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Trae
Apr 27, 2007, 9:28 PM
Usually when you see a photo of downtown Dallas, there is mile after mile of flat area in the foreground and you can see flat land far past the skyline. When I've visited Dallas I was amazed at how far I could see...because it was so flat. I'm sure there are areas that have hills and the wilderness photos are pretty but not representative of the city of Dallas.

Most photos are facing north. You'd be amazed at the hills to the south.

sprtsluvr8
May 5, 2007, 9:57 PM
Most photos are facing north. You'd be amazed at the hills to the south.


Then from the several times I've visted Dallas, the flatness of the land was so pronounced that I could see buildings and other areas of town that were miles and miles away.

From Wikipedia: "Dallas, and its surrounding area, is mostly flat and lies at an elevation ranging from 450 feet to 550 feet."

Trae
May 6, 2007, 12:44 AM
Or this:

http://forum.dallasmetropolis.com/showthread.php?t=4925

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g288/protestmarch/Rebel2039copy.jpg

It is nothing like Atlanta, but a lot of the area is not flat. And I believe those stats are for city limits, not the whole area. The highest point is 1,368 feet. It is where all of the radio towers are:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/33/CedarHillAntennae.jpg

SteveD
May 6, 2007, 2:47 AM
Trae, you are nothing if not persistent. Dallas is as flat as a pancake compared to Atlanta. End of story. Flat flat flat flat flat flat flat. Please stop trying to claim otherwise.

Trae
May 6, 2007, 9:10 PM
The city is, but the southern suburbs aren't. All that I am saying. For someone who lives in a flat place like Houston, the small hills in Dallas make a difference.

SteveD
May 6, 2007, 9:53 PM
No doubt. Don't fret too much about that post anyway, I was pretty darn drunk when I wrote it! :cheers:

JAM
May 6, 2007, 11:04 PM
Trae, you are nothing if not persistent. Dallas is as flat as a pancake compared to Atlanta. End of story. Flat flat flat flat flat flat flat. Please stop trying to claim otherwise.

I'll bet the boys from Denver are getting a good chuckle out of this discussion :)

SteveD
May 6, 2007, 11:11 PM
:previous: I'm sure that's true, however, the tallest mountains east of the Mississippi are a stone's throw from Atlanta in western North Carolina, and of the nation's largest metros, Atlanta is second highest in elevation, second only to Denver.

Trae
May 6, 2007, 11:55 PM
No doubt. Don't fret too much about that post anyway, I was pretty darn drunk when I wrote it! :cheers:
At 9:47! A little early don't you think?

SteveD
May 7, 2007, 12:06 AM
:haha: It was 10:47 eastern, buddy! Happy Hour started at 5! It was Cinco de Mayo!

Plasticman
May 25, 2007, 4:07 PM
:previous: I'm sure that's true, however, the tallest mountains east of the Mississippi are a stone's throw from Atlanta in western North Carolina, and of the nation's largest metros, Atlanta is second highest in elevation, second only to Denver.

Granted Western NC has the tallest Mountain (a few feet higher than Clingman's Dome in Tennssee) but Tennssee has just as much mountainous covereage and just as many 5,000+ footers. Plus if you average the ten highest peaks in each state, the average is within a couple hundred feet of each other with the slight edge going to NC. Basically Tennessee and NC are mirror images of each other. North Carolina does have the beach though :notacrook:

SacTownAndy
May 25, 2007, 4:27 PM
:previous: I'm sure that's true, however, the tallest mountains east of the Mississippi are a stone's throw from Atlanta in western North Carolina, and of the nation's largest metros, Atlanta is second highest in elevation, second only to Denver.

If I remember correctly, doesn't Phoenix just edge out Atlanta for the #2 spot out of the largest 25 metros in terms of elevation?

LouisianaRush
May 25, 2007, 4:42 PM
I'll bet the boys from Denver are getting a good chuckle out of this discussion :)

Why Denver is pretty damn flat as well.

SteveD
May 25, 2007, 8:06 PM
If I remember correctly, doesn't Phoenix just edge out Atlanta for the #2 spot out of the largest 25 metros in terms of elevation?

well, yes, just. Maybe I should have been more careful in my wording and stated "Atlanta has the highest elevation among the nation's 10 largest metros". I didn't know that Phoenix was marginally higher, though, thanks. It's Denver highest, then Phoenix, then Atlanta, among the top 25.

Trae
May 28, 2007, 3:46 AM
Trae, you are nothing if not persistent. Dallas is as flat as a pancake compared to Atlanta. End of story. Flat flat flat flat flat flat flat. Please stop trying to claim otherwise.

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_1.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_13.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_17.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_11.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_2.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_20.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_24.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_5.jpg

So, the area does have hills...not as much (or even close) as ATL though.

Reverberation
May 31, 2007, 5:29 AM
I want to drop into this.

I have lived in Houston for a while, went to school in Dallas for a bit and now I am in Clemson, which is pretty similar to Atlanta climate wise.

Dallas:
(Summer) Hot, Windy, Dry
(Winter) Really Windy, Cold, Dry
When it rains it pours. Rarely did I see steady rain, it was either drizzle or downpour.

Houston:
(Summer) Humid and rainy early, more like Dallas in July, August
(Winter) Cool and wet or warm and dry. Cold Wind.

Clemson (near Atlanta):
(Summer) dry or humid depending on the day, more haze and trees and less wind.
(Winter) Alternates between F*ng cold and pleasant.

All I can say is life is much better in the summer in all of these places if you have access to a pool.

Reverberation
May 31, 2007, 5:30 AM
Also,

Dallas has one low ridge that cuts through the city (Cedar Hill)

Other than that, its not flat, but sloped. Everything is downhill to the Trinity River.

BorisMolotov
Jun 6, 2007, 4:11 AM
I didn't read the entire thread so I don't know if this has been discussed, but what happens when all these southern cities start running out of water? I'm sure that places like Atlanta and Florida, and maybe even Houston will be fine, but places that are growing fast now like Phoenix, Las Vegas, and the Southwest? Where do you think all the people will go to next?

LMich
Jun 6, 2007, 5:32 AM
They'll get extremely creative, politically, to get the government to divert the water they need. Great Lakes states, for instance, having been working, for years, on ways to leverage their future advantages, while others plans have been in the works to stop water diversion, altogether.

sprtsluvr8
Jun 6, 2007, 6:00 AM
They'll get extremely creative, politically, to get the government to divert the water they need. Great Lakes states, for instance, having been working, for years, on ways to leverage their future advantages, while others plans have been in the works to stop water diversion, altogether.

It is already a huge problem in Atlanta. Alabama and Florida have been trying to get court orders to severely limit the amount of water usage in Georgia from the Chatahoochee River. Evidently it has harmed the fresh-water oyster business in the Florida panhandle where the river meets the Gulf of Mexico. We already have pretty strict water restrictions here...

john3eblover
Jun 6, 2007, 12:38 PM
I want to drop into this.

I have lived in Houston for a while, went to school in Dallas for a bit and now I am in Clemson, which is pretty similar to Atlanta climate wise.

Dallas:
(Summer) Hot, Windy, Dry
(Winter) Really Windy, Cold, Dry
When it rains it pours. Rarely did I see steady rain, it was either drizzle or downpour.

Houston:
(Summer) Humid and rainy early, more like Dallas in July, August
(Winter) Cool and wet or warm and dry. Cold Wind.

Clemson (near Atlanta):
(Summer) dry or humid depending on the day, more haze and trees and less wind.
(Winter) Alternates between F*ng cold and pleasant.

All I can say is life is much better in the summer in all of these places if you have access to a pool.

If you think its cold in ANY of those cities in the winter, then DO NOT move any further north. i've lived in Ohio for a few years and also DC, and the winters are brutal compared to anything in the south. I mean its colder in Ohio in OCTOBER than it is in January in Atlanta from my experience.

RobMidtowner
Jun 6, 2007, 1:09 PM
I didn't read the entire thread so I don't know if this has been discussed, but what happens when all these southern cities start running out of water? I'm sure that places like Atlanta and Florida, and maybe even Houston will be fine, but places that are growing fast now like Phoenix, Las Vegas, and the Southwest? Where do you think all the people will go to next?

I don't know how much this has been studied but I wouldn't be surprised if water desalinization plants is what ends up saving southern cities running out of water. It seems like the next logical step to me.

sprtsluvr8
Jun 6, 2007, 5:02 PM
It's not really southern cities with water problems...I don't know of another situation like Atlanta's, but there may be others like it. I think the desert cities and the southwestern part of the country may have a bigger issue with water.

LMich
Jun 7, 2007, 1:32 AM
I don't know how much this has been studied but I wouldn't be surprised if water desalinization plants is what ends up saving southern cities running out of water. It seems like the next logical step to me.

They better start cranking tons more money into the constructing and operation of these plants, because the technology isn't cheap in the least. This isn't SimCity we're talking about.

Trae
Jun 9, 2007, 6:01 PM
Houston has plenty of water. We get it from Lake Houston and Lake Conroe (I think Lake Conroe, I'm not sure).

liat91
Jun 10, 2007, 10:24 PM
http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_1.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_13.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_17.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_11.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_2.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_20.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_24.jpg

http://urbandallas.us/postings/mtn_creek_5.jpg

So, the area does have hills...not as much (or even close) as ATL though.

Where is this?

Trae
Jun 12, 2007, 1:35 AM
Southwest Dallas.

Rail Claimore
Jun 16, 2007, 8:07 PM
They better start cranking tons more money into the constructing and operation of these plants, because the technology isn't cheap in the least. This isn't SimCity we're talking about.

Money isn't the issue now, and it won't be the issue once economics plays into it all. The real obstacle is environmental. There are already several in Florida, and from what I hear, it was a real battle just to build two that operate in the Tampa Bay Area.

TexasStar
Jun 24, 2007, 10:19 PM
There are a LOT of people who just hate cold weather.
And while the summers here can be a challenge (so far not this one) the winters are simply wonderful. I'm not saying that's why I live here, but it's a big plus to me.

Plasticman
Nov 28, 2007, 4:32 PM
It's currently 40F in NYC and 48F in ATL. How is that a substantial difference?

Someone who doesn't like the current temp in NYC will not be much happier in ATL.

I agree. I've lived here since 1983 having moved from Northern KY which gets plenty of cold and snow. While Atlanta is easily milder than the northern states, it is by no means without bitter cold snaps. We get into the teens several times per winter and we do get the occasional snow. OUr biggest threat are ice storms which we didn't get too often in KY but get down here at least a small one every winter.

So if you want a warmer climate, yes we are a little warmer. But if you are seriously coming south to avoid the cold, Atlanta isn't the best choice.

Neosoul
Nov 28, 2007, 7:32 PM
True, but it's also not unsual in Atlanta for the weather to be in the mid 60's in January. And we haven't had snow accumulate in a couple of years now.

sprtsluvr8
Nov 28, 2007, 10:20 PM
I agree. I've lived here since 1983 having moved from Northern KY which gets plenty of cold and snow. While Atlanta is easily milder than the northern states, it is by no means without bitter cold snaps. We get into the teens several times per winter and we do get the occasional snow. OUr biggest threat are ice storms which we didn't get too often in KY but get down here at least a small one every winter.

So if you want a warmer climate, yes we are a little warmer. But if you are seriously coming south to avoid the cold, Atlanta isn't the best choice.

You must know that you can't compare temperatures on one single day in order to compare climates...that's absurd. You have to compare months or years worth of days to get a correct reading.

Spring, Summer, and Fall weather in Atlanta lasts from late February through mid-November. That doesn't mean there are never below-freezing temperatures in March or November, but the majority of those days are nice and warm, just like about half the days in December and January. With a few exceptions, you can wear shorts/t-shirts out of the gym to go home in with no problem for the entire year in Atlanta.

Ice storms are not common in Atlanta. They happen, but are quite uncommon.

Plasticman
Dec 4, 2007, 7:12 PM
You must know that you can't compare temperatures on one single day in order to compare climates...that's absurd. You have to compare months or years worth of days to get a correct reading.

Spring, Summer, and Fall weather in Atlanta lasts from late February through mid-November. That doesn't mean there are never below-freezing temperatures in March or November, but the majority of those days are nice and warm, just like about half the days in December and January. With a few exceptions, you can wear shorts/t-shirts out of the gym to go home in with no problem for the entire year in Atlanta.

Ice storms are not common in Atlanta. They happen, but are quite uncommon.

Absurd is reading more into my post than is there. I'm not talking about climate overall. I dont know how old you are or how long you've been in this area but I've lived here 25 years just outside Athens. We don't get much snow, particularly in the last four or five years. This last few years has been the least amount of snow I can remember.

But in no way are ice storms "uncommon"...but are in fact "common" to this area. I guess it depends on your definition of "common" but once a year is often enough in my book to be labeled common. We had one last year, the year before that, the year before that. We've had more than one per year several times in the last 25 years. They aren't always the major tree snapping kind but ice is ice. Last years was lame. The year before that we had the kind that you can hear limbs crashing in the woods.

I agree winters are much milder here overall than they are even as far south as Tennessee, particularly in the mountains of East Tennessee where they get huge snows.

My point (again) is that if you are looking to escape cold and ice and snow, northern Georgia isn't quite far enough south.

edluva
Dec 8, 2007, 8:59 AM
Been there done that.

dante2308
Dec 10, 2007, 10:54 PM
Just a note. Today's high was 77 degrees. (Average: 57 Last Record: 71). All sun of course. I'm not sure I should have unpacked my winter clothes... at least humidity is low.

Don't hold your breath for snow this year...

LucasS6
Dec 15, 2007, 8:04 PM
I guess it depends on your definition of "common" but once a year is often enough in my book to be labeled common.


By that definition it's 'commonly' Christmas. I snows maybe once a year in Seattle, too, is snow common in Seattle?

Plasticman
Dec 21, 2007, 3:24 PM
By that definition it's 'commonly' Christmas. I snows maybe once a year in Seattle, too, is snow common in Seattle?

You are trying to mis-equate the word "common" with the word "often". Yes Christmas is common. It happens every year, it can be expected. The same for an ice storm here in Georgia.

People don't usually get the flu but once per year and only a % get the flu at all yet flu is a considered common.

A small % of American's drive Humvees yet they are common to see on the interstate.

Again...it's all about how one defines common.

PremierAtlanta
Dec 22, 2007, 8:12 PM
Snow and/or ice of any consequence is NOT common in Atlanta. Having been here for over 30 years, I have seen many stretches where there was no snow or ice. There may be a few back to back (yearly) occurances of a snow or ice event but that is rare. The last time I remember ice or snow of any consequence took place in January of 2005. We are about to go into January 2008. This would make ice or snow uncommon in Atlanta. Unless I was asleep at the wheel for a few years, I cannot remember ice or snow here in Atlanta since January 2005.

An overnight dusting of snow (which is gone by 10am that morning), snow flurries or a few pellets of sleet mixed with rain do not count.

For the record, I live about 32-35 miles due north of downtown Atlanta.

jcathens
Jan 6, 2008, 12:30 AM
Ice storms are more common in the piedmont region than most other regions in the country.
We may not always have accumulating snow, but snow falls from the sky every year.

soonermeteor
Jan 6, 2008, 1:46 AM
:previous: He did, but cut him some slack. Hot and flat will suffice. Annual average precipitation:

Atlanta: 56.43 inches
Dallas: 18.97 inches
Houston: 41.21 inches

Maybe we could say

Dallas: Hot, Flat, Dry
Houston: Hot, Flat, Humid
Atlanta: Not as Hot as either, Rolling and Hilly, not as Dry or Humid

I sort of dug this out after reading through the thread, but your average rainfall for Dallas is WAY off. It's 37.1 inches.

Trae
Jan 7, 2008, 10:15 PM
Usually when you see a photo of downtown Dallas, there is mile after mile of flat area in the foreground and you can see flat land far past the skyline. When I've visited Dallas I was amazed at how far I could see...because it was so flat. I'm sure there are areas that have hills and the wilderness photos are pretty but not representative of the city of Dallas.

You know, I noticed this about Atlanta, too. If you look south from the Westin Peachtree in DT, it looks pretty flat, but you know damn well it isn't.

alleystreetindustry
Feb 1, 2008, 1:23 AM
i would believe weather plays an important part in the migration. i went to nyc one winter, and although it wasn't alot colder than atlanta at the time, the combination of the shade and the wind made me miserable. new york is a great place, but i can't stand the cold, just as others can't stand the hot.

Jdawgboy
Feb 1, 2008, 3:01 AM
http://www.bizjournals.com/austin/

Thursday, January 31, 2008 - 2:32 PM CST
Austin economy spanks the competition
Austin Business Journal

High-tech, a booming film industry and the University of Texas all helped propel Austin to the top of Forbes' 2008 list of America's Fastest Growing Metros.

The magazine ranked Austin No. 1 among the nation's 100 largest metropolitan areas. The list sorted cities by their anticipated gross domestic product growth between 2007 and 2012. Austin's GMP, or the value of goods and services produced in the area, is expected to climb 32 percent over the five-year period.

Forbes credits the local boom to high-tech employers like Dell Inc. (NASDAQ: DELL) and IBM (NYSE: IBM) as well as the University of Texas, which is producing ample engineering talent.

Other cities that ranked high on the list include Atlanta, Seattle, Orlando, Houston and San Jose, Calif. The Forbes article points out that all of those cities share several key characteristics with Austin: They are tech hubs in close proximity to universities with growing population bases.

Forbes used GMP forecasts provided by Moody's Economy.com.

The regions of the country with the fastest growing metro areas overall are the Southeast and West. Forbes credits the lower costs of living and doing business in those areas for their higher anticipated performance.


To read full artical click link...
http://www.forbes.com/business/2008/01/30/economy-cities-alabama-biz-cx_bw_0130econcities.html

Best Places
America's Fastest-Growing Metros
Brian Wingfield and William Pentland 01.30.08, 2:20 PM ET






It's no secret that the Southeast and Western United States are booming. The costs of living and doing business there are often cheaper there than in big coastal cities. But where and how much those cities are thriving might surprise you.

Take Alabama. The state has some of the fastest growing metro areas in the country, including Mobile, which is projected to have the greatest change in "gross metropolitan product (GMP)," 34% between 2007-2012, according to research forecasts done for us by Moody's Economy.com.

In Pictures: America's Fastest-Growing Large And Small Metros
One boon to Alabama is ThyssenKrupp's announcement last year to build a $3.7 billion steel plant in Mobile. And Huntsville--expected GMP growth 15% by 2012--has long been a hub for defense and space research. Since the mid-1990s, Alabama has also become a manufacturing center for automakers like DaimlerChrysler (nyse: DCX - news - people ), Toyota (nyse: TM - news - people ) and Hyundai.

"The automotive industry has been Alabama's real growth industry in the last 15 years," says Brian Hilson, president and CEO of Huntsville's chamber of commerce.

Other metro areas, like Port St. Lucie and Palm Bay, are part of a growing biotech cluster in central Florida. Straddling Texas and Arkansas, Texarkana is seeing war-related development: Its Red River Army Depot is a major maintenance and storage facility for military equipment. And St. George, Utah, located about 120 miles from Las Vegas, has boomed in recent years as a destination for retirees.

All of them sit at or near the top of Forbes' list of America's fastest-growing metropolitan areas, places large and small that offer at least the promise of booming economies for years to come.

To compile our list, we looked at all of the country's 363 metropolitan areas, defined by the U.S. Census Bureau has a geographic region with a "core urban area" of at least 50,000 people. Because many small metro areas are high growth--and because we wanted to show growth in large cities as well--we split the group into two classes: the largest 100 metro areas (with at least 528,000 people) and everyone else. We use projections run for us by Moody's Economy.com to show growth in GMP between 2007-2012.

Of course, if one looks at economic growth in the country's largest 100 metros, the usual suspects jump to the top of the list. With an estimated 32% GMP growth from 2007-2012, Austin, Texas, is the winner for big metros. Atlanta, Seattle, Orlando, Houston and San Jose, Calif., also appear high on the list. What do they all have in common? They're tech hubs with proximity to universities and a healthy increase in population. Austin's population, for example, is expected to increase by nearly 15% by 2012, according to Moody's Economy.com forecasts

JDRCRASH
Feb 5, 2008, 6:08 AM
The drought isn't slowing it down? Impressive.

Rail Claimore
Feb 5, 2008, 9:22 AM
The drought isn't slowing it down? Impressive.

There's plenty of water around. The thing keeping Atlanta back is the politics of it with the rest of Georgia and neighboring states. That's being worked out as we speak.

JDRCRASH
Feb 5, 2008, 5:32 PM
What's sad is that there are people out there that are willing to save some sort of fish instead of feeding millions of people the water they need and deserve.

ATLksuGUY
Feb 6, 2008, 3:56 AM
What's sad is that there are people out there that are willing to save some sort of fish instead of feeding millions of people the water they need and deserve.

Wow, i was thinking the same thing. Atlanta is only in a drought if you count the water we have to sacrifice everyday to sustain the oyster population at the base of the Chatahoochie river. There is no drought without these nutso enviro's who think the oysters need millions of fresh clean water everyday, because I'm sure we all know that they (oysters) evolved due to the development of treated human waste into what we call "fresh water". i realize the environmental issues, however if you want fresh water for these oysters, then produce it yourself-Florida/Alabama! :tup:

brickell
Feb 6, 2008, 3:58 PM
It's not just an environmental issue. It's a economic issue for the thousands of oyster harvesters in the Gulf Coast. We're talking the collapse of a whole ecosystem, just because Atlanta couldn't think ahead.

sprtsluvr8
Feb 6, 2008, 4:30 PM
It's not just an environmental issue. It's a economic issue for the thousands of oyster harvesters in the Gulf Coast. We're talking the collapse of a whole ecosystem, just because Atlanta couldn't think ahead.

Why is it Atlanta that didn't think ahead? I think the thousands of oyster harvesters in the Gulf Coast should think ahead and come up with some new water resources...maybe some that don't originate in Georgia. It works both ways, smart guy...

JDRCRASH
Feb 6, 2008, 5:31 PM
It's not just an environmental issue. It's a economic issue for the thousands of oyster harvesters in the Gulf Coast. We're talking the collapse of a whole ecosystem, just because Atlanta couldn't think ahead.

Well apparently you guys in the sunshine state got spared because Georgia took the hit for you; as you all are using the water they could be getting right now.

alleystreetindustry
Feb 7, 2008, 2:05 AM
nutso enviro's
i just so happen to be a proud "nutso enviro", but the thing 'those people' don't/didn't understand is that you may be saving the oysters now with all that water, but when we run out of water, the oysters will too. why put the both of us through that?

JDRCRASH
Feb 7, 2008, 5:38 PM
Is it economically reasonable to make such a sacrifice?

How big is the Oyster fishing industry?

scguy
Feb 11, 2008, 4:08 AM
Ice storms are more common in the piedmont region than most other regions in the country.
We may not always have accumulating snow, but snow falls from the sky every year.

I think the reason why Atlanta usually sees one (usually never more than one though) Ice storm a year is because the temps stay too warm for it to actually snow. Most of these ice storms are actually freezing rain. Snow or sleet falls from the sky then melts before reaching the ground. The temps may be just above or right at freezing but on impact the rain turns into ice, creating a big mess, especially for tree limbs and powerlines. Most of the snow I have seen is when temps are below freezing BUT not always.

Of course that is not to say that it never snows in Atlanta or gets below freezing....it definately does. Look at the weather map when we are getting a big weather system on the east coast. Middle and South Georgia are getting rain, Atlanta and northward getting freezing rain and ice and Tennesee and northward its usually snow.