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delts145
Oct 7, 2006, 12:04 PM
Provo MSA Thread

The Greater Salt Lake City Wasatch Front CSA is composed of three interconnecting metros. The Provo MSA would be the southern most metro area, connecting southward
to the central or Salt Lake City MSA

U.S. Census Bureau: 2016 Pop. 603,309
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/512da0b4e4b004435d999243/5133507ae4b0c6fb04dbb0ef/513350a9e4b066ad532d8597/1362317504646/DSC_8353.jpg
Typical suburban CSA Metroscape of the Wasatch Front. Seen here, looking southeast toward Utah Lake and the Provo MSA of Utah Valley

Downtown Provo, Looking northeast toward the intersection of Center and University Avenue
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/Downtown_Provo.jpg/1200px-Downtown_Provo.jpg
https://upload.wikimedia.org/

http://www.provo.org/Home/ShowImage?id=13982&t=636101478388300000
http://www.provo.org/

Provo and its Metro setting is nothing short of stunning
https://thumbs.trulia-cdn.com/pictures/thumbs_6/ps.57/c/2/d/9/picture-uh=9278df8daf3a86266ed7db82c3d1e43-ps=c2d9ead6dbf0766d0af5a1051b27cc6.jpg
https://thumbs.trulia-cdn.com/

delts145
Oct 7, 2006, 12:07 PM
.............................................

leebuddy
Oct 7, 2006, 3:43 PM
Today Buildinggurl and i will be meeting up with Wasatch_One down in Orem and provo to check up on some projects like the Orem midtown village. i'll take some pics of that later and post them on here soon.

:tup:

delts145
Oct 7, 2006, 3:49 PM
...........................................

BuiLDing GuRL
Oct 7, 2006, 5:05 PM
Don't give leebuddy a big head. I have to live with him!!! :) j/k if there is anything he loves it's getting to take pictures of buildings to share with his fellow building nerds. :) We'll be in Orem tonight, any specific requests for pics?
:dancing:

delts145
Oct 7, 2006, 8:54 PM
Hmmmmm, It looks like you're going to have kind of a rainy afternoon. The new Orem lifestyle center would be great like you already pointed out . OH YEAH!! That new lifestyle center in the Provo Riverbottom area. Lot's of new mixed use there. There's also a great round-about on Provo's Center Street and about what? Is it 900 east? Those new office buildings in Provo's Riverbottom are really cool, like the Covey Center or the Noni Headquarters. I'm sure you guys are going to have more than your hands full.

wrendog
Oct 7, 2006, 11:13 PM
i drive by signs for the new 12 story hotel in PG every day on my way to and from work. Anyone know when that is slated to break ground?

delts145
Oct 7, 2006, 11:56 PM
The project your talking about is going to be big. I had'nt realized how big until I started looking into it.

The luxury,full service Embassy Suites will break ground this Spring, 2007. It will also include a major convention/conference center. Adjacement to the 300 room plus Embassy Suite Hotel will be another national chain of 200 plus rooms which will commence construction at approximately the same time. In addition to these hotels and conference facilities a 1 million sq. ft lifestyle center will begin taking shape. Already under construction is a major regional BMW dealership, and alot of very attractive condo blocks,

Delts

SLCFly'n
Oct 8, 2006, 1:22 PM
<Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145
leebuddy,

In going over your recent post regarding UVSC and the development down there, it got me stoked for the thread for Utah Valley. Any of you guys and gals,(WASATCH ONE) have some more pics of UVSC to post on the new thread?

p.s. Looking out my window now at the Wasatch. NEW DUSTING OF SNOW!!!
Man, I can't wait to hit that incredible new tunnel at the BIRD.>




The Pics on this are small but it has some info on the new Digital Learning Center. http://www.uvsc.edu/library/info/dlcinfo.html They have the area fenced off and just started digging this week.(nothing real big yet)....

leebuddy
Oct 8, 2006, 11:04 PM
Utah Valley Projects report.........


Ok this past saturday Building gurl and i met up with Wasatch_one to check out some of the on going projects that are going on or about to happen real soon. here is our report....


1. Orem Midtown Village PRoject. (8-stoires)
As you can see the south wing is coming alone now that it's all topped out and is now starting to get walls put up. Work on the north wing hasn't started yet. it's still just hole in the ground that more work on the underground parking still needs to be done.
http://img103.imageshack.us/img103/934/1ee7.jpg



2 UVSC Library (five-stories)
We didn't get to drive by this project, but for what we are told the site is cleared out and ground breaking will start soon. But here is a pic of what it will look like.
http://img242.imageshack.us/img242/9375/dlcsouthdw8.jpg



3.Huntington (4-stories)
Right in the heart of downtown provo this 4-story condo project is about to break ground. the site has been cleared out and work should start soon.
http://img434.imageshack.us/img434/5950/3vq1.jpg


4.Northgate Village. (up to 8-stories)
For what we know about this project is that it's going to be a mix use right off of I-15 and 800 North in Orem. The site use to be warehouses but the site has been cleared off and work should begine soon. Sorry i didn't get any pics of this project. But there will be condos, office space and retail. Kind of like midtown village. One of the buildings could be as tall as 8-stories. Also there is alot of road work on 800 north. looks like the road is adding two new lines making 800 north 6 lines total.


5.P.G.'s Hotel and Convention center (12-story hotel)
PLEASANT GROVE will be getting a 12-story hotel and a convention center. Ground breaking could start next spring. Right new the site is just a field.
http://img144.imageshack.us/img144/8247/pg12storyhotelpv0.jpg

Now the rest are projects that are in the planning stages still and we hope to hear more about soon. Since wasatch (Nic) is from the prove/Orem he gave us a tour of the downtown provo area and around orem. He told us some of the following projects that are in the works....

Downtown provo

1. Zion bank building.
Just like the wells fargo buildng Zion wants to built their own builidng right in the heart of downtown. We don't know of any plans as of yet, but their could be around 8-10 stories tall.

2.Well Fargo Phase II
The wells fargo center in downtown provo is almost two years old new and all it's space has been lease out. Word is their are getting ready for a phase II of the center to be built just behind their first building that could be around 8-stoires also. (Both zions and well fargo will be across the street from one another)

3.Provo Convention Center
Downtown provo could be getting their own convention center here soon, since P.G. will be building one with a 12-story hotel tower. this was a wake up call for provo and now the city is moving with their own plans. not sure when this project will start.


So there is our report of some of the major projects that are happening or soon to start here in happy valley.:yes:


http://img529.imageshack.us/img529/9036/2cq7.jpg
Leebuddy and Wasatch_one down in orem getting ready to check out some projects. (burling Gurl took the picture. :haha:


(A special thanks goes out to Wasatch_one of the tour he gave buildng gurl and myself. thanks nic.)

Wasatch_One
Oct 9, 2006, 1:30 AM
http://www.hiponline.com/artist/music/v/vanilla_ice/vanillaice.jpg

...is that Vanilla Ice with Lee Buddy?

haha

...everyone that sees that picture... the steps in the side of my hair are a joke, my friends didnt believe that I would do it...

i did ;)

Viperlord
Oct 9, 2006, 2:15 AM
I was wondering that..... but I didnt want to say anything for fear that I may offend someone. lol

delts145
Oct 9, 2006, 4:32 AM
:tup: :worship: :worship: :worship: Our new Utah Valley Thread is getting off to a great start because of you guys.:worship: :worship: :worship:

wrendog
Oct 10, 2006, 12:00 AM
Vanilla Ice and Donnie Michael... nice to see you guys

SLCFly'n
Oct 12, 2006, 3:50 AM
Oh ya let the diggin start.....:D UVSC project

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/7376/pictures2fimg5f04031fq8.jpg

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/7546/pictures2fimg5f04071gi5.jpg

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/2756/pictures2fimg5f04041ax0.jpg

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/6110/pictures2fimg5f04051cs3.jpg

Sorry about the pic quality i just had my point and shoot camera.

SLCFly'n
Oct 12, 2006, 4:37 AM
Utah Valley Med Center in Provo

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/6218/pictures2fimg5f03991er2.jpg

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/6060/pictures2fimg5f03961rk9.jpg

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/9397/pictures2fimg5f03981np7.jpg

This is getting to be a big hospital campus they just finished an add on to the emergency dept , endoscopy, wound and hyperbaric treatment.

delts145
Oct 12, 2006, 11:34 AM
Deseret Morning News
By Amy Choate-Nielsen

LEHI -- Environmentalists are smiling on a new development in Lehi that's focused on building around Utah Lake's wetlands and saving a valley stream.

Spring Creek Ranch, found in south Lehi at the edge of Utah Lake, touts itself as a place "where consevation matters," according to the development's slogan. The project involves 410 homes on 150 acres, with five parks, recreation areas and three miles of trails.

But none of the development will interfere with the nearby delicate wetlands.

"We are really happy with developers that are keeping the environment in mind and not putting subdivisions in the middle of nowhere where residents have to drive 10 mile to get a gallon of milk," said Marc Heileson, southwest regional representative for the Sierra Club.

Heileson said that Utah Lake's wetlands are expecially important to preserve because they serve as a type of "pit stop" for birds migrating from Argentina to the Arctic Circle.

"We think Spring Creek is a good idea, "Heileson said, "and we hope the wetlands there will get the protection they need."

Dave Klock, master developer and co-owner of the prohject, said he took the project on because he's a "consevationist at heart." Klock is petitioning for a conservation easement for 25 acres of his property.

In addition to building his development around a buffer zone that protects the wetlands, Klock is restoring a creek that has long been polluted.

He hired biologist Ryan Barker to restore native plants to the area, plan a trail system and educate new homeowners about the importance of taking care of their environment.

jedikermit
Oct 12, 2006, 2:00 PM
With the whole West Nile Virus thing going on, I don't know that I'd want to live "adjacent to wetlands."

But by all means--move in!

leebuddy
Oct 12, 2006, 7:52 PM
Looks like there could be more upcoming projects for Orem....




Orem arts hub could hit $66 million
By Sara Israelsen
Deseret Morning News
OREM — In a dream world, a cultural arts hub would be built around the SCERA theater, creating a street of artistic flavor that would be crown jewel of the county.
Photo
Deseret Morning News graphic
Yes, it may be just a dream to arts-loving folks in Orem, but city leaders have been given a glimpse of what it may take — financially, at least — to turn a dream into reality.
A $45,000 feasibility study unveiled Tuesday indicates that such a project would cost about $66 million.
Orem officials wanted to see what could be done with money generated by the voter-approved Cultural Arts and Recreation Enrichment (CARE) tax — a 1/10 of one percent sales tax.
The sales tax, approved last November, was projected to generate $1.6 million a year in revenue, based on current sales-tax figures.
With some of the money generated by the tax, Orem hired a national planning company to look at what Orem has and evaluate what Orem residents and leaders said they want.
Bob Bailey, a principal in California-based AMS Planning and Research, came to Orem in April to survey community members, civic leaders and arts organizations about their thoughts related to cultural arts.
"One of the things that impressed us was the nature of the market," Bailey told the City Council. His research shows that Orem residents, compared to the nation, are 14 percent more likely to attend the theater and 16 percent more likely to go to a dance or music performance.
Bailey also presented potential cost estimates along with architectural sketches of potential future buildings.
"This is a very ambitious and very impressive presentation," said Mayor Jerry Washburn, who also said he was slightly concerned about the $66 million price tag. And that figure, he noted, didn't include annual operating costs, which could range from $600,000 to $800,000.
Bailey recommends a renovation of the SCERA theater, then construction of an arts education center, a children's museum and a heritage museum.
The cost of renovating the SCERA theater — built in 1933 — would be around $40 million, which comes out to a cost of $465 per square foot. New buildings can cost around $600 per square foot and up to $1,000 per square foot.
Expenses could be covered by the city's CARE tax, personal and private donations and federal funds — a funding approach that would have to be worked out in detail if the city decided to go in that direction.
Another way to save on costs could be to house the arts education center, children's museum and a heritage center in one or two large buildings, thus creating an "arts district" near the SCERA theater, pool and park.
"Really, this could be the park which could be the gem of the entire valley," Bailey said.
"As we begin to look at the SCERA facilities, we see a great little street down here," Bailey said, referring to 720 South.
While it's a grandiose proposal, it's exciting to consider, said Orem Councilwoman Karen McCandless.
The city has been studying the issue of cultural arts enhancement for years with the help of a Cultural Arts Advisory Commission.


http://img238.imageshack.us/img238/4389/oremprojectsch5.jpg

delts145
Oct 13, 2006, 1:09 PM
By Amy Choate-Nielsen
Deseret Morning News

LEHI- Ten years ago, the flat lands surrounding Point of the Mountain were nothing but alfalfa fields and sagebrush.

Today, the area is hot property for housing developments, popular businesses such as Cabela's and a soon-to-be college campus. It's all located on the sprawling property of what has become a landmark gem in Utah County - Thanksgiving Point.

"We've got a lot going on, "Thanksgiving Point chief executive officer Mike Washburn said of the myriad activities that happen on a daily basis on the property.

That sentiment might be an understatement.

Aside from 55 acres of manicured gardens, one of the largest dinosaur musemms in the Western hemisphere and gourmet restaurants, the establishment boasts weekly cooking, gardening and art classes. Thanksgiving Point also hosts functions ranging from business meetings to wedding parties.

The daily activities of the quasi-resort, where moviegoers also can catch a flick, are only a part of the packed schedule at Thanksgiving Point. A massive flashing sign high above I-15 constantly advertises a new event at the location.

Among other things, there's the Utah County Fair, a tulip festival, outdoor concerts, corn mazes and Christmas lights that all help draw visitors to the property.

Last year approximately 1.2 million people visited Thanksgiving Point, the most of any year since the gardens opened in 1996.

So far this year, attendance at the Museum of Ancient Life is 40 percent higher than it was last year, and the museum's most popular month, December, is still to come.

Wasburn says word of mouth is bringing the whole area attention - and not just from Utah county. Located in Lehi, on the border of Salt Lake County, the property's museums and gardens pull visitors almost equally from both ends of the counties and across the country.

Earlier this year, Washburn said, the gardens had only been open a month when they receeived tourists from every state except one.

"I'm sure they've showed up by now," Washburn said.

Still, Thanksgiving Point, which is a nonprofit organization, is supplemented by founders Alan and Karen Ashton, who made a fortune through successes with the invention of Word Perfect.

The Ashtons bought some 750 acres on which to build Thanksgiving Point as a gesture to show their gratitude for the blessings thay received. The Ashtons embarked on the project in 1995.

"We realized the Ashtons' mission for Thanksgiving Point," Washburn said. "It is a resource for the community where people can come and have a unique, one-of-a kind, hands-on experience, and learn and grow in a safe and beautiful and comfortable environment."

Since Washburn came to Thanksgiving Point three years ago, his main goal has been to preserve the aim of the establishment. Namely, to give back to the community.

His other goal has been to make the enterprise, which costs between $15 million and $20 million to function, self-suffficient.

"I was brought on to make Thanksgiving Point sustainable," Washburn said. "We've made tremendous progress. The Ashtons have historically been supporting this on their own, but in the last three years, we've invited other companies to help by way of sponsorships."

Washburn said Zions Bank, Larry Miller and XanGo have all become corporate sponsors, which has helped the enterprise come closer to moving from red ink to black.

The resort also has started to focus on its menbership program. The business sells different levels of memberships with annual fees, ranging from $175 for a family to have access to the entire grounds, including discounts on merchandise and food, to $35 for a family to have access to child-friendly Farm Country.....

....Charlotte Ducos, who recently renewed her membership, also said it seems Thanksgiving Point is always adding something new to the museum and the grounds.

That's something that thrills businesses in the surrounding area.

"I honestly believe Thanksgiving Point has been that core catalyst in really catapulting the area," said Heather Miller, president of the Lehi Chamber of Commerce. "It has lit a fire to the whole area."

According to Washburn, Thanksgiving Point only plans to grow.

For example, already in the works are plans for a children's museum, which is scheduled to be completed within three years; a Marriott hotel, to be on location within one year; and construction for the Mountainland Applied Technology College campus, to be under way in less than a year.

"I personally think they're just beginning, "Miller said. "It's going to be a great future for them...The whole region is just going to be incredible. It's going to be powerful."

delts145
Oct 13, 2006, 1:36 PM
Daily Herald

Janelle Leatherwood is pleased.

A Kindermusic instructor teaching out of her Hunter Chase home, she said her property has increased over $30,000 in value, since they purchased it 18 months ago and she expects it will increase even more with the planned development of The Terrace.

"I'm excited about (The Terrace)," she said. "I just wish it was here now instead of in 2008."

Dubbed "a cross between the Gateway and the Shops at the Riverwoods on massive steroids" by Steven Roll, Lehi Area Chamber of Commerce member, the four million plus square feet of retail space and 150-acre development will be located southeast of Cabela's just off of SR 92. Initial plans include business parks, recreation space, a performing and cultural arts center, restaurants and cinemas. Oh, and plenty of retail shopping for the high-end and moderate income consumer.

With statewide media broadcasting the announcement and state dignitaries and other guest officials joining in the accolades for the lates commercial feather in Lehi's cap one would suppose Lehi residents, like Leatherwood, would be excited about the project. But there is a more practical side inherent in some Lehi consumers.

"I'm more excited about Costco, because that's where I go shopping," Bebbie Bartlett said. "It does mean more revenue to Lehi, more taxes. Maybe this will get our roads built." (Costco, a consumer discount club, has just opened
across from the American Fork, "The Meadows" on State Street and is located adjacement to a new Lowe's).

"Wow, for me I'd be happy about it: I've been to the Gateway once or twice," said former Lehi resident Karli Poyfair, now of Orem. "I'm pretty much pro shopping. Not having to go to Salt Lake would be fun

SLCFly'n
Oct 14, 2006, 1:39 PM
Map of the hospital in Provo and the recent add-ons

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/2218/ihc2ci2.jpg

delts145
Oct 14, 2006, 2:15 PM
:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:

AGAIN,Great Pic's Slc'fly'n !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

delts145
Oct 14, 2006, 6:38 PM
LINDON- Canopy Properties broke ground for a 95,000-square-foot office building at 331 S. 670 West in Lindon.

The $10 million, three-story building, called Canopy V, is expected to be ready for occupancy in December 2007

Canopy operates four other office buildings on its Lindon campus and has about 20 additional acres that can be used for expansion.

Canopy Ventures provides venture funding, while Canopy Properties provides office space.

delts145
Oct 15, 2006, 12:29 PM
The Daily Herald
Cathy Allred

Since the announcement of the IM Flash technologies venture between Micron and Intel in March, the environment of the 2,000-acre Lehi campus has changed significantly from what it used to be - empty lots and silent halls.

Steeped in a flurry of activity, the plant is nearing completion and is at 53 percent of its employment target - 1,850 workers by spring 2007.

The number of new hires changes daily said Rod Morgan, IM Flash co-chief executive officer, as does the number of contractors. There are about 2,000 contractors currently

"It's geen pretty exciting to come together with Intel," Morgan said. "There's quite a bit of stuff going on right now."

Initially a 20-building fabrication plant built for Micron's microchip production in 1997, much of it was left unfinished and remained hauntingly empty in recent years because of changing dynamics in the semiconductor industry.

But the Lehi plant is now the international headquarters for IM Flash Technologies and its NAND Flash memory production using nanotechnology to create NAND memory products, which are electrically re-writeable, non-volatile semiconductor devices that retain memory content when power is turned off.

"I went after this one. This to me is just a great opportunity for the two companies," David Baglee, IM Flash co-chief executive officer, said. "It's the fastest semiconductor business there is and I wanted to be a part of it."

Expectations for NAND memory products, which are used in cell phones, MP3 players, computers, digital cameras, flash drives and handhelds, is more than $14.8 billion in 2006, up 40 percent from 2005. With two of the largest semiconductor companies joining forces, their total investment will be upwards of $5 billion. One of the largest single private sector investments in Utah, IM Flash is expected to provide $1.1 billion in total salary at the Lehi plant, with annual incomes averaging $50,000 per employee.

Stan Lockhart, who has been with Micron since the plant's inception, said he is thrilled with its latest developments.

''The IM Flash corporate headquarters here in Utah County gives us the opportunity to realize the full potential of our Lehi site as a major NAND manufacturing facility. It also shows a long-tem commitment to Utah on the part of Micron and Intel," he said.

Most of the construction is going on inside the facility. The mile-long corridor at IM Flash is bustling with foot traffic, with noise of saws, hammers and drills echoing along the halls. Ducts, plumbing and wiring are being installed along with walls, a lot of walls.

The fabricating clean room is under wraps-- covered with a thick opaque plastic. Workers have to suit up in static-free white coveralls, caps and gloves before entering the room. They are installing the air conditioning system in a adjoining room, and duct tape fencing, and gates guide visitors along the construction route.

It's just a hub of activity, "Lockhard said. "All of this is preparing for what is going to go on in the fabricating room."

West of 22 large buildings at the site, a construction village of portable trailers has been brought in, and a temporary 200-man cafeteria tent behind the buildings feeds a small army of workers. A storage building with its metal frame is being built to the norteast. Because the fabrication of NAND semiconductors needs to be done in a clean enviroment, a one-story , 25,000-square-foot warehouse capable of storing a three- to seven-day supply of chemicals is being built.

The IM Flash headquarters is only part of the economic growth in north Lehi. Below its campus, farm fields are quickly disappearing with homes popping up south of State Road 92. Growth is nearing the 2,000- acre buffer of cheat grass.

Part; of what has been termed "the billion dollar mile" by Kim Struthers, Lehi city planner, IM Flash Technologies is bordered on the south and west by two mammoth planned communities expected ;to attract more than 12,000 residents, or one quarter of Lehi's existing population. Each residential/commercial project comes with its own unique amenities-- Traverse Mountain's The Terrace mall and Cabela's and Ivory Ridge's tennis club, water facility and reception center.

The plant built by Micron in 1995 has facilitated much of the growth by funding the building of Lehi's ;infrastructure, he said.

"IM Flash Technologies will be investing millions of dollars," Struthers said. "This will create a huge employment center for those in Lehi."

:tup: :tup: :tup: :tup:If you have'nt been yet. :tup: :tup: :tup: :tup:

p.s. Wow, it's amazing to drive along highway 92 from I-15 to the mouth of American Fork Canyon. No where is the incredible growth of the Wasatch Front more evident on one highway. If any of you out there have some extra time today take a Sunday drive. Exit I-15 at the Alpine/Highland exit,(just after you go over the Point of the Mountain). Head east along highway 92, toward the mouth of Am. Fork Canyon. You'll be challenged to take in all of the sights of growth on both sides of the highway. Literally billion's of dollars in commercial and residential in the pipeline. Be sure to take a little extra time to continue on up American Fork Canyon and over the Alpine Loop.(Take a few extra dollars for the Canyon. They charge a toll, which keeps up the Canyons itself,campgrounds,lakes,etc. Looks like it's going to snow here in the next 48 hours, so get it done today. This Canyon is literally one of the most beautiful in the world, "you'll feel like a tourist in Manhattan for the first time." You'll proceed up and over the loop and down into Sundance and Provo Canyon's. Take a moment to stop and walk around the Sundance resort, Again, the views are among the most beautiful in the world. If you still have time you may want to take a left when you come to the Provo Canyon highway. If you have'nt seen Midway yet, it's worth a look for all development geeks. Then you will move on to Park City and down I-80 to Salt Lake.

delts145
Oct 15, 2006, 11:05 PM
SLCFly'n posted some great pics on the previous page of the hospital expansion currently under construction in Provo. This article deals with some of the additional expansion in the works,

Deseret Morning News
Tad Walch and Laura Hancock

PROVO - Utah Valley Regional Medical Center needs elbow room, and hospital managers are looking at interesting options that would change the face of Provo High School to fill short-term needs at UVRMC.

UVRMC is growing rapidly in a landlocked location in the middle of a population boom.. By 2020, the hospital projects 662,000 residents in Utah County,(a figure considered by many experts as far to conservative), up from 454,000 residents in 2005.

Parking is already a problem without additional expansion. Some employees are grumbling about parking miles away and catching hospital shuttles to work while the hospital builds a new outpatient clinic on the northeast corner of the block.

The construction of a parking terrace is evidence of expansion.

"They recognize they are in an urban setting and need to go up," Provo City Council chairman George Stewart said. "They need parking to do that."

IHC recently purchased an auto parts store that could make room for an outpaitent procedures building and physician office space, said Bryant Larsen, the hospital's director of community relations.

UVRMC needs more parking space and is looking south of 940 North, its southern boundary. In the past 15 years, IHC has purchased 13 of 17 homes in the block to the south, down to 880 North.

"We're negotiating on the remaining four," Larsen said.

The city Planning Commission would have to rezone the two rows of houses before IHC could pave over the land. Larsen said that IHC prefers parking lots to terraces because they are cheaper to build. "2020 is kind of our planning window," Larsen said.

Neighbors also prefer a parking lot to a parking garage, so IHC is looking east, too, specifically Fox Field at Provo High, the wide-open space between the hospital and high school, Larsen said. Fox Field is now home to high school soccer and softball games.

However, Provo School District officials, in informal talks with management at the nonprofit hospital group, said it will cost millions for the field.

"We have had some casual conversations, and our reply to (IHC) is Fox Field is always part of Provo High," Provo School District business manager Kerry Smith said. "You can't take it without all of Provo (High School), and the only way they'd ever consider (selling the high school is) they'd have to pay enough money to rebuild the high school on our land out west."

The district owns property near Utah Lake where a new high school could be built. High schools cost about $40 million to build.

The UVRMC campus is relatively tiny at 23 acres. IHC's McKay-Dee Hospital in Ogden covers 62 acres and has services, patients and staff. IHC's new hospital in Murray is 80 acres, but it is larger than the Ogden and Provo hospitals, Larsen said.

In Provo there is no room for the hospital on the north because UVRMC's last bout of growth swallowed up all the territory to Bulldog Boulevard, or 1230 North, a busy street that acts as a natural boundary. To the west across busy 500 West are two IHC buildings: an employee day-care and a guest hotel for patients and their families. Other medical buildings belong to the Central Utah Clinic, which is not affiliated with UVRMC.

City leaders would like to see the hospital continue to grow.

"A lot of people complain because it is a non-taxable entity, but the hospital is a tremendous amenity to the community," Stewart said. "Companies look at schools, hospitals and parks and recreation opportunities for employees when they pick locations."

Stewart also said expansion in the area around the hospital is best.

"Otherwise they'd have to look off-site. That would be sad because it's great to have everything together."

delts145
Oct 16, 2006, 11:28 AM
:tup: leebuddy has posted some great pics on the previous page dealing with this project,

Deseret News,

By Sara Israelsen
Deseret Morning News

OREM — Neighborhood reactions to a mixed-use development with living-and-shopping options shooting skyward on Orem's State Street are just that — mixed.


Midtown Village — with three wings, each eight stories high — is touted by developers as a project much like Salt Lake's Gateway that will bring more shopping, downtown living and entertainment to the city.


David Runnells, a part owner, says he thinks most neighbors are "excited about not only the project bringing business" but also a new look on State Street.


And, he says, the value of property will increase as a result of the project.


Construction of Midtown Village hasn't been without a few bumps — such as financing delays that left gaping holes on State Street for almost two years, as well as noisy construction equipment during the early morning hours. While all that will pass, some business owners are also worried about future impacts the project will have on the area.


"We're a little concerned about the traffic, especially on Orem Boulevard because that is a narrow street," said Pamela Harrison, who, with her husband Rex, owns Gunnies Sporting Goods and Western Wear and the Gunnies Plaza, 396 S. State. "I haven't heard any plans to address that."


Before the project began, the city required a traffic study to look at Midtown's potential impact to State Street and Orem Boulevard, said Stanford Sainsbury, director of Orem City Development Services. The city denied two of the proposed exits then gave the project the go-ahead.


Based on a traffic study comparing the current levels of service with the completed project and projections for 2010, the "grades" assigned to the roads remain about the same.


Currently, the delay at the traffic light at the 400 South and State Street intersection is 16.5 seconds per vehicle at the noon peak hour and 48.2 seconds during rush hour. With the Midtown traffic added, delays would only increase by one second at noon and three seconds at rush hour. Future time increase projections are almost identical.



Construction on the Midtown Village project in Orem is expected to be complete by January 2008.

Keith Johnson, Deseret Morning News
Noise has also been a bit of a concern, with large construction equipment banging and clanking early in the morning, but Runnells said they have tried to keep all the neighbors posted with what's going on and at what time.


The Harrisons have heard the noise and dealt with a few power outages they think might have been caused by the construction. While not anti-Midtown, they're just a bit frustrated with how the project began.


"There's just a lot of misrepresentation of what they owned and what their plans were and when they were going to complete the project," Harrison said. "It's way behind schedule."


And, originally, the Harrisons said they were told the project would go all the way to 400 S. State — to their property.


That won't happen because contract talks fell through and the western-wear store on the property decided to stay put.


Some people are confused by the nearby construction, however.


"People think we're moving," Pamela Harrison said. "(Midtown hasn't) bought us. We like our location. We plan on being here."


Nearby, Kim Boun, office manager of CLP Skill Trade Solutions, a construction-staffing business, said she is excited about the new addition to the city. Midtown Village is scheduled for completion by January 2008.


"(People) will be visually seeing CLP when they're stopping by (Midtown). It's kind of like a Wal-Mart effect — a lot of stores will place themselves next to Wal-Mart just for free advertising."


"I can't imagine it not being positive for us," said Joey Leyba, senior technician and manager of the Orem Tunex, 184 S. State. "People can go there and shop, drop their car off here."


Many Tunex customers drop off their cars then walk to nearby stores, Leyba said. With a destination spot so close, it may bring more cars to the shop.


So until 2008, cranes will continue to frame the Orem skyline as they piece together the steel addition to State Street.


"It seems like they're taking an awfully long time," said Dean Phelps, manager of Napa Auto Parts at 110 E. 400 South. "I'd like to see it done. It might be a good thing for us, draw more traffic to us.

delts145
Oct 17, 2006, 11:30 AM
Wednesday, October 11, 2006
Daily Herald - Provo


CATHY ALLRED - North County Staff
Ground has not been broken yet, but Wal-Mart Corporation is still planning on building a Super Wal-Mart at the Saratoga Springs commercial crossroads

CLC Associates have submitted downsized plans to the city's planning department from the initial 200,000 square feet to 175,000 square feet and most likely the revised project will appear before the city's planning commission for approval on Nov. 7.

"They kind of indicated they were going with a more efficient building plan," Saratoga Springs Planning Director Clark Labrum said. "They haven't told us, given any clue as to when they are going to begin construction."

Initially scheduled to begin building in spring 2007, the 22-acre project northwest of the S.R. 73 and Redwood Road intersection is on track for completion by the end of 2007 according to spokesperson Karianne Fallow at Wal-Mart's corporate offices.

"We are actually going to be building a smaller, nicer store," Fallow said. "We are looking forward to it ... assuming all goes smoothly through the entitlement process it should be completed by end of 2007."

Mayor Tim Parker has said city officials hope to use the estimated $500,000 in revenue from the store toward maintaining parks, expanding recreation programs and, "most importantly," public safety.

Wal-Mart Supercenters typically employ 350 to 500 employees, including part-time associates, and would serve consumers in the Cedar Valley, Lehi, Saratoga Springs and Bluffdale areas.

"Obviously the most important and immediate benefit will be the sales tax revenue," he said.

This story appeared in North County on page A1

jmonkey
Oct 18, 2006, 7:17 AM
ah, good old UVRMC. I was born there (1974). I had my tonsils removed there (1982). I had an emergency appendectomy there (1984). Our family doctor used to have his office right in the front of the hospital on the west side. He was probably 65+ years old when he removed my appendix in 1984. Very good doctor though.

The hospital stay after the appendectomy is marked on my brain forever, by repeated showings of the movie Battlestar Gallactica on the hospital movie channel. I think they showed that movie 8 times a day; I probably saw the movie ten times during my stay, but I was also pretty out of it--thinking back, I was pretty sedated. :slob:

delts145
Oct 18, 2006, 11:08 AM
Mine was removed in 76 and the scar is longer than left by the new techniques.

delts145
Oct 18, 2006, 11:12 AM
Proposition 3 would aid transit

By Jim Bennett


The "Vote for Proposition 3" campaign is now under way. Polling suggests that Proposition 3 in Salt Lake County has broad-based support, yet the biggest challenge we face is confusion about what the measure actually does. So here are the facts.
Both measures, Proposition 3, as well as the Opinion Question in Utah County, propose increasing the sales tax by a quarter of a cent. That part is very easy to understand. The question the average taxpayer then asks is simple: What do I get for my money?
The answer is simple: economic growth. More transit opportunities. Less congestion and gridlock.
Let's start in Utah County. By voting for the Opinion Question, Utah County voters will generate enough tax revenue to create a commuter rail line from Utah to Salt Lake County. Commuter rail from Ogden to Salt Lake City is well under way and may be in operation as early as late next year. It's hard to overstate the benefits of a commuter rail line extending from Provo to Ogden as part of a regional transit system that will benefit commuters on the road as well as on the train.
In Salt Lake County, the list and timetable of transit and highway projects is still being finalized, which can be frustrating to those clamoring for specifics. But we know the benefits will be enormous, and we ought to rally behind Proposition 3 and approve it at the ballot box Nov. 7.
One-quarter of the new tax revenue will be used to preserve Mountain View Corridor right of way, accelerating construction of a major west-side highway across the Salt Lake Valley and into Utah County. We will save multimillions of dollars by securing the necessary land now. The choice is whether we want to pay for it now or pay like crazy later.
A large share of the money generated by the new tax in Salt Lake County will help accelerate significant new TRAX and FrontRunner commuter rail projects. The Utah Transit Authority is planning construction of five rail transit projects in the county: four new TRAX lines to Draper, West Jordan, West Valley, and to the Salt Lake International Airport, as well as new commuter rail from Salt Lake City south, meeting the proposed Utah County segment. Most of the confusion surrounding Proposition 3 focuses on which of these projects will be constructed and how quickly.
Here's the answer.
All of these projects will be built under an accelerated schedule if Proposition 3 passes. But without a positive vote, some of them won't be completed until 2030 — almost a quarter century from now. By approving Proposition 3, all of these projects will be completed much, much sooner — many as quickly as 2015.
Utah's population is growing by roughly the size of Layton every year for the next three decades, and traffic congestion is increasing twice as fast. Every person who rides commuter rail or TRAX is another car taken off of our crowded roads. Anyone who has driven on I-15 across Point of the Mountain during rush hour knows exactly what I'm talking about.
The choice is clear. A quarter of a cent sales tax increase is a small price to pay to preserve Utah's future. No one wants I-15 to become the equivalent of a Los Angeles freeway.
That doesn't have to happen. In Utah County, please vote for the Opinion Question. In Salt Lake County, please vote for Proposition 3. We can create an efficient regional transportation system. If we wait, congestion will only get worse.

Utaaah!
Oct 18, 2006, 3:40 PM
Pleasant Grove apparently wants to heavily subsidize this hotel/convention center development with city, county, and school funds. I'm generally opposed to using public subsidies for private development -- especially on raw, undeveloped ground. This project may bring outside dollars from out-of-state convention go-ers, but I'm skeptical that enough patrons will pay $284/night to fill the facility on a consistent basis. The convenient flat subsidies from restaurant and auto rental taxes will backfire if the project fails, forcing the county to contribute funds for many years without a corresponding increase in revenue. Also, while the restaurants around the facility may feed hotel/convention center patrons, they will largely draw business from existing restaurants. This is bad, bad policy IMHO. Read on....

Tax money sought for hotel

Pleasant Grove seeks county help for the complex

By Amy Choate-Nielsen
Deseret Morning News

PROVO — Pleasant Grove officials asked Utah County commissioners Tuesday for tax money to help pay a debt the city will incur so a hotel and convention center project can be built in the north Utah County city.
The city is purchasing 37 acres of land to give to John Q. Hammons Hotels and Resorts, which has proposed building a hotel and a convention center on the property. Plans for restaurants, a corporate center and an auto mall have been made for an additional 13-acre parcel of land that will be part of the project.
"The (project) would be in a caliber slightly different than that which is currently available in the valley," said Pleasant Grove Mayor Mike Daniels, who compared the proposed hotels to the Grand America in Salt Lake City.
"This isn't your pull up, roll up, roll out your carpet (event)," he said. "This is a sit-down dinner with 2,700 of your closest friends."
City officials, who offered the land to the resort-builder as an incentive for choosing Pleasant Grove as the site of the project, proposed entering an interlocal agreement with the county that would return a portion of taxes generated by the convention center— to be located by the Pleasant Grove interchange off of exit 275 on I-15— and surrounding businesses to the city. The taxes would help pay off a bond issuance that will cost about $35 million over 25 years.
Pleasant Grove proposes the county give the city one-third of the transient room tax garnered by the hotel. The city also wants to receive all of the restaurant tax generated by the 50-acre project and a flat rate of $85,000 per year to compensate for other restaurant business generated outside of the project.
"The justification is there are going to be many, many other restaurants coming to that intersection on the other three quadrants (of the project)," said Richard Bradford, Pleasant Grove economic development director. "Rather than anticipate what those collections would be, the item being negotiated is they would just have a flat amount."
The proposed agreement requests a flat figure of $50,000 from the county for car rental tax and all of the property tax increment from the county's share of the project area tax from 2008 to 2031.
All totaled, the city is looking to get about $18 million from the county. Pleasant Grove has forged a tax agreement with the Alpine School District that garners the city $8 million over the lifespan of the bond. Pleasant Grove plans to contribute about $13.5 million to the bond.
"We think our proposal is fairly straightforward," Daniels said.
Daniels added Pleasant Grove is anxious to complete the deal quickly, as the city's land deal is set to close by the end of November.
As of Tuesday, county commissioners did not have an up-to-date copy of the proposed interlocal agreement, and they requested to consider the decision when they had the correct documents. It is expected the commission will discuss the agreement within the next two weeks.
Meanwhile, Pleasant Grove's proposal needn't cause problems for other cities trying to make plans for a convention center, Commissioner Steve White said.
"There really isn't competition," White said. "As far as I'm concerned, I don't see anything that would change anything that would happen in Provo or Orem or Lehi or anywhere else because of this."
Provo officials are seeking a partnership with the county on a proposed $32 million, 80,000-square-foot facility adjacent to the Provo Marriott in downtown Provo.
White said room rates for Hammons' proposed hotels would likely hover around $284 a night, and discounts aren't given for conventions. Because of the room rates, White said, the convention center will likely draw a different customer base than other proposed convention centers.
"If there's a demand out there for that kind of facility, (Hammons) will be very successful," White said. "If there isn't, it will be very difficult. It will be interesting to see if Utah County has come that far, that fast."

leebuddy
Oct 18, 2006, 9:39 PM
Here is a rending of the new Hotel to be built.
http://img144.imageshack.us/img144/8247/pg12storyhotelpv0.jpg

SmilingBob
Oct 18, 2006, 11:53 PM
Pleasant Grove apparently wants to heavily subsidize this hotel/convention center development with city, county, and school funds. I'm generally opposed to using public subsidies for private development -- especially on raw, undeveloped ground. This project may bring outside dollars from out-of-state convention go-ers, but I'm skeptical that enough patrons will pay $284/night to fill the facility on a consistent basis. The convenient flat subsidies from restaurant and auto rental taxes will backfire if the project fails, forcing the county to contribute funds for many years without a corresponding increase in revenue. Also, while the restaurants around the facility may feed hotel/convention center patrons, they will largely draw business from existing restaurants. This is bad, bad policy IMHO. Read on....."

I agree.

I dont like using tax incentives to build retail developments. (ie Wal-Mart, Home Depot, etc.) They will stay for 10 years, then move to the next town who will give them 10 more years of tax incentives. Not generally done with a hotel and convention center.

Here is are the good and bad points of this plan as I see it.

First, the tax money they are looking at using will be mostly generated by the project. If the hotel/convention center is not built there is no money.

Second, PG is only asking for a third of the transient room tax. The county still keeps the other two-thirds, and the restaurant portion of the sales tax which the $85,000 is an estimate of the restaurant tax for the additional restaurants not all the sales tax revenue.

Third, I usually oppose these types of projects because the school districts pay more than other government agencies, but if Alpine School District has negotiated an arrangement they see some benefit in them I will defer to them.

Fourth, Car Rental Tax--what convention visitor is going to rent a car in Utah Valley? I usually get one at the airport (ie SLC gets the revenue) when I travel. This one I don't like.

Fifth, don't like to see the county give up all of their share of the property tax from this development.

Sixth, $284 a night? This isn't New York. Maybe this is the posted rate no one really pays. It had better be one "oh my heck" of a hotel to charge more than NYC hotels.

Part of me says Hammonds must have research demand before committing to build this size of facility, but I still wonder:
Is there enough demand for this kind of facility? If so, where are these types of convention going now?
Are we talking big conventions/meetings of over 1000 people?
I do know that Utah Valley has limited meeting space for large groups. You have BYU, UVSC, Thanksgiving Point or the Marriott Hotel.

I do know that demand for meeting space is tough to find in SLC, and more available and cheaper at the Provo Marriott. I've heard they plan on going after the SLC meeting business--different from convention business. Meetings are generally local people, and conventioners travel from outside the area and need rooms to stay in.

delts145
Oct 19, 2006, 12:09 AM
:koko: :koko: :koko: :koko: [ Originally posted by SmilingBob]
Sixth, $284 a night? This isn't New York. Maybe this is the posted rate no one really pays. It had better be one "oh my heck" of a hotel to charge more than NYC hotels.


It isn't the Grand America or Deer Valley either. I have to wonder about that figure. Do you think it's a mis-print. I can't imagine paying that rate, unless they plan on building a subway to Sundance direct from the hotel.

Of course, I guess this hotel is just one piece of many,i.e.:large lifestyle center,convention center etc. But still,"$284 a night"?

delts145
Oct 19, 2006, 12:12 PM
:D LEHI/ Construction has commenced! Located on the south side of highway 92 which leads up to American Fork Canyon from I-15.

Ivory Ridge is an exceptional master-planned community that will take you back to the time of neighborhood markets, tree lined streets and Classic American architecture. Ivory Ridge is a complete community with 400 luxury townhomes, 435 estate homes, and exceptional new city park, retail center and an exclusive swim and tennis club - all tied together beautifully within a convenient, pedestrian friendly community

delts145
Oct 19, 2006, 1:02 PM
IVORY RIDGE

Get ready for something big - something really BIG from Ivory Homes, the No. 1 builder in Utah. After three years of planning, Ivory Homes is releasing for reservation its new flagship community, Ivory Ridge. This exciting new community is located in east Lehi just southwest of Micron off State Road 92.

"We haven't done anything of this magnitude before," says David Zollingeer, Ivory's sales manager for Utah County.

More than 800 single-family and multi-family homes are slated for this master-planned, mixed-use community. In addition to being the biggest project Ivory has ever tackled Ivory Ridge marks several more firsts for the company.

Ivory Ridge will feature Ivory's new line of townhomes, Ivory Homes created several townhome designs just for Ivory Ridge that emphasize classic American Architecture, spacious living and ample garage space. Similar townhomes will also soon be offered in other communities such as Ivory Highlands in Taylorville and Benson Mill in Stansbury Park.

"It just shows our commitment to provide a product that meets the needs of Utah homebuyers." Zollinger says. "As the land prices go up we see maintaining affordability while offering an excellant product with great value in our townhomes."

Another first willl be the multi-million-dollar Ivory Ridge Swim and Tennis Club. Never before has Ivory Homes built such a large recreation center in one of its communities. And never before has Ivory offered memberships to people who live outside a community.

What will the Club contain? Six indoor and five outdoor tennis courts, three outdoor swimming pools to suit all uses and abilities, a volleyball court, indoor and outdoor reception areas, meeting rooms ,locker rooms, a fitness-center with weight and cardiovascular equipment, and more.

In addition, the Club will have a tenis pro shop and staff, complete with personal trainers, and instructiors to keep menbers fit and kids busy year-rond.

"What we are creating with this facility is a country-club atmosphere that has a community feel to it," says Jeff Christensen, project manager for the Ivory Ridge Swim and Tennis Club."This is designed to be the social center of the area.

In addition to the Club, Ivory Ridge has many more amenitites.

To name a couple, substantial open space that includes a large park with soccer fields, baseball diamonds and more that will anchor the community, and a walkable Center Street will offer a cluster of office space and stores, such as restaurants, convenience stores and banks.

Planning for the community has beeen immense. Ivory Ridge has gone through many public hearings and neighborhood meetings over the past two years. Many suggestions from those gatherings have been used to hone the designs.

The massive effort has paid off the Ivory Homes. The company believes in the project so much that not only are many Ivory employees planning on living there, but Ivory Homes is also building its Utah County headquarters at Ivory Ridge.

Construction on Ivory's headquarters started earlier this summer. It's expected to be one of the first buildings finished in Ivory Ridge.

Ivory Homes is especially proud of the careful atttention it put into the master plan for the community. The ultimate goal is to create a exclusive, well-planned and executed neihborhood structure with an attractive, unified architectural theme and significant amenities.

"This is the flagship community for Ivory," Zollinger says of Ivory Ridge. "We are extremely excited about it. I think it shows our commitment to our buyers and to Utah County."

The benefits of a master-planned community are many. It prevents fractured mini-subdivisions. it streamlines construction of infrastructure, and most importantly, it guarantees open space, parks and other amenities that increase quality of life.

Homes available at Ivory Ridge will come in three types- traditional single-family estates, townhomes and live-work lofts.

The single-family estates will be the same high-end homes available through Ivory's catalogue of homes. The catalogue offers more than 30 floor plans. Each home comes with countless design options and color selections.

Townhomes will be available in several locations throughoout Ivory Ridge. In addition to excellent location, the townhomes boast Classic American architecture featuring brick and stucco exteriors,2-car attached garages, rambler and two-story designs, full basements, and ample interior space.

The live-work lofts will be located in the heart of Center Street shoppping. They willl provide a unique opportunity for residents to lie above or near their work and close to retail.

Summing up the entier community. Zollinger says:

"This definately sets the tone for the quality of work that Ivory does. It also lets everybody know that we are not only able to plan a great community, but we are also very sensitive to the varying needs of our homebuyers in every demographic. Whether it be a young married couple, a move-up homebuyer, a family buying their dream home, or an older couple looking to down-size, we are going to have it all at Ivory Ridge."

Utaaah!
Oct 19, 2006, 2:21 PM
Part of me says Hammonds must have research demand before committing to build this size of facility, but I still wonder:
Is there enough demand for this kind of facility? If so, where are these types of convention going now?

Good question. Are they trying to steal business from existing hotels/convention centers in Utah? Or are they targeting groups that otherwise would meet in surrounding states. I strongly disagree with the use of public subsidies to fund competion for existing local ventures.



Are we talking big conventions/meetings of over 1000 people?
I do know that Utah Valley has limited meeting space for large groups. You have BYU, UVSC, Thanksgiving Point or the Marriott Hotel.

I do know that demand for meeting space is tough to find in SLC, and more available and cheaper at the Provo Marriott. I've heard they plan on going after the SLC meeting business--different from convention business. Meetings are generally local people, and conventioners travel from outside the area and need rooms to stay in.

If they are targeting local groups, how will they fill their hotel at $284 per night? BTW, the lowest price I've paid in New York this year was $299/night, but I stayed at an Embassy in Chicago for about $145/night. I certainly wouldn't want to pay that much in Pleasant Grove.

delts145
Oct 21, 2006, 6:18 AM
Utah County population is surging

Lehi has state's 2nd largest growth — after St. George

By Amy Choate
Deseret Morning News
LEHI — Back when the West was wild, Lehi used to be a dusty place where cowboys came to drink whiskey and trade horses.
Now, the town that is strategically located between Salt Lake City and the heart of Utah County is becoming one of the fastest growing cities in the state. According to a U.S. Census report being released today, Lehi had the second-largest increase of population from 2004 to 2005 after St. George.
"We're having growing pains learning how to be a little bit bigger than we're used to being," Lehi Mayor Howard Johnson said.
The city grew from 27,633 people in 2004 to 31,730 in 2005, according to the report. The city is continuing to skyrocket in 2006, Johnson said.
"We have traffic problems" because of the influx of population in Utah County, Johnson said. "We have a hard time responding to all of the growth wanted for the annexations, the developments; putting in the sewer and water. We're keeping up with it, but we're very busy in those areas."

Other parts of the county are also expanding rapidly.
Pleasant Grove had the sixth-biggest increase in population in the state — more than Draper or Provo. Eagle Mountain grew by 18 percent and Cedar Hills grew by nearly 17 percent.
Since anyone traveling north to Salt Lake City must pass through Lehi, the county's growth is having a slightly negative effect on the town's road system.
Johnson said Lehi's main traffic problem lies with Main Street. The two-lane road is the only major artery out to Cedar Valley from I-15, where equally booming Saratoga Springs and Eagle Mountain lie. Main Street runs through the middle of Lehi, then continues on to Tooele.
If the state does not provide another outlet from the rapidly developing area west of Utah Lake, then Lehi and its surrounding cities will be crippled economically, Johnson said.
Eagle Mountain Mayor Brian Olsen agrees with Johnson. Eagle Mountain grew from 8,760 in 2004 to 10,343 in 2005. The town, which houses mostly young families and retirement-age residents, also faces water and transportation challenges.
While Eagle Mountain offers affordable homes in a beautiful environment, Olsen said, changes will be needed to help the city continue to grow in a positive way.
"I have a political job to do, and that's push (for transportation alternatives)," Olsen said. "This is an area in our state that really needs attention."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------

delts145
Oct 22, 2006, 6:13 PM
Fitness center renovated

By Sara Israelsen
Deseret Morning News
OREM — To Karl Hirst, the answer to the nation's health-care issues can be found within the renovated walls of the Orem Fitness Center.
Keith Johnson, Deseret Morning NewsVisitors to the newly renovated Orem Fitness Center work out in the 6,000-square-foot addition. "I challenge you to watch TV for two nights and not see something about the national health care crisis or the obesity epidemic," said Hirst, Orem city recreation director.
"The answer to those questions is not in TV or Washington, D.C., it's in (this) building. We can solve all of the national crises in this building today."
As he spoke, Hirst pointed to the new wing of the Orem Fitness Center, a 6,000-square-foot addition at a "grand reopening" Thursday.
The addition at the center brings the total area to 105,000 square feet, with a basketball court, racquetball courts, small dance studios, a swimming pool and a weight room.
The center, built in 1979, welcomes nearly 1,500 people a day, with a current active membership of 15,386, said Lissy Sanders, fitness center manager.
Construction on the project began in March and was finished by August.
Before the new addition, cardio and aerobic equipment was jammed in stuffy hallways.
But thanks to a $1 million donation, the center was able to move the 18 treadmills and elliptical machines and the 12 exercise and spinning bikes into a new, breezy, two-story cardio area.
A new enclosed breezeway allows children who have come from the pool with wet hair and suits to wait for their parents inside rather than outside on the sidewalk.
There was also a steam room added near the pool. The steam room was the sole request by the donors, who were publicly thanked for the first time Thursday.
The Noorda family provided the million-dollar donation for the center and were at the grand reopening to see Tye Noorda's idea fulfilled and her husband, Ray Noorda, honored.
Ray Noorda, the former CEO of Novell and an Orem resident, died Oct. 9.
"We are so honored to have folks who are generous and are mindful of the community," said Orem City Mayor Jerry Washburn.
Hirst presented Tye Noorda with a new pass to the fitness center.
The center is open to anyone, although rates vary from Orem city residents to non-residents. For more information visit www.orem.org or call 229-7154.

delts145
Oct 23, 2006, 12:48 PM
UVSC enrollment still rising

By Laura Hancock and Tiffany Erickson
Deseret Morning News
OREM — What goes up must come down.
Except at Utah Valley State College, where enrollment continues to rise, even if just in small amounts.
Fall semester figures released Tuesday by Utah's System of Higher Education show UVSC saw an increase in the total number of students at the school and a jump in those taking a full load of classes.
UVSC joined Southern Utah University and Snow College as the taxpayer-supported colleges that enjoyed enrollment increases this semester.
The other taxpayer-funded schools in Utah's higher-education system — the University of Utah, Utah State University, Weber State University, Dixie State College, the College of Eastern Utah and Salt Lake Community College — saw a drop in the number of students who are taking college-credit courses.
"Although we are experiencing a small decline in the number of students enrolling in college, it is concerning when you think of the potential impact it will have on the lives of individuals," Richard Kendell, Utah's higher education commissioner, said in a statement. "Postsecondary education provides workforce training and increased income potential for students — it produces self-sustaining adults who, in turn, can support a family."
Kendell wants to see the enrollment grow at least a half percent each year.
At UVSC, in all, 20,262 students are taking at least one class at the Orem-based college, an increase of 426 students over last year at this time, according to Tuesday's enrollment report. The number of full-time students is 13,877, an increase of 146 students over fall semester 2005.
Utah Valley officials say enrollment figures may not have grown as much as previous years because of changes to the concurrent enrollment program, which allows high school students to enroll in college classes.

A new statewide requirement says high school students must finish certain prerequisite courses before enrolling in the college classes, UVSC spokeswoman Megan Laurie said.
However, UVSC officials are relishing in the 1 percent increase in the number of students taking a full course load.
"Our revenue is based on our tuition dollars," Laurie said.
That means the school will have a larger budget this year because of additional students paying for courses.
University of Utah President Michael Young said the numbers come as a pleasant surprise.
He said the trend is that enrollments increase when the economy lags and decrease when it thrives.
"I just would have thought, given how very robust the economy is, the (decreases) would be much deeper," Young said. "Right now there are hundreds of unfilled jobs with moderately attractive salaries for high school graduates."
He said the enrollment dip's small size was a ringing endorsement across the state "that, at the end of the day, the people of the state still really understand the value of higher education and have quite a commitment to it."
Young attributed the enrollment drop at the U. to transfer students and fifth-year seniors — students often pursuing a second bachelor's degree.
Last year, the U. raised admission standards, but the freshman class is the same size as last year's and the head count in graduate programs has increased about 3 percent.
Young said the decrease in transfer students was most pronounced in those coming from Salt Lake Community College but said administrators don't know why at this point.
Nonetheless, Young said, the U. is not looking for growth.
"We are pretty committed to a quality of education that requires a certain intensity and student-teacher ratio ... (and) as an institution have not been chasing enrollment," Young said.
"In this economy — with enrollments with such a modest decline — it really is quite a tribute to the quality of education that the U. provides and the general recognition around the state of a quality education and the importance of that, both to the individual and society."
But that is not to say U. leaders aren't concerned about more students going to college in Utah.
Young said the state has dropped from about seventh in the nation in the percentage of people between the ages of 25 and 40 holding bachelor's degrees to about 21st in the nation.
"That's a pretty scary statistic, so from our perspective the participation rate remains a very significant issue and we would like to see that increase dramatically," Young said.

delts145
Oct 23, 2006, 1:18 PM
Also posted on No Magic Thread.:D

By Sara Israelsen and Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — Orem and Provo are great cities destined to become even better, their mayors said in State of the City addresses before the Provo/Orem Chamber of Commerce.
Lewis BillingsJerry Washburn "Is Orem as good as it gets?" Mayor Jerry Washburn asked, "Heck no, it's going to get a lot better."
Provo Mayor Lewis Billings echoed the theme, but both men cautioned that transportation upgrades, especially on I-15, are necessary to maintain growth.
"Transportation is a big deal," Billings said. "Have you recently traveled to that city to the north, Salt Lake City, on a Friday afternoon or evening? We're trying to foist on that I-15 backbone more traffic than it can handle."
He said thousands of new homes in Lehi and other northern Utah County cities and towns will further complicate the issue.
"That will impact your business," he said. "It will impact your ability to be efficient."
The mayors said Provo and Orem are seeing job and business growth despite flatter population growth than other communities in the county and new commercial centers in northern Utah County.
Orem saw a 9 percent increase in jobs — from 33,921 to 34,983 — last year, Washburn said.
"We must really be sure to always fight against complacency," he said, stating his belief that Orem is destined to improve, even though the population will probably remain about the same.
According to the city's figures, Orem is projected to see a 43 percent boost in population through 2050, but in the same 45 years the county as a whole will grow at a rate of 200 percent.
Both cities, Washburn reminded business leaders, are 10th in the Morgan Quitno rankings of safe cities — Provo, for cities with more than 100,000 residents and Orem, for those with 75,000 to 99,999 residents.
Billings said Provo has seen a resurgence in interest from carriers in bringing scheduled airline service to the Provo Municipal Airport since the air traffic control tower became operational in 2004.
"Multiple proposals have come to the city," he said. "Two of those are very viable. We don't know when, and we don't know what, but I believe there will come a day when scheduled service will take you to Las Vegas, Southern California, Colorado" and other regional destinations.
The next hurdle is improving access to the airport from I-15.
"The Provo City Council has said they want to provide additional connectivity to the airport before scheduled service begins," Billings said.
The city is using federal funds to study the feasibility of such a road or offramp from I-15.

delts145
Oct 23, 2006, 3:56 PM
Vineyard to bear rich fruit

Geneva land sale and developments to expand small town

By Sara Israelsen
Deseret Morning News

VINEYARD — It's a quiet place. There are a handful of homes, a pristine lake view and room to grow.
Nestled between Utah Lake and Orem, the small town of Vineyard won't stay quiet for long, with the recent sale of the Geneva Steel property, two planned housing developments and the lure of spacious, lake-front property. It's going to start growing. And soon.
"Trying to build a town is huge," said Mayor Randy Farnworth. "(But) that's the nice thing about having everybody develop around you. If you're smart, you'll look at what they did that was good and bad. You have a lot of examples out there."
To help ensure good growth and preparation for the anticipated population boom, the city hired Bruce Parker and an assistant to work as consultants. They previously worked at a Salt Lake planning firm
Parker, who serves as the principal consultant for planning and development, has been working with the Town Council to modify the general plan and the zoning map, which in the past has been limited to farm and industrial categories. The Town Council and residents want to ensure the preservation of the town's agricultural history.
Vineyard shares a border with Orem — from 800 South to 1600 North — as well as some services, including police and fire protection and some water and sewer lines. As the city grows, that may have to change.
Transportation will also be a major issue as the town grows.
The Utah Department of Transportation has started an environmental impact study to look at possible improvements for Geneva Road. The study will take two years and cost $1.5 million, said UDOT regional spokesman Geoff Dupaix.
There is also serious talk of getting commuter rail in the county — another answer to the growing traffic concerns. The line — as currently designed — would pass through Vineyard alongside the existing Union Pacific railroad tracks.
The Utah Transit Authority owns 175 miles of corridor, stretching from Payson to Brigham City. Commuter rail construction from Salt Lake County to Weber County started last fall and will cost almost $600 million when it is finished in 2008.
Although there is interest in Utah County for commuter rail, the funds aren't yet available, said UTA spokesman Justin Jones.
"When they want it, we'll build it," Jones said. "We're moving forward with the idea that when they figure out how they want to pay for it, they'll come to us." UTA is working on the lengthy environmental study so the agency is ready when the local governments are.
A lot of options face the little town. The main goal is to determine how best to promote long-term economic growth and then sustain that growth.
"Location . . . is going to be huge," Farnworth said of Vineyard's close proximity to I-15 and the fact it lies between Provo and Orem, Utah County's two largest cities. "The location will be able to make it a good vibrant town, but it will grow into a city, no doubt."
The Geneva property
It's cleanup time for the 1,700-acre Geneva Steel property recently sold to Anderson Development LLC.
Demolition began in July of 2005 when dynamite took out a handful of towers and furnaces. It will take another five years before the entire area is clean, said Gary Chandler, project manager for Anderson Geneva Development Inc.
Under a permit from the State Department of Environment Quality, Chandler said they are working to identify and clean up contamination in the soil and groundwater.
Most of the waste is non-toxic but will need to be treated at the site, consolidated into a closed impound or taken to a secure landfill.
The developers hope work can begin within a year in the area north of 1600 North, which is zoned for industrial uses. After the industrial park, efforts will likely focus on building homes in the southeast region.
The 1,700-acre plot is divided into two basic sections. One section lies west of the Union Pacific railroad line and could be a perfect spot for the commuter rail connection with UTA.
With a planned-development zoning that allows for mixed uses, individual homes could go in on the west side of the tracks, with businesses, light industrial and some high-density homes on the east side of the tracks, Chandler said. The proximity to the freeway and to potential commuter rail should add to the land's appeal.
"This property . . . is a very unique property that will have a very high long-term value," Chandler said. "It takes vision to see what it will look like in a few years vs. what it looks like today."
Lakes at Sleepy Ridge
The Lakes at Sleepy Ridge development, straddling the boundaries of Orem and Vineyard, will likely spark a population explosion west of I-15.
There are 160 lots proposed for Vineyard and 65 for Orem, with many homes backing on Orem's Sleepy Ridge golf course and facing Utah Lake.
The homes are expected to start in the high $400,000s and range into the $700,000s, providing an upper middle-class living opportunity new to the area, said Brandt Andersen, managing partner with Cambridge Partners.
"There's not a lot of property left in Orem," Andersen said. "(Vineyard) is going to be a place where people are really going to want to live. The number of requests we've had has been off the charts."
The community is scheduled to be finished within three years; home building should start toward the end of the summer.
Cambridge Partners will contract out the actual construction, and the Orem side of the development will begin first, with construction in Vineyard beginning by 2007.

Homestead at Vineyard
Stuart Johnson, Deseret Morning News

Only a few Geneva Steel buildings remain standing. The site will be developed once cleanup is completed. To the southwest of the former Geneva Steel site, The Homestead at Vineyard will add another 1,100 homes on 319 acres.
Anderson Development is working to finalize a development agreement with the town outlining details for future home builders and city officials, such as lot sizes and water and sewer set-ups.
The agreement is to ensure that the development follows what was promised, said Bruce Baird, legal counsel for Anderson Development. It also details requirements for the appearances of houses, streets and signs.
"We hope we're going to provide a good model of development for all cities," Baird said. "There's not a lot of master-planned communities in the Provo-Orem area."
The lifetime community will offer town homes, middle-range homes and the larger homes for "after the big promotion."
Anderson, who manages the land, will contract out to builders, who will hopefully begin constructing homes by the end of the summer.

delts145
Oct 23, 2006, 4:12 PM
Also posted on the Salt Lake Development Thread.

Power shortfalls expected

Demand growth may exceed supply growth by 3 times

By Tina Seeley
Bloomberg News
U.S. electricity demand will increase three times faster than supplies during the next decade, threatening reliable operation of the nation's power grid, according to an industry report.

Jason Olson, Deseret Morning News,

Operations began last year at the Currant Creek power plant in Mona, Utah's first significant power plant since 1983. Demand for power will increase 19 percent, or 141,000 megawatts, while supplies are only expected to increase 6 percent, or 57,000 megawatts, leaving a shortfall of 84,000 megawatts, the report from the North American Electric Reliability Council said. A megawatt is enough power for about 800 typical U.S. homes, according to the U.S. Energy Department.
For PacifiCorp, which serves Utah and five other states, another 1,775 to 2,743 megawatts of electricity will be needed by 2014, with Utah driving much of the new demand, according to company spokesman Dave Eskelsen.

PacifiCorp's Lake Side power plant is currently under construction on 62 acres at the site of the defunct Geneva Steel in Vineyard.
"We're trying to get more out of the system than it's capable of providing in the long term," Rick Sergel, president of the Electric Reliability Council, said at a press conference Monday.
Regions whose power reserves are expected to fall below minimum recommended levels in the next two to three years are Texas, the upper Midwest, New England, the Mid-Atlantic and Rocky Mountain areas. Other parts of the country face the same prospect within 10 years, the report said.
Those declining reserve measurements do not count plants that have been mothballed because of falling power prices or because they have not been able to get transmission access to sell generation where it's needed, said Dave Nevius, vice president of the council. The report estimates there are about 50,000 megawatts of generation in that predicament.
"As customer demand increases and transmission systems experience increased power transfers, portions of these systems will be operated at or near their reliability limits more of the time," the report said. "Under these conditions, coincident unavailability of generating units, transmission lines or transformers, while improbable, can degrade bulk power system reliability."
The council, based in Princeton, N.J., was founded in 1968 by the power industry as a self-regulatory group after a 1965 blackout cut power to 30 million people in the Northeast. Federal regulators earlier this year named the nonprofit organization as the developer and enforcer of now mandatory reliability rules for power line owners and operators.
The council based its report on data supplied by its members, including utilities and government-owned power buyers and sellers.
The council's "report confirms what we've been saying for some time, that the nation needs more power resources sooner rather than later, and that it's the case across all regulatory systems," John Shelk, president of the Electric Power Supply Association, said in a statement.
Along with a shortfall in new power plants, the report finds a lack of adequate power line construction. The amount of new transmission lines will increase by 6.1 percent, adding about 12,873 miles of wire to the nation's grid.
"Expansion and strengthening of the transmission system continues to lag demand growth and expansion of generating resources in most areas," said the report.
"The lack of adequate transmission emergency transfer capability or transmission service agreements could limit the ability to deliver available resources from areas of surplus to areas of need."
Sergel said that in both transmission and generation there has not been enough long-term planning to accommodate rising needs.
"In both cases, we have become more short term in our thinking, and I believe that we have to extend that," he said.

Contributing: Dave Anderton

delts145
Oct 25, 2006, 11:17 AM
Meadows

American Fork official praises project, but some residents see a downside

By Amy Choate-Nielsen
Deseret Morning News

AMERICAN FORK — If Saturday afternoon shopping is any indication of a growing trend, the parking lots of The Meadows in American Fork show the new development is a hit.

Tom Smart, Deseret Morning News

Many shoppers like The Meadows because they no longer have to drive far to find major stores. To some locals, the collection of big-box retailers, ranging from Wal-Mart to Old Navy to Super Target is like a breath of fresh air for convenience. About four years ago, the area just off I-15 on Main Street was nothing but marsh land, and people living in north Utah County had to travel elsewhere for a majority of their shopping.
"I used to have to go to Orem or (Sandy)," said Alpine resident George Veit. "This saves me a lot of time and money. It's a much shorter trip."
The Meadows has become a sprawling community of Kohl's, Target, Pier 1, a Sears Grand,Ross,many Banks and other stores and restaurants and a large multi-plex movie theater, all connected by parking lots,attractive landscaping,bridges,round-abouts, and sidewalks.
According to Melanie Marsh, chief of American Fork's city staff, the project has been successful in that other commercial developments are drawn to the area because of The Meadows. Costco and Loew's in Lehi city boundaries for example, opened Aug. 24 across the street from the Walmart Supercenter and Home Depot in American Fork city boundaries.
Marsh said the city also expects The Meadows to have a positive financial impact on American Fork residents by easing potential property tax increases over the years.
"The Meadows has provided a positive economic impact to American Fork," Marsh said. "It has created a destination shopping place.
"American Fork believes that it has done a lot of things right with respect to The Meadows development and would absolutely want to have another development like The Meadows in our community."
But some residents aren't sure they want more developments like The Meadows in their city. Though the shopping center is convenient, it also has a downside, some residents say.
"It's good and bad," said Nola Harvey of American Fork. "The good part is we have shopping here. We don't have to go to Orem for everything."
Tom Smart, Deseret Morning NewsAmerican Fork's The Meadows is a work in progress. It already boasts numerous big-box and other stores and restaurants and a movie theater. The bad part, Harvey said, is the development has brought more traffic to the area.
"Increased growth never pays for itself," Harvey said.
Other shoppers at The Meadows expressed the same sentiment, that convenience is good but traffic is bad. Some said they don't mind driving farther to deal with less crowding.
"I don't mind driving 15 minutes to shop with less people," said Chris Lee of Provo. Lee said he drives to American Fork or Springville to shop at Wal-Mart because it is not as busy as the Wal-Mart in Orem.
Lee said he appreciates growing cities, but he doesn't like overcrowding and big developments.
"It's kind of like a necessary evil," Lee said. "People need a place to shop."

delts145
Oct 25, 2006, 1:11 PM
Aging SCERA gaining new luster

5-year-plan aims to turn building into a state-of-the-art facility

By Sara Israelsen
Deseret Morning News
OREM — At 73 years old, the SCERA theater is getting a makeover.
Eric Mansfield works to remove seats from the SCERA theater as part of a project to renovate the landmark using a $1 million donation from Xango. The five-week face-lift began this past week as construction crews ripped out theater seats, tore up carpet and prepped the walls, said SCERA President and CEO Adam Robertson. The seats are now gone, allowing construction workers access to the floor, which will be sandblasted and finished, then carpeted in some areas.
By Thanksgiving, the Xango Grand Theater should be ready for holiday movies.
"Basically, it's everything we have right now, only all brand new," Robertson said.
It is the first step in converting the old building into a state-of-the-art home for plays, movies, concerts and art programs.
"We have a five-year plan for the theater, and this first year is just to take everything we have now and make it brand new," Robertson said. "Next year, we start upgrading the theatrical side of things."
The face-lift is made possible by a $1 million gift from Xango, a Lehi-based company that markets juice made from the mangosteen fruit.
"We're thrilled that we've been able to help bolster and ensure that they have a long-term future," Xango spokesman Bob Freeze said. "Our hope was also that a commitment like this would spur others to get involved and support SCERA as well."
The five-year, $1 million commitment is doled out in chunks each year, and once the theater is up to par, Robertson said, SCERA executives will use the money to update other areas and improve some of the current art, music and drama programs.
Robertson is also hopeful that they will be able to apply for and receive funds generated by the CARE tax — a one-tenth-of-1-percent sales-tax increase approved by voters last November. The tax was projected to generate $1.6 million a year for cultural arts and recreation.
Orem city recently reviewed a feasibility study about how funds could be used, but no plans or promises have been made yet.
With renovations, the SCERA is sponsoring an "adopt-a-chair" program that allows interested community members to contribute $250 for a theater chair that would have a small name plaque. For more information, call 225-2569.

SmilingBob
Oct 25, 2006, 3:29 PM
Geneva site plan offers shops, hub

By Sara Israelsen (http://deseretnews.com/dn/staff/card/1,1228,2311,00.html)
Deseret Morning News
VINEYARD — The land west of I-15 near Orem may not look like much right now, but in a few years, the former Geneva Steel site may be home to shops, homes and even a commuter hub.
http://deseretnews.com/photos/geneva102506.jpg Deseret Morning News graphic

Vineyard town and Anderson Geneva Development Inc. are looking at potential uses for the 1,700 acres of lake front property, but there won't be any signs of life for a while, at least not until the large plot of land goes through an environmental cleanup.
Geneva Steel opened in 1944 and finally closed its doors in 2001. The main smoke stacks were demolished in 2005, and piece by piece the plant is being dismantled and shipped to China.
The area is still zoned industrial, although Anderson Geneva Development Inc. may apply for rezones to allow residential, retail and even light industrial firms in the area.
The group is hoping to have some commercial space available by mid-2007 said Dennis Astill, project manager and attorney for Anderson Geneva Development.
Vineyard is waiting for the cleanup process to be complete before addressing development specifics, said Bruce Parker, principal consultant for Planning and Development Services of Vineyard.
In the meantime, Vineyard also is looking at transportation options, with the possibility of an intermodal hub or commuter rail station hub in the middle of the town.
"There's a portion of the track where both our light rail line and our commuter rail line meet up in Vineyard, creating an opportunity ... for a hub of sorts," said UTA spokesman Justin Jones.
Specifics are still up in the air because most everything is on hold until Utah's Department of Environmental Quality finishes testing, evaluating and cleaning up what they call "hot spots" of past contamination on the former factory land.
State officials have estimated that within a decade most environmental cleanup will be done and homes will be built at the site.
document.writeln(AAMB6); var bnum=new Number(Math.floor(99999999 * Math.random())+1); document.write(''); http://63.225.61.6/IMPCNT/ccid=9677/area=dn.local.article.position1Y/adsize=300x250/keyword=/site=/acc_random=9061896/pageid=9061896 With those projections, Vineyard wants to ensure it is ready for a population boom.
The Town and Planning Council each recently met with a planning facilitator to discuss the qualities of the agricultural town and how to preserve those in the midst of growth.
The town's vision statement lays out its desire to have "rural living in a well-planned, independent municipality," and a desire to preserve open space, broaden the tax base and have adequate access in and around the community.




E-mail: sisraelsen@desnews.com (sisraelsen@desnews.com)

SmilingBob
Oct 25, 2006, 8:19 PM
Projects from around the state:

Salt Lake City – The UTAH SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION and UTAH VALLEY STATE COLLEGE have agreed on a blueprint to prepare UVSC for university status. The plan includes building a new library, increasing full-time faculty numbers and developing graduate programs.


Brian Head - With the Brian Head Town Council’s blessing in the form of a $3.7 million special improvement district, roadway and utility work for the Summit at Brian Head Resort complex has begun.
The project is one of four developments in the pipeline for the community. “At total build out, we’ll more than double the size of Brian Head,” said Mayor “Dutch” Deutschlander. Most of the town’s housing units are second homes, with about 50 of the existing 1,000 units occupied by full-time residents. The Lofts, Black Diamond and White Bear are the other three condo projects. The Summit is the largest at 42 acres with 420 condos, 34 town homes and a clubhouse.
Sales, which are targeted to people in the Las Vegas area, are scheduled to begin this fall, with a groundbreaking next spring. The first units should be ready for occupation by late fall of 2007.
While Brian Head is the closest ski area to Las Vegas and draws many of its winter visitors from Nevada, it’s also become a year-round recreational destination for hikers, mountain bikers and ATV enthusiasts.
The town council awarded Feller Enterprises of St. George and M-13 Construction of Springville the contracts to construct and manage the Summit’s infrastructure. Ray Gardner of Gardner Partnership Architects of Cedar City is the project architect and Stantec will be the civil engineer.


Snowbird - A 600-foot tunnel connecting Peruvian Gulch and Mineral Basin in Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort saw the light Aug. 16 as excavators punched through the tunnel exit. The tunnel, the first of its kind in North America, will carry skiers from one side of the mountain to the other on a conveyer belt similar to those in airports.
Skiers will catch a new high-speed quad lift from the base to the tunnel entrance on the Peruvian Gulch side. Then, without removing their skis or snowboards, they’ll travel through the lighted tunnel on the conveyer in about four minutes. Once on the other side, they’ll be able to access the Mineral Basin Express or head down Mt. Baldy.
In Utah, the number of skier days has increased by 29 percent during the past three years, and long lines for the tram to Hidden Peak spurred the improvements at the resort.
“We wanted to give our existing customers a better experience at Snowbird,” without adding a lift or tram on the ridgeline because of aesthetics and concerns about wind shear, says Snowbird President Bob Bonar. Ski tunnels are common in Europe, although they don’t often have the “magic carpet” conveyer, so Snowbird adapted the idea.
The $650,000 project was approved a year ago, and work began Aug. 17, 2005. The chairlift adds $5.6 million to the project, which is expected to be complete by the beginning of ski season.

delts145
Oct 25, 2006, 8:37 PM
Projects from around the state:

Snowbird - A 600-foot tunnel connecting Peruvian Gulch and Mineral Basin in Snowbird Ski & Summer Resort saw the light Aug. 16 as excavators punched through the tunnel exit. The tunnel, the first of its kind in North America, will carry skiers from one side of the mountain to the other on a conveyer belt similar to those in airports.
Skiers will catch a new high-speed quad lift from the base to the tunnel entrance on the Peruvian Gulch side. Then, without removing their skis or snowboards, they’ll travel through the lighted tunnel on the conveyer in about four minutes. Once on the other side, they’ll be able to access the Mineral Basin Express or head down Mt. Baldy.
In Utah, the number of skier days has increased by 29 percent during the past three years, and long lines for the tram to Hidden Peak spurred the improvements at the resort.
“We wanted to give our existing customers a better experience at Snowbird,” without adding a lift or tram on the ridgeline because of aesthetics and concerns about wind shear, says Snowbird President Bob Bonar. Ski tunnels are common in Europe, although they don’t often have the “magic carpet” conveyer, so Snowbird adapted the idea.
The $650,000 project was approved a year ago, and work began Aug. 17, 2005. The chairlift adds $5.6 million to the project, which is expected to be complete by the beginning of ski season.

:banana: I can't wait to make my first trip through this tunnel!!

Happy Valley Freak
Oct 25, 2006, 9:02 PM
oh yea! I can't wait until they start construction In P.G.!!!!

StevenF
Oct 25, 2006, 11:35 PM
I remember that back in 96 or 97 there was a proposal for a 13 story building that was to go up on the North end of Provo's downtown. Does anyone know what happened to it?

delts145
Oct 25, 2006, 11:59 PM
StevenF,

There has been a huge amount of construction on Provo's north end along University Ave and the river-bottoms. A lot of mixed use development,McMansions, "and I mean Big Mansions." The tower you're talking about would be at the mouth of Provo Canyon.:koko: While there are new multi-level office towers going up there,I seem to remember a ruling against anything over a certain height. We ought to look into it .

davericard
Oct 26, 2006, 12:23 AM
Here is the Project I was talking about. Though not as tall as it appeared from a glance nevertheless big. It's called Alpine Village it's located @ 1340 N. Freedom Blvd. in Provo (I am not familiar with provo so not dure where that is) There will be 4 different buildings not sure on total count yet. The permit is in the City for building "A"http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e290/karlique/AlpineVillage.jpg
Building Bhttp://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e290/karlique/alpine2.jpg
Building Chttp://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e290/karlique/alpinec.jpg
Building Dhttp://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e290/karlique/alpined.jpg

davericard
Oct 26, 2006, 12:23 AM
Here is the Project I was talking about. Though not as tall as it appeared from a glance nevertheless big. It's called Alpine Village it's located @ 1340 N. Freedom Blvd. in Provo (I am not familiar with provo so not dure where that is) There will be 4 different buildings not sure on total count yet. The permit is in the City for building "A"http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e290/karlique/AlpineVillage.jpg
Building Bhttp://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e290/karlique/alpine2.jpg
Building Chttp://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e290/karlique/alpinec.jpg
Building Dhttp://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e290/karlique/alpined.jpg

StevenF
Oct 26, 2006, 1:53 AM
StevenF,

There has been a huge amount of construction on Provo's north end along University Ave and the river-bottoms. A lot of mixed use development,McMansions, "and I mean Big Mansions." The tower you're talking about would be at the mouth of Provo Canyon.:koko: While there are new multi-level office towers going up there,I seem to remember a ruling against anything over a certain height. We ought to look into it .

I had a paper route from 93-97 and I would read anything and everything that would pertain to construction aspecially if it was about a new skyscraper. I am not sure of the exact year but there was a special edition in the paper at the end of one year that was on construction. I remember it mentioning the Salt Lake airport, I-15 reconstruction and had the article on the building in Provo. I believe it was a block or two just behind the marriot and at one time there was even a sign with a rendering of it. I believe it was white with a little red in it.

Wasatch_One
Oct 26, 2006, 7:40 AM
Davericard, this is going to be student housing for BYU. I believe that there will be in the area of 200 units total

delts145
Oct 26, 2006, 10:14 AM
Davericard, this is going to be student housing for BYU. I believe that there will be in the area of 200 units total

WasatchOne,

Have you seen a billboard around the site? The rendering seems to be borrowing off of the Old Academy theme,which is very attractive. I'm just wondering what kind of materials there going to use for the exterior finish. I hope not too much stucco. Also, would that location be where the old Reams grocery store use to be and also taking in some of that old single story medical plaza along University that they tore down?

delts145
Oct 26, 2006, 10:16 AM
I had a paper route from 93-97 and I would read anything and everything that would pertain to construction aspecially if it was about a new skyscraper. I am not sure of the exact year but there was a special edition in the paper at the end of one year that was on construction. I remember it mentioning the Salt Lake airport, I-15 reconstruction and had the article on the building in Provo. I believe it was a block or two just behind the marriot and at one time there was even a sign with a rendering of it. I believe it was white with a little red in it.

Now you have me really curious. I'll see if I can find out any info on it.

delts145
Oct 26, 2006, 11:17 AM
Highland backs rec center by Lone Peak

HIGHLAND — City Council members voted Tuesday to support using city-owned land adjacent to Lone Peak High School for a possible recreation center for public use.
The council stopped short of guaranteeing cooperation with Alpine School District on the funding of the project if plans for a recreation center on the site fall through.
Alpine District has proposed adding to the high school's gym facility as part of a $230 million bond that will be voted on Nov. 7. If the bond is approved, the district would likely add the gym sometime between 2007 to 2011.
Alpine, Cedar Hills and Highland may help pay for the gym as part of plans to form a tri-city recreation center. If the cities and Alpine School District work together on the project, the facility would be open for public use. If plans for the center fall through, the district plans to expand their gym for school use only. The deal is still in early stages.
All three cities expect to have a feasibility study on the project completed by early 2007.

delts145
Oct 26, 2006, 12:31 PM
This article is a little bit of a departure from our love of buildings, but somehow I thought that there are a lot of us who have an equal love of our architectural landscape design, whether natural or man-made.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
D. ROBERT CARTER -
A royal branch of the family abies concolor ruled over a section of the Wasatch Mountains for more than three and a half centuries. Approximately 25 years after Spanish conquistador Francisco Coronado began his search for the fabled Seven Cities of Gold, a young seedling prince germinated on a promontory overlooking a beautiful glacial-worn canyon on the east side of the mountain we now call Timpanogos.

When the Pilgrims landed near Plymouth Rock in 1620, this princely white fir, or white balsam, was likely 6 or 7 inches in diameter. The tree continued to grow for more than 300 years.

When workers constructed the Alpine Loop Road connecting Provo and American Fork canyons in the 1920s, the majestic monarch stood 110 feet tall and measured 20 feet in circumference. He towered above a ridge about a half mile beyond Aspen Grove and only a few feet from the newly constructed narrow, dirt lane.

King of the hill

Woodsmen and others certainly knew of the Monarch of Timpanogos, but it wasn't until 1923 that the giant tree received recognition for its size and uniqueness. During the summer of that year, Henry C. Cowles, a renown ecologist from the University of Chicago, taught classes during BYU's summer school at Aspen Grove.

While guiding his students on a field trip one balmy July day, Cowles noticed the giant balsam for the first time. After a close inspection of this king of the forest, Cowles took off his hat and pronounced it to be "the most magnificent fir in all the world."

Fallen, rotting trees surrounded the monarch showing that it had once been in a grove of fir trees, but it had outlived them all. Cowles believed that the tree might be the oldest of its species in existence. The fir had achieved extraordinary size for being located in the heart of the Rockies.

In 1923, Brigham Young University professor Walter Cottam wrote to the National American Forest Association and nominated the fir to the National Tree Hall of Fame. The association accepted the nomination, and the fir became Utah's only tree to be listed on the register. The monarch joined the ranks of such famous trees as the Washington Elm, the tree under which George Washington took command of the colonial army.

As Cottam studied the fir in more detail, he became deeply attached to it, and ascribed to it human qualities. Cottam believed that in its youth, the tree had reigned as the Apollo of firs. He viewed it in the 1920s as being an aging warrior, tenacious of life.

Clinging to life

During its long lifetime, the tree had suffered many tribulations. From his studies, Cottam deduced that when the tree was approximately 300 years old, lightning had stuck its uppermost branches, destroying the tree's symmetry, but not its life.

Cottam also postulated that it was about 1815 when a fire scarred the base of the tree. The flames could not destroy the monarch, but they did expose its Achilles' heel. The burned areas around the base of the tree became susceptible to fungi, which led to rot inside of the fir.

Beetles also attacked the tree, making some of its branches dry and brittle.

Still, the tree clung to life, although it grew extremely slowly for the next 100 years after the fire. Cottam developed the impression that the tree might be saying, "My adversaries if they be strong, may shatter my crown or break my arms, but never shall they bend my upright position while life lasts."

15 minutes of fame

As the old tree gained in fame, students and tourists beat a path through a grove of aspen trees to the monarch's base. Photographers snapped its image. Painters daubed its likeness on canvas. However, the fir's newfound fame did not last long.

On April 26, 1930, a group of BYU students wandered through the woods near the Aspen Grove campus on an early spring hike.

Orlin Biddulph discovered a scene that later sent a twinge of sadness through the hearts of Utah Valley conservationists. At some unknown time, a strong blast of wind from the south had toppled the monarch and sent him plunging to the comforting lap of Mother Earth. News of the well-known tree's demise made the front page of the Evening Herald and the Deseret News.

After hearing the sad tidings, Cottam made plans to visit the fallen giant. Two days later, he and a group of his advanced students climbed to the side of the huge fir, and like a committee of pathologists, they studied his death.

Ironically, their findings showed that the Monarch had died just as the warmth of spring heralded new life. Its branches were buried deep in the thawed earth's mud and rock.

When they cut a cross-section from the tree, the botanists found that fungi had hollowed the first 23 feet of the fir's body.

At a distance that would have measured 23 feet above ground level, the group cut out a section of the trunk. At this point, the fir measured 5 1/2 feet in diameter.

In the cross-section, the group counted 315 rings. If one allowed 50 years for the tree to reach a height of 23 feet, the fir would have lived for 365 years.

Cottam planned to take the cross-section back to BYU campus, sand it, polish it and preserve the huge slab in the school's museum.

A funeral fit for a king

One night during the summer of 1930, a group of BYU summer school students visited the broken body of the dead tree and held a memorial service. Using splinters and broken limbs from the deceased, they lighted a funeral bier. One of the mourners then recapped the life history of the monarch.

The words of Cottam summarized the conclusion of the memorial service and revealed his deep respect for the fallen fir and all of nature.

Cottam wrote: "Appropriate songs echoed from the cliffs high upon the face of grand Timpanogos, where spruce and balsam still murmur their solemn requiem. A mighty monarch lay dead."

davericard
Oct 26, 2006, 3:35 PM
Student Housing I don't know. It' does have retail and office space. The first building is 255,000 sq ft w/ 161 units and underground parking

SmilingBob
Oct 26, 2006, 4:17 PM
Davericard, this is going to be student housing for BYU. I believe that there will be in the area of 200 units total

1340 N. Freedom is where the old Turtle shell Reams was, near The Glenwood.

SmilingBob
Oct 26, 2006, 4:55 PM
http://udot.utah.gov/mountainview/images/maps/12b.jpg
The Mountain View Corridor would change the north part of the the county a lot. These maps show a highway like Bangerter Hwy. or a Freeway with access roads between it a I-15.

Personally I like the the above option the best.

Here are the other options.
http://udot.utah.gov/mountainview/images/maps/5a.jpghttp://udot.utah.gov/mountainview/images/maps/7a.jpg
http://udot.utah.gov/mountainview/maps.php

Funny part about this to me is that they have been studying this since 2003 and won't even get started until 2008. You'd think this could be done faster, but with all the studies they have to do it takes years just to get started.

Utaaah!
Oct 26, 2006, 6:36 PM
Delts, I wish I could have seen that tree in your story. I was glad to learn that the tree didn't meet it's demise prematurely to make way for roads, etc., in the name of "progress". Most of Utah isn't blessed with an abundance of arbors. We need to save the trees we have.

delts145
Oct 27, 2006, 11:20 AM
IM Flash Technologies recruiting for Lehi plant

IM Flash Technologies, the joint venture of Intel and Micron to make NAND Flash memory, announced that it is recruiting entry-level production operators for its Lehi plant.
The partnership, which will produce memory chips for the consumer electronics, hand-held communication device and portable memory storage global markets, calls for 300 production operators.
"These are entry-level, trainable positions and the foundation to an excellent career in the semiconductor industry," Shawn Siddoway, IM Flash Technologies' recruiting manager, said in a prepared statement.
Wages start at $11 per hour, plus shift differential for night shift. Performance bonuses are available, as well as 401(k) matching, medical, dental, vision, holiday pay and a time off plan. No previous manufacturing experience is necessary.
Applications are available online at imftech.com/careers. For more information, call 801-767-4473.

delts145
Oct 27, 2006, 12:44 PM
Student Housing I don't know. It' does have retail and office space. The first building is 255,000 sq ft w/ 161 units and underground parking

:tup: This was an earlier article which gave some additional details and some of the thought process for the Alpine Village project.



BYU housing dooms 'turtle'

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — The sky is falling on Chicken Little in theaters everywhere, and now the end is near for the Ream's Turtle on Freedom Boulevard.
Stuart Johnson, Deseret Morning NewsThe Reams "turtle" has stood at 200 West near 1400 North in Provo since 1961 but will soon be replaced by apartments housing BYU students. A Provo landmark because of its tortoise-shell shape, the former skating rink and Ream's grocery store may be demolished by the middle of the month after the City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to approve a new housing development exclusively for Brigham Young University students.
The Alpine Village will include more than 160 four-bedroom condominiums and a number of shops on the corner of Freedom Boulevard (200 West) and Paul Ream Avenue (about 1400 North), where the silver-domed "Turtle" has been since 1961.
BYU considers Alpine Village part of a pilot program to see how students react to apartment-style housing both on campus and off. Nationally and locally, college students appear increasingly interested in apartments over dorms.
The on-campus portion of the test begins next fall when BYU begins to move single students out of dorms at Deseret Towers and temporarily into apartments at Wyview Park, which previously had been reserved for married students. BYU announced last year that half of the current Wyview tenants must move by July. The remainder must leave by July 2007.
The university hasn't made any decisions about the future of Deseret Towers, but officials are considering renovating the six towers or tearing them down and building a new apartment-style complex for single students. That would allow married students to return to Wyview.
Off campus, BYU has an exclusive contract with Alpine Village to rent or sell solely to BYU students. The experiment, called "chartered housing," gives the university additional control of the living environment beyond what it already enjoys with other off-campus housing complexes because BYU will have the right to veto businesses that apply for commercial space.
"BYU will be allowed to screen our retail so there are no tattoo parlors or tanning parlors, for example," said Gary Otterstrom of Timpanogos West Development and Management.
Otterstrom said developers have obtained demolition permits for the Turtle and two other buildings.
Provo officials like the project because they hope it will create an urban village for 3,000 people living within a quarter-mile of the project. Plans call for more than 11,000 square feet of commercial space, including a small general grocery store like BYU's Creamery on Ninth — without the restaurant.
The project also will include a full-size basketball court, a fitness center, a sand pit for volleyball, a swimming pool, a recreation center and a study hall.
The City Council and city staff have focused on walkable communities for years, and they believe they have succeeded with the Shops at Riverwoods and other projects. Similar developments are under way near the Riverside Golf Course (Trellis on the Green) and across University Avenue from the Riverwoods (The Arbors on the Avenue).
"There are about 3,000 residents in the immediate area who would have retail shops now within a walkable distance," said Jan Yeckes, assistant director of economic development, during Tuesday night's council meeting. "There are major multiple-family projects in the area with little in common. The area is disjointed. This could bring the area together."
BYU welcomed the council's approval.
"We are excited to see the progression in this pilot program to provide chartered housing," university spokeswoman Carri Jenkins said.
Single BYU students must live in university-approved housing, and apartment complexes earn approved status by enforcing BYU's Honor Code.

delts145
Oct 27, 2006, 11:08 PM
'Village' seeks approval

Project to replace old Joaquin Elementary

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News

PROVO — The developer paying $6.5 million to purchase the former Joaquin Elementary in Provo is asking the City Council for permission to replace the school with "Joaquin Village," a community of 236 condominiums.
The ArrowStar Group presented a preliminary proposal to the council but interviews with ArrowStar's Wayne Ross and others reveal intense interest in the project because of its proximity to Brigham Young University and long-standing concerns of neighbors about open space and traffic.
"It may be the biggest project we'll see in the four years I'll be on the council," council chairman George Stewart said.
Provo's system is set up to allow a developer to first bring a proposal through the planning commission to the council for feedback before returning later to seek final approval.
"We're just looking for guidance from the City Council to know what they think is best for this project," Ross said.
This was the first time the council had seen drawings and information about the project, which as proposed would include housing for nearly 950 BYU students and more than 600 underground parking spaces. More parking would be provided above ground on the five acres of property, Ross said.
At 550 N. 600 East, Joaquin Village would the be first major attempt at creating the sort of walkable community envisioned for BYU students by the City Council when it considered the South Campus Area Master Plan (SCAMP) several years ago. The site is within 450 feet of BYU, Ross said.
The plans also attempt to meet the unique requirements BYU has for off-campus student housing. Single BYU students are required to live in "approved housing," which means the landlords agree to enforce the school's strict conduct code.
"BYU is looking for housing developments that are conducive to students abiding by the Honor Code, that are well-managed and well-maintained," Ross said.
One way the plans do that is to create separation between the two buildings — one restricted to men and the other to women — while planning a courtyard in between where they can mingle. A central clubhouse would include exercise equipment, a sport court, a swimming pool and meeting rooms.
Neighbors expressed concern in early meetings with ArrowStar that the condos, at four stories high, were too imposing in an area filled with one- or two-story, single-family homes, said Kurt Peterson, a neighborhood activist. There were also concerns that the courtyard was too enclosed.
"Since then, they've done a fair amount of design to change the look, make it less imposing," Peterson said. "They've put some steps into the design so we're not looking at a four-story wall. They've also widened the opening to the courtyard. They also said they would provide permanent access to a sidewalk through that block to anyone who wants to walk through there. That's a plus. Neighbors were happy to hear that change."
Peterson said neighbors still would like to see the buildings pushed 20 feet back from the surrounding sidewalks.
Another SCAMP objective was to help the Joaquin neighborhood move single students out of single-family homes and increase the number of owner-occupant families living in the area. Peterson said Joaquin Village likely would aid that effort.
"One positive part of the proposal in my view is it will house 1,000 students, and many of them probably will move out of homes that frankly are better suited to housing families," he said. "The students are looking for good, quality housing and families would like to have homes back. That could be a benefit in the long run."
Neighbors do have some additional requests for the city. They want to have the city push 500 North, which now ends at 700 East, all the way through to 900 East. "We'd like to know city's schedule for completing that road," Peterson said. "We realize there are properties to be purchased and road to be paved."
Neighbors also have suggested blocking access from 500 North to the southbound lane on 600 East. That would prevent the influx of students from using 600 East to travel south to Center Street — past Farrer Elementary School.
After more than 65 years, Joaquin Elementary closed its doors for good in the spring of 2005. Provo School District officials determined it would be cheaper to sell the land than to renovate.


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delts145
Oct 28, 2006, 5:53 AM
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HEIDI TOTH - Daily Herald

For rent. That's the most popular advertisement in Provo, it seems, with the signs cropping up everywhere -- on homes, on duplexes, on major apartment complexes.

Yet the buildings just keep coming. Joaquin Elementary School came down two months ago to make room for high-density student housing. The Reams turtle was demolished in February and work began almost immediately on the Alpine Village. Student housing just radiates out from Brigham Young University.

But those for-rent signs just stick around. Sure, they move around some to various complexes and buildings, but the number never seems to decrease in a city that's more than half filled with rentals.

The newest developer entering the market is Steve Maddox, who wants to build 120 units on just more than six acres. His proposal would raze the old Meridian School on 300 North and 900 East and build Meridian Housing. The question of a zone change comes before the Planning Commission next week.

On the one hand, Maddox has reason to be worried, because the Provo Municipal Council, whenever more high-density housing comes up, asks why the city needs more. But on the other hand, said Municipal Council Chairman George Stewart, they're deferring to the housing market to regulate how much housing is needed. The properties going up still are being filled.

"Now where it's located is not a market decision," he said.

Maddox made the argument to Foothills Neighborhood residents Thursday night that Meridian provides an ideal location for student housing.

It's right by a bus stop, most of the additional traffic will feed onto 900 East and it's close to retail and other amenities. The three and a half story structure will be buffered by 100 feet of green space all around, which turns into just more than an acre that can become a city park.

No concerns were raised by neighbors at the meeting, most of whom seemed pleased by Maddox's commitment to make Meridian a positive development. He wanted to make sure that happened for his sake as much as theirs.

"When you have this much to rent out, you cannot let it become dilapidated," because students make their rental decisions based on friends' and relatives' experiences, he said.

But the question of where to put the thousands of students attending BYU and Utah Valley State College and living in Provo is more complicated than neighborhood agreement, and there's more to it than how the number of rooms compares to the number of students, said Provo City Community Development Director Gary McGinn. The city has to consider a number of factors and see if each proposal makes sense.

He agreed with Stewart that there wasn't a need to start limiting the number of complexes coming into Provo.

"Obviously there's a finite limit. You can't have 1 million new units come on line," he said, adding that wouldn't be possible from anyone's standpoint. "The absorption rate into the community just isn't there."

The city also has to consider the location and design of the project, he said.

The good thing about these new developments, both men said, is if done right, they potentially can improve the rent vs. own situation in Provo.

The idea, McGinn said, is as the new buildings with amenities, more space and close proximity to campus come in, students opt for those instead of smaller single-family homes that have been converted to apartments.

Stewart declined to comment on the Meridian project specifically, since the issue is still in the land use committee and hasn't come before the council yet.

Stewart did wonder if high-density housing was appropriate for this neighborhood, which he thought might be better served by getting some single-family homes in.

delts145
Oct 28, 2006, 5:59 AM
Y. to raze residence halls

By Jeremy Twitchell
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — Brigham Young University's overhaul of student housing took another step forward with school officials announcing that two of the residence halls in the landmark Deseret Towers complex will be razed.
All of the Deseret Towers, on-campus dormitories for BYU single students, are expected to be demolished within the next two years. No date has been set for the work and a contractor has not yet been selected, but university officials indicated the demolition will proceed in a "timely manner."
The other five buildings at Deseret Towers will remain in service for the coming school year, though they are expected to be vacated and razed as well over the next two years.
The university has not yet decided how to replace Deseret Towers, saying it is still investigating the changing needs and desires of students before determining what type of facility to select. Any long-term decisions are not likely to come before the housing master plan is completed and there is no timetable for when that might happen.
"We want to take our time and we want to be careful," BYU spokeswoman Carri Jenkins said.
BYU is experimenting with a pair of pilot programs where the emphasis is on moving from dormitory-style housing to apartment housing. BYU Housing employees said BYU has seen rising vacancy rates in its on-campus dormitories, particularly Deseret Towers.
"Although we will need more time to study this issue, we are seeing a trend that students are requesting more apartment-style living versus the traditional room-and-board," Julie Franklin, director of residence life at BYU, said in a statement.
For the coming year, the university has displaced nearly half of the students in Wyview, its apartment complex built in the 1990s for married students, to make room for single students.
The remaining married students at Wyview have been given until July 1, 2007, to vacate so the complex can be devoted entirely to single student housing for the 2007 school year.
Jenkins said student response to the Wyview option has been positive and those apartments are full for the coming year.
BYU has also signed two deals with private property owners as part of a second pilot program, which makes those complexes exclusive for the use of BYU students.
The first was signed with Alpine Village, a 159-condominium project being built west of campus that is expected to be completed by fall 2007. Centennial Apartments, located south of campus, also recently signed such an agreement.
"In these arrangements, the private property owner will work closely with the university in providing appropriate housing," Jenkins said.
The arrangements allow BYU to directly train employees at the complexes regarding BYU policies and services, Jenkins said.
The university has been updating its housing complexes since 1992, when it began renovating the eight dormitories in the Helaman Halls facility. That job was finished last summer and the focus shifted to Deseret Towers.
BYU announced last September it would be removing the aging buildings, the first of which were built in 1964. The two buildings to be removed, V Hall and W Hall, are actually the newest structures, having been built in 1969 and 1978, respectively. But the two were targeted for demolition first because they are built on a separate spot, west of the other buildings, and will be easier to remove.
Brian Evans, administrative vice president and chief financial officer at BYU, said in a statement that rising maintenance costs have made it no longer prudent to operate the obsolete buildings, and added that their infrastructure is ill-equipped to deal with the needs of modern students.
"For instance, unlike in 1964 when students came with a radio alarm clock, students now come with computers, MP3 players, hair dryers, curling irons and more," he said. "There are simply not enough outlets to handle their needs."


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delts145
Oct 28, 2006, 6:08 AM
A rose by any other name...

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CATHY ALLRED - North County Staff
The Daily Herald

The Gardens at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi is always changing as was seen in approaching the apex of this past rose season. This past season the Thanksgiving Point roses, all 600, were rich and vibrant, reflecting the attentive care they receive at The Gardens.

"They were beautiful," Tracy Edurman, Garden director, said. "They really are quite spectacular."

The roses weren't always as prolific. Two years ago, one third of them, 200 rose bushes, died from a rare disease called Pseudomonas. First seen in the Intermountain Region in Idaho in 1997, Thanksgiving Point is the only site in Utah to have had to fight the blight.

"I think three years ago is when we first really noticed it," Larry Sagers, Thanksgiving Point USU Extension Service representative, said. "It's more of a problem where you have moist climates."

Quickly ascertaining the problem, Thanksgiving Point gardeners took steps to eradicate the bacterial blight losing only a few dozen rose plants last year. They have installed a drip irrigation system to replace the sprinkler system, use Lysol wipes to clean the shears, use disposable gloves and treat the roses in the fall with a copper sulfate solution.

Whether it is a Pseudomonas blight or an early frost, Thanksgiving Point gardeners work constantly to maintain the beauty and peace prevailing at The Gardens.

Utah landscape architect Leonard Grassli created 10 thematic gardens within 55-acre The Gardens. Visitors can take in panoramic view of The Gardens from the Grand Allee, cross the Monet Bridge over a bubbling creek, and enjoy the cool mists from the largest man-made waterfall in the western hemisphere.

This year, The Gardens, not just the Rose Gardens, offered an unusually rich display of blossom and greenery.

"With the extra rain we had everything is just lush and green," Edurman said. "The blooms on the water lilies in the Monet Gardens were six inches in diameter, just huge,"

The Grand Allee takes visitors down into The Garden. At the bottom of the pathway is the Creek Garden where the gurgling stream leads travelers through a collection of creeks and ponds surrounded by an expanse of stately lawns.

Some 60 varieties of new and old roses are displayed in the Rose Garden and are cared for by some 30 gardeners. An arbor and benches are provided for resting under the shade of the climbing roses.

A 1.8-acre lake with boardwalk reflects Claude Monet's masterpieces with a replica of Monet's bridge. Walking up a cobblestone path that spirals a hill crowned with neo-classic ruined columns, visitors can enjoy a panoramic view of The Gardens from a garden bench at the Vista Garden.

The centerpiece of the Fragrance Garden in the southwest part of The Gardens is a garden temple surrounded by dozens of plants and flowers chosen to stimulate the sense of smell. Perhaps one of the most popular gardens at Thanksgiving Point, The Secret Garden was inspired by the classic children's novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

The Italian Garden is a Mediterranean Renaissance water garden reminiscent of a sixteenth century Italian villa with cascading basins flanked by yew hedges and benches. The Butterfly Garden is shaped with a pathway formed in the shape of butterfly wings and has a meadow filled with plants that provide food and shelter for butterflies.

A large carousel with topiary horses is the focal point of the Paterre Garden.

Neighboring the expansive Gardens, Thanksgiving Point Institute added a Children's Discovery Garden with its Noah's Ark water fountain, mazes, paw print trails and story time amphitheater. Additional attractions include the Garden Gate Gift Shop, the visitor and reception center, the Garden Trellis Cafe and the Horticulture Learning Center.

delts145
Oct 28, 2006, 6:13 AM
DAVID RANDALL - Daily Herald

After 17 years of waiting and planning, developer David Gardner has started work on a $16 million condominium development at the north end of Freedom Boulevard.

The upscale Trellis on the Green, intended for empty-nesters, will soon be overlooking the third and fourth holes of the Riverside Country Club.

Gardner has been hoping to develop the property, occupied by two homes, since the late 1980s, but until recently he wasn't able to get the separate owners to sell at the same time.

Gardner decided to buy the land once both plots became available, even though he hadn't yet run his plan for the land past the Provo City Council. The council approved the building earlier this month.

"I think the council felt it was a quality product," he said, though he admitted he was nervous about the presentation.

City Councilman Dave Knecht said he couldn't find anything wrong with the development and liked the proximity to area businesses and entertainment.

"I liked the idea -- that it's walkable," he said.

The four-story building will include 43 units in one large building with an atrium, swimming pool, exercise room and views of Mount Timpanogos, Squaw Peak and the golf course.

"It's going to be a very beautiful high-end type condominium," said Carl Bacon, one of the developers working on marketing for the project.

Prices for the condos will range from around $300,000 to $500,000, and owners will be required to sign restrictive covenants saying they won't rent out the units, Gardner said.

Construction on the project could begin as soon as October, though Gardner admitted that's a little optimistic. He expects once construction begins the building will be done in about a year.

Bacon said he has already talked to some people who have expressed interest in the complex, and now with the approval from the council he is ready to start reserving spaces.

Concerns have been raised about how the building would affect parking, traffic and the Provo skyline, but Gardner said the effects would be minimal.

"From an economic standpoint it will actually be a benefit," he said. "I think it will appeal to people who might otherwise move out of the area to find this kind of product ... people that have some disposable income."

Knecht said he didn't consider concerns about the size of the building a major issue.

"If we were worried about blocking views we wouldn't have any two story houses in town," he said.

The building will sit back away from major roads, and developers plan to keep the area's tall trees.

"It will continue to be a secluded, tree-lined area," Bacon said.

delts145
Oct 28, 2006, 1:50 PM
Variety Magazine
Hollywood, California


Stone Five Studios, owner of HaleStorm Entertainment, expanded its Mormon-based film niche to include more general audience family fare with the building of a new Utah studio.

The studio hopes to lure filmmakers with a new incentives bill signed by Governor Huntsman that went into effect July 1. 2005. House Bill 17, a post-performance rebate returning 10% for every dollar spent in Utah, allocates $1 million for the 2006 fiscal year for filming in the state.

"The studio allows for all the accommodations available to serve as a base camp for any major production," said Dave Hunter, Stone Five Studios' CEO and president of HaleStorm Entertainment. "We're excited about a studio that will not only provide local filmmakers with the necessary resources for film and video production but also helps to entice out-of-state filmmakers to shoot their movies here."

HaleStorm, founded in 2001 by entrepreneurial friends Dave Hunter, Kurt Hale and George Dayton, morphed into their newest venture, Stone Five Studios, which also boasts established distribution channels through many of the leading theater chains, DVD rental and retail outlets.

New facility, is a 42,000-square-foot site built on three acres in the Riverwoods area of Provo, Utah.

Complex features two fully equipped film and TV soundstages and a state-of-the-art recording studio featuring a Foley stage and band accommodations. Several video editing suites, including fiber-optic networked editing systems, a high-end compositing station and full HD editing capabilities, are housed in the studio as well.

"With Stone Five's film studio and the recent addition of the incentive fund for filmmakers, the state will have greater success enticing more filmmakers and producers to shoot in Utah than in previous years," said Leigh Von der Esch, director of the Office of Tourism.

delts145
Oct 29, 2006, 12:27 PM
A door closes, 2 open

BYU's Pilling wanted Holmoe's job — but he gets pair of jobs

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News
PROVO — Nine months after Brigham Young University hired Tom Holmoe as athletic director, the other finalist in that search is leaving BYU.
Peter Pilling announced he will run the business operations of Stone Five Studios, the Utah company that owns HaleStorm Entertainment and HaleStorm Distribution, which produced the movies "Singles Ward" and the "Home Teachers" for LDS audiences.
At nearly the same time Thursday, BYU announced a new corporate marketing agreement that will keep Pilling involved with the Cougar athletic program. He will be a minority partner in the university's deal with ISP Sports, completing a soft landing for Pilling after the disappointment of finishing behind his friend Holmoe in the race for his dream job.
ISP will be responsible for boosting sales of corporate sponsorships of BYU sports. It will also sell signage at games, ads in game programs and on byucougars.com, but it won't sell TV or radio rights or advertising. ISP is based in Winston-Salem, N.C., but will maintain an office at BYU. The company is a partner with 25 other college sports programs including Alabama, Cal, Miami (Fla.), UCLA and Washington.
"The company has a well-deserved reputation as the foremost authority on collegiate sports marketing," Holmoe said in a press release. "We feel the addition of ISP Sports will bring BYU athletics one step closer to being the best in the business on and off the playing field."
The job with a film studio turns out to be a dream gig for Pilling, too. He has a part as a basketball coach in Stone Five Studio's next release, "Church Ball," which is scheduled to be in theaters in March. He was the ice cream man in "Home Teachers" and was an extra in M. Night Shyamalan's international hit "Unbreakable." He even wrote a script after seeing Shyamalan at work, but don't expect HaleStorm to film it or to see Pilling on the silver screen again.
Stone Five Studios has launched an ambitious one-stop shop in Provo for filmmakers and wanted Pilling to be its chief operating officer and to court investors for a $20 million fund that will finance five films.
"Each movie will have a budget of $2 million for production and $2 million for marketing," Pilling said. The films will be family-oriented but not specifically directed at LDS audiences. "Instead of aiming for 5 million LDS Church members in the United States, we'll try to capture 50 million people who want to go see a good movie with family values."
Stone Five is building a 42,000-square-foot film studio and sound stage in Provo's Riverwoods area. The new studio will include a recording studio, band accommodations, mixing console and several video-editing suites.
"Stone Five can take a movie all the way from production to distribution," company CEO David Hunter said.
Pilling and Holmoe ran the Cougar athletic department on an interim basis for seven months after BYU fired Val Hale and Elaine Michaelis in September 2004. BYU handed the reins to Holmoe on March 1, 2005, and Pilling continued as senior associate AD responsible for revenue enhancement, finances, marketing and corporate sponsorships.
Pilling had been a self-described nomad climbing the ladder toward an AD slot. He served as an associate athletic director at Villanova, St. Bonaventure and the University of Wyoming and held other administrative athletic positions at Morehead State and the University of Kentucky.
"I've wanted to be an AD, and a couple of executive search firms called about some AD jobs back in the Midwest and East, but it's not a priority for me right now," Pilling said. "I decided I didn't want to move, I wanted to stay in the community, and with Stone Five and ISP I had two tremendous opportunities to stay for my family and my career.
"One door just closed and two phenomenal doors just opened. I'll be involved in film industry and be involved in college athletics."
BYU marketing director Tony Jewkes will become the general manager of ISP's BYU account. Karen Tebbs, recently hired in corporate sponsorships at BYU, will become an ISP account executive. A third position will be filled in the future.


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wrendog
Oct 29, 2006, 6:58 PM
DT is getting razed? Guess it's about time.. the only good thing about them was that they were "tall" for provo. Hope they replace them with other talls..

i-215
Oct 29, 2006, 10:36 PM
Yeah, I walked over to BYU by "V" and "W" on my walk today ... No plywood yet, but they've covered up all the windows with paper on the inside.

What's odd is they are actually removing the brick from "V" Hall and are loading it onto pallets and wrapping it up ... almost like they are saving the tan brick for another project. Is tan brick that valuable of a commodity?

Wasatch_One
Oct 30, 2006, 12:21 AM
DT is getting razed? Guess it's about time.. the only good thing about them was that they were "tall" for provo. Hope they replace them with other talls..

The company that is designing the new BYU dorms is Architectural Nexus (their website is archnexus.com if youre interested)

here are some renderings of the new dorm project, however, it is going to be built on 8th north and between 4th and 5th east (currently a parking lot)

Taken from their site

Heritage Halls/8th North Student Housing, Brigham Young University -- Provo, Utah

Architectural Nexus was recently awarded the design of phase 1 for the Brigham Young University New Student Housing along 800 North which is currently in schematic design. Architectural Nexus also completed the initial program and master plan for the 3 different housing complexes at Brigham Young University including the replacement of Heritage Halls Housing, Deseret Towers Housing, and new student housing identified as 800 North. The Heritage/Deseret Towers complex will comprise 3000 beds and 1,213,884 G.S.F. The 800 North complex will comprise 1000 beds and will be 645,306 G.S.F.

BUILDING SIZE
1,859,190 S.F.
In Schematic Design
BUDGET
$374,121,200



http://www.archnexus.com/portfolio/housing_hospitality/images/heritagehalls/heritagehallss_campus_3.gif

http://www.archnexus.com/portfolio/housing_hospitality/images/heritagehalls/heritagehallss_campus_2.gif

http://www.archnexus.com/portfolio/housing_hospitality/images/heritagehalls/heritagehallss_campus.jpg

Wasatch_One
Oct 30, 2006, 12:32 AM
I remember that back in 96 or 97 there was a proposal for a 13 story building that was to go up on the North end of Provo's downtown. Does anyone know what happened to it?

Steven,

I would love to investigate more into this as well...

I have lived in Provo since 1992 and all I can recall is a hotel proposed at the mouth of Provo Canyon that was suposed to be like 8-10 stories back around 1996 or so.

Wasatch_One
Oct 30, 2006, 12:59 AM
DAVID RANDALL - Daily Herald

After 17 years of waiting and planning, developer David Gardner has started work on a $16 million condominium development at the north end of Freedom Boulevard.

The upscale Trellis on the Green, intended for empty-nesters, will soon be overlooking the third and fourth holes of the Riverside Country Club.

Gardner has been hoping to develop the property, occupied by two homes, since the late 1980s, but until recently he wasn't able to get the separate owners to sell at the same time.

Gardner decided to buy the land once both plots became available.

Here is a picture of the location. Its in the bottom left hand corner of the picture (next to the golf course and the two houses that were torn down are also visible in the picture)

http://www.archnexus.com/portfolio/housing_hospitality/images/wyview_studentfamilyhousing/wyview_aerialshot.jpg

Here are some pictures from their website www.trellisinfo.com

http://www.trellisinfo.com/trellis_images/view_southfacade2.jpg

http://www.trellisinfo.com/trellis_images/news%20images/trellis_040506.jpg

http://www.trellisinfo.com/trellis_images/living_area.jpg

delts145
Oct 30, 2006, 1:53 AM
StevenF,
The tower you're talking about would be at the mouth of Provo Canyon.:koko: While there are new multi-level office towers going up there,I seem to remember a ruling against anything over a certain height. We ought to look into it .

From what I have been able to find out, that tower was nixed. Too much opposition by surrounding neighborhoods. That particular location is 360 degrees,surrounded by multimillion dollar homes with spectacular views. There are some very attractive office buildings, but at only about 5-6 stories max.

delts145
Oct 30, 2006, 2:00 AM
Here is a picture of the location. Its in the bottom left hand corner of the picture (next to the golf course and the two houses that were torn down are also visible in the picture)

http://www.archnexus.com/portfolio/housing_hospitality/images/wyview_studentfamilyhousing/wyview_aerialshot.jpg

Here are some pictures from their website www.trellisinfo.com

http://www.trellisinfo.com/trellis_images/view_southfacade2.jpg

http://www.trellisinfo.com/trellis_images/news%20images/trellis_040506.jpg

http://www.trellisinfo.com/trellis_images/living_area.jpg

Wow Wasatch, Great Pics. Can you imagine having one of those condo's with an expansive view of those greens and Timp towering in the middle. A view couldn't be any more spectacular. And all within an urban environment.

delts145
Oct 30, 2006, 2:03 AM
[QUOTE=Wasatch_One]Here is a picture of the location. Its in the bottom left hand corner of the picture (next to the golf course and the two houses that were torn down are also visible in the picture)







http://www.trellisinfo.com/trellis_images/news%20images/trellis_040506.jpg



Wow Wasatch, Great Pics. Can you imagine having one of those condo's with an expansive view of those greens and Timp towering in the middle. A view couldn't be any more spectacular. And all within an urban environment.

StevenF
Oct 30, 2006, 11:08 PM
Steven,

I would love to investigate more into this as well...

I have lived in Provo since 1992 and all I can recall is a hotel proposed at the mouth of Provo Canyon that was suposed to be like 8-10 stories back around 1996 or so.

called Deseret News archive department and found it.

13-STORY BUILDING TO SPROUT IN DOWNTOWN PROVO NEXT YEAR

By Jim Rayburn, Staff Writer

Utah County's skyline will grow a few hundred feet next year when Boyer Co. of Salt Lake City builds a 13-story office building in downtown Provo.
``We feel the time is right to build a major office building in downtown Provo,'' Boyer President Kem Gardner said at a press conference Friday morning. ``We hope it will be the catalyst for future growth in this very prime market area.''The $25 million, state-of-the-art tower will be built north of Provo Park Hotel on Freedom Boulevard between 100 North and 200 North, adjacent to the 4th District Judicial Center. The office complex will be named One Freedom Center. Construction will begin in the spring and is planned for completion in the summer of 1997.
``We've never announced a building that we haven't built,'' Gardner said.
The first 12 floors will contain a total of 200,000 square feet of office space. Boyer officials are still negotiating with several potential tenants. The 13th floor will be a penthouse conference and meeting center. The building will be constructed mainly of steel and concrete, but the bottom facade will be made of red granite.
The complex will be built on land purchased from the city for about $1 million. The city will use tax increments from the increased value of the property to construct a 660-stall parking structure north of the building.
The 209-feet tall building will be Utah Valley's highest structure. In comparison, the Nu Skin building is 100 feet high and Kimball Tower on the campus of Brigham Young University is 150 feet high.
``This will be a monolith and landmark for downtown and the whole valley,'' said Gary Golightly, Boyer Co.'s leasing agent.
City officials say the office complex is another piece in the city's goal to revitalize downtown Provo. Plans were recently announced to expand Provo Park Hotel and build a new conference center, and the city is helping to build a new mall in south Provo.
``There's a great deal of support for what's going on in Provo,'' council chairwoman Jane Carlile said.
Mayor George Stewart said he believes hotels, office buildings and conference centers belong in the downtown area - that's why he opposed plans two years ago for a hotel and conference center in Riverwoods Business Park.
``This office building just immeasurably adds to that equation,'' Stewart said.
Gardner said the building will fill a niche for more office space so local companies can expand and new ones locate in Utah Valley. The mayor said the city is looking for an increased retail tax base. New jobs are a byproduct of the project.
``The sales tax base is the real key to a city's growth as far as financing goes,'' the mayor said.
The city once planned to construct a performing arts center on the land, but financing on the project is far behind schedule. Stewart said the city will find another place to build the arts center.
``That project is too far in the future. The need for this complex is now,'' he said.

StevenF
Oct 30, 2006, 11:11 PM
I will see if I can find a rendering now.

delts145
Oct 30, 2006, 11:32 PM
StevenF,

So when was this announcement made? Is this building downtown still a go?

delts145
Oct 30, 2006, 11:34 PM
Lehi is planning park on a 72-acre plot

LEHI, Utah (AP) — Saying it could attract many visitors, city leaders are talking about turning 72 acres into a recreation destination, with golf, fishing and ice skating.
"This has a million possibilities," city planner Kim Struthers said. "This is going to be an exciting park. It's goingd to draw from the whole region."
Lehi, north of Provo in Utah County, purchased the Thomas J. Peck Family Park a year ago for $50,000 per acre.
Construction has begun, but a parking study and design work still must be done before the City Council can give preliminary approval. The project also will go before the Parks and Trails Committee for review.
The plan includes a skate park, fishing pond, cascading water, a water-play area for children, a skating pond, a large-event pavilion and several smaller pavilions. The public could be charged to use them.
Council member Mark Johnson said the city is considering selling plastic bracelets that would allow all-day access.
"It would definitely be a regional draw. It's not a common park," said Jamie Davidson, city administrator.
Struthers said Johnson has donated his time over nine months to draw a concept plan, a service that would have cost the city at least $11,000.
"This obviously has the potential to be a pretty exciting project," Johnson said. "Having 72 acres is a heck of a lot of property. There is a lot you can do up there."

leebuddy
Oct 31, 2006, 12:09 AM
``We've never announced a building that we haven't built,'' Gardner said.

And yet this would be the first. :haha:

Wasatch_One
Oct 31, 2006, 12:20 AM
called Deseret News archive department and found it.

13-STORY BUILDING TO SPROUT IN DOWNTOWN PROVO NEXT YEAR

By Jim Rayburn, Staff Writer

Utah County's skyline will grow a few hundred feet next year when Boyer Co. of Salt Lake City builds a 13-story office building in downtown Provo.
``We feel the time is right to build a major office building in downtown Provo,'' Boyer President Kem Gardner said at a press conference Friday morning. ``We hope it will be the catalyst for future growth in this very prime market area.''The $25 million, state-of-the-art tower will be built north of Provo Park Hotel on Freedom Boulevard between 100 North and 200 North, adjacent to the 4th District Judicial Center. The office complex will be named One Freedom Center. Construction will begin in the spring and is planned for completion in the summer of 1997.
``We've never announced a building that we haven't built,'' Gardner said.
The first 12 floors will contain a total of 200,000 square feet of office space. Boyer officials are still negotiating with several potential tenants. The 13th floor will be a penthouse conference and meeting center. The building will be constructed mainly of steel and concrete, but the bottom facade will be made of red granite.
The complex will be built on land purchased from the city for about $1 million. The city will use tax increments from the increased value of the property to construct a 660-stall parking structure north of the building.
The 209-feet tall building will be Utah Valley's highest structure. In comparison, the Nu Skin building is 100 feet high and Kimball Tower on the campus of Brigham Young University is 150 feet high.
``This will be a monolith and landmark for downtown and the whole valley,'' said Gary Golightly, Boyer Co.'s leasing agent.
City officials say the office complex is another piece in the city's goal to revitalize downtown Provo. Plans were recently announced to expand Provo Park Hotel and build a new conference center, and the city is helping to build a new mall in south Provo.
``There's a great deal of support for what's going on in Provo,'' council chairwoman Jane Carlile said.
Mayor George Stewart said he believes hotels, office buildings and conference centers belong in the downtown area - that's why he opposed plans two years ago for a hotel and conference center in Riverwoods Business Park.
``This office building just immeasurably adds to that equation,'' Stewart said.
Gardner said the building will fill a niche for more office space so local companies can expand and new ones locate in Utah Valley. The mayor said the city is looking for an increased retail tax base. New jobs are a byproduct of the project.
``The sales tax base is the real key to a city's growth as far as financing goes,'' the mayor said.
The city once planned to construct a performing arts center on the land, but financing on the project is far behind schedule. Stewart said the city will find another place to build the arts center.
``That project is too far in the future. The need for this complex is now,'' he said.

Interesting that they are currently building the performing arts center as we speak (renovating and adding on to the old city library)

This building will not be built for two reasons.

1. the land once slated for this building now has a convention center planned on it.

2. Around this same time Provo City rezoned an area on the Provo River at the mouth of Provo Canyon to be an office park.

From Provo City's website:
At the mouth of Provo Canyon is the Riverwoods Business and Research Park. One of Provo's class-A business parks. Riverwoods features 112 acres of beautifully landscaped real estate with a spectacular view of majestic Mount Timpanogos...

Since then there has probably been 20 new office buildings adding a conservative 2-3,000,000 sq ft of office space to Provo.

This parks land as been filled approx 80-85%. In my opinion, downtown Provo will not see a major office building until this business park has been built out.

wrendog
Oct 31, 2006, 1:18 AM
aha.. i remember that bldg being proposed for provo.. it would be cool to have a couple 10-15 story bldgs in dt provo..

StevenF
Oct 31, 2006, 3:15 AM
StevenF,

So when was this announcement made? Is this building downtown still a go?

It was in the Deseret News back in July of 95

delts145
Oct 31, 2006, 11:39 AM
This would be a critical link if we're going to see more tower development in the Provo metro hub.

Radar for Provo Airport?

Support by S.L., visit by Peters may clinch deal

By Tad Walch
Deseret Morning News


PROVO — A turbulent effort to bring radar to the Provo Municipal Airport might enjoy a soft landing now that the Salt Lake International Airport plans to help and new U.S. Transportation Secretary Mary Peters is planning a visit.
The Federal Aviation Administration has repeatedly turned down requests by city leaders and Utah senators to put radar in Provo because the FAA doesn't believe the airport is busy enough. Salt Lake City's support is conditioned on basing the radar at the Point of the Mountain, and the plan could get a boost when Peters visits for a personal inspection at the invitation of Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah.
Salt Lake City is interested in radar at the Point of the Mountain because it would act as backup for its operations and would solve the problem of a radar shadow in Utah Valley.
The mountains make it impossible for radar operators in Salt Lake City to see anything below 8,000 feet in Utah Valley. The shadow created a problem in January when air traffic controllers diverted six flights bound for Salt Lake City to Provo because of bad weather. The radar shadow made it difficult for the planes to take off after the weather improved.
"The Salt Lake International Airport has agreed to submit the request in its name," Billings told the Provo City Council. "In exchange, we agreed to put it at the Point of the Mountain, where it can serve all of Utah County and as a backup for Salt Lake."
The radar could help operations at the Spanish Fork airport, as well as Provo, Salt Lake International and Salt Lake City Airport No. 2 in West Jordan.
"The Salt Lake City Department of Airports does support the radar because of its regional benefit," department spokeswoman Barbara Gann said. "So we are working with the Provo airport and will pursue a group effort to entice a radar system to the area."
The radar would cost the FAA about $12 million. Hatch is lobbying to pave the way for the funding.
"It is crucial that the Provo Airport receive adequate radar coverage for the safety and future of air travel along the Wasatch Front," Hatch said. "I encouraged Transportation Secretary Mary Peters to take a look at this very important safety initiative, and I was pleased she accepted my offer to visit Utah to see firsthand the airport site. Improving radar coverage in Utah County is a high priority for me, and it's high time something is done about it.
"The partnership between the Salt Lake City International Airport and the Provo Airport is a very important step forward in getting the radar installed and operational. I commend these two entities for working together for the good of both communities."
Peters hasn't determined the date of her visit.
The FAA temporarily installed radar in Provo for the 2002 Winter Olympic Games, but lobbying efforts to keep it by Sen. Bob Bennett, R-Utah, were unsuccessful.
"The FAA continually scores us too low to get radar," Billings said.
A new radar system could be the state-of-the-art ASR-11 radar. ASR stands for automated surveillance radar. The system deployed in Provo during the Olympics was ASR-9. Salt Lake International operates with ASR-9, Gann said.
Radar could open the door to bringing commercial service to Provo.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------

delts145
Oct 31, 2006, 11:40 AM
By Jared Page
Deseret Morning News
If traffic on I-15 in Utah County grinds to a halt, so will the economy.
That's the message local elected leaders and concerned citizens are trying to get out to the public before voters decide the fate of a sales tax increase to fund commuter rail and other transit and road projects.
A citizen-driven public awareness campaign is under way to ensure that voters know exactly what they'll be voting for or against when they cast their ballots on Nov. 7.
Meanwhile, local elected leaders are making the rounds in the business community, service clubs and other organizations to voice their support of the tax and the reasoning behind it.
Utah County voters will be casting ballots on whether to increase the sales tax by a quarter of a cent to address the county's transportation woes. If it passes, the tax would generate an estimated $765 million, based on what Mountainland Association of Governments officials say is a conservative annual growth rate of 5.5 percent.

Most of those funds would be allocated for construction and early operation and maintenance of a 22 1/2-mile commuter rail line from Provo north to the Salt Lake County border.
"Nobody likes a tax increase, but we need this one," said Thone Heppler, former regional president for Zions Bank and chairman of the public awareness campaign. "We need it to remove the congestion (on I-15) that's already here and will get worse. We need it to keep business commerce going so we're a healthy county with a healthy state economy."
The Utah County Commission unanimously voted in August to put the tax increase on the ballot. That decision had the support of MAG, which coordinates transportation planning in Utah County, as well as local mayors.
"We either pay for it now and put it in so we have the capacity for people to move in our state," Provo Mayor Lewis Billings said, "or we choose not to pay for it and then our economy eventually grinds to a slower mode as congestion increases and people can't get to and from their work."
Commissioner Steve White paints an equally bleak picture. I-15 in Utah County is due for a makeover in the next five to six years. Work will take about four years to complete, and during that time traffic likely will be limited to two lanes in each direction.
In addition, Utah County is growing by 18,000 to 22,000 people every year, increasing daily traffic on I-15 by 2,000 to 2,250 vehicles each year, White said
"We're going to have another 10,000 cars a day (on I-15) by the time we get four years down the road," he said.
Recent history shows how much Utah County residents rely on I-15 to travel within the county and to and from Salt Lake County. With three lanes, the freeway was gridlocked — often coming to a complete stop — during the morning and evening commutes until a fourth lane was opened in May.
A trip from Lehi to Springville took about 90 minutes before the fourth lane opened, White said. A reduction to two lanes — without any freeway alternatives — would make things even worse.
"It would take 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 hours to go 25 miles in Utah County during rush hour," White said. "Is that what we really want? Or would we rather get the cars off the road by having commuter rail?"
Darrell Cook, MAG executive director, says he expects the public awareness campaign in Utah County to benefit from the state Legislature's decision during last week's special session to allow counties to levy a third quarter of a cent sales tax to pay for transportation projects.
Salt Lake County will put the third quarter-cent on the ballot in November. Utah County voters will be asked to add a second quarter-cent.
"I think you're going to see some synergy as the Salt Lake County campaign takes hold and there's additional visibility and publicity from that," Cook said. "You'll see the two kind of building on each other. There'll be some compound effect and complementary benefit."
The Utah Taxpayers Association hasn't taken a position on the quarter-cent sales tax increase, said Mike Jerman, vice president of the group that advocates low taxes, sound tax policy and economic development.
The state's transportation needs must be addressed, but giving counties the OK to raise sales taxes isn't the solution, Jerman said.
"State-level governments need to spend more money on transportation," he said. "(Commuter rail) should be funded at the state level, not the local level — but obviously that's not going to happen."
The taxpayers association favors congestion pricing, a form of tolling in which the cost to use a road increases by congestion.
"Congestion pricing is about giving people financial incentive to change their driving habits," Jerman said. "Obviously, that's not going to happen between now and November. In the long run, that's what needs to happen."
Although elected leaders unanimously support the tax increase, governmental institutions are prohibited from spending taxpayer money to advocate an issue unless they allocate equal funds to each side.
That puts the public awareness campaign in the hands of citizens, who are raising money from area businesses to publicize the issue through the media and with promotional materials.
Billings says Provo is putting together an information packet on the quarter-cent sales tax increase to provide to anyone who requests the information.
"(Provo city's) legal counsel says, as an elected official, it's not only my right to put out that kind of factual information, but it's my obligation to do that," he said.
Billings said he also plans to support the citizen's committee in his own time and expects that other mayors will get similarly involved.
"The mayors are pretty revved up about this," he said.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

delts145
Oct 31, 2006, 12:27 PM
Also posted on no magic cash and SLC development thread

Ballot propositions

Salt Lake County—Proposition 3

Title: Sales and use tax for corridor preservation, congestion mitigation, and expansion of capacity for regionally significant transportation facilities

Question: Shall Salt Lake County, Utah, be authorized to impose a 0.25 percent sales and use tax for corridor preservation, congestion mitigation, or to expand capacity for regionally significant transportation facilities?

Utah County — Opinion Question

Title: Official ballot opinion question for Utah County, Utah County option sales and use tax opinion question.

Question: Should the Board of County Commissioners of Utah County, Utah, impose a sales and use tax of 0.25 percent pursuant to the provisions of the County Option Sales and Use Tax for Highways, Fixed Guideways, or Systems for Public Transit Act, with 87 percent of the revenues received from the imposition of the said tax being allocated for a project or service relating to a fixed guideway system (commuter rail), with 5 percent of the revenues received from the imposition of said tax being allocated for a project or service relating to a system for public transit, and with 8 percent of the revenues received from the imposition of said tax being allocated for either new construction, renovation, improvements, or an environmental study, and the associated debt service and bond issuance costs for state highway projects within Utah County?

leebuddy
Oct 31, 2006, 12:56 PM
Big-D wins pact to build IHC center in Provo
Big-D Construction announced Monday that it has been awarded a $39 million contract with Intermountain Healthcare to build the Utah Valley Outpatient Center at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo.
The four-story, 91,000-square-foot building will include imaging services, lab services, rehabilitation and same-day surgery. Construction will begin in November, with completion set for December 2007.
The project also includes an $11 million, three-level parking terrace.

SmilingBob
Oct 31, 2006, 5:40 PM
Here are a couple of artist views of the overpass in PG on State St. over the railroad bridge instead of expanding under the bridge.

This is badly needed to relieve the bottle that develops there.
Getting around this construction will be tough. There aren't that many good roads to use a secondary access points.

http://www.udot.utah.gov/dl.php/tid=790/Color%20Scan%20002.jpg

http://www.udot.utah.gov/dl.php/tid=790/Color%20Scan%20001.jpg
Project Name: U.S. 89: State Street Railroad Bridge, Pleasant Grove

Project Location: State Street, between Main Street (Geneva Road) and 200 South in Pleasant Grove

Project Design Schedule:

Design Phase Start-up – Oct. 2006
Right of Way Acquisition Start-up – Sept. 2007
Design Completion – Sept. 2007
Anticipated Construction Start-up – Dec. 2007
Anticipated Construction Completion – Fall 2009Project Overview: In June 2006, the Federal Highway Administration issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) after reviewing the Environmental Assessment conducted by UDOT for improving the railroad bridge crossing at State Street (U.S. 89) in Pleasant Grove. UDOT has now moved into the design phase. The improvements include:

Eliminating the bottleneck by widening State Street from the current two lanes to five lanes (two lanes in each direction with a center turn lane, shoulders, curb and gutter, park strips, and sidewalks).
Removing the existing UTA/UPRR bridge and building a new highway bridge which crosses over the tracks.
Improving the State Street and Geneva Road intersection

SmilingBob
Oct 31, 2006, 5:51 PM
Did anyone see the show on transportation issue in Utah Valley on KBYU last night. Lots of great information on what UDOT and UTA are looking at to handle the fast growth in Utah Valley.

Mentioned that 8,000 homes are expected to be built in Lehi in the next 5 years. Basically doubling the size of Lehi. Don't know if this includes Saratoga Springs and Eagle Mountain, but probably does.

Population in Utah Valley is expected to grow to 900,000 by 2030.


Who Goes There?



http://kbyutv.org/images/tier2_mods/header_airdates.gifhttp://kbyutv.org/images/structure/spacer.gifKBYU-TV Air Times
11/6/2006 9:30:00 PM
http://kbyutv.org/images/structure/spacer.gifhttp://kbyutv.org/images/tier2_mods/footer_orange.gif
The new KBYU Documentary “Who Goes There?” examines transportation issues facing Utah County in the coming decades. A fast growing population threatens to overwhelm existing transportation infrastructure. The impact spreads beyond the county as the impediments to commerce and convenience compound with clogged highways. The documentary examines various proposals to improve transportation in the county. Voters in Utah and Salt Lake Counties will be asked to hike taxes in order to fund improvements.

Watch “Who Goes There” Monday October 30 at 9:30pm and again Monday November 6 at 9:30 pm.

delts145
Oct 31, 2006, 7:11 PM
The new KBYU Documentary “Who Goes There?” examines transportation issues facing Utah County in the coming decades. A fast growing population threatens to overwhelm existing transportation infrastructure. The impact spreads beyond the county as the impediments to commerce and convenience compound with clogged highways. The documentary examines various proposals to improve transportation in the county. Voters in Utah and Salt Lake Counties will be asked to hike taxes in order to fund improvements.

Watch “Who Goes There” Monday October 30 at 9:30pm and again Monday November 6 at 9:30 pm.

I'll definately write that down for November 6. It sounds very interesting.

delts145
Oct 31, 2006, 7:21 PM
SmilingBob, I was looking again at your post on the overpass. It's about time they did something there. Have you heard anything similar for the one on State Street in Midvale/Sandy? Or have they already expanded it, and I just missed it.

About the overpass in Pleasant Grove. That's a perfect point of entrance to create a sort of gateway. Even if it's only a nicer rod-iron railing and those vintage style lamplights. That rendering doesn't seem to give it much in the way of aesthetics. I've been very impressed with the development around PG lately(i.e.,new interchage,historical homes restored around downtown,etc). Hopefully, they will use the same sense of style with this bridge.

dewaalnuts
Oct 31, 2006, 8:28 PM
900,000 people by 2030 and not a single descent highrise to be found.
how sad.:( :( :( :( :( :( :( :(

delts145
Nov 1, 2006, 1:58 AM
When Utah Valley has over one million people, especially the southern end of the valley from Springville to Santaquin, then you will see more of a skyline around Provo.

SmilingBob
Nov 1, 2006, 6:02 PM
When Utah Valley has over one million people, especially the southern end of the valley from Springville to Santaquin, then you will see more of a skyline around Provo.

900,000+ residents by 2030. Utah Valley in 2030 will look like Salt Lake area right now. We are going to need a lot of new transportation options. I talked to my Utah House Rep. and he mentioned that the Freeway option of the Mountain View Corridor is the most likely option right now. That would definitely increase the need for more high rise office buildings. Someone needs to take the bull by the horns and bring people on board to build some 10-15 story buildings.