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Fabb
Nov 12, 2006, 4:48 PM
Several european countries are currently working on the extension and the modernization of their high-speed railways. Next year promises to be memorable with significant improvements in France, the Netherlands and the UK.

Please, post in this thread the news/pictures/opinions on this topic.

To begin with, an article about the opening of a new section of the Eurostar network to Central London.



Full speed ahead for Channel link
The Sunday Times
November 12, 2006

The railway is on schedule to be completed in a year’s time, reports Dominic O’Connell

A NEW NAME in rail transport will be launched in Britain this week when the Channel Tunnel Rail Link is renamed High Speed 1. In a year’s time it will start carrying high-speed services from London’s St Pancras station to Paris and Brussels.

Speed is what the new route is all about. Constructed at a cost of £5.8 billion, it is the first mainline railway built in Britain for more than a century. Eurostar trains have run from London since 1994, but have had to slow down in England to crawl across busy commuter lines. With the opening of the new link, they will run at the same speed as on France’s TGV tracks — 186mph.

Trips between London and Paris will take two hours 15 minutes, 20 minutes faster than the current quickest time — itself a 15-minute improvement on the original Eurostar journey thanks to the opening three years ago of the first section of the high-speed line, from the Channel tunnel to Fawkham junction, Kent. The second section runs from Fawkham across the Thames and into central London (through tunnels) from the east.

Rob Holden, chief executive of London & Continental Railways (LCR), the consortium that has built the line, said the name change signalled that construction was coming to an end and the first passenger services were only a year away.

“Channel Tunnel Rail Link is a bit of a mouthful and the initials CTRL don’t mean much to anyone who isn’t familiar with the project. We wanted to change the name, and high-speed rail has positive connotations here and in the rest of Europe,” he said.

The new name poses the question whether there might be a High Speed 2 in the pipeline, and whether LCR might want to build it.

High-speed rail is at the forefront of the current debate about transport and climate change in Britain. Iain Coucher, deputy chief executive of Network Rail, has proposed a north-south high-speed line to relieve pressure on the existing network. Sir Rod Eddington, the former chief executive of British Airways, is expected to publish his long-awaited report on transport at the end of the month, and may also back new high-speed lines.

If a new line was ordered, LCR would be an obvious candidate to construct it. Holden said the company had built up a great deal of expertise and it would be a shame to lose it. “There is a lot of experience here that could be extremely useful if the government decided to proceed. We can’t be involved in speculative development, but we are pro high-speed rail for the UK,” he said.

But if the government is to take advantage of LCR’s expertise, it will need to move quickly. Holden said his team would be ready “to step into a new railway” in 12-18 months, but beyond that the nucleus of experienced people would be dispersed. “The skills they have are transferable, and by then they will have the opening of this railway on their CVs, which will make them very marketable.”

The hype around this week’s launch of High Speed 1 will obscure some of the big questions about the rail link — such as whether it should have been built at all.

A House of Commons public accounts select committee concluded earlier this year that the economic case for its construction was “marginal”, because the number of passengers using Eurostar services is much lower than originally forecast.

When bidding for the project in 1996, LCR — a consortium comprising Bechtel, UBS, Arup, Halcrow, Electricite de France, National Express and SNCF — forecast 21m passengers a year by 2004. The actual number has turned out to be one-third of that. This year Eurostar will carry about 8.5m.

Holden said the original forecasts were “just wrong”. “When I arrived here I said — ‘so, everyone in the south of England is going to make multiple trips every year to Paris and Brussels? I don’t think so.’”

The truth dawned two years into the project and led to a financial crisis. LCR had to be bailed out by the government.

This in turn prompted much soul-searching by transport officials. Scarred by their experience on the Jubilee Line extension, which ended up late and £1.4 billion over budget, they had resolved not to entrust the management of the high-speed rail line to the public sector. By choosing LCR, they had thought the risk of cost-overruns had been avoided — only to find the solution blowing up in their face.

In revealing comments to the select committee last year, David Rowlands, then permanent secretary at the Department for Transport, said that next year the department planned to re-evaluate its handling of the project. “We would probably want to re-visit it quietly and hide it in a drawer in case of FOI (the Freedom of Information Act) . . . but there are lessons to be learnt.”

The solution was for the government to give LCR an extra £1 billion, and to issue bonds to finance the project. Railtrack was brought in to carry the cost-overruns — another clever solution that backfired when the company collapsed into administration in 2001.

Holden maintains that the public accounts committee, and the National Audit Office, have found it difficult to quantify the project’s regeneration benefits. As well as the international trains, the new line will carry domestic services that will sprint to Ashford in Kent in 26 minutes.

LCR believes the link will bring £10.5 billion of extra investment for regeneration. The big schemes are at three sites: in the brownfield land north of King’s Cross station, where developer Argent plans 50 new buildings and 30,000 new jobs; at Stratford, where Westfield plans a £4 billion development including 7,000 new homes; and at Ebbsfleet, where 3,000 new homes will be built.

“When the project began, the priorities were the international services, the domestic services and regeneration. Now it is the other way round. Regeneration is No1 and then take your pick,” said Holden.

And despite LCR’s interesting history, it can at least claim to have avoided the curse of most big projects in Britain and to have delivered on time and to budget. Under the terms of its funding agreement with the government, the line will be on time as long as it opens before the end of the first week in January 2008 — and while the expected cost of £5.8 billion is more than the £5.3 billion target, it is with- in the available financing of £6.1 billion. An insurance facility put in place with Bechtel and a consortium of insurers to underwrite construction overruns was unlikely to be called on, said Holden.

As well as speeding passengers between London and the Continent, the new line has rejuvenated St Pancras station, London’s smartest terminal when it opened in 1868 but which had long been allowed to fall into decay. The most visible sign of the work to date has been the restoration of the Midland Grand Hotel, Sir George Gilbert Scott’s famous neo-Gothic pile on Euston Road.

But from next November, when the station behind the hotel reopens, travellers will be treated to another restored Victorian marvel — the St Pancras train shed built by William Barlow. Barlow’s name is less well-known than Brunel’s, but the train shed may change that. When it first opened, its 74- metre span made it the largest enclosed space in the world, and, with ironwork repainted in the original peacock blue and reglazed, it retains its “wow” factor.

Beneath the platforms is another Barlow gem, the station’s undercroft, originally used for storing Burton’s beer. It has been opened up as a passenger concourse, but the 900 original cast-iron pillars that support the platforms above remain in place — the spacing between them by repute dictated by the width of three beer barrels.

the urban politician
Nov 12, 2006, 5:24 PM
^ It pains me to read this while living in the ass-backwards US. I think I'm gonna move to Europe

atlantaguy
Nov 12, 2006, 6:15 PM
^LOL! I was thinking the exact the same thing as I was finishing the article. We need a sea-change in this country.

I just wish someone would come along with a huge proposal for HSR and sell it to the public as the new millenniums version of the Interstate highway system. Think of all the good that would come from such a huge, multi-year project. The amount of $$$ per capita spent on rail in Europe just makes me weak. We could probably easily do it for less than we've spent on the war so far.....

Fabb - Thanks for posting this, it was a good read.

The Cheat
Nov 12, 2006, 8:30 PM
Here's some average speeds I found on the web:

France TGV -- 158 mph
Japan Shinkansen -- 164
Germany -- 125
Italy -- 103
British - London to York -- 112

By contrast, the fastest part of the Acela Express route (Philadelphia-Washington) averages 85.3 MPH, and the entire Boston-Washington route averages 70.3 MPH.

Justin10000
Nov 13, 2006, 1:41 AM
I hate livinig in North America.

nito
Nov 13, 2006, 3:04 PM
The CTRL is an amazing project that involves dozens of tunnels (2x19km tunnels under London to get to London St Pancras) and high-spec redevelopment that will essentially create new centres..... Phase I as the article noted is already open, but Phase II is where it really gets interesting....




Ebbsfleet will be the last station before entering London....this is part of the giant Thames Gateway project: several million homes, hundreds of thousands of jobs...

Pictures from earlier this year of Ebbsfleet International...nothing really special because its practically in the middle of nowhere and is going to be the catalyst for future development.
http://www.kentrail.co.uk/Ebbsfleet%20021.jpg

http://www.kentrail.co.uk/Ebbsfleet%20023.jpg




The CTRL then dives under the Thames, rides over a viaduct for a few miles and then just when it enters the eastern border of London, the line dives into the 2 19km tunnels. The line emerges in a 'box/trench' (ie still below ground level but open to the elements) at Stratford for a new transport interchange. This is where the 2012 Olympics will be held and where a massive new development called Stratford City will be based. The CTRL is right at the centre of this.

http://www.skyscrapernews.com/images/pics/333StratfordCity2012_pic1.jpg

http://www.fletcherpriest.com/p070B.jpg

Including Stratford City and the 2012 London Olympic Park
http://www.lda.gov.uk/upload/img/facilities.jpg




From Stratford, the CTRL again goes underground, where it then emerges at London St Pancras: the new terminus for Eurostar services.

This is the over-view of the King's Cross-St Pancras Area. St Pancras is the terminus at the top, while King's Cross lies at the bottom. The new rail-lands development is to the west. Currently St Pancras is being greatly overhauled: the entire original station is being given a clean, while the interior is being completely remodelled for next years opening. The extension by Foster compliments the train by not competing with it and will house:
- Midland Mainline services
- Domestic Shinkansen services that will use the CTRL

Eurostars will run the entire length of the original Barlow shed and the Foster extension because they are 400m long. A new station is also being built below St Pancras to cater for longer and more frequent Thameslink services (currently they use platforms just to the bottom left of where King's Cross is in the image).

King's Cross is also being redeveloped. This involves the demolition of the temporary ticket hall which has stood at the front since the 70's...and being replaced by a 'dome' to the top of the station in the image which will be far more welcoming and connected to St Pancras next door. This will also involve the creation of a new piazza (equivalent in size to that of Leicester Square) in place of the original King's Cross ticket hall.

On top of this, the 6 line London Underground station which lies beneath the station is being completely overhauled. Essentially the size of the underground complex is being doubled, if not tripled in volume to cater for future rail demands.

http://www.argentkingscross.com/live/revised_applications/images/illust-landscp-schm-large.jpg


Pictures taken by me a few months back showing the Barlow train shed and the extension.
http://img180.imageshack.us/img180/4559/awj7.jpg

http://img148.imageshack.us/img148/3118/bhv6.jpg

http://img100.imageshack.us/img100/2088/cbq6.jpg

http://img169.imageshack.us/img169/9352/dpa8.jpg



Its quite a lot to get around so hopefully that all made sense :D

Grumpy
Nov 13, 2006, 3:08 PM
[COLOR="Blue"]Several european countries are currently working on the extension and the modernization of their high-speed railways. Next year promises to be memorable with significant improvements in France, the Netherlands and the UK.

I guess you forgot about Belgium where already two lines are operative and in 2007 two more will be opened.

@ nick_taylor , wouldn't have a detailed map from the CTRL line from Ashford to Stratford + what is the purpose of a station in Ebbsfleet ??

nito
Nov 13, 2006, 5:46 PM
Its actually quite hard to find a good map of the project - there is a set of maps showing every 10km but that was on the old CTRL website and it doesn't exist any more!

http://www.dft.gov.uk/stellent/groups/dft_railways/documents/graphic/dft_railways_035479-1.jpg


Ebbsfleet is being built for several reasons:
- Possible future ECML connections that by-pass London altogether (although that is unlikely any time soon)
- Acting as a catalyst for the Thames Gateway project...
- A station that provides HSR services to London (ie no need to get on the slower current commuter lines - hence the Shinkansen services) or to Paris (no need to drive further south to Ashford or go into London - less car journeys and more train journeys)




The BBC have some good info on the station:

On 12th September 2006, another chapter in the story of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link was completed - as work on the £100 million Ebbsfleet International Station came to an end. The map shows how Ebbsfleet will link to London and the Continent.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_map_470x355.gif

An artist's impression of how Ebbsfleet International Station will look in 2007, when Eurostar trains will run from St Pancras International to the Continent, via Ebbsfleet and Ashford.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_impression_470x355.jpg

2003: this image shows work to push into place a new, 9,000 tonne bridge for the existing North Kent Line near Ebbsfleet. The new bridge was needed to allow the high-speed line to run underneath. (LCR/QA Photos)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_new_bridge_470x355.jpg

July 2004: this photo shows the early stages of construction of the station. The massive slab which crosses the high-speed line is in place, while construction of the main station building and platforms progresses. Photo: LCR/QA Photos
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_slab_2004_470x355.jpg

2005: aerial view, looking towards the Thames. Much of the key structures are in place, but the is still much evidence of earthworks etc. (LCR/Hawk Editions)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_aerial_2005_470x355.jpg

Early 2006: this photo shows track and overhead power lines for the train in place. The track machine is on the 'link' which connects the high-speed line with the existing North Kent Line. (LCR/Ros Orpin)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_track_2006_470x355.jpg

Aerial shot in May 2006, showing the station nearing completion with car parks in place. (LCR/Hawk Editions) nick_taylor: The Thames Tunnel is visible, as is the Thames itself - this entire area will become part of a new hub and major transport interchange. The car park is for people to drive to Ebbsfleet rather than going further south to Ashford or into London to get on the Eurostar
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_aerial_2006_470x355.jpg

18th July 2006: London & Continental Railways, the company behind the Channel Tunnel Rail Link, unveiled a plaque as part of a ceremony to remember Pocahontas, the famous North American Indian who is buried near Ebbsfleet International Station.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_pocahontas_470x323.jpg

September 2006: Ebbsfleet International Station from the air as work is completed.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_2006_470x355.jpg




Not all Eurostars will stop at Ebbsfleet, but 5 daily services to Lille & Brussels and 7 daily services to Paris will (the other Eurostars will by-pass the station thanks to the seperated tracks on either side of the station). The main services that stop here though will be the CTRL-DS (Domestic Services) which are essentially Series 400 Shinkansen (the first country in Europe to buy Japanese trains):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9e/Hitachi_A-train%2C_CTRL_domestic_%26_Olympic_Shuttle.jpg

These services will run all around the major Kent urban areas, but their terminus will be at London St Pancras. The bigger picture with this though is that its showing one of the signs of re-birth of British railways after years of decline and poor service. Also for train geeks - London is going to be pretty interesting when the Shinkansens are introduced over the coming years (they are currently being built in Japan):
- Italian Pendolinos
- Japanese Shinkansens
- French TGV
- British Diesels (nout beats them :D)
- Maglev (okay maybe not quite yet... ;))

GNU
Nov 13, 2006, 6:58 PM
Nice thread.

These are the upcoming big station projects in Germany:

Stuttgart 21:

http://www.dayandlight.de/projekte/s21/S21_03.jpg
http://www.dayandlight.de/projekte/s21/S21_01.jpg
http://www.dayandlight.de/projekte/s21/S21_02.jpg
http://www.dayandlight.de/projekte/s21/S21_05.jpg
http://www.0lll.com/architecture-exhibitions/gallery17/sttutgart21_01.jpg
http://www.0lll.com/architecture-exhibitions/gallery17/sttutgart21_01.jpg
http://www.0lll.com/architecture-exhibitions/gallery17/sttutgart21_04.jpg
http://www.0lll.com/architecture-exhibitions/gallery17/sttutgart21_05.jpg
http://www.0lll.com/architecture-exhibitions/gallery17/sttutgart21_06.jpg
http://www.stuttgarter-zeitung.de/media_fast/626/21_gross.179350.jpg


Dortmund 3DO: (construction starts in 2007)

http://img476.imageshack.us/img476/7962/abbildung1gr5gt.jpg
http://img476.imageshack.us/img476/3589/abbildung3gr9gi.jpg
http://img422.imageshack.us/img422/4214/3domodellqj3.jpg

proposal for Essen HBF:

http://img54.imageshack.us/img54/7919/hbf5kv.jpg

Munich HBF:

http://plato.alien.de/temp/muenchen/hbf/entwurf01.jpg
http://www.sueddeutsche.de/muenchen/artikel/907/22885/image_zoom_0_2.jpg


Dresden HBF: was just finished by Norman Foster:

http://foto.arcor-online.net/palb/alben/93/3580593/1024_3731666139656333.jpg
ttp://foto.arcor-online.net/palb/alben/93/3580593/1024_6239326466333239.jpg
http://www.baunetz.de/upload/83035az.jpg
http://www.baunetz.de/upload/83035dz.jpg
http://www.baunetz.de/upload/83035cz.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/74/Dresden-Germany-Main_Station-Entrance_Hall.jpg/400px-Dresden-Germany-Main_Station-Entrance_Hall.jpg



More pics here:

http://www.fosterandpartners.com/Projects/0916/default.aspx

VivaLFuego
Nov 13, 2006, 7:03 PM
Drool.

SHiRO
Nov 13, 2006, 7:49 PM
Does anyone have a good map of the entire European network?

zilfondel
Nov 13, 2006, 9:41 PM
Oh good lord. You guys have way too much money!

You are so lucky you don't have to spend $1 trillion/year invading other countries. Instead, you get nice shiny toys (instead of drab ones amed with missiles).

Swede
Nov 13, 2006, 10:36 PM
That Stuttgart station is amazing. I hope it turns out just as good in reality.

@SHiRO - don't think I've ever seen one. maybe someone here with map-skillz could...

WonderlandPark
Nov 13, 2006, 11:00 PM
Damn I'm so jealous.

Grumpy
Nov 13, 2006, 11:19 PM
Does anyone have a good map of the entire European network?

Some detailed maps from France I have if you want them?

This could become the 2nd TGV station in Brussels:

http://www.eurostation.be/images/svt_vorming1.jpg

http://www.eurostation.be/images/svt_v2.jpg

http://www.eurostation.be/images/svt_v3.jpg

http://www.eurostation.be/images/svt_xdg.jpg

SHiRO
Nov 13, 2006, 11:39 PM
Yeah please post the maps Grumpy.

Riise
Nov 14, 2006, 7:26 AM
nick_taylor, once again thanks for the wealth of knowledge! I cannot wait to finish my schooling and move to London, but if you guys keep building/proposing stuff at this rate I just might get too excited and try to finish my schooling across the pond!

Grumpy
Nov 14, 2006, 10:08 AM
@ SHiRO,

Here you have some maps but I rather would like to give you the link cause the site contains several maps of France:
http://membres.lycos.fr/cartesferro/index_fr.html

Example : the entire Paris region

Ile-de-France

http://membres.lycos.fr/cartesferro/france/iledefrance_fr.jpg

Région Parisiennne

http://membres.lycos.fr/cartesferro/france/parisreg_fr.jpg

Paris

http://membres.lycos.fr/cartesferro/france/paris_fr.jpg


More maps:
http://www.bueker.net/trainspotting/maps.php
http://www.avoe05.dsl.pipex.com/rmw_maps.htm

Info in general:
http://www.steane.com/egtre/egtre.php

Grumpy
Nov 14, 2006, 10:21 AM
Some pictures I took lately of LIEGE GUILLEMINS (new station by Calatrava) & ANTWERPEN CENTRAAL (entire renovation of an existing station), both stations should be finished by june 2007:

Liége Guillemins:
http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC01031.jpg

http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC01028.jpg

http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC00972.jpg

http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC01024.jpg

Antwerpen Centraal:
http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC00463.jpg

http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC00439.jpg

http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC00435.jpg

http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC00430.jpg

http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC00458.jpg

http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g2/De_Snor/DSC00436.jpg

eduardo88
Nov 14, 2006, 3:49 PM
are they actually going through with the new Stuttgart HBf? Do they really need to replace the existing one? I find it one of the most beautiful railways stations in Germany except for the trainshed which seems quite outdated. If they just fixed that (ie. put a high glass roof similar to Frankfurt Flughafen Fernbahnhof) it would look amazing.

SHiRO
Nov 14, 2006, 4:50 PM
Thanks Grumpy!

Fabb
Nov 15, 2006, 9:09 PM
Filed 14/11/06

The final section of the Folkestone to London high speed Channel Tunnel Rail Link is to open exactly a year from today.

Train operator Eurostar said its 186mph trains would start using the final section to St Pancras on 14 November 2007, as predicted (Transport Briefing 02/08/06).

The opening of the final stage will cut journey times from London to Paris from 2hr 35min to 2hr 15min. The first phase, from Folkestone to south London, opened in September 2003, while the high speed link from Paris to the Channel Tunnel was completed in 1993, a year before the tunnel opened.

"This move will be the most significant event in Eurostar's history since we started running passenger services 12 years ago today," said chief executive Richard Brown.

"It will mark the start of a new era in travel between the UK and mainland Europe, making high-speed rail an even faster, more reliable and less environmentally damaging alternative to flying."

Eurostar trains will continue running into Waterloo International until 13 November 2007. Waterloo's international terminal will then be handed back to the government and the platforms used to provide additional capacity for domestic commuter trains.

Eurostar is also to run services from the £100m Ebbsfleet station near Dartford to Paris and Brussels, but is to cut the services it currently runs from Ashford International in Kent.

The opening of the St Pancras section will also cut the journey time from London to Brussels, from 2hr 15min to 1hr 51 min. High-speed domestic services will start using the new section from 2009. The Channel Tunnel Rail Link is also being rebranded as High Speed 1, or HS1.

nito
Nov 15, 2006, 10:20 PM
http://images.thetimes.co.uk/images/TIMESHeadBGLogo_1.gif
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2-2453536,00.html

Travel times slashed as London gets on the fast track to Europe

By Ben Webster, Transport Correspondent

nick: this isn't a map of the entire European HSR network....
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/TGD/picture/0,,363585,00.jpg


HIGH-SPEED trains will compete with airlines between London and dozens of cities on the Continent from next year, when three missing links in Europe’s 186mph rail network will be filled.

Eurostar is joining forces with high-speed rail operators in six European countries to offer through tickets and fast connections.

Journey times from London to Amsterdam, Cologne, Strasbourg and Zurich will be cut by up to two hours, making rail a fast alternative to air travel for the first time in 30 years.

From November 14 next year Eurostar passengers will no longer have to spend the first 30 miles of their journey on slow, suburban lines in South London.

The completion of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link, which was renamed High Speed 1 (or HS1) yesterday, will allow Eurostar trains to accelerate to 186mph (300km/h) within minutes of leaving their new terminus at St Pancras. They will reach the Channel Tunnel 70 miles away in half an hour, shaving about 25 minutes off the journey time to Paris and Brussels. London to Paris will take 2 hours and 15 minutes.

With a change of trains at Lille or Brussels, passengers will be able to transfer to two other high-speed lines being completed next year: from Brussels to Amsterdam and from Paris to Strasbourg.

The fastest time between London and Amsterdam will be cut by an hour and 20 minutes to three and a half hours. Train times will be synchronised to allow about 15 minutes to change platforms at Brussels.

Richard Brown, Eurostar’s chief executive, said that the cheapest fares between London and Amsterdam would be less than £100, to compete with budget airlines. Eurostar believes that security measures at airports, which force passengers to arrive earlier for flights, have made rail more attractive.

Flying between London and Amsterdam takes an hour, but the total journey from city centre to city centre takes about the same as high-speed trains will take from the end of next year.

Eurostar is also considering running direct trains from London to Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris, which serves more destinations than Heathrow and can be much cheaper for transatlantic flights.

Europe’s high-speed rail network will be promoted by Rail Team, a new body linking Eurostar with train operators in France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland and Austria. Passengers will be able to view a single timetable and book through tickets.

Eurostar will promote itself as the green alternative to air travel. It has published a study which shows that, per passenger, a Eurostar train emits ten times less carbon dioxide than a typical aircraft flying between London and Paris.

Mr Brown said that the average fare would increase slightly from next year but the cheapest return fare of £59 would be maintained.

Frequency will be increased, and trains will operate earlier and later, with services reaching Paris or Brussels before 9am.

Eurostar’s terminus at Waterloo will close on November 13. Eurostar decided that it would be too expensive to have two London terminals.

pdxman
Nov 16, 2006, 2:54 AM
Wow europe, wow, wow, wow! Why the hell was i not born in europe????

austin356
Nov 16, 2006, 4:19 AM
Wow europe, wow, wow, wow! Why the hell was i not born in europe????


I am sure you can qualify for legal immigrant status in the EU as an American. Be my guest.

KingKrunch
Nov 16, 2006, 8:55 AM
This is what I found on wikipedia:
Orange = TGV
Red = Thalys
Yellow = Eurostar
Blue = ICE
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b8/Hgv_netz.jpg

And here's the german part:
Red = High-speed lines for 300 km/h
Orange = High-speed lines for 250 km/h or more
Blue = Upgraded lines for 200 km/h or 230 km/h
Grey = Conventional lines, often upgraded for 160 km/h
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/ICE_Network.png

Grumpy
Nov 16, 2006, 9:59 AM
I have some questions with this map:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/TGD/picture/0,,363585,00.jpg

1. Travel time from Zurich to Basel = 90min ?
2. no change of trains between LDN and Frankfurt, Zurich , Lyon & Marseille ?
3. at 186 mph from Baudrecourt to Strasbourg & Basel/Zurich ?
4. From LDN to Marseille a gain of 25' by the end of 2007?

@ KingKrunch:
The first map you posted is where high speed trains run but it is not accurate:

1. Brussels - Liege is in service since 12/2002
2. The french TGV network misses lots of travel destinations (especially in the Nord/Pas-de-Calais region)

Fabb
Nov 16, 2006, 10:36 AM
Italy, ETR 600 : the new generation of high-speed trains :

http://img144.imageshack.us/img144/5688/img26704qu8.jpg

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/1995/normaletr600200001pi8.jpg

http://img247.imageshack.us/img247/2582/normalimg26237im8.jpg

http://img165.imageshack.us/img165/138/img26792up7.jpg

The extension of the italian network is painfully slow. The new Firenze-Bologna line (under construction for over ten years) was just delayed again. The opening is now expected at the beginning of 2009.

il primo treno non passerà più entro quest’anno, ma nei primi mesi del 2009
(L'espresso)

http://www.infrastrutturetrasporti.it/sites/italferr/images/Galleria_Firenzuola.jpg

http://www.infrastrutturetrasporti.it/sites/italferr/images/Galleria_Borgo_Rinzelli.jpg

brian_b
Nov 16, 2006, 3:33 PM
Does anyone have a good map of the entire European network?

This is a very nice overview of the European rail system. It's an interactive flash site.

http://downloads.raileurope.com/map_europe/europe.html

By the way, the new Berlin HBF is very nice. I really liked it.

Fabb
Nov 16, 2006, 7:40 PM
2. no change of trains between LDN and Frankfurt, Zurich , Lyon & Marseille ?

I don't know about Frankfurt, but the direct link between London, Lyon&Marseille wouldn't surprise me.
During the skiing season, there's already a Eurostar service from London to the French Alps.

What I don't understand is the absence of a London-Amsterdam link without change. I think that it would be a big commercial success.

Grumpy
Nov 16, 2006, 10:09 PM
What I don't understand is the absence of a London-Amsterdam link without change. I think that it would be a big commercial success.

Certainly would be a succes , could it be the Schengen agreement perhaps ?

Grumpy
Nov 16, 2006, 11:00 PM
Renovation of GENT SINT PIETERS railwaystation , TGV stop on the line Paris-Oostende

http://thepubagency.be/pgsp/new/bib/IM_GFL_inplanting.jpg

http://thepubagency.be/pgsp/new/bib/IM_GFL_luchtfoto.jpg

http://thepubagency.be/pgsp/new/bib/IM_GSP_overkapping.jpg

http://thepubagency.be/pgsp/new/bib/IM_GSP_3Dinkijk.jpg

SHiRO
Nov 17, 2006, 2:54 AM
This is a very nice overview of the European rail system. It's an interactive flash site.

http://downloads.raileurope.com/map_europe/europe.html

By the way, the new Berlin HBF is very nice. I really liked it.
Awesome!

Thanks!

Grumpy
Nov 17, 2006, 10:45 AM
very detailed maps of of public transport in French cities: http://www.itransports.fr

Grumpy
Nov 17, 2006, 3:14 PM
the new Rotterdam Central Station:

http://207.44.228.232/images/B03/3406.jpg

http://207.44.228.232/images/B03/3407.jpg

http://207.44.228.232/images/B03/3408.jpg

Zaragoza Delicias AVE

http://img246.exs.cx/img246/7667/renfestation0110ak.jpg

http://img22.exs.cx/img22/5031/delicias2302058gs.jpg

http://img146.exs.cx/img146/7260/delicias0903050lg.jpg

http://img153.exs.cx/img153/1343/lleidapirineus67yb.jpg

http://img250.exs.cx/img250/4925/lleidapirineus46te.jpg

nomarandlee
Nov 17, 2006, 7:56 PM
Does anyone know the price tags on some of these new stations? I am really curious how much some of these cost.

Fabb
Nov 18, 2006, 2:50 PM
No idea.
Here's one more : Calatrava's TGV station, Lyon st Exupéry :

http://static.flickr.com/83/246634077_7d418aaf6c.jpg?v=0

http://archiguide.free.fr/PH/FRA/Lyo/LyonStExCa05.jpg

http://archiguide.free.fr/PH/FRA/Lyo/LyonStExCa03.jpg

SHiRO
Nov 19, 2006, 7:08 AM
Wow, way to rub it in! :D

ul1
Nov 19, 2006, 12:17 PM
I have some questions with this map:

1. Travel time from Zurich to Basel = 90min ?
2. no change of trains between LDN and Frankfurt, Zurich , Lyon & Marseille ?
3. at 186 mph from Baudrecourt to Strasbourg & Basel/Zurich ?
4. From LDN to Marseille a gain of 25' by the end of 2007?



1. is surely wrong. The fastest travel time today is 52 min. Afaik there are some small improvements planned, they will probably cut it down another 5 min or so.

Alargule
Nov 19, 2006, 1:52 PM
Here in Holland, a new high speed line is u/c and scheduled to be opened in April 2007. The line connects Schiphol Airport (some of you probably landed there for their visit to Amsterdam or Europe) to Rotterdam, and Rotterdam to Antwerp (Belgium). Travel time between Amsterdam and Paris should be reduced to a mere 3 1/2 hrs. One of the most compelling (from an engineering perspective) elements is a 4 mile long tunnel underneath the 'Groene Hart' (Green Heart), considered to be the green lung in the Dutch metropolitan area called 'Randstad'.

http://www.railway-technology.com/projects/zuid/images/zuid1.jpg

More info to be found here (http://www.hslzuid.nl/hsl/uk/hslzuid/).

Grumpy
Nov 19, 2006, 2:09 PM
I find it very strange that smaller countries like Belgium & the Netherlands do have perfect connections with France than France does have with Germany.

There is not even a HSL between those 2 countries,next year the TGV Est is going in service but at which speed (for trains going from Paris to Frankfurt/Stuttgart)?

Why arent there any plans for a HSL from NE France to Frankfurt ??
Is the DB not interested or don't they have the money to built one ?
The same goes for a line connecting Amsterdam with Koln...

staff
Nov 19, 2006, 2:17 PM
Transit pornography. :)
http://thepubagency.be/pgsp/new/bib/IM_GSP_3Dinkijk.jpg

Alargule
Nov 19, 2006, 2:40 PM
Why arent there any plans for a HSL from NE France to Frankfurt ??

Maybe because the demand for such a connection isn't high enough to justify it. BTW: trains from Lille can run via Brussels to Germany. When the HST-link between Brussels and Liege opens, it should be high-speed all the way.

The same goes for a line connecting Amsterdam with Koln...

There already is one. It's just not high-speed.

Joka
Nov 20, 2006, 5:35 PM
18th July 2006: London & Continental Railways, the company behind the Channel Tunnel Rail Link, unveiled a plaque as part of a ceremony to remember Pocahontas, the famous North American Indian who is buried near Ebbsfleet International Station.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/kent/content/images/2006/09/12/ebbsfleet_pocahontas_470x323.jpg


So Pocahontas was a real person.. .live and learn, eh :)

elfabyanos
Nov 21, 2006, 10:57 AM
Does anyone have a good map of the entire European network?

http://www.johomaps.com/eu/europehighspeed.html

Sorry, I can't work out how to use photobucket to post it.

It is lacking a few lines under-construction aswell, florence to milan in italy is a good example.

elfabyanos
Nov 21, 2006, 11:06 AM
I find it very strange that smaller countries like Belgium & the Netherlands do have perfect connections with France than France does have with Germany.

There is not even a HSL between those 2 countries,next year the TGV Est is going in service but at which speed (for trains going from Paris to Frankfurt/Stuttgart)?

Why arent there any plans for a HSL from NE France to Frankfurt ??
Is the DB not interested or don't they have the money to built one ?
The same goes for a line connecting Amsterdam with Koln...

there are plans, and the DB and SNCF are working together - both TGVs and ICEs will be allowed to travel at 330kph on the LGV est.

Grumpy
Nov 21, 2006, 12:06 PM
It is lacking a few lines under-construction aswell, florence to milan in italy is a good example.

here is your map (which contains many mistakes)

http://www.johomaps.com/eu/europehighspeed.jpg


No connection from Scandinavia (CPH) to Germany aswell.
I guess there were plans for a new bridge many years ago between Fehmarn and Lolland or I am wrong ?

staff
Nov 21, 2006, 2:39 PM
Grumpy,
There are plans for a Fehmern Belt bridge - however I think the Germans have problems paying "their part" of it.
Sweden is planning for it's Gröna Tåget network (Stockholm-Malmö-CPH, Göteborg-Malmö-CPH), which is real HSR.

I think Scandinavia will be connected with Hamburg and Germany pretty soon.

KingKrunch
Nov 22, 2006, 10:32 AM
staff,
I hope there will be a fast decision. The project is part of the Trans-European Network and therefore will get up to 20% of the costs paid by the EU. If there is no decision by the end of this year to build the link then those EU subsidies will be dropped. The second condition for the funding is that construction has to start before the end of 2010.
So either we will rather soon see that bridge become reality or get cancelled.

Grumpy
Nov 22, 2006, 11:54 AM
Sweden is planning for it's Gröna Tåget network (Stockholm-Malmö-CPH, Göteborg-Malmö-CPH), which is real HSR.

Got a link for me plz ?

Swede
Nov 22, 2006, 12:27 PM
http://www.gronataget.se/
As I understand it it is basically a new train to run on the same old lines, but thanks to new technology it'll be able to go 250+km/h over newer stretches (i.e. 20-25% faster than our current "fast train", X2000). In one linked to on that page, the guy heading the project at the Swedish Rail Authority clasim the new trains will lead to a 20-25min time saving on the Stockholm-Göteborg line.


Norway is considering real HSR (350km/h) tho, either Oslo-Trondheim or Oslo-Sweden to start with. There is economy in creating these connections if you can afford it - and Norway has all that oil-money...
[url]http://e24.no/makro-og-politikk/article1530759.ece (]article[/url) /sadly, only found stuff in Norwegian.

elfabyanos
Nov 23, 2006, 10:12 AM
here is your map (which contains many mistakes

Thanks Grumpy.

On BBC news yesterday, the government has underestimated railway growth in the uk, they now predict a 10% year on year rise in passengers. This may help push a north-south uk high speed line.

Fabb
Nov 25, 2006, 11:38 AM
http://www.railway-technology.com/projects/LVG_Est/images/TGV-network.jpg

Due to open in 2007, the line should reduce Paris Est-Strasbourg times from 4 hr to 2 hr 20 min, with Metz and Nancy just 90 min from the capital rather than the current 3 hr. However to justify the €5 billion cost of building the line, it must also serve destinations in other countries. The new line will reduce Paris-Frankfurt journeys to 3 hr 45 min, Paris-Luxembourg to 2 hr 15 min and Paris-Zurich to 4 hr 30 min.

http://www.railway-technology.com/projects/LVG_Est/images/TGV-est.jpg

http://www.lgv-est.com/medias/images/medias1105.jpg

^See the photo gallery (http://www.lgv-est.com/les-photos.php?ga=92&d=2006-07)

Grumpy
Nov 26, 2006, 11:35 AM
It is going to be faster travelling from Brussels to Zurich via Paris Est !
How is the actual situation on the Rhein/Rhone project ?

@ Swede , thanks for the link

Fabb
Dec 3, 2006, 12:39 PM
Thalys High-Speed Train Sales Grow, Travel Times Due to Shrink; Kids Ride Free on Thalys Thru March 2007

WHITE PLAINS, NY -- (MARKET WIRE) -- December 01, 2006 -- Thalys, the high-speed crimson train that dominates the Paris-Brussels transportation route, celebrates its 10th year in service and more than 6 million passengers -- with good news, according to an announcement by Rail Europe, leading North American distributor of European train travel:

Sales growing -- Rail Europe's 2006 sales of Thalys tickets in North America are up 12% over 2005 sales for the same period (January-October). Thalys sales worldwide grew at a rate of 5.5% per year in 2004 and 2005. Recent surveys show 88% of Thalys customers rate the service satisfactory overall, and 95% feel the service is reliable.

Travel times will shrink -- In 2008, new portions of high-speed lines in Belgium and in The Netherlands will allow Thalys to operate at a speed of 186 mph (300 km/hr) on all segments, saving one hour on the popular Paris-Amsterdam, Paris-Cologne journeys over the current 4hr 10min (Paris-Amsterdam), 3hr 50min (Paris-Cologne) travel times. At present, the train operates at 186 mph only between Paris and Brussels, taking just 1 hour 25 min to go between central Paris and central Brussels.

Kids Ride Free On Thalys -- Up to four children, aged 4-11 can ride free in 1st or 2nd class on Thalys routes to/from Marne La Vallée (Disneyland Resort Paris) if accompanied by a paying adult traveling Jan 7 - March 29th (certain blackout dates apply) when the ticket is purchased from Rail Europe in North America before March 29, 2007.

Alargule
Dec 4, 2006, 4:03 PM
^^ That's not true. The Thalys will not be able to operate at full speed between Antwerp and Brussels.

Grumpy
Dec 6, 2006, 10:29 PM
^^ That's not true. The Thalys will not be able to operate at full speed between Antwerp and Brussels.

Correct , until the new line along the A1 motorways isn't finished no high speed here :(

detailed TGV Est map:
http://www.rff.fr/biblio_pdf/np_ln_est_carte.pdf

detailed Rhin/Rhone map (new line Dijon>Mulhouse)
http://www.rff.fr/biblio_pdf/lgv_RR_BE_vue.pdf

Marre
Dec 7, 2006, 9:55 PM
It's fantastic viewing this thread with all the latest HSL developments in Europe. I think it raises the issue that European High Speed Railways could/should be run as one.

In the UK the CTRL/HSL 1 is a brilliant long overdue development but we now need to get to work on extending it up to Scotland so the rest of the UK is fully brought into line with the rest of Europe.

Grumpy
Dec 19, 2006, 2:58 PM
the RFF is planning to hit the speed record on the TGV Est line in april, talks go to ride at 600km/h

one very bored guy
Dec 19, 2006, 6:27 PM
I'm going to check out that Frankfurt to London at 4hr 40 min claim if it becomes a reality. It may actually be slightly faster that the current Frankfurt (my house) to central London via Heathrow (presuming I don't use taxi's). Currently, including all the waiting and transit's to and from airports it takes about 5.5 hours for me to step into central London after leaving my front door.

Using the new train option, this would drop from door to central London to approx 5.3hours.

Of cause, if I take the taxi to Frankfurt airport (which I usually do) and fly to London city, the travel times drop quite a bit.

However, although the time via Heathrow maybe a tad quicker, I bet it will feel a lot longer. For some reason, flying always seems quicker. Maybe it's the extra shops and all the chores at the airport, checking in, going through security, customs, then having breakfast or lunch at a restaurant etc, and the short actual flying time. As vrs, sitting in a train in one spot for 20minutes shy of 5 hours. (well, there will also be the changes involved).

I'll have to wait and see.

Fabb
Dec 28, 2006, 5:56 PM
Thursday December 28, 2006


Conservatives are to press ahead with detailed feasibility work on three major potential future rail projects, which could help address Britain's longer term transport challenges.

Working with experts, the Party will examine options which include the possibility of building up a high speed rail network in the UK to match the expanding systems already operating in Continental Europe - paving the way for the introduction of 300 mph magnetic levitation trains.

With discussions already underway with groups that have been developing high speed and freight options, including the High Speed Rail Panel of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Shadow Transport Secretary Chris Grayling said: "Transport is one of Britain's big headaches. In the immediate future, we have to start making a difference to Britain's congestion problems quickly."

He declared: "So our focus in Government would initially be on "quick wins" - projects that can start to change things in a relatively short period of time. We believe that the right mix of smaller projects, for example longer trains, improvements to individual bottlenecks on the roads, making improvements to transport interchanges, represents the best way to start making a difference quickly."

Mr Grayling went on: "Beyond that we will need to bring forward longer-term projects to tackle the capacity constraints that are hindering both economic development and the kind of modal shift that will be needed to help our battle against global warming. We already know that major routes, like the West Coast Main Line, are going to be full to capacity in ten years time. That's why we have to start assessing in detail longer term solutions as well.

"Any of the three options we are looking at would be expensive, and would probably need to be developed in phases in the way our motorway network was. But we would not be doing our job properly if we were not looking at the longer term as well as short term challenges."

The three options under examination are:

• The construction of a conventional high speed rail network in the United Kingdom, using TGV-type trains running on traditional rails. This would probably initially involve extending the existing Channel Tunnel Rail link northwards. Typical trains of this kind run at around 180 miles per hour.

• The construction of ultra-high speed inter-city rail links using Maglev technology, capable of reaching speeds in excess of 300 miles per hour. Maglev is an experimental technology, though it is currently in public use in China. It has both advantages and disadvantages, and we want to assess its potential over both longer and shorter distances.

• The development of a new dedicated freight route, possibly using derelict or under-used rail corridors, to link our major ports, the Channel Tunnel, and Britain's major business centres. The aim would be to reduce pressure on motorways and existing rail routes.

The work will focus in particular on the relative construction cost of the three options; the overall commercial potential of the options and whether they would require public subsidy; the likely impact of the development of each of the options, and particularly their ability to link in to existing transport corridors; and the ability of the different options to secure a shift of traffic away from congested roads and motorways and onto rail.

Fabb
Dec 28, 2006, 6:04 PM
France hopes to set world speed record of 342mph with new TGV
By John Lichfield in Paris
Published: 19 December 2006

The French railways will attempt to raise the world speed record for a conventional train to at least 342mph in the new year - smashing their own 16-year-old record.

Tests with a new generation high-speed train, or train à grande vitesse (TGV), will attempt to push the speed record for steel wheels on steel rails to at least 550kph (342 mph) and possibly 570kph (354mph).

The tests will try out a new line to the east, from Paris to Metz, which is due to open to the public at a maximum speed of 320kph (200mph) in June. The record attempt will also make a strong statement that France is ready to take on competition from Japan and Germany in the multibillion-pound market for high-speed trains.

The record for conventional trains is 515.3kph (320mph), which was set by the French railways, SNCF, in 1990. Monorail or magnetic levitation trains have reached higher speeds on experimental tracks. The tests will form part of a "programme of French high-speed excellence" launched yesterday by the Transport Minister, Dominique Perben. A new, more powerful type of double-decker TGV - to be unveiled in the next couple of days by Alstom, the French transport engineering company - will make runs east of Paris from February.

Philippe Mellier, the president of Alstom's transport division, said yesterday that a shortened train of two power cars and two carriages would attempt to reach 570kph. M. Mellier denied reports that SNCF and Alstom would try to smash the 600kph barrier. The tests will nonetheless take rail travel almost up to commercial aircraft speeds. In the medium term, SNCF hopes to upgrade all its high-speed lines to 320kph, possibly 360kph (224mph), for ordinary service trains.

The top speed of service trains on Britain's railways is 140mph on the east coast main line and 125mph on the west coast. The exception is the French-style, purpose-built, high-speed line from the Channel tunnel, which is due to open its second stage to St Pancras in London next year, with a top speed of 300kph (186mph).

M. Perben said that the programme of rail excellence would also explore improvements to track and signalling, and study any environmental effects of service trains with even higher speeds. The aim was to "define railways of the future and allow France to keep its world leadership in high-speed trains".

Alstom and SNCF are competing with Siemens of Germany and Kawasaki-Mitsubishi of Japan to supply high-speed trains to China, South Korea, Spain and Argentina. France has won orders for Spain and South Korea but the first Chinese orders have gone to Siemens.

The domestic high-speed trains to Kent, which will share the Channel tunnel rail link with Eurostar from next year, will be supplied by Japan, but will be operated by Keolis, a subsidiary of SNCF.

Grumpy
Dec 31, 2006, 1:44 PM
A question a little off-topc : Is the RFF/SNCF thinking on building new designed TGV's in future ??

Minato Ku
Dec 31, 2006, 10:44 PM
I would see japanese train in european HSR :)

Swede
Jan 1, 2007, 1:39 AM
^In a way, you will :) Local trains on the Channel Tunnel Rail Link (CTRL) and connecting lines south-east of London will be Hitachi and basicallyy be a variant of Shinkansen technology adapted for the TGV standards.

Fabb
Jan 11, 2007, 10:40 AM
Eurostar boasts record sales for 2006

Thu Jan 11, 2007 6:52 AM GMT

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/41194000/jpg/_41194060_eurostar_pa_203.jpg

PARIS (Reuters) - Eurostar, the passenger train service linking London to Paris and other European cities through Eurotunnel's Channel Tunnel, reported on Thursday record sales figures and traveller numbers for 2006 as it won over customers from rival airline services.

Eurostar said its sales last year topped half a billion pounds for the first time, rising 11.7 percent on the previous year to 518.3 million pounds and passenger numbers up 5.4 percent at 7.85 million travellers.

Eurostar said it benefited from increased security at airports and foggy weather in Britain during December which caused major disruption to flights and meant that thousands of passengers switched from the airlines to Eurostar.

"We expect 2007 to be another good year, with events such as the Tour de France in July and the (France-hosted) rugby World Cup in the autumn already generating strong demand in the group's market," Chief Executive Richard Brown said in a statement.

Eurostar was owned, when launched, by France's SNCF railway body, Belgium's SNCB and British Rail. The British interests are now held by Eurostar UK Ltd (EUKL).

SNCF and SNCB are responsible for the running of Eurostar services on their own territory.

On the British side this is done by the ICRR consortium, which comprises the National Express Group, which has a 40 percent stake, SNCF with 35 percent, SNCB with 15 percent and British Airways with 10 percent.

© Reuters 2007.

nito
Jan 12, 2007, 1:33 PM
Not technically HSR, as their top speed will be 140mph, but these will be the first Shinkansens to run in Europe. That means that Britain will be operating the fastest diesel trains in the world, Italian Pendolino's, French TGV's, and Japanese Shinkansens. Only ICE trains to add to the collection!


http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/8099/ldnshinkansenbb2.jpg


29 have been ordered, and are currently being built by Hitachi. They will run between large commuter settlements in Kent via the CTRL into new platforms at London St Pancras. Eurostar will also terminate at London St Pancras.

BXC
Jan 12, 2007, 3:52 PM
Nick, what's the CTRL? Could you post a map of the future "Shinkansen" network and one of Britain's high-speed network?

Jared
Jan 12, 2007, 6:39 PM
CTRL = Channel Tunnel Rail Link. It's the project for upgrading the Eurostar tracks between the Chunnel and The London terminus, so the trains can run faster.

nito
Jan 12, 2007, 11:00 PM
Nick, what's the CTRL? Could you post a map of the future "Shinkansen" network and one of Britain's high-speed network?

Eurostars will run from London St Pancras - with some trains stopping at either (but not all) Stratford/Ebbsfleet/Ashford before entering the Channel Tunnel.

The Shinkansens will operate along the entire CTRL, as well along the 'yellow route', but that isn't going to be the actual timetabled route (otherwise it would be pretty pointless!).


http://www.casa.ucl.ac.uk/kxsdsses/images/ctrl_dev_map.gif

Visitors to London currently travel on South London commuter lines into London Waterloo which takes up far too much space (the trains are 400m long). Next year, visitors will enter London via 2x19km tunnels under London, emerge at the Stratford (site of the 2012 Olympics) station which is built within a 1km trench, before going underground again to re-emerge just outside the final Eurostar terminus of London St Pancras. The Shinkansens will also use this route.


A Eurostar on the CTRL Phase I which opened 3 years ago. Phase II opens next year and is by far the most complicated and involves the most tunneling. Google Earth has updated the area around the Stratford trench (nor hard to miss) and the work around London St Pancras.

http://www.traintesting.com/images/Up%20service%20-%20Medway%20Bridge%208-3-04s.jpg

BXC
Jan 13, 2007, 9:42 AM
Thanks.

Fabb
Jan 25, 2007, 7:29 PM
http://www.heinzalbers.org/images/ice3.jpg

http://www.sfu-ev.de/sven/bilder/hermannspiegel/icet2.jpg

http://tarkastad.free.fr/Hbf-1x.jpg
^Berlin

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a6/ICE-3-frankfurt.jpg/800px-ICE-3-frankfurt.jpg

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9b/Transrapid.jpg/800px-Transrapid.jpg

xgokhan
Jan 28, 2007, 4:55 PM
Well, Turkey also jumped on the high speed wagon - although a bit late if you ask me - and is currently building two separate lines, each in two phases.

The first and the shorter line is one that runs from Ankara, the capital, to Konya, a city of approx. a million residents to the south. The following map shows the line, where "1. Kesim" is the first phase and "2. Kesim" is the second phase.

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizliresimler/ankkonyaharita.gif

The travel times between Ankara and Konya will be reduced drastically from 10 hrs 30 to 1 hr 15 when this line is completed.

Some rather old pictures from the construction:

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/konyahizli/images/Resim1.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/konyahizli/images/Resim4.jpg


Currently, the second phase is close to completin while the first phase is about to be started. The line, as seen from the map, connects with the other line under construction (Ankara - Istanbul).

The second line under construction is a link between Ankara and Istanbul. The following map illustrates the layout of the line:

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizliresimler/ankistharita.gif

This 533km line will cut travel times between the two cities to 3 hrs.

Some pictures:

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizliresimler/40.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizliresimler/36.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizliresimler/22.jpg

http://www.hizlitren.gov.tr/foto_arsiv/2_10.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim101.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim125.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim133.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim148.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim15.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim167.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim178.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim40.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim58.jpg

http://www.tcdd.gov.tr/genel/hizli/images/Resim72.jpg

The first phase, Ankara to Eskisehir, will open this year.

Fabb
Jan 28, 2007, 5:41 PM
^Very impressive.


The first phase, Ankara to Eskisehir, will open this year.

What kind of thechnology will it use ?

Swede
Jan 28, 2007, 10:35 PM
http://tarkastad.free.fr/Hbf-1x.jpg
^Berlin
That's just such a cool lay-out for a station. Puts the trains up on display.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9b/Transrapid.jpg/800px-Transrapid.jpg
Something about that pic just screems 80s sci-fi to me.

xgokhan
Jan 29, 2007, 8:30 PM
^Very impressive.



What kind of thechnology will it use ?

As far as I know, technical consultancy is provided by Spanish firms - CAF trains will be used initially, to perhaps be replaced later by ROTEM trains (Korean). One of the members of the consortium building the line is OHL (www.ohl.es).

Fabb
Jan 29, 2007, 8:49 PM
What will be the top speed of those trains ?

xgokhan
Jan 30, 2007, 5:00 PM
They are planned for an initial speed of 250kph. Hopefully it won't stop there, but even that is a huge improvement where ordinary train travels take at least half a day.

Grumpy
Jan 30, 2007, 9:38 PM
that Turkish update is fantastic , thx

Fabb
Feb 14, 2007, 9:47 AM
The TGV-est (new line between Paris and eastern France) is currently being used for high speed tests.

New unofficial world record : 553km/h (announced today).
More records to follow.

Info in French :

Le Train à grande vitesse a pulvérisé son record en circulant à 553 km/h sur la ligne du TGV Est.

Record battu pour le TGV : le Train à grande vitesse a franchi un cap, mardi 13 février, en circulant à 553 km/h sur la ligne Est, qui relie Paris à Strasbourg. Il bat ainsi son précédent de record de 515,3 mk/h homologué le 18 mai 1990 près de Vendôme, sur la ligne TGV Atlantique.
La rame expérimentale, composée de deux motrices encadrant trois voitures spécialement équipées a circulé sous le nom de code V 150 (pour 150 mètre par secondes). Le but de cet essai était d'atteindre les 540 km/h. C'est à la hauteur de Passavant-en-Argonne, à 50 km à l'est de Chalons-sur-Saône, que le TGV a atteint sa vitesse record.
Mais la SNCF, Alstom et le Réseau ferré de France ne comptent pas en rester là : ils tablent sur une vitesse de 560 à 570 km/h pour la fin de cette campagne d'essais, en avril.

Grumpy
Feb 17, 2007, 8:29 PM
Talking about time : this map shows the travelling time by TGV

http://img243.imageshack.us/img243/3654/300100024nc3.jpg

Grumpy
Feb 25, 2007, 2:16 PM
The future according to a Swiss idea: the Swissmetro

http://www.swissmetro.ch/img/fahrzeug.JPG

http://www.ntb.ch/files/0/2077/images/netz.gif

Swissmetro Forum : http://www.swissmetro.ch/phpBB

Grumpy
Mar 7, 2007, 12:53 PM
Nice video on the LGV Est: http://www.pleinsfeuxsurlalgv.com

Fabb
Mar 7, 2007, 2:11 PM
From the link that Grumpy posted :

http://www.lgv-est.com/medias/images/medias1268.jpg

http://www.lgv-est.com/medias/images/medias1261.jpg

Crawford
Mar 7, 2007, 5:54 PM
From the newspaper Hamburger Abendblatt:

Beginning June 10, 320km/hr trains will begin running from Frankfurt and Stuttgart to Paris. This will cut times from six to four hours. The Frankfurt line will be ICE. The Stuttgart line will be TGV.

http://www.abendblatt.de/daten/2007/03/07/701736.html

Die Bahn drückt aufs Tempo: Mit 320 km/h nach Paris

Mit bis zu Tempo 320 fährt die Deutsche Bahn vom 10. Juni an nach Paris. Fahrgäste kommen dann von Frankfurt und Stuttgart in rund vier Stunden in die französische Hauptstadt. Das sind gut zwei Stunden weniger als bisher. Die Bahngesellschaften beider Länder wollen bei der Reisezeit von Innenstadt zu Innenstadt das Flugzeug unterbieten. "Wir schlagen die Airlines auch beim Preis", sagte Bahnsprecher Gunnar Meyer. Die einfache Strecke Frankfurt-Paris wird künftig in der 2. Klasse 99 Euro kosten (bisher 86,80 Euro), Stuttgart-Paris 95 Euro (bisher 86,20 Euro). Zur Einführung gibt es für eine begrenzte Zahl an Plätzen vom 10. Juni bis 31. August ein Sonderangebot. Tickets für 29 Euro sind vom 10. April an im Internet und an Automaten zu haben. Auf der neuen Trasse wird der deutsche ICE erstmals im Reiseverkehr 320 km/h erreichen. Von und nach Stuttgart fährt der französische TGV.

Swede
Mar 7, 2007, 9:50 PM
So there'll be ICE(3, I'm guessing) going to Paris? sweet. :D

Now if only we got some real HSR in Scandinavia. As I see it the most likely lines are Oslo-Köbenhavn and Stockholm-Göteborg (with both lines meeting in Göteborg). The Stockholm-Göteborg line is actually under consideration for future building, a recent study said improvements/new tracks should be built to allow an eventual speed of 300+km/h. This is looooongterm planning, but still a glimmer of hope :)

one very bored guy
Mar 8, 2007, 7:37 AM
Sounds great. I wonder how much my Bahncard 50% will knock that price down. Just checked db.de and it looks as though they are only planning two services a day at the high speed. Plenty of slower trains, but who wants them when you can get a faster non-change service. I guess people will have to book ages in advance.

nito
Mar 8, 2007, 9:47 AM
So there'll be ICE(3, I'm guessing) going to Paris? sweet. :D

Now if only we got some real HSR in Scandinavia. As I see it the most likely lines are Oslo-Köbenhavn and Stockholm-Göteborg (with both lines meeting in Göteborg). The Stockholm-Göteborg line is actually under consideration for future building, a recent study said improvements/new tracks should be built to allow an eventual speed of 300+km/h. This is looooongterm planning, but still a glimmer of hope :)They should divert a few ICE-3's to London:
- Eurostar
- Shinkansen
- ICE
- Pendolino

Full house! :D

ardecila
Mar 9, 2007, 12:40 AM
Actually, I think I qualify for German citizenship. (is the fatherland rule still in effect?) I'm 75% German in heritage.

Man, are we missing out over here. I take solace in knowing that if any major HSR gets built here, it's Chicago that will be the center of it all, with its 4 downtown rail terminals and a possible 5th.

one very bored guy
Mar 9, 2007, 7:05 AM
They should divert a few ICE-3's to London:
- Eurostar
- Shinkansen
- ICE
- Pendolino

Full house! :D

From later this year (I think) you will be able to travel between London and Frankfurt at 4hr40minutes. This works out slightly faster door to door than flying (unless using London City) and I'll try it as soon as it's available. Unfortunately, it's not a direct journey as there are a few changes to make along the route.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/TGD/picture/0,,363585,00.jpg

Grumpy
Mar 9, 2007, 1:35 PM
In the latest issue of 'La Vie du Rail" there is a huge article of the Deutsche Bahn.
They want to see trains riding from German cities to the south of France with their ICE's.

The image above is weird: Basel & Zurich are 1h30 away of each other ??

PeterG
Mar 10, 2007, 3:41 PM
It's now HIGHLY UNLIKELY that the UK's domestic rail network will become high speed (similar to those of France and Japan).
A number of reasons for this:
1. The West Coast Main Line (the second busiest rail line in the world) has just completed a £10 billion upgrade to be able to run Virgin's new Pendolino tilting trains at 125mph.
2. The East Coast Main Line is going to be re-franchised by the government over the next year or so after GNER's collapse. These signal an intention that the ECML and WCML will remain the primary rail links in the UK for some time to come.
3. Another point, and perhaps the most important point, is the dense fabric of the UK. We are a small country, with a large population. This means that large urban areas are very close to each other, at which all passenger trains stop. High speed trains could not get up to top speeds and remain there for long enough to give them any advantage over our current trains which run at 100-125mph in normal conditions.
Also, because of the age of the ECML and WCML routes, all of our stations are in the middle of the towns and cities, and building new lines would cause unimaginable disruption to the whole transport infrastructure for many years, probably decades.
The benefits over the current system just don't justify the need for a TGV type network in the UK.

Sorry to burst the bubble, but the whole UK high speed rail thing just won't happen - that's why the government is spending so much on getting the existing infrastructure as efficient as possible, and I can agree 100% why.

Minato Ku
Mar 10, 2007, 5:10 PM
I don't think that The West Coast Main Line is the second busiest rail line in the world.
As I know all world the busiest line in Japon or India
Tokaido line (East section only) 3.7 million passengers per day
Yamanote line 3.5 million passengers per day
Utsunomiya line 3.2 million passengers per day
Chuo line (East section only) 3.1 million passengers per day

As I know, only 4 million passengers per day in rail in the whole U.K (Subways and ligh rails exclude)

PeterG
Mar 10, 2007, 11:24 PM
With 2000 trains a day along just 400 miles of track, and carrying nearly half of all the UK's rail freight, the WCML is the second busiest railway line in the world. It is, I agree not even close to being the second busiest for passengers carried, but factor in all train movements, and it becomes very, very densely packed.

Minato Ku
Mar 11, 2007, 12:03 AM
O.K sorry :worship:
I have forgotten that the U.K is good in train movements
The busiest station in train movements in the world Clapham juction. :yes:

nito
Mar 11, 2007, 5:35 PM
From later this year (I think) you will be able to travel between London and Frankfurt at 4hr40minutes. This works out slightly faster door to door than flying (unless using London City) and I'll try it as soon as it's available. Unfortunately, it's not a direct journey as there are a few changes to make along the route.Yeah, I remember that map, but it would be interesting to see ICE trains using the CTRL. If Shinkansens can, ICE can!

nito
Mar 12, 2007, 11:12 AM
The future terminus of Eurostar: London St Pancras

http://www.therailwaycentre.com/News%20Photo%20File/NightTest03.jpg




And in addition, the first European Shinkansens are nearing completion in Japan. The first batch will arrive for testing in the Summer. The train profiles:

http://www.therailwaycentre.com/News%20Photo%20File/395Layout.jpg

Fabb
Mar 15, 2007, 7:54 PM
France inaugurates high-speed rail link to Germany, Switzerland

The Associated Press
Thursday, March 15, 2007

PARIS: French officials inaugurated a new high-speed train link Thursday which will cut travel time between Paris and more than a dozen cities in Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland and northeast France.

President Jacques Chirac, hosting a lunch with contractors and other partners in the project, hailed a "major industrial success" with the new line for France's celebrated TGV high-speed trains.

Thursday's ceremony signaled an end to work on the line, though engineers will continue tests until June 10, when commercial services are expected to begin.

The 300-kilometer (186-mile) line will nearly halve the railway travel time between Paris and Strasbourg near the German border, to 2 hours 20 minutes, from 3 hours 50 minutes, railway officials said.

The line also will cut travel times between Paris and Luxembourg, the Swiss cities of Basel and Zurich, as well as Munich and Frankfurt in Germany.

"With this new line, France shows it is, and wants to, remain the world's top country for high speed rail," Chirac said.

The five-year project cost €3.13 billion (US$4.12 billion), funded by 22 partners that included the French and Luxembourg governments, the European Union, as well as train operators and French regions.

Trains on the line are expected to travel at speeds of up to 320 kilometers per hour (199 miles per hour), compared to a maximum of 300 kph (186 mph) for current TGV trains.

one very bored guy
Mar 19, 2007, 11:16 PM
France inaugurates high-speed rail link to Germany, Switzerland

The Associated Press
Thursday, March 15, 2007

PARIS: French officials inaugurated a new high-speed train link Thursday which will cut travel time between Paris and more than a dozen cities in Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland and northeast France.

President Jacques Chirac, hosting a lunch with contractors and other partners in the project, hailed a "major industrial success" with the new line for France's celebrated TGV high-speed trains.

Thursday's ceremony signaled an end to work on the line, though engineers will continue tests until June 10, when commercial services are expected to begin.

The 300-kilometer (186-mile) line will nearly halve the railway travel time between Paris and Strasbourg near the German border, to 2 hours 20 minutes, from 3 hours 50 minutes, railway officials said.

The line also will cut travel times between Paris and Luxembourg, the Swiss cities of Basel and Zurich, as well as Munich and Frankfurt in Germany.

"With this new line, France shows it is, and wants to, remain the world's top country for high speed rail," Chirac said.

The five-year project cost €3.13 billion (US$4.12 billion), funded by 22 partners that included the French and Luxembourg governments, the European Union, as well as train operators and French regions.

Trains on the line are expected to travel at speeds of up to 320 kilometers per hour (199 miles per hour), compared to a maximum of 300 kph (186 mph) for current TGV trains.


Thanks for the update Fabb. I wonder when db.de will update their website, as I checked the best runs between Frankfurt and Strasbourg (and Paris) a few months from now, and although it included the TGV connection to Strasbourg, it still required a change at Karlsruhe. In fact, it takes 2hr 06min just to get to Strasbourg from Frankfurt, nearly as long in time as the Paris to Strasbourg despite being much closer (I can drive faster than that).

Fabb
Mar 26, 2007, 9:12 AM
SPAIN : a new link between Córdoba and Málaga

AVE high speed train link to Málaga ready in the Autumn
By h.b.
Mar 26, 2007 - 8:25:30 AM

http://www.typicallyspanish.com/spain/uploads/1/avetrainsinatocha_1.jpg
AVE high speed trains in Atocha station in Madrid - Archive Photo EFE

A new tunnel will take the trains into the new RENFE station in the centre of Málaga

The AVE high speed train link between Córdoba and Málaga is now 95% complete and will be ready by the autumn.

Construction on the line started in 2001 and now 19 of the 22 sections have been completed.

Work continues on the tunnel which will take the new service into the centre of the new RENFE station in Málaga city centre. Work on platforms there is now underway.

The new link has cost 2.1 billion € and that amount does not include the cost of the trains.

The line will have a top commercial speed of 300 km/ hour.