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Jebby
Mar 25, 2017, 1:05 AM
Do they expect that to be enough faregates?

Millennium2002
Mar 25, 2017, 1:16 AM
Do they expect that to be enough faregates?

It will be... that is, once the two other entrances are complete. The expectation is that everyone will gravitate towards the escalators, leaving this entrance to be mostly for elevator and exiting traffic.

MIPS
Mar 25, 2017, 1:16 AM
Why the hell does that need TWO extra wide gates??

Everything about this is just bad.

Edited:

Metrotown Station's Central Stationhouse is opening March 24.

http://buzzer.translink.ca/2017/03/metrotown-station-elevator-is-open-for-business-on-march-24-2017/
http://i1.wp.com/buzzer.translink.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/IMG_3298.jpg?resize=480%2C640

God dammit they did it again.
I call it more of a "retard saver" but they put sheet metal over the path of the door so that if the doors open between floors the typical idiot doesn't walk out and fall into the shaft (instead of going "GEE, THIS DOESN'T LOOK LIKE THE FLOOR. I SHOULD PERHAPS USE THE CALL BUTTON."
It's not as big of a problem here as the walls are all glass but at Main Street it completely nullified the point of cladding the Western stationhouse elevator in glass.

Edited: Actually, I take that back. It's still a cardinal sin.

Jebby
Mar 25, 2017, 1:19 AM
Why the hell does that need TWO extra wide gates??

Everything about this is just bad.

Yeah, it should be one wide gate and two additional normal gates it it's place.

Jebby
Mar 25, 2017, 1:20 AM
It will be... that is, once the two other entrances are complete. The expectation is that everyone will gravitate towards the escalators, leaving this entrance to be mostly for elevator and exiting traffic.

The East station house won't be ready for another year, though.

Is the West already open? How many gates does it have if so?

nname
Mar 25, 2017, 1:26 AM
Why the hell does that need TWO extra wide gates??

Everything about this is just bad.

Well, it's for 3 elevators... Once the other entrances opens, the vast majority of people won't be using this entrance anyway... and many of the ones who uses it DO need the wide gates...

Large Cat
Mar 25, 2017, 1:38 AM
I'm glad they're working on adding screens at older skytrain stations. That's a big step forward.

However, I would really prefer it if they added Evergreen/Canada line style screens on the remaining stations. There should be one screen over each platform, not just a single screen displaying everything when you get down the escalators. The screens should be as close to the centre of the platform as possible, not visible only from one end. And I agree with most of you that regardless of cost, TV-style screens actually look less professional.

Also, screw Jordan Bateman.

WBC
Mar 25, 2017, 2:27 AM
Seems that new backlit way-finding signs have been installed on Burrard station up above the gates....

Sheba
Mar 25, 2017, 2:32 AM
Why the hell does that need TWO extra wide gates??


This is the elevator entrance, so it does warrant having two wide gates. I was there today and it was pretty easy to get through the gates (vs queuing up for the validators that are now covered over). Most people were walking up the stairs on the right side of the railing so that staircase isn't going to be a headache when it's busy, like the temp stairs on this entrance were.

There was only one elevator working today and it only stops at the ground and the platform - no stop at the mid-level. It's bigger than the old one that was there but not massively so. The second one is the same size, which will really help during rush hour. I didn't take a good look at the third elevator so I don't know if it's the same size or not.


The East station house won't be ready for another year, though.

Is the West already open? How many gates does it have if so?

The west stationhouse isn't open yet, although they've finally made some progress on it. That'll be open before the end of the year. We'll be lucky if we see the east stationhouse open in a year.

Millennium2002
Mar 25, 2017, 2:58 AM
There was only one elevator working today and it only stops at the ground and the platform - no stop at the mid-level. It's bigger than the old one that was there but not massively so. The second one is the same size, which will really help during rush hour. I didn't take a good look at the third elevator so I don't know if it's the same size or not.

Hmm. This wasn't what I saw when I went there around 4 to 5 pm...

The first elevator closest to the gates apparently broke down right away (hello teething issues on grand opening), so I went over to try the third one that was furthest from the gates.

The elevator was fast going up and down, but not particularly roomy inside. I imagine this is why they put three of them in there to avoid too many congestion issues... They were also slow at matching floor heights and the doors close rather quickly after people have exited, which forces users to hold the call button.

The third elevator stops at the concourse level AND also has a secret level "X". Secret government agents, maybe? lol.

(Kidding... it's not really that secret as people can see it from the glass doors, but it appears to be for maintenance access only and is otherwise off limits to the public.)

SpongeG
Mar 25, 2017, 2:59 AM
in that pic it looks like that woman is holding the gate open

officedweller
Mar 25, 2017, 3:04 AM
Why the hell does that need TWO extra wide gates??

Everything about this is just bad.


Because the central stationhouse is the elevator/handicapped access to the station - there will be 3 elevators there when complete.

EDIT: nname beat me to it!

aberdeen5698
Mar 25, 2017, 3:15 AM
God dammit they did it again. ... they put sheet metal over the path of the door so that if the doors open between floors the typical idiot doesn't walk out and fall into the shaft (instead of going "GEE, THIS DOESN'T LOOK LIKE THE FLOOR. I SHOULD PERHAPS USE THE CALL BUTTON."
Some of those "idiots" may be blind people.

Meraki
Mar 25, 2017, 8:35 AM
God dammit they did it again.
I call it more of a "retard saver" but they put sheet metal over the path of the door so that if the doors open between floors the typical idiot doesn't walk out and fall into the shaft (instead of going "GEE, THIS DOESN'T LOOK LIKE THE FLOOR. I SHOULD PERHAPS USE THE CALL BUTTON."
It's not as big of a problem here as the walls are all glass but at Main Street it completely nullified the point of cladding the Western stationhouse elevator in glass..

The idea is there's at least some visibility into the elevator. It doesn't have to be unobstructed views around the entire cabin.

For everything else here: :runaway:

flipper316
Mar 25, 2017, 9:40 PM
Why the hell do we need these tv screens anyways since we're talking about it. Who needs more useless advertising or news or weather when we just look at that crap looking outside or on our phones. And also train frequencies are on Translink.ca or other transit related apps or sites or are located on the info boards next to the maps at every station. Much cheaper.

jollyburger
Mar 26, 2017, 1:18 AM
in that pic it looks like that woman is holding the gate open

Just looks like she's looking back at some people are with her while she's tapping in. The gate isn't closing either.

jollyburger
Mar 26, 2017, 1:20 AM
Why the hell do we need these tv screens anyways since we're talking about it. Who needs more useless advertising or news or weather when we just look at that crap looking outside or on our phones. And also train frequencies are on Translink.ca or other transit related apps or sites or are located on the info boards next to the maps at every station. Much cheaper.

Amber alert, terrorist incident, system maintenance. Translink doesn't pay for any of those screens since they are ad revenue supported.

jbrizzy
Mar 26, 2017, 4:41 AM
Why the hell does that need TWO extra wide gates??


I'm pretty sure every entrance with at least four gates has two wide gates. I just noticed the other day that even the east entrance at 29th, which has no escalators or elevators, has two wide gates out of the four total. :shrug:

ryanmaccdn
Mar 26, 2017, 5:27 AM
I'm pretty sure every entrance with at least four gates has two wide gates. I just noticed the other day that even the east entrance at 29th, which has no escalators or elevators, has two wide gates out of the four total. :shrug:

I have no idea why they placed so many of those wide gates and also usually on the nearest the side people travel the most so they default to them.

They should be discouraged for use unless absolutely needed...

xd_1771
Mar 26, 2017, 7:11 AM
Seems that new backlit way-finding signs have been installed on Burrard station up above the gates....

I've been seeing these increasingly, particularly at Stadium and Granville. Personally I don't think they look exceptional, at least compared to the amazing backlit station wayfinding signage I've seen in Japan.

aberdeen5698
Mar 26, 2017, 3:40 PM
They should be discouraged for use unless absolutely needed...
Are you saying they shouldn't be installed unless necessary, or are you saying that passengers should avoid those gates? If the latter, why?

VarBreStr18
Mar 26, 2017, 4:17 PM
I hope Tranalink take note . Please hurry up and put in more fare gates at Brentwood Station before those multiple towers comes to completion. Not counting,
AM B ,there are at least 7 more towers south of the station in 5 more years.
Plus that many more people coming in out of region once AMB completes. Adding frequency and longer trains only create worse bottle neck with the existing 3 fare gates.

Spork
Mar 26, 2017, 6:41 PM
I've noticed more and more that people try to avoid the wider gates due to people using them to sneak beside/behind you. They used to be well used at Waterfront, but people typically avoid them now.

Sheba
Mar 26, 2017, 8:39 PM
I've noticed more and more that people try to avoid the wider gates due to people using them to sneak beside/behind you. They used to be well used at Waterfront, but people typically avoid them now.

I don't use them much either for the same reason. If there's anyone with a phone who just happens to be hanging out near those gates... :runaway:

aberdeen5698
Mar 26, 2017, 9:42 PM
I've noticed more and more that people try to avoid the wider gates due to people using them to sneak beside/behind you. They used to be well used at Waterfront, but people typically avoid them now.
I deal with that by simply moving slowly though the gate, looking back, and if there's anyone behind me I just stand there until the gate closes. It helps that I don't generally travel at busy times and even if I do I'm never in a rush, so I just hang back behind the crowd.

gillty
Mar 26, 2017, 10:56 PM
I've noticed more and more that people try to avoid the wider gates due to people using them to sneak beside/behind you. They used to be well used at Waterfront, but people typically avoid them now.
I've noticed this as well, all the better as it is like VIP access for me. ;) I've seen people actively force the wider gates open as there is greater leverage, if they want to evade fares they are going to do it.

I am not sure why people are so worried about fare evaders, let TransLink and Transit Police worry about that. People are far too worried about what other people do, no need to cause yourself any unneeded stress or risk.

I'd rather see people take on some adequate etiquette such as standing clear of doors and waiting for other users to de-board, or being more mindful of their position on the platform when in groups.

Reecemartin
Mar 26, 2017, 11:54 PM
I remember they added marks for where to stand at YVR airport on the Canada Line, are there plans to expand this? Seems it would be useful.

casper
Mar 27, 2017, 3:38 AM
I remember they added marks for where to stand at YVR airport on the Canada Line, are there plans to expand this? Seems it would be useful.

Common in Japan. Interesting it is coming here.

NewfBC
Mar 27, 2017, 4:50 AM
I remember they added marks for where to stand at YVR airport on the Canada Line, are there plans to expand this? Seems it would be useful.

These were removed a short time after they were added.

Ron.

Spork
Mar 27, 2017, 4:55 AM
I've noticed this as well, all the better as it is like VIP access for me. ;) I've seen people actively force the wider gates open as there is greater leverage, if they want to evade fares they are going to do it.

I am not sure why people are so worried about fare evaders, let TransLink and Transit Police worry about that. People are far too worried about what other people do, no need to cause yourself any unneeded stress or risk.

I'd rather see people take on some adequate etiquette such as standing clear of doors and waiting for other users to de-board, or being more mindful of their position on the platform when in groups.

I believe that a little bit of public shaming goes a long way to push our society gently in the right direction. Often people feel uncomfortable when they are called out - I can just hope that they don't make the decision so easily to do the same the next time they need a ride.

Reecemartin
Mar 27, 2017, 12:43 PM
These were removed a short time after they were added.

Ron.

Interesting, thought that was an good idea tbh.

flipper316
Mar 27, 2017, 7:44 PM
I have no idea why they placed so many of those wide gates and also usually on the nearest the side people travel the most so they default to them.

They should be discouraged for use unless absolutely needed...

yea just leave them so the fare evaders have an easier time to squeeze through them.

flipper316
Mar 27, 2017, 7:50 PM
I believe that a little bit of public shaming goes a long way to push our society gently in the right direction. Often people feel uncomfortable when they are called out - I can just hope that they don't make the decision so easily to do the same the next time they need a ride.

Don't think some crackhead, homeless, or some borderline sociopath is gonna have enough self respect to be worried about being called out. When I worked at the Canada Line, i've seen these guys straight up laugh at Transit Police when caught or throw their fare infraction tickets away once they got it. Once the proximity access gates come online for people that can't use their hands you can bet some of these douchebags will use that handicapped person as another way of getting in and out of the system. They also have no issues of using the emergency exits to leave the fare paid zones. Wish Transit Police would honestly just ban these habitual offenders.

Hot Rod
Mar 27, 2017, 10:00 PM
I think it's just part of the 'grit' of living in the big city and having a metro system, honestly. But yes, the transit police should deal with this. ....

Sheba
Mar 30, 2017, 2:00 AM
I was on elevator 3 today (the first one was closed... ). It felt weird as I got on at ground level and then it moved down about one staircase step and the opposite doors opened for Skytrain staff. They figure it's set up like that to be a 'different level' because it's not for public access. They could have just put a step on the staff side and used a key to access it but no :rolleyes:

SpongeG
Mar 30, 2017, 2:07 AM
i was at lougheed station the other night and two guys were pacing outside, the one guy had a paid ticket while his friend didn't and told him to just follow him really closely behind, but there were 2 transit people inside the station and the guy who wasn't going to pay was stressing out he would be caught and didn't want to try until they left, his buddy was getting impatient and kept egging him on to just go already don't worry about it.

I think having some security presence would deter some people from trying to get in without paying.

Metro-One
Mar 30, 2017, 3:42 AM
i was at lougheed station the other night and two guys were pacing outside, the one guy had a paid ticket while his friend didn't and told him to just follow him really closely behind, but there were 2 transit people inside the station and the guy who wasn't going to pay was stressing out he would be caught and didn't want to try until they left, his buddy was getting impatient and kept egging him on to just go already don't worry about it.

I think having some security presence would deter some people from trying to get in without paying.

Losers.

Of course it helps! Even just for information and assistance as well. All of our major stations should have an assistant near the gates (one who can also issue tickets of course).

All major and even most smaller stations in Japan have an employee near the gates.

Spork
Mar 30, 2017, 5:31 AM
Don't think some crackhead, homeless, or some borderline sociopath is gonna have enough self respect to be worried about being called out. When I worked at the Canada Line, i've seen these guys straight up laugh at Transit Police when caught or throw their fare infraction tickets away once they got it. Once the proximity access gates come online for people that can't use their hands you can bet some of these douchebags will use that handicapped person as another way of getting in and out of the system. They also have no issues of using the emergency exits to leave the fare paid zones. Wish Transit Police would honestly just ban these habitual offenders.

Most of the ones that I see aren't of this type. Asian grandmothers, students, "normal" folk.

Sheba
Mar 30, 2017, 6:03 AM
Most of the ones that I see aren't of this type. Asian grandmothers, students, "normal" folk.

Yeah I was more likely to see "normal" folk get caught without a fare. One I remember well was a couple on the platform at Metrotown getting a ticket - and they had a box for a large (at the time) flat screen tv and some other electronics. I wondered how they could pay so much for that stuff and then not pay their fare.

aberdeen5698
Mar 30, 2017, 3:36 PM
I was on elevator 3 today (the first one was closed... ). It felt weird as I got on at ground level and then it moved down about one staircase step and the opposite doors opened for Skytrain staff. They figure it's set up like that to be a 'different level' because it's not for public access. They could have just put a step on the staff side and used a key to access it but no :rolleyes:
I'm sure there's a building code that prohibits that sort of thing. People, even staff, exit elevators by habit and don't expect to have to step down when they do - it's a recipe for an accident.

officedweller
Mar 30, 2017, 7:33 PM
It's also conceivable that the staff usage would extend to maintenance and repair activities with equipment that would require dollies and carts - i.e. no step.

Could be at a different level to ensure the opposite door does not open - otherwise a ramp could have been built on the staff side.

Mac Write
Mar 30, 2017, 9:45 PM
On the Coastal ferries I was on level 6 a crewmen comes in presses a button and the other door opens and then card the recycling right through the elevator. was really cool.

Transiteer
Apr 1, 2017, 1:50 AM
It's also conceivable that the staff usage would extend to maintenance and repair activities with equipment that would require dollies and carts - i.e. no step.

Could be at a different level to ensure the opposite door does not open - otherwise a ramp could have been built on the staff side.

The floor level of the original old ancillary building is lower down the hill than the new entry. The elevator deals with the change in level between the old staff areas and new public sections. The elevator is also handy for moving equipment from the staff areas to the rest of the station, saving the need to exit the building and walk around outside using the sidewalk. If you are going to all the trouble of putting in a new elevator, it makes sense for it to serve every floor, and saves a lot of room that would otherwise be taken up by a ramp. The elevator also enables the staff washrooms to be accessible to wheelchair using employees, which is a code requirement.

On the use of wider fare gates: In any given bank of gates, two wide gates are used as minimum as these can be used by wheelchair users, mothers with strollers, cyclists, people with luggage and everyone else. The narrower gates are good for the average pedestrian only, so only using narrow gates may increase the number of gates in total, at the expense of preventing a significant portion of the public from getting in the station.

Reecemartin
Apr 1, 2017, 2:15 AM
I'm curious to see if we see some sort of station upgrade 2.0 program when the M Line extension starts construction or sometime soon after. Hypothetically we will need to upgrade a bunch of Canada Line stations for increased ridership by then.

aberdeen5698
Apr 1, 2017, 2:52 AM
On the use of wider fare gates: In any given bank of gates, two wide gates are used as minimum as these can be used by wheelchair users, mothers with strollers, cyclists, people with luggage and everyone else.
Having dual wide gates also provides redundancy - wheelchair users can still access the station even if one of the gates is out of service.

flipper316
Apr 1, 2017, 7:26 AM
Losers.

Of course it helps! Even just for information and assistance as well. All of our major stations should have an assistant near the gates (one who can also issue tickets of course).

All major and even most smaller stations in Japan have an employee near the gates.

That's what I did on the Canada Line. Translink hired 38 station attendants for the Canada Line and many more for Skytrain to have a customer service presence during the rollout for Compass Cards and the faregates. Of course since the system is pretty much self serve. Honestly how hard is to tap a ticket/card and walk through a makeshift door. Our contract was temporary and only a few of us got hired on as full time Canada Line attendants. During the whole controversy about disabled people not being able to tap their cards Translink had the argument that it would cost many millions more to have permament station attendants when the compass card/faregates already cost over 200 million.

Sheba
Apr 1, 2017, 5:09 PM
That's what I did on the Canada Line. Translink hired 38 station attendants for the Canada Line and many more for Skytrain to have a customer service presence during the rollout for Compass Cards and the faregates. Of course since the system is pretty much self serve. Honestly how hard is to tap a ticket/card and walk through a makeshift door. Our contract was temporary and only a few of us got hired on as full time Canada Line attendants. During the whole controversy about disabled people not being able to tap their cards Translink had the argument that it would cost many millions more to have permament station attendants when the compass card/faregates already cost over 200 million.

I still roll my eyes over that. Independence is good but if someone can't tap their card to get through the fare gates and requires help, then they're hardly independent. Is it really so insane to expect those people to travel with someone or phone ahead so TransLink can have someone there to help them through the gates?

cganuelas1995
Apr 1, 2017, 7:37 PM
I'm curious to see if we see some sort of station upgrade 2.0 program when the M Line extension starts construction or sometime soon after. Hypothetically we will need to upgrade a bunch of Canada Line stations for increased ridership by then.

I'd honestly love to see additional entrances to Brighouse. One that is directly connected to the bus loop and one that is directly connected to the mall via a walkway.

flipper316
Apr 2, 2017, 6:14 AM
I still roll my eyes over that. Independence is good but if someone can't tap their card to get through the fare gates and requires help, then they're hardly independent. Is it really so insane to expect those people to travel with someone or phone ahead so TransLink can have someone there to help them through the gates?

Our contract was over July 31, 2016. During that time if you recall with that whole disabled people can't tap controversy Translink came up with a permanent solution to this issue. They said it would take a couple of years but every station would get brand new glass gates at an approximate cost of 5 million to be opened with proximity sensors affixed to the customer's wheelchair or their person. Before that happens Translink set up a Brentwood monitoring centre where staff can answer calls and coordinate with staff from Skytrain or C Line to meet a customer wherever they're travelling to help them through the gates of needed and general customer service. We pretty much have been doing that since day one but I guess it's just something that Translink implemented i guess to appease the disability groups while those new gates are going to be built. That's why you see that number to call on the disabled gates. I doubt anyone actually calls that and most of those people probably have an attendant with them anyways.

aberdeen5698
Apr 2, 2017, 4:15 PM
That's why you see that number to call on the disabled gates. I doubt anyone actually calls that and most of those people probably have an attendant with them anyways.
A very low call volume could be used to justify no further action on Translink's part.

Transiteer
Apr 4, 2017, 12:40 AM
A very low call volume could be used to justify no further action on Translink's part.

TransLink have an RFP posted right now for an accessible fare gate solution for those people who cannot tap their cards:

http://www.translink.ca/en/About-Us/Doing-Business-with-TransLink/Bidding-Opportunities/Open-Bids/Q17-061.aspx

Phase 1 is to install the pilot scheme at 3 stations; Phase 2 for Expo and Millennium lines; Phase 3 for Canada Line.

Reecemartin
Apr 4, 2017, 1:53 AM
TransLink have an RFP posted right now for an accessible fare gate solution for those people who cannot tap their cards:

http://www.translink.ca/en/About-Us/Doing-Business-with-TransLink/Bidding-Opportunities/Open-Bids/Q17-061.aspx

Phase 1 is to install the pilot scheme at 3 stations; Phase 2 for Expo and Millennium lines; Phase 3 for Canada Line.

Any reason Production, Burrard and Edmons were chosen as first?

Transiteer
Apr 4, 2017, 6:21 PM
Any reason Production, Burrard and Edmonds were chosen as first?

I'm not a TransLink employee and I have no involvement in this project, so I can only make wild guesses behind the reasoning. One station is underground, one at grade, one elevated - each station type is represented. Beyond that, maybe these stations are frequented by some of the target user group. Maybe these stations require only minimal work and disruption to install the equipment, which would enable the pilot system to be tested as soon as possible. The decision could boil down to something quite simple but not immediately obvious, such as there being a spare breaker on an electrical panel or the ease of running a new conduit from point A to B. There are usually many factors at play.

jollyburger
Apr 4, 2017, 6:28 PM
Sorry I'm sure somewhat mentioned this. But if there's accessible RFID fare access into an elevator, how do they operate the elevator?

Transiteer
Apr 4, 2017, 7:34 PM
Sorry I'm sure somewhat mentioned this. But if there's accessible RFID fare access into an elevator, how do they operate the elevator?

RFID is just for the fare gate operation; as far as I know there are not any RFID operated elevators on the system. Any other member of the public can assist in pushing an elevator button - it doesn't necessarily need a station assistant to do that - just anyone else using the elevator.

MIPS
Apr 5, 2017, 5:01 AM
There are locations within the system that use RFID to control locks into non-public areas however they operate on a different and more high security standard and are not at all compatible with the Compass system.

jollyburger
Apr 5, 2017, 5:12 AM
RFID is just for the fare gate operation; as far as I know there are not any RFID operated elevators on the system. Any other member of the public can assist in pushing an elevator button - it doesn't necessarily need a station assistant to do that - just anyone else using the elevator.

Okay, then this solution makes no sense to me. You are giving someone independent access for someone without the ability to use their arms to get into a fare zone but then need help to use the elevator?

Meraki
Apr 5, 2017, 5:28 AM
I think they're caught in a "damned if they do, damned if they don't" situation.

The Global/CTV stories about people unable to tap pressured them to do something. Next, Jordan Bateman will complain about the cost of these new gates to service a few people. The news will then "ask questions" why they installed the new RFID gates when the users can't push the elevator button.

flipper316
Apr 5, 2017, 6:04 AM
I think they're caught in a "damned if they do, damned if they don't" situation.

The Global/CTV stories about people unable to tap pressured them to do something. Next, Jordan Bateman will complain about the cost of these new gates to service a few people. The news will then "ask questions" why they installed the new RFID gates when the users can't push the elevator button.
Lol you know the news will be fishing for stories like that. Just like when they interviewed the people that "couldn't use their hands" or had a couple of stories of the disabled gates being closed and unmanned when they're supposed to be open if there as no staff. Just clickbait bs stories. Regarding those new glass RFID gates. Well we'll finally get an extra gate for Yaletown and Brentwood but it certainly won't be ones the general public can use. More bs.

jollyburger
Apr 5, 2017, 6:05 AM
Well the disabled person in this article uses a mouth stick to push elevator button. I literally can't wait to read these articles about the elevators.

http://www.straight.com/news/592016/translink-fare-gates-may-limit-transit-accessibility-passengers-disabilities

Sheba
Apr 5, 2017, 6:29 AM
Well the disabled person in this article uses a mouth stick to push elevator button. I literally can't wait to read these articles about the elevators.

http://www.straight.com/news/592016/translink-fare-gates-may-limit-transit-accessibility-passengers-disabilities

From that article
Tran explained that asking a stranger for help makes her more vulnerable, because once she asks them to help with the Compass card, they may recognize that she is an easy target for theft or assault. “It scares me,” she said.

You mean no one would notice she's "an easy target" until she asks for help???

“About 98 percent of the time I depend upon people—and the other two percent is getting on and off of the SkyTrain and going places,” she said.

Oh yeah you're really independent... :rolleyes:

Transiteer
Apr 5, 2017, 5:08 PM
An important distinction between getting help using a fare gate and an elevator is that one involves trusting a stranger with a card preloaded with your money (increasing the opportunity for theft). The other does not.
Another thing about using an elevator on the skytrain system is that they are well used, and it's likely someone else is there waiting for the cab, and has already pressed the button. They do not require all the users of an elevator to push the button. They also usually serve the floor your on, and the other stop, so asking 'which floor?' is not even required.
As someone else has pointed out, those with limited mobility are also more likely to have a solution to pushing a button (such as the example of the mouth stick) but getting out a compass card and positioning it at the reader on the fare gate is a far more challenging action and a more specialized of a task. This is not to say however that in an ideal set-up, no button pushing would be required - I agree that would be great. It's just that, the issue of using gates (a new element in the stations, that are only found on the SkyTrain) has been raised whereas elevators (invented 1852 by Mr. Otis that are everywhere) have not. RFID upgrades for all existing elevators on all floors nationwide?

Vin
Apr 5, 2017, 9:32 PM
Well the disabled person in this article uses a mouth stick to push elevator button. I literally can't wait to read these articles about the elevators.

http://www.straight.com/news/592016/translink-fare-gates-may-limit-transit-accessibility-passengers-disabilities

Can't they have another stick with the Compass card attached at the end of it?

There are, perhaps, only 10 to, maximum 20 such individuals? Isn't it a way cheaper alternative to issue 20 sticks than to install a multi-million dollar system?

WBC
Apr 5, 2017, 10:03 PM
Can't they have another stick with the Compass card attached at the end of it?

There are, perhaps, only 10 to, maximum 20 such individuals? Isn't it a way cheaper alternative to issue 20 sticks than to install a multi-million dollar system?

Hey get with the times - this is the new age in which no expense is too great to accommodate every last person on the planet to reach their "full potential"...

Reecemartin
Apr 5, 2017, 11:50 PM
Hey get with the times - this is the new age in which no expense is too great to accommodate every last person on the planet to reach their "full potential"...

I think this is a pretty negative outlook, it's called Public Transit for a reason. We should be striving to make our system as accessible to all people as we possibly can.

Sheba
Apr 6, 2017, 12:47 AM
Hey get with the times - this is the new age in which no expense is too great to accommodate every last person on the planet to reach their "full potential"...

I haven't been able reach my "full potential" as they won't provide me with a mansion and servants to tend to my every whim :tup:

Seriously though, for that few people is it really worth it? We're already 99.99% accessible, which is more than elsewhere. Why is it unreasonable to ask people who are clearly not independent to travel with someone or phone ahead.

Mac Write
Apr 6, 2017, 2:51 AM
HandyDart needs to accept compass cards instead of FareSavers. This will drastically make things easer for the users of HandyDart.

jollyburger
Apr 6, 2017, 4:49 AM
Can't they have another stick with the Compass card attached at the end of it?

There are, perhaps, only 10 to, maximum 20 such individuals? Isn't it a way cheaper alternative to issue 20 sticks than to install a multi-million dollar system?

Well someone did that in some article about the problem, they just cut up their Compass card and stuck it on the end. They said a range from around 10-50 people with this specific disability (hopefully assume that take SkyTrain or the SeaBus)

WBC
Apr 6, 2017, 4:52 PM
I haven't been able reach my "full potential" as they won't provide me with a mansion and servants to tend to my every whim :tup:

Seriously though, for that few people is it really worth it? We're already 99.99% accessible, which is more than elsewhere. Why is it unreasonable to ask people who are clearly not independent to travel with someone or phone ahead.

You guys clearly do not understand in what time we live in. For example, we are very close to obesity being declared a disability. I know of a building in Burnaby where morbidly obese dude is making a complaint to Human Rights Tribunal asking for a strata to enlarge a door so he and his giant scooter can pass through comfortably. The building meets all the BC accessibility standards, but his once a week trip to whatever he is doing is made uncomfortable by the door frame touching him.

We as a society now cater and band backwards to satisfy literally everybody's needs no matter whether that makes any sense. If you do not, then you have activists running around and suing everybody and making fuss. And politicians race around taking every opportunity to look more liberal and more sympathetic regardless of the cost. In the meantime every western liberal democracy is running bigger and bigger deficits with the cost of social programs, infrastructure and healthcare ever increasing with no end in sight.

Vin
Apr 6, 2017, 8:24 PM
Hey get with the times - this is the new age in which no expense is too great to accommodate every last person on the planet to reach their "full potential"...

If money is no issue, I would be using the Campass Card on planet Mars' transit by now.


You guys clearly do not understand in what time we live in. For example, we are very close to obesity being declared a disability. I know of a building in Burnaby where morbidly obese dude is making a complaint to Human Rights Tribunal asking for a strata to enlarge a door so he and his giant scooter can pass through comfortably. The building meets all the BC accessibility standards, but his once a week trip to whatever he is doing is made uncomfortable by the door frame touching him.

We as a society now cater and band backwards to satisfy literally everybody's needs no matter whether that makes any sense. If you do not, then you have activists running around and suing everybody and making fuss. And politicians race around taking every opportunity to look more liberal and more sympathetic regardless of the cost. In the meantime every western liberal democracy is running bigger and bigger deficits with the cost of social programs, infrastructure and healthcare ever increasing with no end in site.

That doesn't mean what the obese guy did was right, or that we have to lap up whatever is proposed by authorities. There is something called logic and priority.

You do the math: $100 for a couple of sticks with cards attached VS say, $15 mil to install an automated system: one that can still fail and need maintenance.

Sheba
Apr 6, 2017, 10:37 PM
HandyDart needs to accept compass cards instead of FareSavers. This will drastically make things easer for the users of HandyDart.

Why don't they accept Compass cards? HandyDart is a (obviously specialized) part of the transit system so they really should.


You guys clearly do not understand in what time we live in.


We as a society now cater and band backwards to satisfy literally everybody's needs no matter whether that makes any sense. If you do not, then you have activists running around and suing everybody and making fuss. And politicians race around taking every opportunity to look more liberal and more sympathetic regardless of the cost. In the meantime every western liberal democracy is running bigger and bigger deficits with the cost of social programs, infrastructure and healthcare ever increasing with no end in sight.

Oh I understand - I just don't necessarily like it.



That doesn't mean what the obese guy did was right, or that we have to lap up whatever is proposed by authorities. There is something called logic and priority.

You do the math: $100 for a couple of sticks with cards attached VS say, $15 mil to install an automated system: one that can still fail and need maintenance.

:tup:

aberdeen5698
Apr 6, 2017, 11:17 PM
Why don't they accept Compass cards? HandyDart is a (obviously specialized) part of the transit system so they really should.
They've probably wanted to avoid installing the equipment on all the vans. And there's also the issue of how to read the cards, since in many cases wheelchairs are loaded into the back area. Perhaps they'd need some sort of hand-held device that the driver could offer to the passengers.

Transiteer
Apr 6, 2017, 11:25 PM
New photo of the Metrotown Station Entry from VIA Architecture twitter:

https://twitter.com/viaarchitecture/status/850125390387400704

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C8xAYgaVYAAi5zl.jpg:large

Jebby
Apr 6, 2017, 11:28 PM
They've probably wanted to avoid installing the equipment on all the vans. And there's also the issue of how to read the cards, since in many cases wheelchairs are loaded into the back area. Perhaps they'd need some sort of hand-held device that the driver could offer to the passengers.

If only tech companies could invent handheld computer devices wirelessly connected to the internet and with the capability of reading NFC card.

Jebby
Apr 6, 2017, 11:29 PM
Do those escalators go all the way up to platform level? They look really steep, but it's probably just the angle.

Transiteer
Apr 6, 2017, 11:48 PM
Do those escalators go all the way up to platform level? They look really steep, but it's probably just the angle.

They go all the way to platform - you can see them from the skytrain when leaving the station. They do look steep in that photo but they look no steeper than an average escalator when viewed from the train.

officedweller
Apr 7, 2017, 12:33 AM
Nice!
Looks impressive.

WBC
Apr 7, 2017, 12:38 AM
Nice!
Looks impressive.

Well that looks grand and impressive...Nice work...:cheers:

Express691
Apr 7, 2017, 1:13 AM
Does anyone know how much longer the ones at Granville Station are?

Meraki
Apr 7, 2017, 1:32 AM
Is it just the angle, or do the outer two escalators look narrow compared to the middle ones?

flipper316
Apr 7, 2017, 7:14 AM
I think this is a pretty negative outlook, it's called Public Transit for a reason. We should be striving to make our system as accessible to all people as we possibly can.
Our Transit system is pretty much 100% accessible. Seriously every bus has ramps and every Skytrain has wheelchair accessible areas. I heard that even places like London, England aren't as good as us.

flipper316
Apr 7, 2017, 7:16 AM
You guys clearly do not understand in what time we live in. For example, we are very close to obesity being declared a disability. I know of a building in Burnaby where morbidly obese dude is making a complaint to Human Rights Tribunal asking for a strata to enlarge a door so he and his giant scooter can pass through comfortably. The building meets all the BC accessibility standards, but his once a week trip to whatever he is doing is made uncomfortable by the door frame touching him.

We as a society now cater and band backwards to satisfy literally everybody's needs no matter whether that makes any sense. If you do not, then you have activists running around and suing everybody and making fuss. And politicians race around taking every opportunity to look more liberal and more sympathetic regardless of the cost. In the meantime every western liberal democracy is running bigger and bigger deficits with the cost of social programs, infrastructure and healthcare ever increasing with no end in sight.

Good post. Totally agree. Pandering to all the snowflakes, social justice warriors, politically correct police, those types of groups.

Reecemartin
Apr 7, 2017, 1:09 PM
Our Transit system is pretty much 100% accessible. Seriously every bus has ramps and every Skytrain has wheelchair accessible areas. I heard that even places like London, England aren't as good as us.

They aren't as good, but it's not because they don't want to be. When the system is designed with accessibility in mind retrofitting can be a massive nightmare. Installing elevators etc is expensive and difficult when they weren't original part of the design.

DKaz
Apr 7, 2017, 5:39 PM
Is it just the angle, or do the outer two escalators look narrow compared to the middle ones?

They're definitely more narrow. I wouldn't expect anyone to be able to pass on those.

Transiteer
Apr 7, 2017, 9:20 PM
Another tweet from VIA Architecture, looking the other way.

Source: https://twitter.com/viaarchitecture/status/850403046056116224

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C8xBoh8UIAAsPVr.jpg:large

LeftCoaster
Apr 7, 2017, 9:21 PM
Damn, that looks good.

Mac Write
Apr 7, 2017, 10:28 PM
What colour are they going to pain the I beams? Black would be really cool, it would grab your attention.

Also when will the West station house open?

Transiteer
Apr 7, 2017, 10:59 PM
Also when will the West station house open?

The TransLink website says "Phase 2 West Stationhouse Construction – fall 2015 to spring 2017." So, possibly before June 21st.

Source: http://www.translink.ca/en/Plans-and-Projects/Station-and-Exchange-Improvements/Expo-Line-Upgrades/Metrotown-Station-Upgrades.aspx

Jimbo604
Apr 8, 2017, 1:35 AM
Question: the escalators go down to ground level. This means they are not planning for a replacement overhead walkway?

Reecemartin
Apr 8, 2017, 1:41 AM
Question: the escalators go down to ground level. This means they are not planning for a replacement overhead walkway?

Apparently it's conditional on some funding or something. Considering the number of passengers going to the mall that conclusion would certainly be warranted.

madog222
Apr 8, 2017, 1:45 AM
Question: the escalators go down to ground level. This means they are not planning for a replacement overhead walkway?

The central station house is built to allow a future overhead walkway to be built, but will not be part of this project.

officedweller
Apr 8, 2017, 2:14 AM
Ultimately, there's more flexibility in using the streets and sidewalks for the accessing the station rather than funnelling people onto an overhead walkway.
It'll also encourage circulation to new retail on the south side of the station.

The new stationhouses eliminate the previous impediments created by the slight elevation of the ticketing hall.

Mac Write
Apr 8, 2017, 2:22 AM
In theory could they do a 2 over-head walkways from centre station one on an angle to the bus loop?

I truly hope they can move all the buses to go around the station so that the current bus loop can be semi closed and used for bus layovers and move the shops closer to the street. Win win for everyone.

Reecemartin
Apr 8, 2017, 2:44 AM
Somehow Metrotown might be my new favorite station after these upgrades, in a weird way I feel like removing the walkway adds something to the stations individual identity, kind of making it more of its own designation rather than just being the mall.

Sheba
Apr 8, 2017, 3:26 AM
I truly hope they can move all the buses to go around the station so that the current bus loop can be semi closed and used for bus layovers and move the shops closer to the street. Win win for everyone.

Burnaby won't let that happen as they want Beresford to be a quiet residential street. Some of the buses with drop off at one end on Central Blvd and pick up at the other, without going into the bus loop. Others will go into the loop, plus it'll be used for bus layovers.

dpogue
Apr 8, 2017, 5:31 AM
Apparently it's conditional on some funding or something. Considering the number of passengers going to the mall that conclusion would certainly be warranted.

TransLink and the mall are each willing to contribute 1/3rd of the funding for the new pedestrian passarelle, but Burnaby hasn't said if they'll contribute their 1/3rd. As well, since it goes over the road, it's off TransLink property, so they need a permit from Burnaby before any work can be done.

Sheba
Apr 8, 2017, 5:56 AM
Being civil while yelling loudly can lead to bits of info leaking out:

We have always maintained TransLink did not own the overhead passarelle and that it would be up to the discretion of the City of Burnaby for a replacement to be built. Unfortunately we don’t have a great deal of influence here, but we are continuing to work with the City to sign a formal agreement. No decisions have been made at this time but you can always reach out to the City for more information.

I don't know about that "we have always maintained..." bit at the beginning, but the rest of it matches up.

Waders
Apr 9, 2017, 5:49 PM
First steel structure erected during today's early morning hour at Metrotown station east stationhouse. Hope the construction pace can be maintained.
This structure seems to be different to those at west stationhouse?

Photo I took today.
https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2866/33806639101_f18631d369_o.jpg

Millennium2002
Apr 9, 2017, 10:13 PM
It looks like the platform that the escalators will be mounted on... and there is the same structure on the other side of the station (although apparently somewhat taller!).

VancouverOfTheFuture
Apr 9, 2017, 10:55 PM
i still cant believe they are going through all this trouble, all this money, all this inconvenience and the platforms aren't getting any longer. :facepalm: