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IHEARTPDX
Dec 3, 2008, 7:00 PM
Wasn't there talk of some entity buying those pioneer place and building a tower in its place?
I would love to have all that retail at street level spread out across downtown...yes i know it's impossible at the moment but i would love to see that any way...some of the massive parking structures downtown could be replaced with towers and proper retail at its base...and if the city would tax surface parking lots so that it's more profitable to build on them than to leave them as parking lots we could see an adequate amount of retail, office, and housing space in the downtown core replace the mall. On that note...i wouldn't mind seeing Lloyd center go bye bye as well...the city could convert that space to greenspace with a new museum possibly.

nobody
Dec 3, 2008, 7:07 PM
Pie in the sky but I would love to see those things as well.

65MAX
Dec 3, 2008, 9:43 PM
Lloyd Center isn't going anywhere anytime soon, and I don't think the mall is bad. I'm not sure why you would want to replace perfectly good retail space with another park anyway. What they CAN do though is have storefront retail along the entire Multnomah Ave (south) side so that the mall has a better relationship to Holladay Park and the neighborhood in general. It doesn't have to be so fortress-ey.

Regarding Pioneer Place, the rotunda block (with the theaters on top) was designed to support a tower above it at some point in the future, if they wanted to add on later. There's no need to tear it down. Again, I'm not sure why you would want to tear out perfectly good retail space.

PacificNW
Dec 3, 2008, 11:17 PM
Yup, it is the rotunda/theater block that was designed so that a tower could be incorporated at a later date. I, too, question the need to tear down these malls. I have always thought both Lloyd and Pioneer Place could redesign their street level stores so that they had sidewalk entrances.

IHEARTPDX
Dec 4, 2008, 2:40 AM
I just don't like malls...I think part of the vibrancy of city life is having retail at street level, not concentrated in a mall. There are also tons of restrictions on what type of store you could open in a mall, so it pretty much excludes smaller, new businesses. If all of those retailers in the mall were at street level and spread out within a 10 block area, there would be opportunity for myriad small, local businesses to open in and around those bigger stores, more people on the street, more opportunities for restaurants to open up near these retailers and a chance at having a more vibrant CBD.

llamaorama
Dec 4, 2008, 3:45 AM
You know multi-level urban malls in downtown settings can fail easily. They are vulnerable to high vacancies on the upper levels when shoppers don't bother going to those levels. With enough competition from street-level shops people won't even set foot in the door anymore. Without external visibility the rents will drop

I think focusing public effort on improving the street experience takes priority, let the retail free market sort itself out.

65MAX
Dec 4, 2008, 3:45 AM
Malls are not all bad. They provide the variety and critical mass of retail that a lot of people want when they go shopping. As long as they are accessible by mass transit and integrate well into their surrounding neighborhoods, I see nothing wrong with them.

I think Pioneer Place is a vital part of downtown's retail environment. Remember, a lot of the stores there open right onto the sidewalks, they're not walled off from the rest of downtown.

bvpcvm
Dec 4, 2008, 5:25 AM
Remember, a lot of the stores there open right onto the sidewalks, they're not walled off from the rest of downtown.

they do? i can't think of a single one.

i have to agree with IHEARTPDX, we'd be better off with retail on the street. the one advantage of the mall is the chance to escape the rain on occasion.

zilfondel
Dec 4, 2008, 8:09 AM
I think that Pioneer Place Mall is a special example... and very carefully designed. However, they should have allowed the stores to open onto the sidewalk and not wall it off like they did. However, the design would not work if the blocks were larger, like the Salem Center Mall in Salem, which completely killed off all street activity.

Has anyone ever checked out those old courtyard mall historic buildings downtown? Some of them pack in some very interesting little shops that NOBODY even knows exist! Kind of sad, really... they used to be very popular back at the beginning of Portland's history. However, there are maybe 1/5 the number of people downtown than there used to be, so...

We just don't have the activity and density to support it all, I believe. We need a lot more people downtown!

zilfondel
Dec 4, 2008, 8:14 AM
Lloyd Center, on the other hand, needs a lot of help. It just kills off that whole section of the city.. with that terrible streetwall parking garage.

I bet the architects thought they were being clever, too, by having a colonnade along the street. But man oh man, does it ever make it difficult to find the entrance (!!!!) and kill off any opportunity for street activity.

Needs a billion-dollar overhaul, thats, for sure. And I think its gonna be a few years before thats remotely possible...

65MAX
Dec 4, 2008, 9:42 AM
they do? i can't think of a single one.


Well, off the top of my head....

Tiffany
Macaroni Grill
Saks (the women's store)
the other Saks (the men's store)
Louis Vuitton
Coach
J Jill
the entire food court

I believe there are a couple more PP stores that open directly onto the sidewalk, but just those few are pretty damn good. There is no way you can convince me that Pioneer Place is "walled off" from the rest of downtown.

It might help to think of it as one very large department store. It just has a wider selection of brands than Macy's or Nordstrom.

Okstate
Dec 4, 2008, 9:16 PM
^ Even with that (unimpressive) list... Wa. Square STILL has more storefront entrances. I would hardly consider Tiffany, Mac Grill, or Saks to be in the same league as the actual stores in the "mall". What restaurant in the food court has direct access? All i can think of is the entrance where you descend an escalator...which is even less "in your face" from the street than that of the other stores.

bvpcvm
Dec 5, 2008, 1:21 AM
^ no kidding, the food court doesn't open up onto the street! as okstate said, tiffany/macaroni grill and saks, while technically part of the whole development, aren't located in the mall to begin with. others? i'm drawing a blank on coach, but j. jill - yes, it has an entrance, but you enter into the back of the store. the store faces the mall. you can tell that they were stuck with an entrance and couldn't close it off entirely, but definitely wanted to. no, pioneer place is definitely walled off from the city.

downtownpdx
Dec 9, 2008, 8:36 AM
I agree it would be ideal to open up some of the storefronts of Pioneer Place -- it feels especially walled-off in the rotunda block on the east side.

But the idea of a mall is ok with me just because I think it serves the purpose of critical mass. Grouping dozens of retailers together on a couple blocks draws people to the center of downtown, who walk the streets and bring vitality to the surrounding area.

I have a hard time imagining, (as much as I would like to see this), all the shops of Pioneer Place spread out across downtown. Much of the existing streetside retail probably exists simply because of the draw of Pioneer Place. It acts like kind of an anchor, and then the spill-over activity makes the nearby streets more attractive. ...I wonder who'll move into the former Shoe Pavilion space? It's a weird spot, huge and mostly underground.

PacificNW
Dec 9, 2008, 9:34 AM
↑ Maybe one of the national "theme" cafe's like the "Rainforest Cafe".....Food isn't great but it does bring in the crowds and it doesn't need storefront windows for people and their kids to find it.......

65MAX
Dec 9, 2008, 11:06 AM
^ Even with that (unimpressive) list... Wa. Square STILL has more storefront entrances. I would hardly consider Tiffany, Mac Grill, or Saks to be in the same league as the actual stores in the "mall". What restaurant in the food court has direct access? All i can think of is the entrance where you descend an escalator...which is even less "in your face" from the street than that of the other stores.

Wasn't trying to impress anyone. BVPCVM couldn't think of a single store that opened onto the sidewalk. I was just listing the ones that do. And yes, Tiffany and MacGrill, while part of Pioneer Place, aren't directly connected to the mall, but both Saks most definitely are. Also, the sidewalk entrance to the food court at Fifth and Taylor is used by thousands of people every day (including myself). I'm not sure about "in your face", but it's absolutely well-designed and heavily used.

Okstate
Dec 10, 2008, 4:25 AM
I hope its OK if I consider that list unimpressive no matter your intention upon posting the info.

downtownpdx
Dec 10, 2008, 4:30 AM
↑ Maybe one of the national "theme" cafe's like the "Rainforest Cafe".....Food isn't great but it does bring in the crowds and it doesn't need storefront windows for people and their kids to find it.......

Right -- or a Cheesecake Factory or something? If it's gonna be a chain it might as well draw the crowds. I don't think Shoe Pavilion really hit the mark in that category.

I like Nordstrom Rack's new(ish) digs but I miss the old location a bit, just b/c now that corner lacks the intensity it once had. The Rack pulls in a ton of people, and there was also an adjacent high-end shoe store ... then they just tore out the wall, and made it into one huge space that now sits empty. I know something will move in before too long, but I really like a bunch of smaller retail spaces over the huge ones that take up so much street frontage when they're vacant.

The new Mercantile shop at Alder and Park, as attractive as it is, did the same thing -- tore out a couple retail spots to make room for a big one. Just diminishes the character and variety of downtown's streetscape a bit, I think, but I realize many retailers need larger spaces to be viable.

BTW what the hell is keeping H&M from moving in, (despite the crap economy?) :) There are several perfectly good spots waiting for them...

bvpcvm
Dec 10, 2008, 4:52 AM
rainforest cafe... i sincerely hope you're kidding. same goes for cheesecake factory. the faux-stucco and robotic service are the last thing i want to see downtown.

on the other hand - i guess this is an instance of "my fascist retail chain is cooler than yours" - i'd love to see H&M in town. after several visits to H&M in SFO i've found myself regularly checking their facebook page for an announcement of a store here. it can't be long - there are already 3 in seattle...

downtownpdx
Dec 10, 2008, 5:06 AM
^^^ I agree, I wouldn't be too excited about either of those in Portland... just saying if it's gonna be a chain it oughta be something that draws foot traffic. But I honestly don't wanna see a Las-Vegasization of downtown.

Not to beat a dead horse, but seriously why THREE H&M's in Seattle and not one here??? I know of the Southcenter and downtown stores, but not the third. I have a feeling they would do ok here. :rolleyes:

pdxman
Dec 10, 2008, 6:49 AM
I too am looking forward to the day when H&M opens in portland-whenever that may be...That corner spot, which downtownpdx mentioned, would be great as well as the space next to it thats wedged between ross and the corner. To me that space would be perfect with its 2 story layout and potential for a broadway-esque sign out front.

65MAX
Dec 10, 2008, 7:32 AM
I hope its OK if I consider that list unimpressive no matter your intention upon posting the info.

Perfectly OK, Ok(state). 'Nuff said.

PacificNW
Dec 10, 2008, 5:01 PM
Geez,....the Rainforest Cafe is great for the kids to see and visit even though their food is crap. Cheesecake factory is good for the "home cooking portions" and attracts people visiting from out of town. Again, their food isn't anything special. I realize these type of places don't appeal to "the finer, acquired tastes" of those living in the city but, I feel, the city can offer something for everyone to make it a healthy, thriving, and attractive place to visit for all tastes and lifestyles. These types of places, like H & M, etc. bring people to downtown. If you guys don't want national chains downtown maybe Nordstrom, Saks and Macy's shouldn't be there either...and then think what kind of downtown Portland would be. IMO, there are many "local" options for the choosing which offer uniqueness to the downtown. BTW, the other H & M in Seattle is at University Village.

2oh1
Dec 10, 2008, 8:05 PM
PacificNW: I couldn't agree more.

I don't go to Macaroni Grill, but I'm glad it's there and doing well. If a Cheesecake Factory opened downtown, I would be happy to have it around. The more we can bring people TO downtown, the more money those people will bring with them. If we only cater to those of us who live downtown, we discourage future businesses we'd prefer by limiting the amount of money flowing in. People who eat at Cheesecake Factory are likely to be shoppers.

I really hope that when H&M comes to Portland, they choose a space downtown rather than in a mall. Love them or hate them, they're a destination for shoppers. I'd rather see them bring shoppers into downtown than help pull Portlanders out to the burbs.

The old Famous Footwear spot would be perfect for an H&M.

Okstate
Dec 10, 2008, 11:13 PM
I woulnd't mind having a Flemings Steakhouse while we're on the subject of chains.

Off topic- When does a "chain" become unpopular by Oregon standards. I mean if Stumptown started branching out exclusively to Oregon, Idaho, and Washington, would all the (locals) stop their patronage immediately? Or if the corporate office is homebased out of Oregon then "chains" aren't bad anymore???

PacificNW
Dec 10, 2008, 11:51 PM
↑ Good question... I think a mix of national and local is a good thing.

rsbear
Dec 11, 2008, 3:53 AM
Off topic- When does a "chain" become unpopular by Oregon standards. I mean if Stumptown started branching out exclusively to Oregon, Idaho, and Washington, would all the (locals) stop their patronage immediately? Or if the corporate office is homebased out of Oregon then "chains" aren't bad anymore???

No one on this forum can possibly answer this question because no one here can speak for all Oregonian's as to their "standards". But you'll likely get a number of individual responses by folks reporting their standards.

Okstate
Dec 11, 2008, 7:20 AM
^ You're telling me there is no medium by which all Oregonians tune into to better gauge one another?:shrug: How disappointing. There is always a very simple, unscientific monitor ingrained into my head that tells me what will or will not fly in Oklahoma...call it my Okie-gauge. Then again, the Oregonian set comes with a lot more pieces than my Okie folk.

For example-

Would Okies like the idea of a Bass Pro Shop being enticed by TIF for urban renewal in OKC?

Okie-Gauge intuition says: Sounds great, lets get this project going yesterday

zilfondel
Dec 11, 2008, 10:36 AM
I woulnd't mind having a Flemings Steakhouse while we're on the subject of chains.

Off topic- When does a "chain" become unpopular by Oregon standards. I mean if Stumptown started branching out exclusively to Oregon, Idaho, and Washington, would all the (locals) stop their patronage immediately? Or if the corporate office is homebased out of Oregon then "chains" aren't bad anymore???

There are a couple different views on chains in Portland and why some Portlanders don't like them. Here's a few reasons you may find people using:

1) supporting local businesses, keeps money in the local economy, rather than the profits going to anonymous shareholders out of state and out of country

2) local businesses, rather than corporatized chains, tend to be more independent and unique. Authenticity is highly valued in Portland, particularly when it comes to business owners trying to cater a product to the people here, rather than a generalized national consumer identity

3) local businesses are usually more responsive to the community, and are viewed as fitting in better to the local environment. Particularly relevant are issues of social responsibility and environmental awareness.

4) local businesses are usually viewed as offering a higher quality product, food, service, etc - as they have to compete with larger companies

5) perhaps most importantly, is the identity issue. Many, many Portlanders view themselves as different than the rest of the country, and thus identify with companies that aren't just a clone of every other company out there.


Just thought I'd throw those out there as I realized not everyone are aware of them.

One interesting story is a Seattle coffee equipment mfgr sold out to Starbucks; Stumptown (a local company) stopped using their coffee brewing equipment as they were viewed as 'selling out to the enemy.' LINK (http://blogtown.portlandmercury.com/2008/03/stumptown_to_abandon_clover_co.php)

zilfondel
Dec 11, 2008, 10:39 AM
I should probably add that there is a huge DIY community and mentality in the city... it gets kind of ridiculous sometimes. We have one of the highest % of self-employed workforce in the entire nation.

Yah for consulting work.. :P

PacificNW
Dec 11, 2008, 4:10 PM
↑ Then with that reasoning Macy's, Nordstrom, Saks, the Gap, Regal Cinema's, etc. should close up shop downtown Portland. I have worked in the private sector and for corporate chains. One area(s) our smaller, non corporate, retail competitors couldn't come close to match, (in my career field) was a employer paid comprehensive health care plan, 401k, pension, holiday, vacation, paid family leave, illness recovery pay. The latest in technology and paid advanced training....just to name a few general differences. That is why I sold my private enterprise many, many years ago.

What I do like about Portland (and I have lived in many larger American cities in comparison) is that PDX has a healthy mix of national and local business. Many of the larger American cities don't have either anymore.

I take it that people who shop in downtown Portland (who are against the national chain presence) would not step foot in a national chain???? I don't believe that for one moment.

Okstate
Dec 11, 2008, 11:19 PM
I know there is no way of measuring this but it would be incredibly interesting to do a survey on all Portlanders to weather they are 1. local loyalist 2. criss-crossers or 3. Chains are successful for a reason...people. Obviously the local loyalist people would be faaaaaar outnumbered but when compared to other cities in America, that's where it would be interesting.

Thursday tantrum FYI: Oregon is the 4th or 5th lowest per capita state in the U.S. to have fast food restaurants. Colorado was number one with the least per capita.

zilfondel
Dec 12, 2008, 2:49 AM
OK: Aah, you're in Eugene! I understand now.

There really isn't much of ANYTHING going on there, huh? At least there's the High St Cafe, and some good breakfast spots along 13th ave next to the UO bookstore. The Caspian? Is it still there? They had great french toast, with nuts, if I recall.

But yeah, glad I moved to PDX. :P

zilfondel
Dec 12, 2008, 2:56 AM
↑ Then with that reasoning Macy's, Nordstrom, Saks, the Gap, Regal Cinema's, etc. should close up shop downtown Portland. I have worked in the private sector and for corporate chains. One area(s) our smaller, non corporate, retail competitors couldn't come close to match, (in my career field) was a employer paid comprehensive health care plan, 401k, pension, holiday, vacation, paid family leave, illness recovery pay. The latest in technology and paid advanced training....just to name a few general differences. That is why I sold my private enterprise many, many years ago.

What I do like about Portland (and I have lived in many larger American cities in comparison) is that PDX has a healthy mix of national and local business. Many of the larger American cities don't have either anymore.

I take it that people who shop in downtown Portland (who are against the national chain presence) would not step foot in a national chain???? I don't believe that for one moment.

Thats not what I meant. I live in SE; many of the people I know in my neighborhood never even go downtown. Maybe once a month, apparently (I go all the time). There are a ton of stores, bars, and such that offer alternatives (ie, Hawthorne). People actually shop there. This is a city, after all, where 1/5 of the population considers themselves a skateboarder. :koko:

This doesn't really exist on the west side of pdx, nor any of the burbs. Its primarily a SE/NE/NoPo phenom - and not just with hipsters.


Disclaimer: These are just anecdotal observations, and do not necessarily reflect my own opinions. I'm just trying to distill down what I have observed and picked up from what seems to be the general sentiments in Portland. And I am not a hipster. :haha:

Okstate
Dec 12, 2008, 7:35 AM
Zilf: Caspian is still around. I've only been to the Mcmenamins bordering the river (Willamette of course) & East 19th St. Cafe which is steps away from my front door. My family is moving to PDX Jan. 1st. I'm actually writing this from my new digs currently. Oh & Studio One has the best breakfast IMO.

As for retail: I am all about doing it smart rather than being concerned with who it is that locates there. Most adult individuals should be intelligent enough to know which side of the game they are on as far as where they eat, shop, live & play...that's their prerogative Our only role should be to make it more enticing to cross over into the side of supporting smart growth development, which I think most of us are advocates on here. People are yearning for smart development they are just not presented with enough options (although in Portland there are a few). Why do you think so many people visit Europe at some point in their lives? The historical aspect? Give me a break, most people could care less for history & want to be in a culture that has embraced a street-level vibe incomparable to what's back at home, wherever that may be. Give me a good balance between local & chains developing by smart growth methods & i'd be a happy guy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_growth

RED_PDXer
Dec 12, 2008, 9:10 AM
Ughh.. this argument is old and tiresome.. shop where you want. end of story.

I'll shop at local stores where possible, you shop wherever you damn well please. If you enjoy the mundane, go to the Gap, Stanford's, and Safeway..

PacificNW
Dec 12, 2008, 8:30 PM
↑ Cheap shot.....I didn't realize you were a "moderator" who could "end of story" and then "add" your own view: "If you enjoy the mundane, go to the Gap, Stanford's, and Safeway.."

IHEARTPDX
Dec 12, 2008, 9:29 PM
I have a hard time imagining, (as much as I would like to see this), all the shops of Pioneer Place spread out across downtown. Much of the existing streetside retail probably exists simply because of the draw of Pioneer Place. It acts like kind of an anchor, and then the spill-over activity makes the nearby streets more attractive. ...I wonder who'll move into the former Shoe Pavilion space? It's a weird spot, huge and mostly underground.

I could see pioneer place thriving with half or even a third of the space it has (and without the underground aspect as well). That area of downtown streetlife is not as vibrant as it could be, there have been storefronts adjacent to PP that have been vacant for years...and as i have said before i think malls, especially if they are too big and cavernous, act as blackholes rather than magnets. All the potential streetlife is sanitized and housed indoors. I have never read a study or seen any evidence of a mall improving streetlife or adding to the social fabric that makes up a city's "energy" or "feel".

65MAX
Dec 13, 2008, 4:33 AM
I have never read a study or seen any evidence of a mall improving streetlife or adding to the social fabric that makes up a city's "energy" or "feel".

Anyone who has lived here since pre-Pioneer Place knows that this particular mall was a huge shot in the arm to downtown retail. It helped solidify downtown as the region's premiere shopping destination. Plus, a lot of the stores in the mall would only be downtown in a mall setting because they need the critical mass to be successful. They typically would not open a stand-alone store.

Okstate
Dec 13, 2008, 6:01 AM
^ I'll second that. I can't attest to the "energy" or "feel" but what city doesn't have a mall while simultaneously having an abundance of retail? I really am asking b/c I don't know.

zilfondel
Dec 13, 2008, 8:54 AM
Ugh, all I meant was to help inform anyone who didn't know some of those sentiments in Portland. I wasn't trying to push any ideologies or anything...

Keep Portland Weird and all that, but lets not hate, ok?

MarkDaMan
Dec 18, 2008, 2:33 AM
Historic Galleria Building in downtown Portland gets a facelift
General contractor Lease Crutcher Lewis, which is performing construction, will move in once project wraps up
Daily Journal of Commerce
POSTED: 04:00 AM PST Tuesday, December 16, 2008
BY TYLER GRAF

The Galleria Building began life as the city’s preeminent retail building. In recent years it has maintained its integrity and historical significance by continuing to attract high-end retailers, such as Brooks Brothers.

But the Galleria’s owners at the Bill Naito Co. are subtly shifting the building’s focus toward office tenants, with the second and third floors being converted to offices. This means one thing: The building needs some sprucing up to meet those new needs.

Contractor Lease Crutcher Lewis has begun interior renovation work, and will soon begin shell and core construction, inside the Galleria Building in order to modernize the 100-year-old building and boost its energy efficiency.

The Bill Naito Co. is aiming for a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design gold designation for the interior work and hopes the remainder of the building will be LEED certified as well.

Not only is Lease Crutcher Lewis working as the general contractor on the building, it will also be its first new office tenant. The firm will occupy 10,000 square feet of new office space that it’s renovating on the building’s third story.

“What we like about the building is that it continues to be close to our design partners,” said Janice Thompson of Lease Crutcher Lewis.

The company currently resides inside the Pittock Block, a mere stone’s throw across a parking lot to the Galleria. According to Thompson, once the company made its decision to move, a couple of stipulations surfaced. First, it would have to stay close to the Central Business District. Check. Second, it would have to occupy a historical building. Another check.

Lease Crutcher Lewis’ space in the Pittock Block, on Washington Street between Southwest Ninth and 10th avenues, wasn’t cutting it due to space constraints. In the last two years, Lease Crutcher Lewis has grown by 50 percent.

“We’ve grown tremendously over the last several years,” Thompson said. “We can no longer fit inside the Pittock Block.”

In the Galleria Building, however, there is plenty of space – it just needs a facelift.

The current renovation marks the first significant scrapping of antiquated technology and scuttling of resources within the Galleria since the building was last renovated in 1975. In 2003, however, tenant improvements were made to the building, to make room for the Western Culinary Institute.

The new office space will feature an open office floor plan, offering a wider variety of amenities than Lease Crutcher Lewis currently has. The space will have conference rooms, a break room, a plan room and production space.

The centerpiece of the project, said architect Craig Rice of SERA Architects, is a more efficient mechanical system, in addition to low-VOC materials. The office will also abut the building’s central atrium, with an exposed ceiling that maximizes sightlines to its high windows, optimizing the exposure to natural daylight.

Seismic work for the building will take a year to design, due to the city’s peer review process for engineering projects. Overall, Rice expects the project to take about two years to complete.

With these changes come expectations of a broadened tenant base.

Over the years, the Galleria Building has struggled to retain tenants, despite its plum location. When Brooks Brothers and AM Living signed ground-floor leases last year, however, the Bill Naito Co. considered it a good omen.

Now the trick will be to change the Galleria’s interior – primarily by centralizing its mechanical systems, which are presently in far-flung corners of the building – so the building can attract a mix of tenant types, Rice said.

“During the retail years, three of the four corners (of the building) were used as mechanical space and one was used as a bathroom,” Rice said. “Those corner spaces have obviously become much more valuable during the office years, so all the corners are being added back to office space and we’re performing bathroom upgrades.”

Additionally, SERA plans to add bike storage and shower rooms, both to make the building more appealing to office tenants and to achieve LEED gold certification.

http://www.djcoregon.com/articleDetail.htm/2008/12/16/Historic-Galleria-Building-in-downtown-Portland-gets-a-facelift-General-contractor-Lease-Crutcher-Le

Downtown_Gal
Jan 5, 2009, 10:35 PM
From Pioneer Place:

For Immediate Release

TRUE RELIGION SET TO OPEN THIS SPRING AT PIONEER PLACE

PORTLAND, Ore., (December 16, 2008) Pioneer Place, Oregon’s premier fashion and luxury shopping center, is pleased to announce the spring 2009 opening of True Religion. The 1,662 square foot store is slated to open in March 2009 on the street level of the Rotunda Pavilion.

“This is the third first-to-market retailer announcement this year at Pioneer Place. True Religion will be joining Kate Spade, Juicy Couture and Betsey Johnson in choosing Pioneer Place as their exclusive Oregon location,” said Robert Buchanan, Senior General Manager at Pioneer Place. “Our goal is to provide our customers with the finest shopping experience in Oregon and to achieve this goal, we must continue to bring new retailers our customers want to the center.”

About True Religion
Jeffrey Lubell founded True Religion in 2002 with the intention of redefining premium denim. His vision was to make quality, American-made, authentic, timeless, great fitting, 1970’s inspired jeans wear, with a trendsetting appeal for today’s consumer. Today, True Religion Brand Jeans is known not only for denim, but also for its knit and woven sportswear, such as t-shirts, western shirts, sweatshirts and sweatpants that all have that vintage feel. True Religion’s commitment to perfect fit, timeless style and that hippie bohemian chic flare have solidified True Religion’s brand position as a leader in premium denim and casual sportswear globally. While continuing to expand True Religion’s line of jeans and sportswear, the company most recently branched out into numerous licensed products such as Footwear, Headwear, Handbags, Swimwear and Fragrance.

Okstate
Jan 6, 2009, 8:02 AM
^ nice update. We actually beat Seattle to something

MarkDaMan
Feb 18, 2009, 4:06 AM
Friday, February 13, 2009 | Modified: Monday, February 16, 2009, 12:01am
Portland leaders strive to make downtown a retail destination
Portland Business Journal - by Erik Siemers Business Journal staff writer

Using places like Chicago’s Magnificent Mile and Boston’s Newbury Street as examples, city officials are hoping to transform downtown Portland into a signature retail destination.

While downtown advocates say such efforts have been ongoing for years, a new report released this month from a city-hired consultant adds a new level of detail to the plan — and a few big ideas.

For starters, Portland-based Leland Consulting Group Inc. has identified two primary downtown corridors as the “signature retail” streets: Southwest Broadway, from Washington to Taylor, and Southwest Morrison Street from Third to 10th avenues.

At the nexus of those streets is the federally owned Pioneer Courthouse, at 555 S.W. Yamhill St., which the consultants suggested the city buy. Leland Consulting called buying the courthouse a “big idea” that would add continuity to the retail corridor by adding cultural uses such as retail, restaurants, and other attractions to the landmark building, which was built in 1869.

Whether the big ideas will fly remains an open question, but city leaders and downtown stakeholders agree on the concept of a more thriving and marketable downtown shopping district.

“The report recognizes how crucial it is to the regional economy to have a healthy downtown,” said Scott Andrews, president of commercial real estate firm Melvin Mark Property Management Co. and chairman of the city’s Downtown Vision Task Force. “You don’t have healthy neighborhoods or a healthy region if the downtown isn’t doing well.”

Mayor Sam Adams convened the Downtown Vision Task Force last fall to address concerns over the vibrancy of downtown Portland. The consultant’s report is a continuation of that effort.

Kimberly Schneider, Adams’ economic development director, said that while visiting other cities Adams became interested in the notion of downtowns with retail streets that are tourist destinations.

Leland was hired by Adams and the Portland Development Commission in December to study the best practices of five retail districts: Newbury Street in Boston, the Magnificent Mile in Chicago, the Seattle retail core, Old Pasadena in Pasadena, Calif., and Robson Street in Vancouver, British Columbia.

From that study, it offered a series of recommendations for Portland. It includes short-term goals such as revitalizing vacant storefronts with things like public art projects, advocating for increased safety measures and improve lighting.

It also offers bigger recommendations:

l The city must retain and attract locally based retailers, emphasizing Portland’s unique flavor and enhancing the city’s brand.

l The city should seek urban versions of affordable big box stores such as Target and H&M to complement downtown’s ample higher-end offerings like Brooks Brothers and Nordstrom.

l With banks occupying several key retail corners downtown, the city should seek to add “retail liner space” to bank spaces as a means of adding retail continuity throughout the district.

l Conceive a distinctive brand for the downtown shopping district and design physical gateways into signature retail streets at locations such as Broadway and Washington, Broadway and Taylor, Morrison and 10th and Morrison and Naito Parkway.

The idea of remaking downtown retail has been kicked around for at least a decade, said Vanessa Sturgeon, a member of the task force and president of TMT Development Co. Inc., which owns downtown high-rises The Fox Tower, 1000 Broadway and others.

She said property owners — a critical stakeholder for such a plan to become successful — are involved in the discussions.

Sandra McDonough, CEO of the Portland Business Alliance, said the Leland report is the latest chapter in an ongoing process.

“They all say we have a phenomenal downtown, one of the best downtowns in the country,” she said. “But that’s not something you can rest your laurels on. We had to get very strategic about how we attract and retain great retail in our downtown core.”

The so-called “big idea” of buying Pioneer Courthouse is the kind of thinking the city needs in such a big project, several officials said. But that doesn’t mean it’s a project likely to come to fruition.

“It’s not practical in that the federal government just spent a fortune upgrading it seismically and setting it up for the courthouses that are there,” Andrews said.

Dave Feehan, president of the Washington, D.C.-based International Downtown Association, said cities across the country have successfully turned downtowns into entertainment centers and brought housing back into the urban core.

But in today’s weak economic climate, most cities are stepping back from ambitious downtown retail projects.

“What we hear from a lot of people is that caution is the word of the day,” Feehan said. “If any city has a good chance of success in doing this, it’s Portland.”
Plan provides a series of steps to meet goals

Portland-based Leland Consulting Group suggests a series of short-term to long-term goals the city can accomplish in creating a signature downtown retail district. Among the recommendations:

Short-term:

l Employ a “retail stimulus package” that includes improving storefronts, hiring for the city’s vacant retail liasion position, and offer low-interest capital loans for struggling local retailers.

l Advocate for renewing the Sit-Lie Ordinance and consider other steps to improve the perception of a safe downtown.

l Retain and attract locally-based retailers to downtown.

l Attract more affordable retailers to add diversity to downtown’s high-end offerings. That could be urban versions of big box retailers like Target or TJ Maxx.

Mid-term:

l Develop a distinctive brand for a signature retail district.

l Identify signature retail territory. Leland recommends the intersecting downtown corridors of Morrison and Broadway, with a series of connecting streets as secondary retail areas.

l Improve continuity between retail streets.

l Identify catalyst sites to could spur new development and tax revenues, such as Block 216 on 10th Avenue.

l Consider alternative financing tools, such as a retail-focused Local Improvement District.

Long-term:

l Design gateways into the retail district, perhaps through a design competition.

l Consider turning Southwest Broadway into a two-way street to improve traffic flow and on-street parking.

l Improve housing options near the retail core.

esiemers@bizjournals.com | 503-219-3418
http://portland.bizjournals.com/portland/stories/2009/02/16/story1.html?t=printable

Okstate
Feb 18, 2009, 5:00 AM
Must be nice to get paid big bucks to state such obvious "goals". I swear the city officials just get bored with day to day things & say lets find an excuse to go play in several different cities & we'll call it "research" :) Don't hate the player hate the game though.

zilfondel
Feb 18, 2009, 5:26 AM
^ Hasn't the city been successful in getting a huge amount of building owners remodel their first-floor in the buildings along the transit mall? I can't believe how much micro-construction I've seen down there in the past year.

Okstate
Feb 18, 2009, 5:43 AM
I don't know if you can still access it online, but PSU has a speaker series once a week & one showcased the transit mall design explained by the "architects" of the project. It was really interesting to see how much work goes into such seemingly simple ideas. Btw my comment above was joking but it does seem so easy to say "ummm we should focus on this street...maybe perhaps a gateway entrance of sorts..maybe a design competition should be held? Oh, and a target would probably be nice."

MarkDaMan
Feb 19, 2009, 2:41 AM
I understand what your are saying Okstate, but I think that is a little flippant too.

Portland has a strong tradition of planning and executing. That's why downtown is as great as it is. Just like other cities come to Portland to view what we've done successfully, it's important our planners get out to other successful projects and see what could be brought back to Portland.

Portland does need some additions to make it a true shopping destination. I don't want it all fauxed up, but creating an identity, along with some must see attractions (think umbrella man) will make a stronger downtown.

Okstate
Feb 19, 2009, 4:22 AM
From Morrison (3rd-10th) & Broadway (Washington-Taylor):

Aren't most of those parcels already taken by "pretty stable" retailers/restaurants? I drove by there today & could only see a small amount of lease space that needs a new tenant (i.e.- doesn't currently have one or one that needs replacement)

-When/is the Ross store getting a facelift still?
-What could they be planning for the (actual) courthouse? Many separate high end retailers i guess. Does anything similar in other cities have something like this?

PacificNW
Feb 19, 2009, 4:54 AM
I seriously doubt that the old courthouse will ever become a retail center....that would be just plain wrong from an historical point, imo. I think it is the 2nd oldest federal courthouse (West of the Mississippi) still in operation. It is a recently upgraded Federal Courthouse. From wikipedia (so the following info has to be correct. :).... I am pretty sure it is): "The Pioneer Courthouse is a federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon, United States. Built beginning in 1869, the structure is the oldest federal building in the Pacific Northwest, and the second oldest west of the Mississippi River. Along with Pioneer Courthouse Square, it serves as the center of downtown Portland. It is also known as the Pioneer Post Office because a popular downtown Portland post office was, until 2005, located inside. The courthouse is one of four primary locations where the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit hears oral arguments. It also houses the chambers of the Portland-based judges on the Ninth Circuit."

NewUrbanist
Feb 19, 2009, 6:19 PM
From Morrison (3rd-10th) & Broadway (Washington-Taylor):

Aren't most of those parcels already taken by "pretty stable" retailers/restaurants? I drove by there today & could only see a small amount of lease space that needs a new tenant (i.e.- doesn't currently have one or one that needs replacement)

-When/is the Ross store getting a facelift still?
-What could they be planning for the (actual) courthouse? Many separate high end retailers i guess. Does anything similar in other cities have something like this?


Ross was given an uplift on the backside of the store. It is housed in two buildings, and the West side entrance was spruced up. Nothing will happen on the east side or the interior, unfortunately.

I can't imagine changing the courthouse into anything... I think it should remain as it is... a stately historic civic building in the center of the city. It is a great link to the past, and should maintain it's use.

Okstate
Feb 19, 2009, 9:44 PM
^ for some reason I thought Ross was completely renovating their exterior...maybe i just read into it too much.

scleeb
Feb 20, 2009, 4:06 AM
Some insight into the Ross Facade Upgrade- When the 620 Building (The western building Ross occupies) was sold in 2006, serious structural deficiencies were identified during the due diligence phase. The 1956 removal of the interior walls between the two buildings Ross occupies created an unsafe lateral weakness. A shear wall was needed inside the 620 Building to correct the problem. Additionally, the ceramic/concrete veneer, added to the building in 1956, infilled the original plate glass windows. This infill caused an unacceptable weak story condition, and also needed to be repaired. Once these deficiencies were identified by the new building owners, they used the opportunity to repair the defects and improve the facade of the building. Incidentally, it should be noted that Ross fought the Landlord's repairs/improvements every step of the way.

hossboss85
Feb 20, 2009, 5:51 AM
^ Good to know, scleeb. :)

I work in the 620 Building! (Not the Ross part, fortunately.)

Downtown_Gal
Mar 10, 2009, 10:09 PM
I was recently sent the list below of some of the stores that have closed up recently or will be closing soon. I am so ready for this economy to turn back around... :(


Imp on Alberta
Aubergine in the Pearl
Bee & Thistle in the Pearl (I'm very sad about this one)
Henny Penny in the Pearl
Hello Portland in NW
Cheeky B in the Pearl
The Paper Garden in NE

dkealoha
Mar 10, 2009, 11:16 PM
I was recently sent the list below of some of the stores that have closed up recently or will be closing soon. I am so ready for this economy to turn back around... :(


Imp on Alberta
Aubergine in the Pearl
Bee & Thistle in the Pearl (I'm very sad about this one)
Henny Penny in the Pearl
Hello Portland in NW
Cheeky B in the Pearl
The Paper Garden in NE


Cheeky B closed?!!?! I liked that store... :-(

Downtown_Gal
Mar 11, 2009, 12:31 AM
I guess it is open through the end of March while they sell everything they can... even the light fixtures and stuff like that. Very sad.

MarkDaMan
Mar 28, 2009, 2:38 AM
Friday, March 27, 2009
Small stores close as sales plummet
Vacancy rates rise in Portland retail corridors
Portland Business Journal - by Andy Giegerich Business Journal staff writer
Media

After 12 years, The Cat’s Meow is closing its doors.

Owner Linda Wion’s Southeast Hawthorne retail shop, which caters to cat owners, couldn’t survive December’s ice storm. Sales dropped 66 percent last year.

“As fun as it is, it’s frivolous retail,” Wion said. “People are worried about losing their jobs and they’re concerned about their finances. We did not have a December, and gift stores survive on that during the year.”

Small shops like Wion’s continue to suffer through the deepening recession. With no end in sight and retail vacancy rates in small spaces skyrocketing, many more could go under.

Northwest Portland’s Nob Hill district has been hit the hardest. About 6.3 percent of retail spaces under 25,000 square feet are empty, an 85 percent increase from 2008’s first quarter.

Many stores along Northwest 23rd Avenue are struggling.

l 23rd Avenue Books closed in January after 29 years. Hello Portland, a quirky gift shop, closed last year after five years of retail wackiness.

l Zelda’s Shoe Bar, at 633 N.W. 23rd Ave., now shares space next door with women’s clothing store Elizabeth Street as owner Libby Hartung seeks to defray a 25 percent sales drop last year.

l Further south, Sammy’s Restaurant & Bar sits vacant, its shoddily constructed bar splintering and its floor warping from a leaky roof.

Portland Mayor Sam Adams calls the situation dire.

“The independent neighborhood retailers are swamped with economic pressures,” Adams said. “A lot of them can’t wait for this tsunami to end.”

Vacancies are up in other key shopping districts as well. Some 4.3 percent of retail spots in the Pearl District are empty. Vacancies in the Belmont and Hawthorne neighborhoods are up 25 percent. In Mississippi and Alberta, they’ve risen 16 percent.

Oregon lost 4,000 retail jobs from January to February, a 2.1 percent drop. The state’s retail workforce has shrunk by 6.8 percent in the past year.

Thanks to trickle-down effects, retail sales provide a clear economic bellwether. When retailers don’t sell goods, wholesalers cannot distribute them. When wholesalers aren’t moving products, manufacturers and suppliers produce fewer goods.

When suppliers don’t produce goods, the transportation industry sits idle.

“As people get more conservative, it manifests itself in retail sales and that’s what’s happening here,” said Sue Iggulden, Portland-based managing director for Colliers International’s real estate management services division. “We’ve been watching this downward trend for the better part of a year.”

For Wion, the downturn came quickly.

Since 2006, she’d mulled selling the Cat’s Meow to a buyer who’d amp its online sales but maintain the store’s physical presence. No buyers had arrived when sales began slowly declining last fall. Then came the ice storm.

“The economy really put me over the edge,” she said. “When it came time to buckle down, there was nothing to buckle in with.”

At least Wion has a fallback. She’s a Prudential Northwest Properties Realtor who’s become busier as the housing market slowly reheats.

Sales at Urban Wineworks near the Pearl District grew 20 percent annually through each of owner Reuel Fish’s first eight years as a retailer. Suddenly, by year-end 2008, revenue dropped 33 percent.

With economic prospects low, Fish closed up and began liquidating his stock. He will now oversee a vineyard near Yamhill.

“I’ve heard a lot of retailers complain about the weather, but that doesn’t explain why everyone had a bad January,” he said.

Many retailers are surviving month to month, said Nick Stanton, a Commercial Realty Advisors LLC broker who showed the Sammy’s spot to prospective restaurant owners.

“A year ago, this space would have been leased almost instantly,” he said, watching the would-be clients inspect the outdated kitchen. “But now, there are people who get to the lease phase who can’t get financing.”
Growing companies adopt creative strategies

Not all retailers are feeling the economic pain.

The Cat’s Meow aside, most stores along Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard, where neighbors and tourists alike flock to specialty retailers, remain relatively strong. Just seven empty spaces sit between Southeast 14th and 41st avenues.

One of those spaces, the old Daily Grind building at Southeast 41st Avenue and Hawthorne, is slated to host a New Seasons store by 2010. The grocer’s operators are hammering out parking details: It wants to accommodate 41 cars, as opposed to the 13 cars its lot can currently hold.

Sales at MuseArt+Design on Southeast Hawthorne Boulevard rose 25 percent over last year’s monthly figures. Owner Peter Rossing, a neighborhood business activist, said while his fellow retailers worry about the economy, most feel they can sustain more bottom-line hits.

“Things are actually pretty good over here,” Rossing said. “Things are poised to take off when the economy gets better.”

Muse, at 4224 S.E. Hawthorne Blvd., is one of several businesses recently sprouting at the street’s eastern end.

“It used to be a mess here, but it’s changing,” Rossing said.

On the other side of town in Northeast Portland, sales at Broadway Books have risen 2.5 percent this year.

To help get there, owner Roberta Dyer cut her hours, closing at 7 p.m. instead of 9 p.m. However, she credits her solid performance to “buy local” promotions that steer neighborhood residents to smaller stores.

Some 68 cents of every dollar spent in stores owned by Portlanders goes back into the community, compared to 43 cents of each dollar spent in a chain.

“I really have faith in Portland consumers,” Dyer said.

Revenue at Portland’s two Oh Baby lingerie stores rose 20 percent from a year ago. The figure includes a Northwest 23rd Avenue location that’s attracting customers even as nearby retailers shut their doors.

The stores are doing well because sex may be a recession-proof business, said owner Laura Fitzpatrick.

“People will always get married and will always need lingerie,” she said. “And sex is always going to be a part of our world. When things are bad, people tend to stay home and stay close to their spouses. It’s easy to guess what happens then.”

agiegerich@bizjournals.com | 503-219-3419
http://portland.bizjournals.com/portland/stories/2009/03/30/story6.html

edirp
Apr 2, 2009, 4:20 PM
Thursday, April 2, 2009

Storables files Chapter 11

Portland Business Journal
The recession has claimed a prominent Portland retailer.

Storables Inc. sought protection from creditors by filing under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in U.S. District Court of Oregon late Tuesday.

Chapter 11 allows financially troubled companies to reorganize by shedding debt and paring their operations.

Bankruptcy courts have wide discretion to void leases and other legally-binding contracts.

The private company is owned by Dodd Fischer and employs about 220 people at its Portland headquarters and the eight stores it operates.

The stores are in Oregon, Washington, Minnesota, California and Arizona. In court filings, Storables said it has between 200 and 999 creditors. It estimated its assets between $1 million and $10 million and its liabilities between $500,000 and $1 million.

Its five largest unsecured creditors are Village Square Dana Park LLC in Las Vegas ($93,857), Interdesign Inc. ($22,260), Schulte Corp. ($18,601), Iris ($17,418) and Richards Homewares Inc. ($17,266).

Albert N. Kennedy of Tonkon Torp LLP is Storables’ bankruptcy attorney. His phone number is 503-802-2013.

Downtown_Gal
Apr 2, 2009, 6:01 PM
This all really sucks... when the economy finally does turn back around we are going to have no where fun to shop.

JordanL
Apr 2, 2009, 9:09 PM
This all really sucks... when the economy finally does turn back around we are going to have no where fun to shop.

:sly:

As someone looking for work, I can say that is one of the most assinine concerns I've heard during this entire economic bullshit.

Downtown_Gal
Apr 2, 2009, 9:15 PM
Sorry if I offended you... I was being superficial and I guess it was a poor attempt to make light of a really bad situation. Point taken though.

zilfondel
Apr 2, 2009, 10:48 PM
Storables is going?! Aww... ****!

pdxf
Apr 2, 2009, 11:22 PM
:sly:
As someone looking for work, I can say that is one of the most assinine concerns I've heard during this entire economic bullshit.

I've heard many, far more assinine comments during this economic downturn. Downtown_Gal's comment didn't even register on my assinine meter at all and I don't see how this comment could have seriously offended anyone.

ue
Apr 2, 2009, 11:36 PM
.

sopdx
Apr 3, 2009, 1:06 AM
Great...really happy for you. I hear they've got a special on foot longs.

MarkDaMan
Apr 3, 2009, 2:32 AM
I thought I read somewhere that Storables was closing the Scottsdale store, but the rest of them will remain open?

2oh1
Apr 3, 2009, 3:45 AM
:sly:

As someone looking for work, I can say that is one of the most assinine concerns I've heard during this entire economic bullshit.

It's actually not.

Part of what makes Portland so special is the quality of life we have here. All of our funky local shops and restaurants are part of that. When the recession comes to an end, we may find we've lost more than we realized.

And let's not forget, local shops put more dollars back into the local economy than chains. "Some 68 cents of every dollar spent in stores owned by Portlanders goes back into the community, compared to 43 cents of each dollar spent in a chain." These things matter.

Oh, and by the way, every store that can't keep its doors open equates to more people looking for work. That means more people competing for even fewer jobs, plus fewer options for people who can't find work in their chosen field and need *something* to at least help pay bills while they continue to look for a way back into the career of their choice.

2oh1
Apr 3, 2009, 3:46 AM
I thought I read somewhere that Storables was closing the Scottsdale store, but the rest of them will remain open?

I sure hope so. I love that store. It's neat-freak-bliss!

JordanL
Apr 3, 2009, 4:12 AM
Sorry if I offended you... I was being superficial and I guess it was a poor attempt to make light of a really bad situation. Point taken though.

I didn't think you did it on purpose, it's just frustrating... the City of Portland has done a lot of work adding people to the area, and hardly any work adding jobs, and it shows. This isn't just because of the recession, it's because Portland, and the people in it, seem to think that money falls on them from the sky no matter what they do.

We're the 31st largest metro in the country, but we have a pithy amount of corporate investment. Do people here really think that its for any reason except that Portland does a poor job comparatively of attracting jobs?

Now we're set on biotech and "green tech", which of course isn't bad, but what am I supposed to do now? Go get a new degree so that I can get the jobs that the city is intent on adding?

Now it seems at the expense of other jobs?

People here have consistently voiced opinions about just getting rid of a lot of the industrial space for "nicer" things.

Jobs need to be a much bigger part of regional planning because we're clearly doing a piss poor job of it. This is the second recession in ten years that we've far outpaced the nation at. Does anyone really think that's a coincidence?

This is just really frustrating for a person who's spent 40 hours a week for four months looking for work.

The quirky shops keep Portland like "Portland"? Fine. You know what else does? The people that live here. And people can't live here if we don't fix our broken economic model for the region.

If anyone really thinks we're going to see explosive population growth without explosive job growth, they're delusional...

And comments like the one you made... they have nothing to do with the frustration that I'm talking about, but it just reminds me so much of the way our City treats jobs... like they're something that just sprouts from the ground because you command it so.

Portland is such a liveable place... I just wish I could afford to live here.

bvpcvm
Apr 3, 2009, 6:25 AM
We're the 31st largest metro in the country

Sorry to nitpick, but we're actually #23, and have been since I was a kid (and read things like lists of metro area populations in the World Almanac).

JordanL
Apr 3, 2009, 7:04 AM
Sorry to nitpick, but we're actually #23, and have been since I was a kid (and read things like lists of metro area populations in the World Almanac).

???

Huh... Maybe we're the 31st largest market? I was going off the list of markets for pro-sports (not a great measure I admit).

The point is even more emphatic if we're the 23rd largest metro though...

65MAX
Apr 3, 2009, 9:16 AM
bvpcvm is correct, we are #23. Here is the link (as of July 2007).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_United_States_Metropolitan_Statistical_Areas

If you're ranking CSAs (Combined Statistical Areas), we're #21. Riverside merges with LA and Baltimore merges with DC.

AND, if you include Salem with Portland, which was done up until 2000 (the Bush administration changed the rules, so one more thing they f'd up), we'd be #20... ahead of Pittsburgh, but right behind Denver, which still combines with Boulder.

Not sure where you got the #31 ranking. How is a "sports market" defined?

JordanL
Apr 3, 2009, 9:41 AM
bvpcvm is correct, we are #23. Here is the link (as of July 2007).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_United_States_Metropolitan_Statistical_Areas

If you're ranking CSAs (Combined Statistical Areas), we're #21. Riverside merges with LA and Baltimore merges with DC.

AND, if you include Salem with Portland, which was done up until 2000 (the Bush administration changed the rules, so one more thing they f'd up), we'd be #20... ahead of Pittsburgh, but right behind Denver, which still combines with Boulder.

Not sure where you got the #31 ranking. How is a "sports market" defined?

I don't know... clearly the number I was looking at was flawed.

Regardless, the point I was making is even more emphasized with a larger CSA.

pdxf
Apr 3, 2009, 4:08 PM
Interesting post JordanL, I definitely feel for you and best of luck with the job search. What is your degree in?

A couple thoughts and questions:

We're the 31st largest metro, with a “pithy amount of corporate investment”. How much corporate investment do #30 and #32 have? Do we really have less corporate investment or is this perception?

What is it about bringing green jobs to Portland that is at the expense of other jobs?

“We outpaced the nation at it. Does anyone really think that's a coincidence?” - There is an assumption here that Portland's approach on business is soley to blame for this, but could there be other reason for this(for one, it seems like people keep moving here regardless of whether there are jobs or not, and I'm not sure that business growth could ever really keep up)?

Does Portland actively try to get more people to move here, as you suggest in your first paragraph. I would argue no, that Portland has tried to make a livable city for the citizens, and as other people discover this, they want to live here. Perhaps Portland feels these recessions more because we've been too successful at making a city that people want to live in?

brandonpdx
Apr 3, 2009, 7:16 PM
[QUOTE=JordanL;4174693]I didn't think you did it on purpose, it's just frustrating... the City of Portland has done a lot of work adding people to the area, and hardly any work adding jobs, and it shows. This isn't just because of the recession, it's because Portland, and the people in it, seem to think that money falls on them from the sky no matter what they do.

QUOTE]

Who thinks this? I don't know anybody in the Portland metro area who thinks money falls from the sky no matter what they do. Look, I'm sorry you don't have a job, and I'm sure you will soon enough, but how about instead of blaming someone or something you take reasonability for yourself? Yes, Portland has a higher unemployment average than the nation but 9 out of 10 people still have a job. There's no easy way to explain why we have high unemployment. Some theories are that many people move here jobless and count as the unemployed. Nevertheless, lighten up as much as you can and don't attack somebody because they say they want to have fun! Life is so short and I'd rather spend most of my hours having fun than bitter and frustrated. I know it may be more difficult to see the fun in life when you're down but it will come around. Good luck in finding a job, I'm sure you will soon.

downtownpdx
Apr 4, 2009, 4:15 AM
This region gives tax breaks all the time to companies like Intel, and I know Mayor Adams last year revamped/lowered the city business taxes. Nobody takes jobs for granted around here, I'm sure, but I don't want to see Portland become another Houston and destroy our quality of life for economic gain.

The last recession hurt us badly because of the concentration of tech jobs that vanished with the dot com bust. This time, we're hurting b/c of the state's higher-than-average share of manufacturing, and the timber industry being pulled down with the housing collapse. But we fared better than most in the 1990-1991 recession, so it just depends on which industries are shedding jobs.

I don't say this thinking it makes anyone whose jobless feel better, but I have a friend in LA who's also been looking for over four months now, for example, so this is not just a Portland 'business environment' problem. And Oregon outpaced the nation in the last growth period, and will probably do so again this time -- Intel and Nike are in good positions for growth, and there's the area's growing concentration of green jobs, like SolarWorld. I agree, though, I would like to see more employment growth in the central city, and I really think more investment in PSU would spurn some research- and start-up - related activity.

Downtown_Gal
Apr 16, 2009, 10:20 PM
From Portland Business Journal:

Pioneer Place owner files bankruptcy

General Growth Properties Inc., which owns several properties in Oregon — including Pioneer Place in Portland — has filed for Chapter 11 federal bankruptcy protection.

General Growth listed $29.5 billion in total assets and about $27.3 billion of debts in its bankruptcy petition, making it the largest real estate bankruptcy in U.S. history.

Chicago-based General Growth (NYSE: GGP), whose shopping mall holdings include Clackamas Town Center and Gateway Mall in Portland, Rogue Valley Mall in Medford, Gateway Mall in Springfield and the Salem Center, said in an announcement Thursday that it had sought bankruptcy protection only after being unable to refinance or extend maturing debt. The company said all day-to-day operations and business of its shopping malls would continue as usual while it reorganizes.

General Growth owns or manages more than 200 malls, several planned communities and a collection of commercial office buildings. In Oregon, its shopping centers include Bailey Hills in Eugene and Division Crossing and Halsey Crossing in Gresham.

"We don’t expect any of our visitors to notice any difference in our quality of service to customers,” CEO Adam Metz said in a news release. “Our tenant retailers, restaurants, movie theaters and everyone at our malls stand ready to serve you, just as we have in the past.”

The company had been struggling to pay off debt it owed since acquiring Columbia, Md.-based Rouse Co. in 2004 for $12.6 billion.

Since its decline, General Growth has made a number of management changes, such as replacing founder and current chairman John Bucksbaum (whose family is still a major investor) as CEO with Metz, and replacing its chief financial officer.

The company has received a $375 million financing commitment from New York-based Pershing Square Capital Management LP, which it says it will use during the Chapter 11 process. It also is seeking approval to make payments to keep its shopping centers up and running and do other functions such as pay employees.

General Growth said earlier in the year it might be forced to seek bankruptcy protection from its creditors as it struggles to refinance debt.

The company is scheduled to hold a media conference on Thursday to discuss the filing.

rsbear
Apr 16, 2009, 11:15 PM
... the City of Portland has done a lot of work adding people to the area, and hardly any work adding jobs, and it shows. This isn't just because of the recession, it's because Portland, and the people in it, seem to think that money falls on them from the sky no matter what they do.

We're the 31st largest metro in the country, but we have a pithy amount of corporate investment. Do people here really think that its for any reason except that Portland does a poor job comparatively of attracting jobs?

Now we're set on biotech and "green tech", which of course isn't bad, but what am I supposed to do now? Go get a new degree so that I can get the jobs that the city is intent on adding?

Now it seems at the expense of other jobs?

People here have consistently voiced opinions about just getting rid of a lot of the industrial space for "nicer" things.

Jobs need to be a much bigger part of regional planning because we're clearly doing a piss poor job of it. This is the second recession in ten years that we've far outpaced the nation at. Does anyone really think that's a coincidence?

This is just really frustrating for a person who's spent 40 hours a week for four months looking for work.

The quirky shops keep Portland like "Portland"? Fine. You know what else does? The people that live here. And people can't live here if we don't fix our broken economic model for the region.

If anyone really thinks we're going to see explosive population growth without explosive job growth, they're delusional...

And comments like the one you made... they have nothing to do with the frustration that I'm talking about, but it just reminds me so much of the way our City treats jobs... like they're something that just sprouts from the ground because you command it so.

Portland is such a liveable place... I just wish I could afford to live here.

I'm sorry to hear you're having a tough time finding a job. But it is tough in other areas, too. It took my partner nearly four months to find a job here in LA.

I'm curious as to your suggestions for Portland to improve the local job market. What are your ideas?

JordanL
May 5, 2009, 3:58 AM
I'm sorry to hear you're having a tough time finding a job. But it is tough in other areas, too. It took my partner nearly four months to find a job here in LA.

I'm curious as to your suggestions for Portland to improve the local job market. What are your ideas?

I thought I'd come back to this thread and add something constructive, as many people took my pervious post as a very self-oriented complaint. I want to be clear, I was trying to establish that I had seen certain things in the city and region, and that my personal experiences confirmed those things for me and allowed me to put a face on my point.

As for what I would do?

Portland needs to realize that a job is a job. The political leaders here are contiually focused on grabbing markets which are emergent. First it was hi-tech & frabrication, then biotech, now solar.

The problem is that if our unemployment figures are correct over 300,000 people in the Portland metro are looking for a job. Emergent markets are fragile and we see it everytime the economy turns south. We have very little invested in resistant markets which will see utility even when consumers all over the globe cut back on luxury spending.

There is very little push for any fundamentals here. The way Portland's politicians, and to a very large extent its voters, seek to grow our economy is precarious. We push for companies that are unproven, we push for technologies that don't have established markets, we push for "ideals" that makes investors and business leaders apprehensive. We need to take away that apprehension by reassuring them that we understand the value of their business is worth something to us just as the solar industry is.

There is nothing wrong with targetting emergent markets... but we don't really have any markets. It's not that we dream too big or anything, I just feel like we ignore the fact that there are OTHER business oportunities.

Freightliner is a great example. The plant here in Portland should never have closed. This is where Freightliner was started, and where it was based. It's not even moving to Mexico... the trucks made here are going to be made in North Carolina.

I wish I had a magic button to press, but the economy is a lot more complex than that. There is no quick fix.

zilfondel
May 5, 2009, 10:15 AM
Actually, since only 1/2 (on average) of the population is even in the workforce, you should divide your 300k number by 2. Even then its too high.

On the plus side, I've been seeing more job postings lately. I even landed one last week, but I'll be commuting to the suburbs. :P

JordanL
May 5, 2009, 10:22 AM
Actually, since only 1/2 (on average) of the population is even in the workforce, you should divide your 300k number by 2. Even then its too high.

On the plus side, I've been seeing more job postings lately. I even landed one last week, but I'll be commuting to the suburbs. :P

Yeah, I haven't been able to find a payroll job. I've been able to pay for food so far by freelancing, but it takes a lot of energy to generate those sales. At least it's something.:)

pdxtraveler
Jul 6, 2009, 8:53 PM
The Beaver's stadium would fit at Cascade Station and there is a MAX stop,actually two. Would the planes distract the players? Maybe that would be a home field advantage!

urbanlife
Jul 6, 2009, 10:31 PM
The Beaver's stadium would fit at Cascade Station and there is a MAX stop,actually two. Would the planes distract the players? Maybe that would be a home field advantage!

Airport, I dont think the FAA would allow it...it was a miracle they let the IKEA go in.

ad hoc
Jul 13, 2009, 12:08 PM
yeah, the way i understand it, the uses are limited at that site due to the flight path. residential is totally out of possibility. major gathering places like stadiums are probably out as well. i think it will always be a low-intensity/low-density area for as long as planes fly overhead...

smendesPDX
Jul 13, 2009, 4:40 PM
Cascade Station is amazing, Target...upcoming FBI offices...Aloft... it goes to show when land is cheap traffic is high, businesses will come.

2oh1
Jul 13, 2009, 7:40 PM
What's the status of Target at Cascade Station? I'm looking forward to having Target easily accessible on a MAX line.

redbeard
Jul 13, 2009, 7:48 PM
What's the status of Target at Cascade Station? I'm looking forward to having Target easily accessible on a MAX line.

Not sure, but when the green line opens in September you'll be able to get to the Target at Mall 205 on the MAX. That will probably be sooner than a Target at Cascade Station.

nobody
Jul 13, 2009, 9:28 PM
It opens in October.

pdxtraveler
Jul 13, 2009, 10:47 PM
What's the status of Target at Cascade Station? I'm looking forward to having Target easily accessible on a MAX line.

The walls are up. Supposed to open in October. By the look of it, it will be ready.

smendesPDX
Jul 13, 2009, 11:21 PM
opens in October:cheers:

nobody
Jul 13, 2009, 11:52 PM
By the way I think it opens in October.

RED_PDXer
Jul 14, 2009, 3:04 AM
Gateway Target at 122nd and Glisan is accessible by the Blue Line - I've taken MAX there at least once..

Okstate
Jul 15, 2009, 10:30 PM
Hyatt Place is moving right along as well. Probably will open around fall/winter as well.

Off topic- Why are there no Super-Targets in Oregon? I didn't even know "regular" targets still existed until I moved here.

nobody
Jul 15, 2009, 10:57 PM
What could they possibly add to Target that they don't already have?

PacificNW
Jul 15, 2009, 11:17 PM
:previous: :previous: Probably a supermarket....like Fred Meyer and WalMart.

ad hoc
Jul 16, 2009, 1:01 PM
yes. super targets have a large food section.

Okstate
Jul 18, 2009, 5:23 AM
^ Yep. Super Targets are normally half grocery store instead of just a few aisles like targets.

tworivers
Dec 9, 2009, 8:29 AM
Li Ning plans Portland store in challenge against Nike, Adidas
By The Oregonian
December 08, 2009, 6:37PM

Li Ning Co., China's largest footwear and apparel maker, plans to open a Portland store in January that will be its first outlet outside Asia, Reuters reports.

Li Ning competes with Nike and Adidas in mainland China. The company, controlled by ex-Olympic gymnast Li Ning, aims to become a major global brand within a decade.

Li Ning already has a research and development center in the Pearl District. Ziba Design Inc. of Portland has been helping Li Ning revamp products and design stores as the Chinese company multiplies mainland outlets.

Ziba founder Sohrab Vossoughi also advises Li Ning chief executive Zhang Zhiyong, who said this week in Hong Kong that the Portland store would test the waters for the U.S. market. Li Ning representatives in Portland could not be reached Tuesday for comment .

--The Oregonian