PDA

You are viewing a trimmed-down version of the SkyscraperPage.com discussion forum.  For the full version follow the link below.

View Full Version : General Sterotypes - Why and Where??



MayorOfChicago
Mar 1, 2007, 8:43 PM
So I know this has been done in different fashions, but I was curious what's your instant sterotype of a state. I don't know why I always find this so interesting, but I find it fascinating what some states are known for - and wonder how these views developed. I don't care if it's good or bad, I'm just curious what they are. We ALL know that they aren't true, and I'm DEFINITELY not trying to get people to defend any of these. I've been to all 50 states, and I love them all - but if you were to say a state name, this is what would instantly pop into my head before I had a chance to think.

Think The Simpsons. They're excellent at doing this. The Simpsons go to Alabama to live - a week later they show them wearing overalls sitting on a porch talking with slow southern drawls and chewing on long grass. Of course that isn't true, but you scream Alabama, and this is the picture I get in my head.

Place, then people.

Alabama Place: Smaller towns and cities, hot, rural in nature. People: Southern drawl, race issues, religious.
Alaska Place: Mountains, very sparsly populated. People: Rugged, white or natives.
Arizona Place: Empty except for Phoenix, sprawling, beautiful. People: Old people and transplants, riding on Californias coattails.
Arkansas Place: Small towns, wooded, farms. People: Simple, a little hillbilly-ish. Lots of pickup trucks.
California Place: Very diverse state, two huge cities, desert in south, mountains in north. People: Lots of transplants, feel like the rest of the country are their "accessories". Blonds at the beach, hispanics doing all the manual labor.
Colorado Place: Mountains, ski resorts, Denver is the only city. People: No real sterotype I can think of here. Nice people, young.
Connecticut Place: North of NYC, lots of little cities. People: Rich, people living off NYC.
Delaware Place: Small! coastal. People: Really get no image, stuck between large cities with not much of a voice.
Florida Place: Palm trees, beach, people living in cities. People: Lots of old people, lots of transplants, lots of snobs in the cities, hillbillies in the central areas.
Georgia Place: Low mountains, Atlanta. People: Atlanta as the capital of the upper class blacks, more race issues and ignorance in the rural areas.
Hawaii Place: Beaches, mountains, isolated. People: Natives of the area, easy going, friendly.
Idaho Place: Mountains, isolated. People: No real image, not "mountain people", but not cosmopolitan.
Illinois Place: Chicago, farms, flat. People: "city" types in Chicago, rural hics downstate.
Indiana Place: Indy, farms. People: Very republican, white, conservative.
Iowa Place: Flat, rural, farms. People: hics, white, simple.
Kansas Place: Very flat, lots of wheat, nothing else there. People: Rural people, simple, nice.
Kentucky Place: Mountains, little towns. People: Mountain hics, hillbillies.
Louisiana Place: Swamps, New Orleans. People: Easy going, meandering through life, better off than Mississippi.
Maine Place: Nature, forests. People: Democrats, white, content.
Maryland Place: Smashed between DC and Philly. People: Tied to DC, Baltimore gets lost in the mix, professionals.
Massachusetts Place: Boston, coastal. People: Very democratic, white, educated, liberal.
Michigan Place: Detroit, great lakes. People: Friendly in rural areas, lots of urban poor.
Minnesota Place: Cold weather, lakes, farms. People: Friendly, white, Rose from Golden Girls.
Mississippi Place: Deep south, rural areas. People: Low education, race issues, struggling.
Missouri Place: The area between Kansas City and St. Louis, part north, part south. People: Urban poor in St. Louis, Cowboys and whites in Kansas City. Rural areas are farmers.
Montana Place: Mountains! Big sky. No people. People: Isolated, rugged, independant.
Nebraska Place: Very flat, boring, corn/wheat. People: Farmers, nice, simple.
Nevada Place: Vegas all the way. People: People actually LIVE in Nevada?
New Hampshire Place: Trees, more trees. People: Very nice and friendly, quiet life, mind their own business and want out of the rest of the countries issues.
New Jersey Place: Philly, NYC. People: The other half of NYC, cliche, loud mouths.
New Mexico Place: Rural, mountains, dry. People: Hispanic...no other impression.
New York Place: New York City. People: Fast moving, loud, annoying.
North Carolina Place: Mountains in west, coast to east. People: Transplants, near south, friendly "normal" people.
North Dakota Place: Desolate, flat, cold. People: What are they doing up there??
Ohio Place: Industrial, cities. People: Average Americans, stagnant economy.
Oklahoma Place: North of Texas, lots of Native Americans. People: Riding on the coattails of Texas. Unknown really...
Oregon Place: Pretty, Portland, clean. People: Tree huggers, friendly, busy recycling and enjoying nature.
Pennsylvania Place: Philly/Pitts with a lot of mountains in between. People: Big city on either end, mountain myserious people in between.
Rhode Island Place: Small, counching next to Boston. People: New Englanders.
South Carolina Place: Southern, Atlantic, resorts. People: Race issues, not as educated, easy going.
South Dakota Place: Mountains/farms/plains. People: Friendly, rural in nature. Work with the land a lot.
Tennessee Place: Mountains, Nashville, country music. People: Hics, country folk, but nice.
Texas Place: Very large, big cities, tornadoes. People: Big hair, loud, self absorbed, but open and friendly.
Utah Place: Rural except Salt Lake City, mountains. People: Mormans, guarded, not overly concerned with the rest of the country.
Vermont Place: That big V shaped park people in NYC go visit. People: White, nice, quiet.
Virginia Place: Colonial, hilly. People: Democrats in north, Republicans in south. Prosperous, happy.
Washington Place: Nature, pretty, Seattle. People: Friendly, clean, white, outdoorsy.
West Virginia Place: All mountains, no cities. People: Coal miners, kinda poor, flat economy. No new people moving in.
Wisconsin Place: Standard Midwestern. Great Lakes, cows. People: Lots of everyone, friendly, dairy farmers.
Wyoming Place: Open, very rural, quiet. People: Cowboys, macho, conservative.

Again, don't start defending these or getting upset, I know they're wrong and I'm not trying to start a "movement".

I'm Just curious, do you recognize any general sterotypes above? Do you have any others? Where did they come from? Media? Word of mouth? Do they go back decades? Do you think people actually believe these, or is it more like the Simpsons where they play them up so obviously - people know they really aren't true.

Chicago103
Mar 1, 2007, 9:10 PM
Illinois is not associated with Chicago as much as New York is with NYC or California is with LA or SF. There is such a thing as a New York lifestyle (associated with NYC) and there is a California lifestyle, a Florida lifestyle, a Texas lifestyle, etc but not an Illinois lifestyle. When popular culture wants to refer to Chicago its simply called Chicago when Illinois is mentioned by itself usually it conjours up the same imagery as Iowa or Indiana; cornfields and small towns. Its associated with the midwest or the dreaded term "flyover country", heck even Chicago itself fails to escape that from the most ignorant people.

Take a picture of a Lake Michigan beach or harbor in Chicago during the summer time and slap the label "Illinois" on it and the brains of many coastal people would melt even though most of the Illinois population lives in close proximity to it. Chicagoans and suburbanites associate Illinois with Chicagoland and basically dont give downstate any thought, to them Illinois is pretty much just Chicago and a bunch of suburbs, to downstaters its just the opposite many of them dont think of Chicago when they think of Illinois but rather the cornfields and small towns closest to them. Heck one time in High School I wore a sweater that said "Illinois" on it and yet it had part of the Chicago skyline etched into it, it didnt show the whole skyline just boats as if it was taken from the breakwater and the skyline with skysrapers including the Aon Center in it so it wouldnt be very clear to untrained eyes. Anyways, this girl asked me if I was sure that was Chicago, that it could be St. Louis because the water could be the Mississippi River and the picture could have been taken from the Illinois side, never mind the fact that if that were true regardless of where it was taken from it would mostly be showing a Missouri scene. It just blowed my mind that someone could consider St. Louis to be more of an Illinois city than Chicago, but down in Decatur which is closer to St. Louis than Chicago and there are a number of St. Louis suburbs on the Illinois side thats the perspective they are coming from regardless of how strange that sounds to a Chicagoan.

MayorOfChicago
Mar 1, 2007, 9:29 PM
^ Agreed. I never say I'm from Illinois, just Chicago. My mom said it to someone once and without thinking I found myself "correcting" her.

JManc
Mar 2, 2007, 3:01 AM
New York Place: New York City. People: Fast moving, loud, annoying.

being from upstate new york, this grates me to no end.

Avian001
Mar 2, 2007, 3:09 AM
"Minnesota Place: Cold weather, lakes, farms. People: Friendly, white, Rose from Golden Girls."

Yes, I tend to agree with this. Unfortunately, a LOT of people think it's cold ALL THE TIME, even in July!

Crikey, I've never been in a hotter place than Minnesota in August! 98 degrees and 100% humidity!

We all have to laugh about the stereotypes.:)

BTinSF
Mar 2, 2007, 3:39 AM
I've been to all 50 states, and I love them all - but if you were to say a state name, this is what would instantly pop into my head before I had a chance to think.

Arizona Place: Empty except for Phoenix, sprawling, beautiful. People: Old people and transplants, riding on Californias coattails.

You owe yourself a return trip--and not to Phoenix. Tucson and Nogales and the land between are definitely not empty and while there's lots of retirees, there's even more young Hispanic people. Oh, and I'd say there's a stronger connection to Mexico than to California in this part of the state.

California Place: Very diverse state, two huge cities, desert in south, mountains in north. People: Lots of transplants, feel like the rest of the country are their "accessories". Blonds at the beach, hispanics doing all the manual labor.


You mean "three huge metro areas" unless you want people from San Diego, San Jose, Oakland and some others to come after you. And you need to somehow work the Central Valley, where a good part of your food (like every other American's) comes from, into your stereotype.

TexasBoi
Mar 2, 2007, 5:34 AM
Oklahoma Place: North of Texas, lots of Native Americans. People: Riding on the coattails of Texas. Unknown really...
:haha: :haha:
For Texas, I will say that the one thing they probably should have added was it's diverse land. Texas is very diverse from swamps to hills to praries to thick forests to desert to plains.

Derek
Mar 3, 2007, 6:20 AM
being from upstate new york, this grates me to no end.

same here...:hell:

JManc
Mar 3, 2007, 8:40 PM
^ i think you and i hail from the same area if i recall. utica?

tocoto
Mar 3, 2007, 9:49 PM
I can't imagine having such a narrow minded, ignortant and biased opinion of every state in the US. Overgeneralizations taken to an upsurd new level. Talk about perpetuating bigotry. WOW.

Evergrey
Mar 11, 2007, 2:25 AM
Pennsylvania Place: Philly/Pitts with a lot of mountains in between. People: Big city on either end, mountain myserious people in between.


Me and EastSideHBG are a couple of those "mysterious mountain people" lol

Great_Hizzy
Mar 12, 2007, 4:24 PM
We sometimes joke here in Texas that Dallas is the capitol of Oklahoma due to the number of Okies who migrate to DFW eventually.

MayorOfChicago
Mar 23, 2007, 2:18 PM
You owe yourself a return trip--and not to Phoenix. Tucson and Nogales and the land between are definitely not empty and while there's lots of retirees, there's even more young Hispanic people. Oh, and I'd say there's a stronger connection to Mexico than to California in this part of the state.



You mean "three huge metro areas" unless you want people from San Diego, San Jose, Oakland and some others to come after you. And you need to somehow work the Central Valley, where a good part of your food (like every other American's) comes from, into your stereotype.

Ha, I said this isn't what I think personally by any means, it's STEREOTYPES. I've never been to Phoenix either, I've just criss-crossed the rest of the state.

I don't think your average joe-shmo in anywhere US realizes how much food is grown in Cali either, they just think LA, San Fran, liberals and the beach.

MayorOfChicago
Mar 23, 2007, 2:19 PM
I can't imagine having such a narrow minded, ignortant and biased opinion of every state in the US. Overgeneralizations taken to an upsurd new level. Talk about perpetuating bigotry. WOW.

Exactly, I thank God every day I'm nowhere near that category!

I'm saying if you scream out a state name in front of some random person who's never stepped foot in the state, it's amazing what some people will come up with...

BG918
Mar 23, 2007, 8:34 PM
We sometimes joke here in Texas that Dallas is the capitol of Oklahoma due to the number of Okies who migrate to DFW eventually.

Very true! I know lots of people who came to Oklahoma for relatively cheap college and then head back to the Metroplex or Houston.

Good generalizations, I would guess most of the country except those that have actually traveled quite a bit around the U.S. still believe a lot of them. Actually most of them are pretty dead on as far as 'generalizations' go.

Mr. Franks
May 19, 2007, 2:29 AM
You got Alaska right.

sprtsluvr8
May 20, 2007, 12:39 AM
I don't stereotype anyone...it's kind of lame to assume people are alike in any way just because of a certain trait or characteristic they share, or especially because of geography.

EtherealMist
May 20, 2007, 4:55 PM
New Jersey Place: Philly, NYC. People: The other half of NYC, cliche, loud mouths.


LOUD MOUTHS?? :hell:


;)

Chef
Jun 1, 2007, 1:26 AM
When I think of Wisconsin stereotypes 3 things come to mind: beer, cheese and the Green Bay Packers.

DruidCity
Jun 6, 2007, 4:07 AM
Yeah, a lot of those are popular outside impressions of the states, for good or ill.

Mississippi Place: Deep south, rural areas. People: Low education, race issues, struggling.


I'll try to add a little to this one.
A lot of us in the region also think "casinos" when we think of Mississippi.

In terms of people, one thing that stands out to me about MS is the sizable rural black population.

Some Mississippians will point out their state's list of successful writers, musicians, actors, and artists, but that seems to be more of a state pride thing than how MS is viewed from outside.

Boiseguy
Jun 7, 2007, 5:53 AM
I think Idaho.. alteast before I moved here.. I thought..
Mountains, rivers, Potatoes People: lumberjacks, natives, outdoorsy

upon moving here... Mountains, Computer Chips, Warm Springs People: Outdoorsy, welcoming, adventerous. (I've noticed there's a lot of good looking people around as well)

ThisSideofSteinway
Jul 3, 2007, 2:03 PM
being from upstate new york, this grates me to no end.

Even though, as a born-and-raised Upstater I have to admit that the City is, was, and always will be the crux of the state, it still does indeed grate when people are totally ignorant of all that space between the northern edge of the Bronx and Lake Ontario/St. Lawrence River/Lake Erie.

You don't know how many times I've had to viciously tickle the wife for taking pot-shots at Upstate. Damn Downstaters... ;)

cabasse
Jul 8, 2007, 11:42 PM
atlanta: "Baptist-new agey hipster wannabe-hip hop mixed culture" - heckles

(hahawha?!)

ctman987
Jul 13, 2007, 3:21 PM
Go to school in NYC but am from Connecticut (Hartford) and everyone automatically assumes that all of Connecticut must be like Fairfield County - the closest part of Connecticut to metro New York City. These people cannot possibly view poverty, violence, unemployment, blight, etc. as being in Connecticut.

Oh and with Mass. - yes amazingly there is more to the state then Boston. Residents of the Pioneer Valley (western Mass around Springfield, I-91 and the CT River) feel a world away from their state capital in Boston.

RG1976
Jul 16, 2007, 12:38 AM
Coming from Pittsburgh, I know that PA has often been described as Pittsburgh and Philadelphia with Nebraska (or some other rural state) in the middle. Obviously, the topography is different.

I've also been to all 50 states (some more frequently than others), so I guess I would have different impressions than many people.

To the upstate New Yorkers, I think of NY as NYC plus the rest of the state, even if NYC dominates. I think of NYC people as abrasive in aggregate, but I've never had any issues one-on-one.

Florida makes me think of hurricanes, swamp, Disney, oranges, and rude people in the south.

For Illinois, I think of Chicago along with a typical Midwestern state.

Wisconsin makes me think of cheese and water slides (what's up with that?).

Nevada conjures up Vegas, Tahoe, and vast desert.

Minnesota does make me think of winter cold (though I've never been there in winter), summer humidity, 10,000 lakes, and mosquitoes.

Texas brings to mind, "Don't Mess with Texas" and "Drive Friendly--The Texas Way."

New Jersey seems to be largely a suburb of Philadelphia or New York, aside from the Atlantic City and resort areas.

J-MAN
Jul 21, 2007, 12:21 AM
The biggest steryotype of all is probably of Canada as a whole being like alaska or antactica

Im not sure if thats what its like for everyone but thats so extremely far from the truth with even just province to province its like going to different countries



As for it being cold its supposed to get to 36 or 37C for sunday here in winnipeg (98F)

winnipeg has more then half a months worth of 86F + and with the humidity 86F can easily feel like 104F my thermometer my be wronge but its read 122F a lot last year

(this years been cooler then average [average being last 20 years])
dont get me wronge though but most major canadian cities shutter at winnipeg or even Minniapolis's winter temperature though with winnipeg being the Coldest city in the world (pop over 600 000)
easily reaching -22F during january or even febuary or even -40F a couple of times




for more check me website

Seely32
Jul 25, 2007, 3:32 PM
I'm from Jersey and South Jersey Is philadelphia and north Jersey is NYC its likes 2 completely different states.

stranger
Nov 12, 2007, 6:02 PM
I hate to say it, but the only reason stereotypes exist is because there is some truth to them. There will always be those that continue to adhere to the stereotype, no matter how much everyone else tries to get away from it.

sprtsluvr8
Nov 12, 2007, 11:44 PM
I hate to say it, but the only reason stereotypes exist is because there is some truth to them. There will always be those that continue to adhere to the stereotype, no matter how much everyone else tries to get away from it.


True, but many stereotypes are based on outdated ideas that have become rarely seen or nonexistent. Habits, fads, social characteristics, income levels, communities, and cultures in general - apects of these groups can change or come and go very quickly...but some people still like to hold on to the stereotypes from 1980...think about how things around you have changed since then...

rrskylar
Nov 13, 2007, 6:43 AM
When I think of Wisconsin stereotypes 3 things come to mind: beer, cheese and the Green Bay Packers.

You forgot serial killers

NYRY85
May 21, 2008, 4:49 AM
To the upstate New Yorkers, I think of NY as NYC plus the rest of the state, even if NYC dominates. I think of NYC people as abrasive in aggregate, but I've never had any issues one-on-one.


The thing is that people think because downstate and upstate are "different" (which is extremely relative unless we're talking economy) and that upstate NY is up for grabs. There are people that honestly think Albany is 8 hours from NYC, when in fact its 2 hours (145 miles). Thats "so far" but commuting from PA to work in NYC isnt apparently, which almost takes the same amount of time, obviously depending on where.

NYC most certainly has an influence upstate, but it lessens the more west you go on 90. Albany is the medium for upstate and downstate, and when you look one way and have NYC and to the other with dying cities, its a no brainer where most of the power goes. Utica consists of half of NYC rejects, and was also an important player in connection with the mob in Brooklyn from the prohibition to the 70s, due to the largest population of Italians outside the NYC metro. There are also old maps that show Utica (Fort Schuyler) during the American Revolution and how the frontier was just west of it (including Syracuse). Utica also prospered from being on the Mohawk River, which is a runoff of the Hudson coming from Albany and obviously NYC.

Then you have people that think Upstate cities are non-existent. There are about 4 which at least 100,000 in the city and a million in their metros, inner city problems typical of anywhere else (sometimes worse) and loads of diversity. I've ran into people that think Upstate is all white people, which is partly true-- IN RURAL AREAS. Alot of the immigrants trickle upstate, especially Utica, which is probably the most diverse city of its size (60,000). Crime rates and ghettos in Upstate cities are even worse than in NYC.

Ive split time between Brooklyn and Utica and recently graduated from college in Jersey and I remember I went out one night in the city and got into a discussion about being from upstate with a bouncer. He assumed "I had land" and it kinda pissed me off. Honestly, Id bet I got as much land as he does in his 2x4 yard in Brooklyn. Most NYCers think if you're from Upstate you got land, which is not true in any sense.

I'd bet the majority of Upstaters that go to the city are familiar with the culture because theres a higher % that live in said Upstate cities. Theres plenty of diversity Upstate and any culture shock is relative. The only difference I find is the economy.

rockyi
May 24, 2008, 5:21 PM
One stereotype I've noticed (from East and West Coasters) - Iowa, Ohio, Idaho.....meh, same thing.

alexjon
May 24, 2008, 8:29 PM
:haha: :haha:
For Texas, I will say that the one thing they probably should have added was it's diverse land. Texas is very diverse from swamps to hills to praries to thick forests to desert to plains.

Also: Flash floods.

San Antonio: Land of the Rescue Fee!

krudmonk
Jun 15, 2008, 11:34 PM
California Place: Very diverse state, two huge cities
San Diego isn't really that big.

alexjon
Jun 16, 2008, 1:48 AM
San Diego isn't really that big.

San Francisco is kinda big. Only a little.

krudmonk
Jun 17, 2008, 4:58 PM
San Francisco is kinda big. Only a little.
So then the state has at least four huge cities?

alexjon
Jun 17, 2008, 8:31 PM
CA is all sprawl.

Everything is a suburb of LA

krudmonk
Jun 18, 2008, 3:52 PM
CA is all sprawl.

Everything is a suburb of LA
including LA

alexjon
Jun 18, 2008, 4:26 PM
including LA

It's the LA-LA MSA

I wonder what the other big city is? I bet it's Fresno

the architect26
Oct 5, 2008, 6:47 PM
I am a resident of StLouis MO and your stero type about the state is correct. Highway I70 corridor is populated by the middle class but your statements about StLouis are wrong. The fifth wealthiest city in America(Huntleigh)is in Saint Louis County.Saint Louis County, Saint charles,Jefferson,Madison, Saint Clair and Marion counties have collectively the 14Th highest population in america at 2,985.943 people. the neighborhoods of Belreive, University City, Dog Town, The Central West End, Webster Groves are style and design centers. Washington University and Webster University are top rated schools in America . O,fallon and Saint Charles are the fastest growing cities in America. The Inner city is under going several projects to bring it back to its former glory. with the mass renovation of Washington Ave we even have our own loft district. A new Mississippi River bridge to replace the Popular Street bridge is even in the works. You can say what you want to about Missouri,but do not mess with Saint Louis[/B] Cause we WILL FIND YOU .

the architect26
Oct 5, 2008, 6:51 PM
:banana: :gaah: :ahhh:

diablo234
Oct 6, 2008, 10:07 PM
Speaking of stereotypes I thought some of you might find this to be funny. I have a copy of Our Dumb World, which is an atlas with a few funny jokes and stereotypes about different state and countries.

Here is an exerpt from the book.

"Connecticut (Home of New York's Other Population) has, for over 300 years, upheld a proud tradition of being next to New York."

"Texas is where everything is big, whether it includes having the fattest people, executing the most mentally retarded people, or dragging a minority the farthest with the biggest pickup truck."

austin242
Dec 30, 2008, 8:32 AM
you Forgot some of the real stereotypes of Texas like us all riding horses to work and not living in big cities but in small towns with dirt roads. I think its funny that some people still believe that is what texas is.:D oh and cowboy hats I really in all my years living in texas ever seen but a few people wearing a cowboy hat except that of course of Kinky Friedmen which I think is the perfect person to say is the stereotype of texans.

diablo234
Dec 31, 2008, 2:29 AM
I was going to mention that but Family Guy already had those stereotypes covered.

Here is another exerpt.

"Florida: "The Silent Holocaust: Though on the surface Florida appears to be a tropical paradise, inside this state lurks a dark, gruesome secret: Each year, thousands of Jews are sent here to die."

ItsaTribunal
Jan 5, 2009, 1:51 AM
atlanta: "Baptist-new agey hipster wannabe-hip hop mixed culture" - heckles

(hahawha?!)


It's like you know me.....and honestly I am a little frightened.

aaronstlcards
Jan 5, 2009, 6:11 PM
being from st. louis, i hate to say it, but your description of Missouri is about right

Metro Matt
Jan 24, 2009, 9:16 AM
you Forgot some of the real stereotypes of Texas like us all riding horses to work and not living in big cities but in small towns with dirt roads. I think its funny that some people still believe that is what texas is.:D oh and cowboy hats I really in all my years living in texas ever seen but a few people wearing a cowboy hat except that of course of Kinky Friedmen which I think is the perfect person to say is the stereotype of texans.

You obviously are not a born n raised Texan then if you've only seen a few people wearing cowboy hats. Its engraved in our culture & heritage. I see it all the time when UT's playing. Fort Worth proudly calls itself Cowtown. Houston has its annual Rodeo which attracts thousands of visitors.

I could go on...

Urbanguy
Feb 12, 2009, 3:55 AM
The south/southern cities. I'd rather not go into detail but my view of the region is not good (just being honest)! Although, I have family members and friends living in that region the political climate (way too conservative for me), accents, long history of racism and so on have and continue to shape my views in a negative way. Sorry southern peeps. :(

diablo234
Feb 15, 2009, 3:22 AM
I don't know about that. I currently am attending school in Lafayette, LA getting my architecture degree and after living in Utah for about one year (Riverton, UT to be exact). I would say the south is in general is way less conservative compared with Utah. But then again Louisiana is very different compared with other parts of the south.

Avanine-Commuter
May 27, 2009, 8:41 AM
Some of my impressions of some states:

California- Beach, Mountain, Desert, Valley. Democrats, Plastic Surgery, Gay people, Mexican immigrants, Silicon Valley, Wine.

Florida- Resorts, Tropical Beaches, Hurricanes, Disney, Swamp.

Nevada- Casinos, Lights, Unsustainable, Fake, Glitz in the desert.

Texas- Guns, Cowboy hats, Red, Guns, Oil, Tex-Mex, Tornadoes, Guns.

New Jersey- Industry, Suburbs, Annoying people, less-than NY, Atlantic City

Massachusetts- Colleges, Bawston, American history, Blue, Young, Rich Cape Cod.

New Mexico- Spa, Resort, Red Rock, Mexican, Pueblos, Native American, Cactus

Washington- Apples, Forest, Deep Green, Wet, Recycling, Green Living, the same as Oregon.

Oregon- Washington + Oregon Trail - Apples.

Hawaii- Volcano, Beach resort, Sand, Japan, Philippines, Tropical.

Nebraska + Kansas + Oklahoma - Flat, tornadoes, and wheat.

Ohio- Typical America, White and Black, Boring.

Montana + Idaho + Wyoming- Nature, Mountains and Trees, Wildlife, Cabins, Bears, White water.

North Dakota + South Dakota- Empty.

Wisconsin- Cheese.

Michigan- Broken cars, Lake Michigan, Urban decay, :(.

Arizona- Thunderstorm, Desert, Sprawl, Inferiority Complex.

Atlanta- Black people.

Mississippi- Trailers, White hicks, Catfish, Swamps.

Indiana- Race cars, typical white people, red.

Maryland- Washington D.C., Professionals, Politics, Flags.

I just thought of state by state, and the ones that immediately gave me a strong image in my mind I wrote down. They can be way off but this is just what I think when I hear/imagine a state's name.

Dan Denson
Jun 6, 2009, 4:25 AM
All this thread does is show peoples' ignorance. What a disgrace.

Dan Denson
Jun 6, 2009, 4:27 AM
You obviously are not a born n raised Texan then if you've only seen a few people wearing cowboy hats. Its engraved in our culture & heritage. I see it all the time when UT's playing. Fort Worth proudly calls itself Cowtown. Houston has its annual Rodeo which attracts thousands of visitors.

I could go on...

I think you're the one who has quite the imagination.

KevinFromTexas
Jun 6, 2009, 7:59 AM
You obviously are not a born n raised Texan then if you've only seen a few people wearing cowboy hats. Its engraved in our culture & heritage. I see it all the time when UT's playing. Fort Worth proudly calls itself Cowtown. Houston has its annual Rodeo which attracts thousands of visitors.

I could go on...

Yeah, but if you have to go to the rodeo to find cowboys, then it doesn't count. It's like going to the Lamborghini dealership so you can say you saw one that day. Aren't there rodeos up north? Seriously, I've only seen maybe a handful of people wearing cowboy hats in Austin. You tend to see more women wearing them than men actually. I see a fair amount of women especially wearing them at concerts. Of course you'd be crazy not to have some sun protection if you're going to be standing in broad daylight watching a concert for 6 to 8 hours. And I'm not talking about country music either. Blues, rock, just about anything. They might be wearing cowboy hats, but that might also be a joint in their hand too.

betterthannothing
Jun 10, 2009, 6:09 PM
my perceptions based on personal experience and observation:

The south: Religion.. A lot of fake christians..they go to church on sundays but totally forget the bible principles during the rest of the week. Very judging. Don´t care much and lack knowledge about everything other than what surrounds them. Southern hospitality exists in few places, and in most part btw southerns. Big cities are different..cities like Atlanta , New orleans tends to be more open minded, people are more aware of what´s happening in the world. they are less self-centered. more friendly with foreigners.

Texas: Same as Above..Cities like Dallas, Austin Houston and san antonio are exceptions.

Florida:
Miami: Feels like a resort...couldn´t work there... Foreigners are snoob. very ostentations people..Nice vibe overall..Very friendly "locals".

Orlando: Less ostentations than miami. Disney plays a huge role in the local culture and vibe.

Northeast: NYC: overcrowded, fast paced. friendly people , but always stressed out and in a hurry(that´s why some will think they are unfriedly).
educated people. open minded.

Boston: people are less stressed than new yorkers. more laid back. people take pride on their city. education is big among residents.

Midwest: Chicago: one of the most friendly people i have ever encountered. very clean city for its size. underrated in my opinion.. people, specially in the south tend to ignore it.

Denver: Before visiting i heard a lot of bad comments of people being rude there...Not true they are very polite and welcoming. some think denver is a freezing. not really the weather is pretty nice and it does´t get that cold. Although somehow "isolated", people there are aware of whats going on in the rest of the country and world.

California: Very diverse. Your perception will probabiloy rely on where you go and who you encounter. I never been to the north, but L.A was a surprise for me, and that maybe was so because of the people i met. friendly, not self-absorved as some might think. very laid back. people enjoy what their city and state has to offer. a lot of outdoor activities.


that´s it for the moment:

Note: these are based on my personal experience while living or visiting those cities.

Jobohimself
Jun 25, 2009, 7:41 AM
California has mountains literally everywhere, minus the 400-mile strip of the Central Valley.

turigamot
Nov 8, 2009, 1:56 PM
Pretty much spot on in Virginia, although in the rural areas and in the mountains you may feel like you have stepped back in time on occasion. The metros are all doing pretty well these days though.

SuburbanNation
Nov 20, 2009, 8:08 PM
"Missouri Place: The area between Kansas City and St. Louis, part north, part south. People: Urban poor in St. Louis, Cowboys and whites in Kansas City. Rural areas are farmers."

I'd add to this: St. Louis, good narcotics. Also, Missouri isn't all farm country, I'm surprised you forgot about the Ozark stereotypes and KC = only BBQ. I don't see why everyone should only make fun of Arkansas all the time.

xzmattzx
Nov 23, 2009, 6:50 AM
Too much credit was given to Delaware. Most people, when asked to describe Delaware, or say that they think of when they hear of Delaware, repeat the clip from Wayne's World where they didn't know about anything in Delaware.

HomrQT
Dec 17, 2009, 3:32 PM
I think a huge portion of stereotypes actually have some basis of truth and that's why they are established, but one thing that throws stereotypes about regions and people in those regions off, is relocation. Someone from new york that moves to arkansas, or someone from alaska that moves to los angeles isn't instantly going to start acting like a regular of that area. They are going to generally keep their same personality as before and slowly influence their immediate world around them in a unique way. And there is a lot of relocation in the US. ALOT.

electricron
Dec 17, 2009, 8:29 PM
The only way to overcome our stereotypes is to travel.

You shouldn't be surprised to learn that everyone, not just in the USA but the in the world, basically wants the same things from life.

Realizing that every place is going to have its own culture or style of doing things, those differences are usually cause by the local climate, history, and environment.