guys I have finally left the valley:banana: , moved out here to San Francisco! This place is happenin'. My stay here in the bay area will be short and then at the end of the summer I am off to San Diego for the next five years.

Keep me posted on all the news in the happy valley, and I will continue to pick Brandt's brain on the Gehry project.

Peace out.

KP

wrendog
Apr 9, 2007, 2:29 PM
Nice, brotha! Hopefully the cost of living won't kick your butt... I LOVE San Diego..

poodledoodledude
Apr 9, 2007, 2:41 PM
wrendog!!! i like the name bro--both of our handles take after canines!
at any rate, to answer your question, the deal with the north development is tricky.

both highland and lehi are fighting over water rights and who gets what. also, land issues are HUGE in this part of the county. from what i've heard, there is a land use issue up there over which city has the right of way so to speak.

i know the land was annexed into lehi a few years back...like 2001 or something, but as far as water rights, highland is claiming it, so....how do you build a HUGE mall, with no water rights? highland wants to charge lehi for the water, but lehi says they own the land...

get it? so, i think it's stuck in the courts for now, hence the stall on the development....

i could be wrong on this, as the saying goes, " i heard it through the grapevine" but my grapevine has managed to have some weeds growing, so i feel my info has become tainted....

thanks man! if i get any info, i'll let you know..

poodledoodledude
"be the change you wish to see in the world."

SmilingBob
Apr 9, 2007, 6:39 PM
I'm not a fan of Wal-Marts either but if these communities that come together to protest the Wal-Marts being built would actually NOT shop there once they are up we wouldn't have so many of them.

Problem is that Wal-Mart has become so large that in many communites once the come in most of the other businesses go under. Wal-Mart was built on going into small communities of 10,000-50,000 people and destroying the competition. In larger communities the small business has survived, but in small towns there isn't enough of a specilised customer base for the small business to adapt and survive. Once all the local business close you don't have much choice. It's shop at Wal-mart or drive 10-15 miles to the next town.

Few people understand the connection between their jobs and Wal-Mart. The prices look good, but the "circle of life" affect Wal-Mart has created effects all of us. The more people shop for the cheapest product, then the more our jobs are going to be affected by the drive to provide the cheapest product, not the best value.

Wal-Mart didn't create this dynamic, but they have globalised it.

To bring this back to a development conversation, Wal-Mart asks and cities provide property tax and sales tax incentives for Wal-Mart to locate in their city. These subsidies last for about 10 years at which time Wal-Mart moves to the city next door for the same package of incentives. In the end the community didn't get the tax revenue they thought would be acheived, local business have closed and they have an empty building. The financial benefits of locating a Wal-Mart in a town or city have not been shown to make much of an impact to the local economy.

They are one of the largest recipients of government subsidies related to buildings and developments.

i-215
Apr 10, 2007, 4:48 AM
The trouble is to fight Wal-Mart at this point would cause huge regulatory laws to be passed that would end up hurting ethical businesses as well, while Wal-Mart's legal team would wriggle through anyway.

In my lifetime I'll see something go fowl with the world's gasoline supply, at least for a period of time. All it takes is 2-3 years of $20/gallon gasoline and China, Wal-Mart, and Eagle Mountain will all grind to a halt.

delts145
Apr 10, 2007, 11:42 AM
Spanish Fork breaks ground for center

By Jeremy Twitchell
Deseret Morning News
SPANISH FORK — As a few dozen dignitaries turned the first shovels of dirt to make way for Spanish Fork's new police and courts facility, a chorus of "It's about time" made its way through the crowd.

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/4011783.jpg
Edwards and Daniels ArchitectsThe Spanish Fork Justice Center will house police and courts. Completion date is July 2008.

The $18 million Justice Center, which will house the Spanish Fork Police Department and courtrooms for 4th District Court, was proposed about two years ago under the administration of previous Mayor Dale Barney.
"Mayor Barney got the ball rolling on this — then left us with the bill," quipped current Mayor Joe Thomas at a ceremony Monday. "I don't know what's up with that."
City officials tried to begin construction on the facility last year but were stymied by a lengthy land acquisition process.
In the meantime, the budget for the building that was originally planned to cost $14 million grew to $18 million as the police department asked for more space and construction costs rose.
But at the groundbreaking, all parties involved expressed great satisfaction at the final design.
"I really think that we've been able to maintain the vision both of the city and of the courts and develop a facility that will serve the needs of both for a number of years," said Tom Brennan, the project architect from Edwards and Daniels Architects in Salt Lake City.
Brennan said one of the main concerns in the design was to create a strong presence for the building, which will be readily visible from the freeway, while serving the needs of both organizations.
The building will have two distinct wings, each with its own entrance.
Brennan said emphasizing the legal separation between police and the court system was a driving factor in the design.
"It makes a lot of sense to co-locate these two entities in the same location, but at the same time, it's important to maintain that separation," he said.
Workers and subcontractors for Layton Construction began work on the site as soon as the groundbreaking crowd cleared.
Mike Daniels, project manager for Layton, said working on a building with so many stakeholders usually would be a challenge, but this process has been smooth so far.
"So far everyone we've met and worked with is all pulling in the same direction," Daniels said.
Daniels said he was aware that the project would bring dust and other unwanted impacts to the community but pledged that his company would do all it could to limit those aspects of the construction.
When completed in July 2008, the Justice Center's address will be approximately 700 W. 100 South. It will be the centerpiece on a 13-acre plot of land the city acquired earlier this year with the intention of creating a centralized campus for future city buildings.
The City Council approved a $22 million bond last month to finance the building's construction and pay for some infrastructure improvements on the north side of town. No tax increase is expected for the bond.
The city finished paying off a 10-year bond on the fire station in 2006, and council members voted to keep property taxes the same so that the money that had been going to the fire station could be diverted to paying a bond for the Justice Center.
Money from 4th District Court, which will pay Spanish Fork city to lease space in the buildings for its needs, will also help pay off the bond.

poodledoodledude
Apr 10, 2007, 10:05 PM
i was thinking the other day about the history of univ. mall in orem. back in the 70's when the mall was first proposed for provo, it was going to be built on UNIVERSITY ave, where the academy square is now. they were going to raize the buildings and put in a HUGE mall...this is before everything developed around it.

downtown provo business complained. back then, EVERYTHING was in provo....nothing around the county but orchards, fields, and rural areas. so, provo turned down the mall.

orem came in and said they would take the mall. the mall had to be as close to provo as it could because they didn't want people travelling that far to get to it.

so, they put it in the middle of an orchard right on the border of the city. they kept the name UNIVERSITY mall and orem was born!

within a few years, PROVO almost DIED--in fact, i think it was on it's last breath. so, provo lost the mall, and orem reaped the benefits. taxes and all.

so, years later, provo decided to make downtown a business center so to speak--lawyers, accountants, gov't buildings, etc. so, the bigger buildings started coming in.

for awhile orem would allow NOTHING over 3 stories in their city. that is why the mckay events center in orem has the 'hills' built up around the bottom to stay within code for the city.

so, downtown provo is beginning to build UP..which, for me is AWESOME
years later, provo realized they needed a mall and provo towne centre was developed in a trailer court in the "heart" of east bay.

JCPenney left the univ mall with a 25% ownership in the mall. ZCMI threatened to leave, but because of the tax breaks orem gave them to stay, they did. Nordstrom came in, and their designers redesigned the mall to make it viable again.

Now, the county has two nice malls. which i think is good for everyone! both malls have good and bad things about them, which i think is fine. i wish provo towne centre had more stores i liked (like banana republic, and eddie bauer), but univ mall--what the HELL were you thinking to paint that gawd awful ceiling PEACH and PURPLE only to shine LIGHTS on it?!?!

so, i go to BOTH malls. as long as my money stays in the county, i'm fine.

by the way, riverwoods is REALLY struggling. the nordstrom that came in to univ mall has a HUGE following--similar to dillard's in the provo towne centre. banana republic, eddie bauer, etc moved to univ mall to be by nordy's.

abercrombie wants to go to univ mall, but provo towne centre threatened to sue them if they did. General Growth Properties that owns the provo towne has a legal contract that if abercrombie were to leave riverwoods, they MUST to go the provo towne centre mall.

by the way, abercrombie owns hollister...and that is why hollister is in the provo towne centre mall.

also, victorias secret in the provo towne centre is a LOT bigger than univ mall because the provo mall was owned by JP Realty, and they had a contract with Victorias secret to only be in their malls. but a smaller one went to univ mall under a guise....they could only be a certain size or GGP would file a lawsuit for a conflict of interest. that is what happens when stock holders own a company....

provo towne does have a bit of an advantage--GGP (the owners of provo towne) are the second largest mall owner in the USA! that means they have a TON of pull, so if provo towne's sales are falling, GGP will REALLY redevelop the mall to make sure it is successful. add new stores, and new anchors etc....

WHEW....i'm out of breath...any questions??

poodledoodledude
"be the change you wish to see in the world"

delts145
Apr 10, 2007, 10:25 PM
^^^

That was a lot of fun reading the info. poodledoodle. I had forgotten all about the Academy Square option. Thank goodness that building was saved though. It is easily one of my favorites in the Western U.S. along with the City Hall in Salt Lake.
Someone needs to take some pics of the Hinckley Alumni Center going up on the BYU Campus. I made a point of driving by it for a look-see this past weekend on my way to a family function.That thing is really something! From the renderings you don't realize how big the building is, because it has somewhat of a very homey,traditional design. I was also very impressed with the materials they are using. Definately top quality stone,etc.

Oh, Also noticed a large,very attractive new building just next to the byu studio entrance and a lot of new construction going up around the old Reams site on Freedom Blvd.

wrendog
Apr 10, 2007, 10:42 PM
that's why I wonder if the Terrace at Traverse Mountain mall will succeed (or even get built for that matter). There are 3 major malls within 20 minutes of the site (SouthTowne, University and PTC... 4 if you count Riverwoods). My wife would love it to be built, as it would be close to us, but I don't really see it happening (especially to the grand scale that it was announced 3 years or so ago.)

poodledoodledude
Apr 10, 2007, 11:48 PM
yes, that concerns me too...don't forget about all the stores in AF and the HUGE mall and our favorite hotel development as of late-- the one in PG. they want to make that like riverwoods/gateway...so the mall may never go into traverse mountain for a few years.

it seems that the growth can't keep up with itself.
i mean, if it grows too fast, you have a LOT of vacancies--like riverwoods. i mean 1/2 that mall is empty! nothing but restaurants. i think when the arbors on the avenue are done, it will help. that is like developing 75 homes across the street--and they have MONEY too.

hopefully, the mall at traverse mountain will get built, just don't know if they can handle the competition...not even provo and orem seem to handle it well as of late.

yes, the new development is going in across the street from my little flower shop! it'll be cool when that gets done! it's going to be 168 units, which, again, is like having 168 homes go in, with at least 4 people in each home! that should sure help my business.

poodledoodledude
"be the change you wish to see in the world.":)

i-215
Apr 11, 2007, 1:21 AM
Someone needs to take some pics of the Hinckley Alumni Center going up on the BYU Campus. I made a point of driving by it for a look-see this past weekend on my way to a family function.

I wish I had a camera. Anyway for those who haven't been by here, the building is almost entirely sided and has all the roofing material pretty much on. I would expect it to be open by fall. I think there's still a lot of interior work left, and I don't recall seeing any windows on yet.

urbanboy
Apr 11, 2007, 3:53 AM
Someone needs to take some pics of the Hinckley Alumni Center going up on the BYU Campus. I made a point of driving by it for a look-see this past weekend on my way to a family function.That thing is really something! From the renderings you don't realize how big the building is, because it has somewhat of a very homey,traditional design. I was also very impressed with the materials they are using. Definately top quality stone,etc.


I've seen "Hinkley's" new center. That large bell tower, or whatever it is, looks very phallic. I guess it's how he wants to be remembered. :haha:

poodledoodledude
Apr 11, 2007, 4:30 PM
i'm not a BYU fan by ANY means...i have my OWN opinions about that school, HOWEVER, the bell tower thingy they are buildins is BEAUTIFUL!!!

a lot of universities have a nice bell tower--like the USU in logan. i'm glad they are building it....i wish the tower was taller, but it's ok looking...

ALSO--

i drove in downtown provo today and noticed the back end of the wells fargo center is all fenced off. looks like they are getting ready to do something. i know they want to expand it, but some of the businesses are still in the old building next door. scaffolding is going up...

any ideas??

poodledoodledude
"be the change you wish to see in the world."

Wasatch_One
Apr 11, 2007, 5:15 PM
Suposedly there is going to be a phase II of the Wells Fargo Center. Phase II is suposed to be all residential. But from what I understand it is going to be just south of the current building.... where exactly was the fencing? (N, E, S, W side of the WFC?)

delts145
Apr 11, 2007, 7:30 PM
Wasatch, what was that very upscale, multi-story new building I saw next to the veterinary clinic and the studio entrance over on (?2280) north?

delts145
Apr 12, 2007, 12:03 PM
by the way, riverwoods is REALLY struggling. the nordstrom that came in to univ mall has a HUGE following--similar to dillard's in the provo towne centre. banana republic, eddie bauer, etc moved to univ mall to be by nordy's.

Provo's Arbors on the Avenue

This announcement is dated November 24th, 2005. This past month "March 22,2007," a phase II was approved for 62 units. One reason for the approved high density was to increase the customer base at the Riverwoods Shops

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — The upscale walkable community at the north end of University Avenue is growing again, but this time the action is across the street from the Shops at Riverwoods.

http://deseretnews.com/photos/2525357.jpg
Bruce Cameron
The Arbors on the Avenue will have 112 condominiums and town homes.

The Provo City Council last week unanimously approved The Arbors on the Avenue, 112 condos and town homes with underground parking, a park, a clubhouse and easy access to the Provo River Trail and the restaurants, movie theaters and shops at the Riverwoods.
All that's missing is a grocery store, and that need may be filled soon, too. Preliminary talks have taken place between Riverwoods ownership and a grocer to build a small market just north of Borders.
The high number of units proposed for The Arbors on the Avenue caused some concern for members of the planning commission and City Council. The developers initially approached the city about building 96 units with 23,000 square feet of commercial retail space, but vacancies in the Riverwoods retail shops led them to instead ask for 136 units.
That proposal passed the planning commission by a 3-2 vote, then ran into opposition before the City Council from neighboring residents and developments. That led to an unusual situation where Arbors developer Bruce Cameron and partners Greg and Devin Bird of C&A Construction found it necessary to reach understandings in private meetings with competitors to feel certain they would secure the required 5-2 vote of the City Council for the zoning concessions they needed.
"That's the first time we've ever had to meet with competitors and the city," C&A's Devin Bird said.
The vote was unanimous, but City Council members said they would never again approve a project with such high density outside of the downtown area. The exact density of the project remained open to interpretation. C&A project manager Greg Bird calculated it at 20 units per acre based on the site's total of 5.6 acres. City officials reached a different, higher figure because they don't count about half of the property due to slopes too steep for use.
The $26 million project likely will compete for young married professionals and empty nesters with The Village at Riverwoods and Midtown Village on State Street in Orem. The developer of The Village at Riverwoods recently sold the last of 142 units; Midtown Village is in the early stages of construction.
More condo projects are underway on or near University Avenue. The Trellis on the Green, a set of luxury condos under construction adjacent to Riverside Country Club, is expected to be done in the spring.
The Arbors will offer two- and three-bedroom units with secure underground parking and elevator access to most residences.
"The Arbors will have both two-bedroom and spacious two-bedroom units with a den, study or nursery with hardwood floors, quality cabinets, granite countertops, nine-foot ceilings and engineered soundproofing," Bird said.
The units will range from 1,180 to 1,644 square feet and cost between $239,000 and $269,000. The first phase is expected to be completed in late summer 2006.
Cameron optioned undevel- oped property in 2003 from five different property owners: Shirl Loveless, Ed Payne, Peter Mourik, Joram Lichtenstein and Roger Gillespie. Paul Warnock is the architect.

delts145
Apr 12, 2007, 8:09 PM
THE MEADOWS TO RIVAL SIZE OF UNIVERSITY MALL

American Fork Citizen/Thursday, April 12,2007
Barbara Christiansen

When phase two of the sprawling American Fork commercial development The Meadows is complete in the next few years, it will rival Orem's University Mall in size and offerings.
Retail stores, restaurants, housing, offices, a park-like atmosphere and more are planned for the southern phase two portion of the shopping center in west American Fork.
Representatives of Woodbury Corporation and Woodfield Development presented plans for the second phase of its successful shopping center at a joint session of the City Council and Planning Commission.
Lynn Woodbury told the group the development would be approximately the same size as the main section of the University Mall which they also developed.
George Melara an architect preparing the design of the second phase, said the developers had a vision for the center.
"We wanted to create a place, not just put a bunch of retail there," he said.
J.C. Penney has committed to put a store in the development, provided the timing is right.
"Penney's wants to open in fall of '08," said Woodbury. The rest of the first phase wants to be open in the spring of '09. Timing is a very important thing to the tenants." Another possible tenant the developers are working with is a large yet-to-be identified bookstore.
There are also plans for an expansion of the Cinemark theaters on the development's southeast side. Near there would be a central plaza area with broad sidewalks and benches.
"We want to create an environment where people want to be there,"Melara said. "It becomes a place where the community really interacts." He said the area could become an "urban village" where people stroll and walk their pets. It would have water features, he said."We want to create something that is totally unique," he said.
One concept that would be unparalledled in American Fork is placing housing on floors above the retail shops.
"In the first phase, it would probably be only four stories above it," Woodbury said. Plans were not yet firmed up how many housing units there would be, but Woodbury said he felt there was a demand for that style of multi-use development.
"The market is not a family with six children," he said."We think there is some demand, but we are not fully sure how much."
American Fork Mayor Heber Thompson said while the concept may be relatively new to the city, it has been used in Europe.
"Long before there was American Fork, there were European cities like this,"he said, giving the example of Paris, where people live above stores.
Planning Commissioner Joe Gordon told the developers the SC-1 (shopping center) zone did not allow for residential uses and it could cause some delays to follow the legal processes to make changes to the zone.
"Recognizing those things will take some time," he told the developers.
Woodbury said he would seek the city's cooperation to move things along as quickly as possible.
"This type of development has proven that it can really work, but it can't work if the mentality of the city isn't to move it along as fast as possible," he said. He gave an example of what they might seek. "We are asking for a relaxation of some of your sign ordinances," he said.
Thompson expressed optimism about the concept. "We would be willing to compromise if this is a good concept for our city and region," he said.
Woodbury assured him the development would meet those criteria.
"We really think this is an opportunity for American Fork to do something that is really special in Utah County," he said.
H.H. Hadfield of the city's engineering department offered caution about changing ordinances too quickly.
"We are concerned with unintended consequences," he said, indicating changes needed to be completely analyzed in order to have the right outcome.
Some said they had concerns about the traffic and parking.
"you have got some problem areas that require more parking," Gordon said.
Planning Commission chair James Hansen said there were already traffic problems near the theaters, and the plan closed some of the roads near them.
"Now, the traffic is bad trying to get to the theaters,"He said. "You have closed off accesses. You have got to look at getting traffic around the perimeters."
Planner Rod Despain was cautiously optimistic.
"There are a lot of things to be concerned about, but a lot of those are details" he said. "I hope that we don't send the Woodbury group home saying there are insurmountable issues."

wrendog
Apr 12, 2007, 8:19 PM
wow.. I thought The Meadows was basically done. My wife and I decided (The Meadows is the closest shopping area to our house) that all it needs is a book store (barnes or borders) and then they can be done. :) This tells me that the terrace at traverse mountain may never get built..

Wasatch_One
Apr 12, 2007, 8:55 PM
Wasatch, what was that very upscale, multi-story new building I saw next to the veterinary clinic and the studio entrance over on (?2280) north?

Its Trellis on the Green

http://www.trellisinfo.com/

delts145
Apr 12, 2007, 9:06 PM
:previous:

Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
Wasatch, what was that very upscale, multi-story new building I saw next to the veterinary clinic and the studio entrance over on (?2280) north?

Wasatch:
Its Trellis on the Green

http://www.trellisinfo.com/


Very nice. That and several other major projects I noticed in Provo will get me off of my photo-procrastinating butt yet.

delts145
Apr 12, 2007, 9:25 PM
wow.. I thought The Meadows was basically done. My wife and I decided (The Meadows is the closest shopping area to our house) that all it needs is a book store (barnes or borders) and then they can be done. :) This tells me that the terrace at traverse mountain may never get built..

I've been very impressed with the Meadows thus far. I shop there often and am converted to it's convenience. There are so many different types of stores in close proximity to each other.
I don't know how many people I've asked what they would think of living in some type of apartments above retail in The Meadows. Particularly young couples who are now in the condo's market said they would want to live there definately. Glad to see they're now talking seriously about a residential element. I can see why Woodbury is anxious to pounce on the next phase now. He wants to get the jump on the mixed development in Pleasant Grove and The Terrace. If the Terrace and Gehry project is going to go in, it will have to be very-upscale and really distinguish itself. The Andersen development ideas seem to be correct, I just hope Andersen has his funding in place and its not a pipe dream like Wasatch suggested it could be.

delts145
Apr 17, 2007, 10:39 AM
Provo's Downtown Alliance Now Paying Dividends.

It's tax time for downtown Provo

Provo considering renewal of tax for business alliance

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — A dozen years ago, Ted Schofield thought about pulling up the roots of Heindselman's, the oldest knitting and embroidery store in the United States and moving out of historic downtown Provo.

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/4033745.jpg
Stuart Johnson, Deseret Morning News
Renewal of funding of a downtown Provo tax district would include money for beautification such as this display of flowers on Center Street. Meetings will focus on whether to renew the tax for three years.

"About 60 to 70 percent of my block was vacant," Schofield said. "That old saying applied, 'The last one out, turn out the lights.' We were thinking of moving because it just didn't seem like downtown Provo was going anywhere. The emphasis seemed to be on the malls, the shopping centers, everywhere else, and there was nothing being done to help downtown."
Other Americans cities are hurting today because their downtowns died — but business is better now on Schofield's block, and he is convinced much of the credit for the resuscitation should go to the Downtown Business Alliance.
The future of the alliance depends on a host of meetings, one of them at 7 tonight, when the Provo Municipal Council is expected to give notice of its intent to reinstate a tax on downtown businesses that would fund the alliance for another three years.
Merchant organizations have come and gone in downtown Provo, but Schofield said the Downtown Business Alliance has been successful and deserves another three years to continue ongoing programs and institute new ones that are planned, such as an effort to create pocket parks and a media campaign to inform people where they can park downtown.
The business alliance pays for sidewalk powerwashes and maintenance of flower beds in the area and hanging flower pots on streetlight poles in the district. It also funds storefront improvement grants and has paid for new newspaper racks, wall murals, distinctive Historic Downtown Provo street signs, banners that announce coming events, art displays in empty storefronts and signs that direct visitors to parking areas.
The alliance also sponsors Halloween and Easter events, a "Movies in the Park" series and a Christmas parade. With the Provo Arts Council, the alliance has installed sculptures throughout the downtown district and sponsors art gallery strolls to draw potential customers downtown.
Those and other initiatives, combined with a good economy that has brought new jobs and businesses into the area, including the seven-story Wells Fargo Center at 100 N. University, have boosted the downtown district.
The bulk of the district stretches from 600 West to 300 East and from 100 South to 200 North. It also extends north to 400 North between 300 West and 100 East.
"When we started the alliance, I think the attitude of the businesses was that if something was going to be done, we're going to have to do it, and I think it's our obligation to do it," Schofield said.
So in 2001, most of the business and property owners in downtown Provo agreed to pay an extra .0015 in property tax each year to fund the new Downtown Business Alliance.
In 2004, the tax was renewed at .0011. If the tax is reinstated in July for 2007-10, businesses in the downtown district will annually pay an extra .0014 percent in property tax.
The tax would give the Downtown Business Alliance an annual budget of nearly $170,000.
Not all business and property owners in the downtown district agree with the plan. Some have protested the alliance from the start. They'll have several opportunities to do so over the next three months, but a crucial deadline is four weeks away: Written protests are due to the city recorder by 5 p.m. on May 14.
The Provo Municipal Council will conduct a public hearing on May 15, but if the written protests don't amount to representation of more than 50 percent of affected downtown property, the council can create the tax district.

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/4034050a.jpg
Deseret Morning News graphic

"No one objects to what's happening in Provo," Schofield said, "but there is a very small minority of property owners who don't like that it's an additional assessment and who think Provo city should be funding it."
A message left for for one business owner opposed to the tax was not returned.
Business and property owners would pay a minimum of $175 and a maximum of $10,000 per year, depending on the size of their lots.
The money pays for four committees and budget areas: Beautification and marketing each account for a little less than one-third of the proposed budget. The final slice, a little more than one-third, goes to two areas, transportation and business expansion and retention.
The committees are staffed on a volunteer basis by business and property owners.
Bradford believes 80 percent of those affected are in favor of renewing the tax district.
"We have to make sure our businesses who have seen the benefit and are supportive of the alliance are telling the councilmembers how they feel," Bradford said.
There's no question where Schofield stands.
"Provo is not over the hump yet," he said. "We could easily go back to the situation like a lot of cities where the downtown becomes a virtual ghost town.
"With the special improvement district, I think Provo has a very bright future. Without it, I don't know."

delts145
Apr 17, 2007, 11:12 AM
Spanish Fork,
Remodel development in the works for Nebo District HQ

By Laura Hancock
Deseret Morning News
SPANISH FORK — When the Nebo District Board of Education meets to talk about such issues as boundary changes and budget allocations, it's standing-room only for folks who want to listen to the discussion.

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/4021224.jpg
Jason Olson, Deseret Morning News
Nebo School District offices, front, and Landmark High School in Spanish Fork. A firm has been hired to study the two buildings with a remodel in mind.

Sixty chairs are in the audience area and there isn't a lot of room to stand.
So, when parents show up to voice support or concern over programs or policies, people take places in halls and lean on doorframes to see and hear action in the board room.
But it's not just the board's chambers that needs some elbow room at district headquarters. Cubicles in the basement level are tightly packed, and it's so cramped in the information-technology department that bosses send computer programmers into schools to have peace and quiet while they are working.
To figure out solutions to the space problems, Nebo's school board on Wednesday hired a firm to study the building at 350 S. Main. Kevin Madson and Associates of Provo will complete the study for the district.
"If you've walked around the district offices recently, you'll see every nook and cranny (is filled)," said school board member Randy Boothe.
The architect will also study possibilities for the two-story building now used to house Landmark High School. The building is immediately west of district offices.
The remodeling projects will start in spring 2008, said Steve Maughan, director of operations for the 25,000-student school district.
Landmark, the district's alternative high school, has grown to about 250 students, district spokeswoman Lana Hiskey said. On Wednesday, ground was broken for a new Landmark High three blocks to the south. It should be finished by fall 2008.
District officials have not said what they intend to do with the 1934 building where Landmark classes are now held.
However, they've discussed "getting something else built so we can move out of here when" the district headquarters gets remodeled, said Tracy Olsen, the district's business administrator.
That building will likely be on the same property as district headquarters, possibly in between district headquarters and the current Landmark High, Olsen said.
Olsen is budgeting $3 million for the remodeling of the two buildings.
The money will come from the district's capital outlay budget, Olsen said, for the 2008-2009 fiscal year.
About 90 people work in the district headquarters, which is about 16,000 square feet. The Landmark building is about 12,300 square feet.
The public will benefit from a remodeling of the district offices, Nebo Education Association President Jeff Alexander said.
"We really do need a bigger board room, so when people give public input there's more room," said Alexander.

delts145
Apr 17, 2007, 11:22 AM
Utah business in brief

The Salt Lake Tribune

Astle and Co. and Gary Maxwell Development have broken ground on a 61-unit condominium project. The development is at 100 W. 200 South, Provo.

:shrug: Anyone have more details on this project?

delts145
Apr 17, 2007, 11:35 AM
Utah County Booming
Tuesday, April 17, 2007
County is sixth fastest growing in nation

http://scenicutah.com/nebo/utah-valley.jpg

NATHAN JOHNSON - Daily Herald
If the roads and shopping malls feel crowded now, consider this: Utah County is the sixth fastest growing area in the nation.

The U.S. Census Bureau has ranked the Provo-Orem metro area -- all of Utah County and Juab County -- in the top 10 fastest growers, by percentage, at 25.9 percent. The estimates measured change from April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006.

Planners and city officials say that these kinds of growth rates have a dramatic affect on the counties and cities that experience the influx of new people.

The Census figures estimate that the area has a population of 474,180 -- a change of 97,402 people in just six years.

But the Governor's Office of Planning and Budget puts that number even higher. It uses a slightly different method to collect population statistics, and Shawn Eliot of the Mountainland Association of Governments said he believes the state numbers to be more accurate because it uses more specialized indicators, including building permit data.

The state-derived numbers also include less territory, as Juab County is not included in the estimate. They place the county's growth at 27.9 percent -- 103,531 new people in the last six years.

Eliot said that in the 1990s, Utah County saw growth of 40 percent. This, he says, is something that he fully expects to see again, noting that after six years the county has already matched the numerical growth of the 1990s.

Most of the impact from the growth, Eliot said, will be found on the roads and other infrastructure reaching maximum capacity. There will also be more homes, and the impact will be felt in social services.

Eliot says that the growth can be most easily seen when traveling on State Road 73 from Lehi to Eagle Mountain. "What used to be sleepy farm roads has become congested most of the day," he said. "It's going to get a lot worse before it gets better."

Provo City spokeswoman Raylene Ireland said that mounting transportation issues are a major reason for the "huge support for the quarter-cent sales tax increase," which was approved by voters last year. The increase will be used for putting in commuter rail.

"There's no question that transportation has become a more difficult and demanding issue," Ireland said.

Plans are already under way to alleviate the county's growing pains.

A number of roads are undergoing environmental studies -- the first step for road improvements. Eliot noted that the studies are only good for three years, so it is likely that these roads are going to get attention from road crews soon.

On the study list are State Road 92, Geneva Road, 1000 South in Lehi, Redwood Road, and the Interstate 15 interchange in Springville at 400 South.

Eliot said that these improvements are coming in preparation for I-15 to "go under the knife" in 2011. These roads are what are called "construction mitigation roads" -- streets that need to be widened and improved to keep people moving when the freeway's capacity is cut down.

"The good side of that," Eliot said, "is the Legislature and Congress over the past few years have been pumping a lot of money into the area ... $300 million last year."

Along with all those new roads comes new buildings. Last year, Eagle Mountain, Saratoga Springs and Lehi processed a combined 3,500 building permits. In the Traverse Ridge and IM Flash plant area, 1,700 building permits were issued.

Another mark of growth came from Elk Ridge, when its sewer system recently reached capacity and a moratorium on new sewer lines had to be put into effect.

Southern Utah, however, is growing even faster. St. George is ranked by the Census Bureau at number one with a growth rate of 39.8 percent.

Nathan Johnson can be reached at 344-2543 or njohnson@heraldextra.com

Facts about the Provo-Orem Metro Area

The largest population by age is the 20-24 year old population. The 20-24 year old population segment is larger than the total population of all residents 50 and older.

66.8 percent of housing units are owner-occupied.

Provo-Orem is the 6th fastest growing metro area in the US, growing 25.9 percent from April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006.

The average household has 3.59 people.

94 percent of survey respondents identified themselves as white.

The median age is 23.3 years.

poodledoodledude
Apr 18, 2007, 8:04 PM
delts--

good articles buddy! oh, by the way, i think you are referring to the 'huntington' condo project. it will be 4 stories tall and kiddy-korner to the post office. i was going to buy a condo there-- EXCELLENT view of the city scape of provo. i felt like i was IN THE CITY. the nuskin building, the marriott, and the tabernacles and gov't buildings can be clearly seen from an upper floor.

they are have both upper and lower condos be a 'townhouse style'. i think it will be AWESOME! i mean, you can be on a lower level, yet still have an upstairs and downstairs--which i like. also, the upper ones will have some balconies, but not a lot. it is a good development overall. good location, and excellent to bring people downtown again.

i also drove by the wells fargo center and see scaffolding put up. the upper penthouse is entirely vacant, so i'm not sure what is going on.

i also hope they put in some pocket parks in downtown provo. good idea.

poodledoodledude
Apr 18, 2007, 8:10 PM
i talked with a customer of mine that came into the shop. nice lady. i was asking her about UVRMC and the future. sounds like they need land BAD!! she said a lot of patients are transfered elsewhere because they have NO ROOM for them. the new building they are building will do NOTHING to really alleviate the problem either.

UVRMC owns the homes just south of the hospital campus, and those homes will be raized this summer to make way for parking. also, i remember the provo city council discussing this issue at a past meeting. the parking lot, of course, was approved.

she mentioned in the next 10 years, is something doesn't happen, UVRMC may need to change cities...don't know where they would go, but provo CAN NOT do without any hospitals!! so, they REALLY need to buy the fox field across the street.

talk is they want to buy the field and have BYU buy the high school. with that money, the provo school district could build a new high school by the lake and go from there....don't know how factual all this is, but it was fun talking with her. she's in administration, so i felt good about the info!

any other news, lemme know!
thanks group!

poodledoodledude
'be the change you wish to see in the world.'

delts145
Apr 19, 2007, 11:27 AM
Thursday, April 19, 2007



Eagle Mountain seeks traffic-flow solutions

S.R. 73 is sole link to I-15; cars often bumper-to-bumper

By David Rasmussen
Deseret Morning News
EAGLE MOUNTAIN — It's no secret that traffic in the commute from I-15 to Eagle Mountain has left residents unhappy. On Wednesday evening, members of the community got a chance to hear plans to alleviate the traffic headache.
The city hosted an open house at Eagle Mountain City Hall, with representatives from the Utah Department of Transportation and other involved parties present to field questions and inform the public of what is in the works in the coming years.
Currently, residents of Saratoga Springs and Eagle Mountain have state Road 73 as their sole connection to I-15, causing daily bumper-to-bumper traffic on the stretch of road that has proven sorely inadequate for the booming communities' needs.
"People just want to see that there's not just one way out of here," said Linda Peterson, community relations coordinator for Eagle Mountain. "People have been happy to see that there are options out there, that plans are in the works."
Those plans are coming along but may take longer to reach fruition than most residents would like. UDOT and the Federal Highway Administration are conducting an environmental impact study on the Mountain View Corridor, a proposed highway and transit corridor for northwestern Utah County. Factors including impact on the wetlands north of Utah Lake prompted creation of three alternatives for the corridor. Due to budget constraints and the timetable for approval of the required environmental impact statement, construction will not begin anytime soon.
"It depends on the money; that's a big constraint," said Terry Newell, UDOT project manager for the Mountain View Corridor. "If we had all the money we needed, the summer of 2009 is the earliest dirt would be flying."
The first alternative involves construction of a southern freeway that would follow the west end of the valley before skirting the northern edge of Utah Lake and eventually connecting with the existing Pleasant Grove/Lindon I-15 interchange. A second option would stay away from the wetlands north of the lake. A freeway would be constructed across northern Utah County on 2100 North in Lehi, lessening impact concerns on the wetlands and reducing the number of relocated homes. The third alternative proposes construction of three different east-west arterials across Utah County at Porter Rockwell Boulevard, 2100 North and 1900 South, with each arterial providing three lanes in each direction.
"The three alternatives we have would solve the traffic problem in different ways," Newell said. "That's part of what we have to weigh now. We aren't without issues on any of these alignments."
Notwithstanding the difficulties involved, many residents will be happy for any relief they can get to the daily traffic nightmare.
"I don't think there would be any resistance from anybody in Eagle Mountain for any program that is chosen," said Richard Shelley, an Eagle Mountain resident who commutes daily to Salt Lake County. "I just want to see a timeline or when we're going to see some relief."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

delts145
Apr 19, 2007, 11:32 AM
Deadline is near on saving church

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — The clock is ticking toward a deadline on saving Provo's old, vacant Catholic Church building or dooming it to a date with a wrecking ball.

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/4036836.jpg
Jason Olson, Deseret Morning News
Provo's old Catholic church will be taken off landmarks register if foundation can't buy it by 5 p.m. Thursday.

The Historic Provo Preservation Foundation has until 5 p.m. Thursday to deliver a cashier's check for $1.25 million to the church or to wire the funds.
If it doesn't, then the Spanish Mission-style church will be automatically removed from the Provo City Landmarks Register. That would clear the way for the church to sell the building to Landmark Properties, a development company that plans to tear it down and build condominiums.
The preservation foundation, the city's landmarks commission, the Salt Lake City Catholic Diocese and the developer all agreed during a Provo City Council meeting on April 3 to a surprising deal with a deadline. The agreement bought the preservationists an extra 16 days to raise the cash to buy the building.
The developer agreed to step out of the way for $50,000 to show for his work, and the church agreed to sell the building to the preservationist group for $1.2 million if the foundation can raise the money by this Thursday.
If the foundation fails to come up with the money by the deadline, the City Council agreed the building's protection on the landmarks register would be automatically removed. The church then can sell to the developer. Having been given a last chance, the preservationists and the landmarks commission agreed not file a lawsuit to stop the developer from tearing down the building.
The chairman of the preservation group said he expects the deal will hold together despite some frustration on several fronts over the past week.
"We're on target to meet that deal," Doug Bush said.
Bush sent the diocese a real estate purchase agreement over the weekend that included some conditions and called for a later payment, said Adam Ford, an attorney who represents the developer.
That proposed agreement, rejected by the church and the developer, would have allowed the preservation foundation to pay $50,000 in earnest money on Thursday and have another 15 days to pay the balance of the purchase price. It also would have required the Catholic bishop of Salt Lake City to waive his right to enforce the contract if the foundation failed to perform.
Bush said the number of parties involved has made the situation complex. He declined Tuesday to discuss specific issues that arose in the past week because he was worried that statements made today or Thursday could complicate the situation.
But he also said the foundation is prepared to meet the no-conditions deal agreed to on April 3.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------

SLC Projects
Apr 21, 2007, 2:36 AM
Condos May Replace Historic Church in Provo
April 20th, 2007 @ 6:05pm

Sam Penrod Reporting

The historic St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church in Provo could soon be replaced by condos. That's after preservationists failed to meet a deadline.

It's not looking good for people wanting to save the church because the building was automatically removed from Provo's landmark registry last night when the deal fell through.

But those wanting to save the building are not giving up; they say they have the money, if only the developer will accept it.

The church was built in 1936 and until a few years ago was t he home to the Catholic parish in Utah County.

The parish wants to sell it to finance a new church building and a developer is interested in putting condos on the property. But neighbors want to restore it and believe it will be a catalyst for improving the neighborhood.

Scott Bingham of the Historic Provo Preservation Foundation says of the church's uniqueness, "This building is probably one of the most important structures we have in our neighborhood and the revitalization of it will, I feel, be a domino effect to the revitalization of our houses, neighborhoods and schools."


The Provo Historic Preservation foundation convinced the Provo City Council to give them until last night to buy the property before removing it from historical protection and the organization says it has the money.

Doug Bush, Historic Provo Preservation Foundation says, "By yesterday afternoon we had $1.3 million in an escrow account in Salt Lake with a title company and were detained in being able to finish some title work."

Seven members of the board put up their own property as collateral for a loan to raise the money, but all of the titles could not be cleared by the deadline. Now, without the historical protection, the developer can tear the building down, but preservationists hope the building can still be saved.

"It would be nice if something can still be worked out, in any case I am very grateful to the many people who have spent hundreds and hundreds of hours on this," Bush says.

delts145
Apr 21, 2007, 11:19 AM
Saturday, April 21, 2007
Historic church may yet be saved

http://www.deseretnews.com/photos/4036836.jpg

NATHAN JOHNSON - Daily Herald
After what many thought was a death blow to saving the St. Francis church, Landmark Partners said Friday they would still be willing to let a historic preservation group buy the aging edifice.

The Historic Provo Preservation Foundation was left reeling Thursday evening after what was expected to be a typical real-estate closing failed to go through.

But Peter Duros of Landmark Partners said Friday night that the foundation could still buy the church, "if they have the money." Landmark is a Lindon-based development firm with the rights to purchase the building and demolish it for development if it so chooses.

Doug Bush, president of the preservation foundation, said that his group was planning to meet early next week and discuss what options there may be and decide the foundation's course of action. He said that the group has not been able to get in contact with Landmark Partners.

"There might be some hope," Bush said. "There is a rather remarkable amount of public interest."

The Historic Provo Preservation Foundation planned to purchase the Spanish mission-style building, located at about 200 North and 500 West, from the Salt Lake Catholic Diocese. The foundation had until 5 p.m. on Thursday -- a deadline set by the Provo Municipal Council on April 3 -- to buy the building at a cost of about $1.3 million. The foundation said it showed up with the money in escrow; however, because of what they described as a software glitch, the deal did not close.

Tommy George, property manager for the Catholic church said that Landmark Partners had been "pretty darned fair" with the foundation because they were willing to, "out of the goodness of their hearts ... give them a shot."

The development firm has until May 31 to close the deal.

Monsignor J. Terrence Fitzgerald of the Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake said that the church was "very pleased" with the sale of the building to Landmark Partners. He said the diocese was "fine with the foundation (buying the property), but they have not yet come up with the money."

The Diocese has been trying to sell the building to fund the construction of a new chapel in Orem; however, it was hampered by a historic landmark designation placed on the property by Provo.

Mayor Lewis K. Billings brokered a deal during the April 3 municipal council meeting between the preservation foundation and Landmark Partners who wished to develop the property. Landmark had the first option to buy the property; however, a company representative said during the council meeting that it was more than willing to step aside and allow for the preservation of the building.

The deal that Billings brokered had both parties agreeing that the city would remove the historic landmark designation at 5 p.m. on April 19 if the foundation did not come with the money to pay for the building. Thus, if the foundation bought the building it would be preserved, and if it did not meet the deadline, developers would have the opportunity to buy the building.

Wayne Parker, chief administrative officer of Provo, said the deal that was brokered mostly dealt with the question of "how to make a decision without either party being seriously aggrieved."

Nathan Johnson can be reached at 344-2543 or njohnson@heraldextra.com.

delts145
Apr 21, 2007, 11:31 AM
Saratoga Springs

New Wal-Mart plans presented to Planning Commission



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CATHY ALLRED - North County Staff
Wal-Mart has jumped another hurdle for its Saratoga Springs store.

Having worked with city planners and staff, the new Wal-Mart plans were presented to the Planning Commission on Tuesday.

The Commissioners unanimously recommended for approval on both its preliminary plat and proposed site plan and the proposal will be reviewed by the City Council on April 24.

It represents nearly a year of cooperation by the city and Wal-Mart architects.

"We've been working together for several months," Sarah Carroll, Saratoga Springs senior planner, said.

It's not the first time the city has worked with store representatives.

Council members approved the Wal-Mart plans for the first time in July, but the superstore planners changed their mind, deciding to revise the project, downsizing the floor plans by 20,000 square feet to approximately 200,000 square feet and in turn reducing the parking spaces needed to 718.

The site is located on the northwest corner of the SR 73 and Redwood Road crossroads catty-corner to the Smith's complex situated on 21 acres with 25.6 percent open space provided.

A few minor corrections were left to work out at the Tuesday meeting. BRR Architecture representatives objected to some of the city's requests, one in particular being the height restriction on the "Always" sign of the building.

The code requires a maximum of six feet for the lettering and city staff recorded the "Always" lettering at eight feet. The extra two feet, Marney Frye of BRR Architecture said, was from the underline slash on the sign. It was, she said, a matter of interpretation.

Commissioners conceded and decided to allow the sign as planned.

"We really appreciate the fact that Saratoga Springs has a generous sign code that would allow Wal-Mart to have its typical sign that is tasteful," Frye said.

The city anticipates a greater tax base for revenue with the new store attracting nonresident shoppers as well as its own.

"Fifty percent of the people using the Wal-Mart are going to be coming from the west," Butch Johnson, Commission chair, said.

delts145
Apr 21, 2007, 11:45 AM
Lehi City Council approves 6,800-square-foot expansion

http://protophoto.com/images/lehi/DSC_8653.JPG

CATHY ALLRED - North County Staff
Hutchings Museum may be growing by nearly a third its size.

Lehi City Council members gave a nod in early April to go ahead with the 6,800-sqare foot-addition and OK'd fund raising for the building project, an estimated $672,000.

Councilman Stephen Holbrook said more than $200,000 has already been received from private donors or commitments for the project. The addition completion date is unknown.

"There isn't a goal for a completion date because they haven't gotten a start date yet," Holbrook said.

Museum board members were to have met last night to discuss fund raising strategies.

"I'm really excited," Susan Whittaker, museum director, said. "We really need it because of the Lloyd Gunther donation, and because of other donors. We are the local history repository. We definitely need more storage."

She said the museum board and staff will be seeking grants as well as donations for the project.

In 2006, Gunther gave approximately $500,000 worth of fossils and minerals to the Lehi museum at 55 N. Center St. Others have also made recent donations to the facility.

Donations have created a storage problem with items being stored in "nooks and crannies, in the partial basement and off site storage."

Holbrook, city liaison for the museum, said he estimates $1 million is needed to take into account inflation, and because after the addition is completed there will be a need to purchase furnishings.

"I think it is a great concept," he said. "It will help the museum in being able to display more of its items. It will give areas or workshops and lectures and the (meeting room) will also be used for other city meetings."

Located in the Veterans Memorial Building, a structure listed on the Historic Landmark Register, the museum shares the space with the Lehi Post 19 Veterans, the museum has plaques displayed in the entry of the museum honoring servicemen representing the Lehi area.

The proposed addition plans, drawn up by Mark Wilson Architects, show the new rooms being built north of the Memorial Building and south part of Pioneer Park, and wraps around the west side of the museum south up to the Discovery Room.

Plans for the proposed addition show not only a storage room, but allow for a kitchen, a multipurpose room, a new fossil room, a meeting and activity room and new restrooms.

Space for a garden, green space or a patio divides the addition from the north part of the historic building where there are six other display rooms -- the bird and egg room, the fossil and shell room, the rock and mineral room, the Native American room, the Wild West room and the pioneer room.

Officially named the John Hutchings Museum of Natural History, the museum has its beginnings with John Hutchings and his family in the mid 1900s.

He and his wife Eunice, and the Hutchings family, donated his collections to the non-profit Museum Corporation in 1955 as a trust for the people of Lehi.

SLC Projects
Apr 21, 2007, 1:25 PM
Nooooooooooooooooooooooooo, Not another Wal-Mart. :hell:

wrendog
Apr 21, 2007, 4:12 PM
Sweet another walmart! I will now have 2 within 5 mins of my house!!!!:D :) :( :yuck:

delts145
Apr 24, 2007, 1:04 PM
Inc.Magazine Top 20 Midsize Boomtowns

http://images.inc.com/slideshow/boom07_mid/slide07.jpg
Hottest Industries: Information, Wholesale
2007 Rank in Category: 7
2007 Overall Rank: 31
2006 Rank in Category: 9
2006 Overall Rank: 40
Growth in Nonfarm Jobs 2005-2006: 4.6%
Growth in Nonfarm Jobs 2001-2006: 15.2%

List of top 20

1. Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Fla.
2. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas
3. Sarasota-Bradenton-Venice, Fla.
4. Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, Ark.
5. Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond Beach, Fla.
6. Lakeland, Fla.
7. Provo-Orem, Utah
8. Reno-Sparks, Nev.
9. Boise City-Nampa, Idaho
10. Savannah, Ga.
11. Bakersfield, Calif.
12. Tucson, Arizona
13. Baton Rouge, La.
14. Tacoma, Wash.
15. Charleston-North Charleston, S.C.
16. Odgen-Clearfield, Utah
17. Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent, Fla.
18. Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Fla.
19 Albuquerque, N. Mex.
20. Springfield, Mo.

SLC Projects
Apr 24, 2007, 9:27 PM
Who know that Ogden would be on that list. :shrug:

delts145
Apr 24, 2007, 11:19 PM
^^^
:yes: Hey, Ogden is finally coming into its' own again. Housing is also more affordable than Salt Lake or Utah Counties.

SLC Projects
Apr 25, 2007, 12:47 AM
^^^
:yes: Hey, Ogden is finally coming into its' own again. Housing is also more affordable than Salt Lake or Utah Counties.



It took me by surprise. I didn't even know Ogden was growing as fast as it is.

poodledoodledude
Apr 26, 2007, 6:00 PM
hi guys...just wondering if you all heard that the tanner building was going to have an addition put on it.

you all know the one i'm referring to--the big grey one that has the "Y" put on it every graduation and new school year.

plans are they want to add on OUT TO THE STREET to the west of the building. construction should start within a year...may be as early as june of 2007.

wondering if any of you had heard about this? i know someone who works there and they mentioned it to me....

any ideas?

poodledoodledude

SLC Projects
Apr 26, 2007, 6:46 PM
Not sure if I even know what the tanner building looks like since I never go to BYU. Does anyone have a photo of the building? or a link? :shrug:

wrendog
Apr 26, 2007, 7:03 PM
Tanner Building:

http://wsc.byu.edu/images/tanner_strategy.jpg

One of the few buildings I never had a class in, but it is a nice modern building inside.

DevdogAZ
Apr 26, 2007, 8:31 PM
Tanner Building:

http://wsc.byu.edu/images/tanner_strategy.jpg

One of the few buildings I never had a class in, but it is a nice modern building inside.

That's the building I had all my classes in. Not sure how they'd add on to it though. Anything they do won't really incorporate well, since the interior of that structure is all a big open atrium.

i-215
Apr 26, 2007, 8:34 PM
Yes. They are going to add onto the Tanner building. I know there will be an extra wing of classrooms, but I know the main feature will be a four-story parking deck which is definately needed... although I'll probably never be eligable for a pass to park in the garage in my lifetime.

I'll see what I can find out, and I'll get back to you. They had a "groundbreaking" yesterday.... too bad I didn't know about it until after the fact.

wrendog
Apr 26, 2007, 8:39 PM
gee, you weren't a business major by chance, were you Dev? :)

DevdogAZ
Apr 26, 2007, 8:42 PM
Yes, I was a business major. ;) And yes, additional parking is definitely needed on that site, as you can see here:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5007001832655467131&q=BYU+Parking

SLC Projects
Apr 26, 2007, 8:55 PM
Tanner Building:

http://wsc.byu.edu/images/tanner_strategy.jpg

One of the few buildings I never had a class in, but it is a nice modern building inside.

Thanks wrendog.
I've seen that building before now that I know what it looks like. LOL
Good size building there. Six floors? Not bad. Sounds like a cool project.

DevdogAZ
Apr 26, 2007, 9:03 PM
For those of you who haven't been inside, here are a couple of pictures of the Tanner Building's six-story atrium:
http://marriottschool.byu.edu/images/img.cfc?method=stream&download=true&src=119D99893239E5F182B88FAA9C99B2E464C3CD3F80021B369E9E920AA2BD579A8C3991525312C4830FD4FCFDB60DED2DCF070DC208D74383&mime=image/jpg
http://marriottschool.byu.edu/photofile/image.cfm?id=20000390

Because it's built into the side of a hill, the east entrance is on the 4th floor, while the west entrance is on the 1st floor. The stairway in the atrium is the central means of moving around the building.

http://marriottschool.byu.edu/images/img.cfc?method=stream&download=true&src=119D99893239E5F182B88FAA9C99B2E464C3CD3F80021B369E9E920AA2BD579A8C3991525312C4830FD4FCFDB60DED2DCF080AC008D74383&mime=image/jpg
http://marriottschool.byu.edu/photofile/image.cfm?id=20000358

poodledoodledude
Apr 28, 2007, 6:58 PM
guys, just found out it will be a four story expansion....don't know if its on the west or south side...my assumptions say the west side. also, there will be a 3 story parking structure on the NORTH side of the building. inside, it will be connected by a 30 foot glass atrium with walkways in between each floor.

the building is done entirely by donations...

in the building will house a student eatery, study areas, offices, etc...

found the info on byunewsnet. (something or other....)
:)

poodledoodledude

poodledoodledude
May 14, 2007, 9:49 PM
hi group--

i know it's been awhile since i posted, but i think something BIG is coming to provo....

remember the old mountain states building? the current qwest building? well, i was watching the provo mayor the other day on channel 17 and he mentioned a big development going in on that property, but couldn't announce anything yet....

have you all heard anything?? who owns the land/building?? qwest?? any thoughts lemme know...i'm DYING to find out...

:shrug:

poodledoodledude

wrendog
May 14, 2007, 10:02 PM
Where is that located? I can't picture it..

Well, the newspapers have been rumbling about new highrises coming to Provo, so maybe this will be one!

poodledoodledude
May 15, 2007, 3:19 AM
wrendog--

hey buddy. yeah, the address is like 100 north and 100 east. just north of the current wells fargo building, but behind the canadian store. it's almost kiddy-korner to the wells fargo building. i drove by there the other night and it looks like it sits on a nice big piece of property....

let's hope it's at LEAST 10 stories...we need another big one downtown!:tup:

poodledoodledude

SLC Projects
May 15, 2007, 3:26 AM
wrendog--

hey buddy. yeah, the address is like 100 north and 100 east. just north of the current wells fargo building, but behind the canadian store. it's almost kiddy-korner to the wells fargo building. i drove by there the other night and it looks like it sits on a nice big piece of property....

let's hope it's at LEAST 10 stories...we need another big one downtown!:tup:

poodledoodledude


:previous:
Sounds to me this project could be the expansion of the Wells Fargo building. Word is there will be a 2nd tower east of the Wells Fargo building. But I can see it only being 7-stories just like the first tower. :yes:

SLC Projects
May 15, 2007, 3:29 AM
You know what...after reading that post he said North of Wells Fargo. I was thinking East. In that case it could be the Zions Bank tower project. Word was that Zion Bank wants to build a tower across the street from Wells Fargo. But I also think that tower will only be 7-stories.

So there could be "Two" new towers in that area. "Wells Fargo tower II" ( East ) and "Zion Bank tower" ( North ) I can't wait to see renderings of some of these new projects.

i-215
May 15, 2007, 4:17 AM
Yes, additional parking is definitely needed on that site, as you can see here:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5007001832655467131&q=BYU+Parking

SO TRUE!!!!! :tup: :haha:

DevdogAZ
May 29, 2007, 9:48 PM
You know what...after reading that post he said North of Wells Fargo. I was thinking East. In that case it could be the Zions Bank tower project. Word was that Zion Bank wants to build a tower across the street from Wells Fargo. But I also think that tower will only be 7-stories.

So there could be "Two" new towers in that area. "Wells Fargo tower II" ( East ) and "Zion Bank tower" ( North ) I can't wait to see renderings of some of these new projects.

The telecom building that's being discussed is on the NW corner of 1st North and 1st East. I remember it well when it was the Mountain Bell building. It's got these cool brick sides that flare out toward the sidewalk and I remember looking at it when I was a kid and thinking it would be cool to try and ride a bike or skateboard on it.

Anyway, IIRC, I'm not sure if the site is big enough for a tower, and to me it would seem kind of odd to have a tower behind the stores on University Ave. rather than directly on the street.

i-215
May 29, 2007, 10:01 PM
I found out the plans for the old B-77 Building across from Heleman Halls (old UVSC building).

BYU has plans to demolish the wings within the next 1-2 years, and the main part shortly after......

....to replace it with a new building for IT and a parking lot.

urbane
May 30, 2007, 6:08 AM
SO TRUE!!!!! :tup: :haha:

"Originally Posted by DevdogAZ
Yes, additional parking is definitely needed on that site, as you can see here:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...&q=BYU+Parking"

High rise buildings/skyscrapers and auto infrastrucure are not compatible. You are contradicting yourself by loving freeways and tall buildings. They just don't mix.

i-215
May 30, 2007, 5:25 PM
Urbane -

That's interesting to think about. I think they can be, if things are in their proper zone. I love how traffic is refreshingly light in the central business district of downtown Salt Lake City. It's a sign that the density is high enough that mass transit works.

But I'm also glad that four blocks away is I-15.

When density sort of spills out of downtown, it causes problems because the infastructure isn't there. SLC works because it has a good solid grid, good freeway access for the unavoidable truck/car traffic that any city needs, and it has rail to handle a good chunk of the commuters. I have problems when I see density leave downtown because it rarely has the infastructure needed.

As for loving freeways, I think the quote sums it up best: "Freeways are the cathedrals of our time." I don't know many people who wouldn't see a stack of a speghetti bowl for the first time, and not be in awe.

But I agree .. don't put it right in the central business district.

i-215
May 30, 2007, 5:45 PM
I suppose as an afterthought, I also see why I like freeways. They represent the ability of the majority of Americans to own land. In effect, they're a huge government subsidy that helps a middle class exist in America.

Rarely in history does a central city exist and have a strong middle class. Once a city grows beyond a small town, the land becomes expensive and eventually the populous divides into two classes: owners and renters. And in today's America that would probably mean that 3 or 4 gigantic coorporations would own most of the land and we'd all need to rent.

Freeways, at an environmental cost, have opened up more land to the middle class, allowing the average joe to be an "owner" if he/she chooses.

I don't think gigantic McMansions with gigantic yards or healthy. Nor am I a fan of letting a subdivision developer be in charge of what a street grid should look like for huge tracts of land, like I've seen done in Pheonix, and even in Utah County here in Eagle Mountain. That city is terribly designed.

In many ways first-ring suburbs were done right. Logical street patterns, a tad more walkable - no cul-de-sacs, etc. But still, maybe 1/4 acre lot... enough to keep the house reasonably valuable. But still, freeway access is needed.

If a city is fairly strict, a good suburban plan can develop that allows people to own land. That's important to me, because most of the trouble I've seen with poverty in history is because people were renters to a corrupt land-lord. Imagine if Wal-Mart was the investor who owned all the places we could legal live. Uughhh.....

Happy Valley Freak
May 30, 2007, 11:14 PM
does anyone know what the crap is happening with the Gehry devopment in Lehi???, I heard they were going 2 start the project in spring, but thus far, it seems like nothing is going on over there

wrendog
May 31, 2007, 12:13 AM
Don't hold your breath Happy... I'd still be surprised if it gets built at all. Just think of the Terrace at Traverse Mountain... that was supposed to be done by begginning of '08 and nothing is happening. I doubt we see or hear anything for a while if at all.

DevdogAZ
May 31, 2007, 12:57 AM
I don't think gigantic McMansions with gigantic yards or healthy. Nor am I a fan of letting a subdivision developer be in charge of what a street grid should look like for huge tracts of land, like I've seen done in Pheonix, and even in Utah County here in Eagle Mountain. That city is terribly designed.
Being originally from Utah, and now living in Phoenix for a decade, I have no idea what you're talking about. Phoenix is planned much more logically than any other city I've ever been in. Major streets every mile, laid out in a grid, all going N/S or E/W. It's very well designed. Inside of those square miles, you might have some residential streets that meander a little, but that's done simply to discourage speeding and to create quiet streets. And everyone is no more than 1/2 a mile from a major arterial.

SLC Projects
May 31, 2007, 1:32 AM
does anyone know what the crap is happening with the Gehry devopment in Lehi???, I heard they were going 2 start the project in spring, but thus far, it seems like nothing is going on over there


This does not surprise me. Somehow I doubt it's going to be build at all. Or if it does the project will not start for years to come and that the over all project will not be as big or tall.

pdxman
May 31, 2007, 2:40 AM
^^^That would suck if it didn't get built. I hate when big projects like that are proposed and then die.

i-215
May 31, 2007, 3:15 AM
Being originally from Utah, and now living in Phoenix for a decade, I have no idea what you're talking about. Phoenix is planned much more logically than any other city I've ever been in. Major streets every mile, laid out in a grid, all going N/S or E/W. It's very well designed. Inside of those square miles, you might have some residential streets that meander a little, but that's done simply to discourage speeding and to create quiet streets. And everyone is no more than 1/2 a mile from a major arterial.

I guess I should clarify. I don't mean Pheonix proper. Your right, it rocks. I saw a planned development somewhere in Pinal Country where they had a 3x3 mile mess of windy 5 lane arterials. Looked yucky.

Happy Valley Freak
May 31, 2007, 9:46 PM
does n e 1 k now about the development in P.G. looks like theyre getting started!

poodledoodledude
May 31, 2007, 11:11 PM
hi group. just wondering how you all are doing? i've been in rome, italy for a MUCH needed vacation...no regrets there, but i did miss all that was happening here.

my best friend has a castle he owns right outside of rome. we walked the beach, went touring around, and LOVED the food!! this summer, we are all going to london to see my mom's place of birth, and germany, to see my dad's dad's place of birth....should be pretty exciting.

so, what is the news? i hear the building they are building by the provo towne centre mall is actually a tire store--not a carl's junior....sorry about the confusion.

also, good to hear about the high rise on 1st north and 1st east. it is now a quest building...and yes, i was watching the provo mayor the other day on provo channel 17 and he mentioned it was a 'private' development and that it should be announced shortly and that it was 'huge'

so, here is to hoping. its interesting to see the development take place on 100 north. LOTS of stuff going in. i'm hoping the zion's bank building still happens. also, the art center is coming along nicely!

poodledoodledude
'be the change you wish to see in the world.' --Ghandi

Happy Valley Freak
Jun 3, 2007, 4:53 PM
This does not surprise me. Somehow I doubt it's going to be build at all. Or if it does the project will not start for years to come and that the over all project will not be as big or tall.

Ya it seems like here in utah it happens all the time! IT PISSES ME OFF SO BAD!