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planarchy
Jul 16, 2011, 1:06 PM
At best we would hope to have 2 or 3 or 4 (boy, more opium!!) fast ferries, each with capacity of perhaps 200 souls.

I think official capacity for the ferries is almost double that...385 I think. They regularly call out over 200 passengers on the 8am and 5pm weekday ferries.

-Harlington-
Jul 19, 2011, 2:49 PM
It doesnt seem to be run by metro transit for some reason but its bus service of some sort for prospect:




Bus service opens between Prospect Road communities and HRM



By DAVENE JEFFREY Staff Reporter
Tue, Jul 19 - 7:37 AM
Prospect Road residents are celebrating their new bus service.

Prospect Road Community Transit started up Monday morning, but the kickoff celebration will be held today at 11 a.m. at the Prospect Road Community Centre.

The service connects Whites Lake and communities along the road to Exhibition Park, where riders will be able to connect with Metro Transit’s Route 22 bus.

"This is the best of community development," said Coun. Reg Rankin (Timberlea-Prospect).

Folks in the area wanted buses but Metro Transit was not in a position to provide service there at present, Rankin said.

The service is a project of the Resource Opportunities Centre, a community development association, which was given a grant through the Nova Scotia Transit Research Incentive Program

With the $50,000 in funding, Need-A-Lift was contracted to operate a single bus that will transport passengers to the community centre and to Exhibition Park. The bus can carry 16 passengers and a wheelchair. The service is scheduled to operate Monday through Saturday.

Monday to Friday, there are three early morning trips heading into the city and three return runs at the end of the day. On Tuesdays, there will be three additional mid-day trips to and from Scotia Square in downtown Halifax.

On Saturdays, there will be three evening trips to and from Metro Transit’s Lacewood Terminal, which includes a stop at Empire Theatres in Bayers Lake Business Park. The fare will be $3, or four tickets for $10.

More information can be found at prospectcommunities.com/transit.

( djeffrey@herald.ca)

Jonovision
Jul 19, 2011, 4:17 PM
The second It's More Than Buses session is on tonight at the WTCC from 6-8pm. Come here one of the transportation planning professors from Dal speak and get your hands dirty in designing the actual network. Markers and maps at your disposal.

ewjonsson
Jul 19, 2011, 9:17 PM
Any updates on how that session went tonight would be greatly appreciated. I can't attend cause I'm stuck at work. Thanks.

Dmajackson
Jul 20, 2011, 2:08 AM
Great session tonight Jonovision! :)

The first hour dragged by a bit because of the slow speeches but the workshop part was awesome. I got a great seat with seven very vocal and intelligent people who thankfully were from all over the HRM so some great ideas were formulated. We got some great pointers from the experts and stayed probably a bit too late (people were cracking jokes at us). I really hope to make it to the September session.

BTW Jonovision if you see a map with its own legend that would be my tables. :P

halifaxboyns
Jul 20, 2011, 3:31 AM
I love groups like that - that have great dynamics. When I helped on Plan It Cgy, I had one of those groups and it was awesome. They totally took on the task and we kicked ass.

Jono - you should take photos of the maps they worked on and post them.

Dmajackson
Jul 20, 2011, 4:53 AM
I love groups like that - that have great dynamics. When I helped on Plan It Cgy, I had one of those groups and it was awesome. They totally took on the task and we kicked ass.

Oh we definitely kicked ass. We had the News 95.7 guy hovering over us hanging on our every word. Our group was also shown on CTV local news.

Some of my table mates even liked my You know you bus in Bedford when ... jokes :P

Jonovision
Jul 20, 2011, 11:32 AM
Awesome! Glad you guys liked it! Sorry I didn't get a chance to say hi, I had to run as soon as it finished. I hope you can all make it for Sept 7th! That's when the real hard stuff begins. We have to connect our plans with what currently exists and start lobbying government and metro transit to effect some changes in this city.

Northend Nerd
Jul 20, 2011, 1:36 PM
Here is the News 95.7 Article based on the meeting last night.

http://www.news957.com/news/local/article/255884--bus-talk-dominates-more-than-buses-transit-forum

Bus talk dominates 'More than Buses' transit forum
Jonathan Muma // Jul 20, 2011 05:30:49 AM


About 100 people took on the task of trying to build a better public transportation system in HRM at the second "More than Buses" public forum.

The session, hosted by Fusion Halifax, featured a presentation by Dr. Ahsan Habib, a transportation planner and professor at Dalhousie University, who says improving public transit will require examination of several different aspects.

"What will be our transit network in the future, what kind of buses should we use, what kind of other technology can we explore - for example commuter rail or a fast ferry," he said. "So we're looking at this in a very comprehensive way."

The session was called "More than Buses," but buses were on the mind of most participants.

"Many buses are not frequent enough, so if you miss your transfer, you're waiting a half hour or an hour sometimes," said one woman.

"We don't have very attractive, or well-used waiting areas, with public washrooms," noted another.

Participants put their heads together in small workgroups to discuss their concerns and come up with recommendations for an optimal public transit network.

Suggestions included using existing resources more effectively by overhauling some bus routes - but that wasn't the only idea to come from the workgroups.

"We should have one major bus route that's closed to car traffic and used just for buses during rush hour," suggested one participant.

Another group suggested eliminating meandering, circuitous bus routes and replacing them with a grid system of buses leaving every 10 minutes.

"It means north and south would be more frequent routes, and east and west would make a transition," said the leader. "You might be forced to make a transfer, but everyone would get there faster."

Habib says this session - the second of three - is key in forming a final presentation that Fusion Halifax hopes will be forwarded to regional council in the fall.

The final session takes place September 7.

pblaauw
Jul 29, 2011, 3:50 AM
From Metro Transit's webpage: "With the GoTime system upgrade in its final stages, Metro Transit buses are providing real time departure information to passengers in over 80% of its fleet."

I hope this means Google Transit will be able to tell me soon, where the buses actually are on their respective routes.

Also, this is kind of awesome :cheers: : Metro Transit to improve bus accessibility (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2011/07/28/ns-metro-transit-riders-with-disabilities.html)

Nouvellecosse
Jul 29, 2011, 5:20 AM
Been rumblings for awhile, so hopefully we'll actually get this thing up and running as scheduled this time. It isn't exactly the most fun having to spend an extra $20 each way for the airporter or $50 for a taxi on every visit to the airport.

Halifax to buy buses for airport run
Cabbies fear lose of business

CBC News Posted: Jul 21, 2011 7:42 AM AT Last Updated: Jul 21, 2011 10:29 PM AT

Halifax Mayor Peter Kelly says there should be bus service to the airport starting next May.

Kelly announced this week that the municipality is buying nine buses for its run to Halifax Stanfield International Airport. The tender closes Aug. 11.

"Metro Transit is on track to launching a public bus service connecting the downtown to the airport next spring," Kelly said in a column posted Tuesday on halifaxnewsnet.com.

More here: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2011/07/21/ns-halifax-bus-airport.html

Nouvellecosse
Jul 29, 2011, 5:24 AM
From Metro Transit's webpage: "With the GoTime system upgrade in its final stages, Metro Transit buses are providing real time departure information to passengers in over 80% of its fleet."

I hope this means Google Transit will be able to tell me soon, where the buses actually are on their respective routes.

Also, this is kind of awesome :cheers: : Metro Transit to improve bus accessibility (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2011/07/28/ns-metro-transit-riders-with-disabilities.html)I'd be happy if things were just back to the way they were what, 5 years ago? There were screens at major transfer points that showed scheduled bus arrivals, but then they suddenly stuck signs in front of them all saying temporarily unavailable, and it's been that way for years. :pissed:

pblaauw
Aug 9, 2011, 5:56 AM
Trial of a late night bus route in Edmonton:

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/Buses+will+waiting+weekends+last+call+Whyte+Avenue/5224966/story.html

Wishblade
Aug 21, 2011, 3:23 PM
Bus terminal likely good to go

By MICHAEL LIGHTSTONE City Hall Reporter
Sun, Aug 21 - 7:37 AM

Stuck in neutral, a long-awaited bus terminal replacement near the Dartmouth Sportsplex could be going forward soon.

Deputy Mayor Jim Smith said Saturday the province’s Environment Department is happy with a pyritic slate management plan tied to the $12-million project, and the government’s approval means construction should begin in a couple of weeks or so.

The development has been in the works for years. Halifax regional council sanctioned the project in the spring.

"It’s just been frustrating waiting for it to happen," said Smith, who represents Albro Lake-Harbourview. "I know the bus drivers are frustrated, and people who use the bus are frustrated, too."

More here: http://thechronicleherald.ca/Metro/1259392.html

Waye Mason
Aug 21, 2011, 5:08 PM
I think official capacity for the ferries is almost double that...385 I think. They regularly call out over 200 passengers on the 8am and 5pm weekday ferries.

The new Woodside ferry is only 150-200.

halifaxboyns
Sep 6, 2011, 7:59 PM
(I wasn't sure where to put this...)

Shuttle solution to Halifax parking woes?

Several major employers in Halifax are working on a plan to ease the city's parking crunch.

They want to set up a shuttle service to bring workers into the downtown core, from parking lots outside the city centre.

Capital Health, the IWK, Dalhousie University and St. Mary's University are all involved in the discussion.

Brian Rankin, the director of business development for Capital Health, said ideally employees would be able to park for free.

"Let's say up in Bayers Lake industrial park or some other area ... and we're working with either a private shuttle or ideally with Metro Transit that they would have an express shuttle that would operate selected hours. Pick up staff and bring them down here for not only Capital Health, but IWK and St. Mary's and Dalhousie University as well," said Rankin.

While users could park for free, Rankin estimates the shuttle service would cost users between $6 and $8 a day.


Rest of the story is here (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2011/09/06/ns-parking-shuttle.html).

fenwick16
Sep 6, 2011, 10:29 PM
The idea of a shuttle is a great idea. Something like the Park"N"Fly service at major airports.

If the shuttle service can be set up so that the shuttle buses can bypass traffic and provide fast, frequent and reliable service then it could eliminate a lot of traffic from city streets. If people can park their cars in the suburbs, get to their destination within 5 - 10 minutes and also save money while doing it, then many people will use such a service. I think it would be analogous to using the subway system in Toronto (except it will be a shuttle bus system instead).

Dmajackson
Sep 6, 2011, 10:58 PM
This isn't strictly Metro Transit related but worth mentioning;

The third session of It's More Than Buses will be held tomorrow night hosted by our own Jonovision :tup:

6 - 8pm

World Trade & Convention Centre

I was hoping to attend but unfortunately emergencies at work have messed up my schedule and I can't attend this time. Hopefully someone else can attend and push the importance of service to Burnside and extended bicycle infrastructure for me. :)

Jonovision
Sep 7, 2011, 2:17 PM
Thanks for the plug Dmajackson!

It should be a good evening. We have Paul Bedford coming to talk. He is the former chief planner for Toronto and now sits on the board of directors for Metrolinx.

We are also preparing some chalk art in parade square. We have professionals recreating our downtown route plan.

Hope to see some of you there!

halifaxboyns
Sep 7, 2011, 2:35 PM
Thanks for the plug Dmajackson!

It should be a good evening. We have Paul Bedford coming to talk. He is the former chief planner for Toronto and now sits on the board of directors for Metrolinx.

We are also preparing some chalk art in parade square. We have professionals recreating our downtown route plan.

Hope to see some of you there!

Paul Bedford is a good guy - smart too. I pity Gary Wright - the chief planner for the City of Toronto now. Their new zoning bylaw was a total gong show to the point that after spending $12 million on it's development (and ending up with almost 800 appeals to the OMB on various aspects), the Toronto city council voted to repeal it and put the old bylaw in place until fixes could be done.

That can't be terribly motivating.

Dmajackson
Sep 14, 2011, 12:01 AM
New Bridge Terminal Construction Project to Begin this Week

In conjunction with the ongoing Five Year Transit Strategic Plan which includes the construction of a new Bridge Terminal; and further to the recent CAO Interim Award of Tender 10-188 for construction to Pomerleau Inc., work on the new Metro Transit terminal site is scheduled to get underway as early as the end of this week.

HRM staff and the contractor anticipate that all required permits will be in place by Friday, September 16th or possibly sooner.

Construction signage will be erected at the construction site as soon as possible and an ongoing communications plan will be implemented to keep passengers and citizens advised of the progress.

The new Bridge Terminal is expected to be completed by summer 2012

worldlyhaligonian
Sep 14, 2011, 2:09 AM
Great news... finally! This has the pedestrian bridge component still right?

pblaauw
Sep 14, 2011, 4:25 AM
As a person who mostly uses a wheelchair to get around, I'm thrilled.:cheers::banana::tup:

Sorry, got carried away with the emoticons there.

fenwick16
Sep 14, 2011, 11:40 AM
It is good to see that the terminal will be constructed relatively quickly. It certainly is time for this terminal to move forward.

worldlyhaligonian
Sep 14, 2011, 2:26 PM
As a person who mostly uses a wheelchair to get around, I'm thrilled.:cheers::banana::tup:

Sorry, got carried away with the emoticons there.

I haven't seen if the plan still has the elevator and accessibility options, I hope for your sake it does! Watts voted against this version.

DJ - do you know what plan passed?

Jstaleness
Sep 14, 2011, 3:54 PM
Perfect! Now that this fuss is over (at least it seems like it) they can finally get back on track about what to do about Lacewood Terminal.

Dmajackson
Sep 26, 2011, 7:31 PM
I haven't seen if the plan still has the elevator and accessibility options, I hope for your sake it does! Watts voted against this version.

DJ - do you know what plan passed?

I think its the more expensive plan so yes the pedestrian overpass should be built ...

50

On another note I am quite pleased with Metro Transit right now. :)

Last Thursday I sent in a complaint to Contact HRM and the responses so far have been efficient and very courteous.

I work until late in the evening in Burnside so when I get off I have to take two buses to get home. 90% of the time this works fine and gets me home within 45 minutes which is reasonable given the time of day. Normally I catch the 87 on Windmill Road which takes me to Cobequid Terminal. From there I wait ten minutes and take the 66 back towards Bedford which puts me about a five minute walk from home. On Thursday I caught the 87 and made it to Cobequid Terminal at the normal time. Normally as the bus is waiting the 66 pulls in behind and the two drivers get out and have a chat. That night a bus did pull up but it had 'Out of Service' so I just thought it was the last run for another route. Oddly the bus waited until :35 past before leaving (normal time for the 66). There were no passengers on board and it headed down towards Bedford. I got confused by this and hopped on the 80 so I could get home sometime that day (the next 66 was not until almost midnight). As per normal the 80 floored it trying to get back on schedule and we got within 100m of the other bus. That bus which had just left the Terminal with no route number on it had 66 showing. I didn't bother trying to catch that bus in Bedford because it was apparent the driver was not of high quality (and he didn't stop at all on the Bfd Hwy). I got off the 80 at Sunnyside Mall and managed to get home about ten minutes later than normal.

Shortly after getting home I sent an email to Contact HRM which responded within half hour. That email apologized for the incident, gave me a complaint number, and was forwarded onto Metro Transit for follow-up. Two business days later (today) I got an email from Metro Transit again apologizing for the incident. The driver will be interviewed and punished if deemed necessary. The report I gave was very detailed and I was thanked for it. The suggestions I made for improved bus service in the area are now at the Planning department of MT and hopefully I'll get a response by next week about them.

Metro Transit may have some major downfalls but I am quite pleased with how they handle complaints.

Jstaleness
Sep 26, 2011, 7:39 PM
Congrats on their response time. I wish I had of had the same as a driver making a complaint. Bus 972 I believe tried to make a left hand turn from the outside lane of Highfield Park onto Victoria Rd almost forcing me into the inner guard rail. Good to see they have improved on that portion of customer service.

Speaking of. I was watching Global News (don't shoot me) and their lead story was the need for a Rapid transit option for Halifax. Whether it be rail or ferry there was a poll completed and 92% of voters say that's the number one thing that is needed for transportation in Halifax. The mayor and a few others were interviewed and while not against it seemed as if it was cost that was preventing it. I'm glad it is now being talked about on the evening news though. It's a step in the right direction.

Keith P.
Sep 27, 2011, 1:22 AM
Complaints about MT drivers seldom amount to anything. The union, not management, runs MT and drivers seldom have to be accountable for their behavior.

Dmajackson
Sep 30, 2011, 9:05 PM
Metro Transit is moving ahead with plans for a new MetroX parking lot off of Exit 4 on Highway 103. The public hearing for the rezoning required is on October 24th at the Keshman Goodman Library.

Case 16811 Details (http://www.halifax.ca/planning/Case16811Details.html)

Dmajackson
Oct 7, 2011, 6:02 AM
I was looking for some other photos and ended up viewing this collection of Metro Transit pictures taken by a bus driver (I presume). All photos below taken by Wilson Hum @ Hfx (on Flickr) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/55378459@N07/)

Sackville Terminal (can you guess what route is in front of the building?):

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6180/6206848043_620afc03a0_z.jpg

The new hybrid bus

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6152/6177182867_d873d257e0_z.jpg

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6070/6104654882_c533950ee4_z.jpg

Ragged Lake Transit Centre

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6184/6142089158_a74a15f0b6_z.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3654/5798238317_f4957e1c6b_z.jpg

Downsview Terminal

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2634/5819081931_373620fc40_z.jpg

Mumford Terminal

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5156/5896416693_ff2e282a62_z.jpg

Woodside Terminal

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5227/5557297996_ede89689fd_z.jpg

Jstaleness
Oct 7, 2011, 12:41 PM
I was looking for some other photos and ended up viewing this collection of Metro Transit pictures taken by a bus driver (I presume). All photos below taken by Wilson Hum @ Hfx (on Flickr) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/55378459@N07/)

Sackville Terminal (can you guess what route is in front of the building?):

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6180/6206848043_620afc03a0_z.jpg



That has to be none other than the 80 Sackville. Voted favorite route of every Metro Transit Rider.

DigitalNinja
Oct 8, 2011, 12:23 AM
Oh the 80, how many stinky old men do you have to seat next to me?

Jstaleness
Oct 17, 2011, 12:36 AM
Prep work at the new terminal in Dartmouth is looking good. When I was there yesterday it looked like all the trees are cut and most of the ground had at least the top layers cleared away. The high school is now quite visible from Nantucket Ave., so they cut more trees than I thought. Over all I was surprised by how large the area looks. Sorry no pics as I didn't have a camera with me.

Jstaleness
Nov 23, 2011, 5:53 PM
As per a Twitter post on news957.com there are not one but 2 Articulated buses jammed on Oxford st. One is being reported as wrapped around a pole. Hopefully they aren't our new buses.
I guess it's the 80 and it's a tree and not a pole. I hope someone snaps a picture.

Josh M
Nov 23, 2011, 8:46 PM
I guess it's the 80 and it's a tree and not a pole.

Maybe they'll finally retire one of the 80s

JET
Dec 16, 2011, 8:04 PM
Wilderness terminated
Halifax council approves building new Bridge Terminal on urban wilderness land
POSTED BY TIM BOUSQUET ON THU, JUN 10, 2010 AT 1:41 PM

The proposed expansion of Metro Transit's Bridge Terminal is one step closer to reality, as Halifax council Tuesday gave its final OK to placing the new terminal on land occupied by the Urban Wilderness Park in the Dartmouth Common. Council still has to approve architectural plans and allocate the money to build the terminal but, judging by councillors' statements Tuesday, those actions should present no substantial impediments to the project. If all goes according to plan, construction will start this construction season, with completion in 2011.
Many Dartmouth residents say the removal of the wilderness park and building a large bus terminal next to Dartmouth high school is emblematic of Halifax disdain for Dartmouth. "If this was a proposal to build a bus terminal on the Halifax Common next to Citadel High, we wouldn't be here," said Jane MacKay, a former member of the old Dartmouth school board. "It wouldn't be a question---it'd be impossible."

City staff countered that there is simply no other site for the terminal. Placing it west of Wyse Road or at Alderney Landing was rejected for a variety of logistical reasons (see tinyurl.com/BadTerminalIdeas). An earlier plan to simply extend the existing terminal up Nantucket Avenue was changed after Dartmouth High students and staff objected that the terminal came within 80 feet of the school building.

The amended plan places the terminal perpendicular to Nantucket, stretching to Thistle Street. At it's closest, the terminal will be about 300 feet from the school building, with the school's sports field in between. The terminal will be dug into the hill---18 tonnes of slate will be removed---and so, argues staff, the hill will shield the school from the sound and glare of the terminal.

"It's a very tough decision for me," said Dartmouth councillor Gloria McCluskey. "If there was any other site, I wouldn't be supporting this, but there is no other site." The new terminal will have 18 bus bays, a heated waiting area with snack bar and much-needed washrooms. It will cost $9.5 million to build.

http://www.thecoast.ca/imager/an-architectural-rendering-of-the-proposed-bridge-terminal/b/original/1683642/6cb1/Bridge_Terminal.jpg

this is the phto from the sign where the construction is.

halifaxboyns
Jan 4, 2012, 10:49 PM
Some video from the "More than buses" stuff that Jonovision was doing with fusion.

link (http://youtu.be/7U8moIwLVRU)

bluenoser
Jan 12, 2012, 5:39 PM
Here are a bunch of pictures of metro transit buses (and their surroundings) from 1992. Click 'show info' on the top right for a writeup.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/49744222@N08/sets/72157628259149861/show/with/6449056355

I was a little surprised to see ads for MT&T Mobility and the green 'Clean Machine'. They seem pretty advanced for 1992. And the old Superstore style brought back memories!

halifaxboyns
Jan 12, 2012, 6:47 PM
Those scania buses were fun, but really dangerous. Those high back seats, if you hit a bump the right way, you were being sent upward or forward.

Some of those old GMC buses are still in use, loved the ones with the automatic back doors that would open and close without you pushing it.

Dmajackson
Jan 12, 2012, 6:49 PM
I think a couple of those buses are still used on the 80. :P (or at least the seats look the same).

Whatever happened to Route 8?

cormiermax
Jan 12, 2012, 7:34 PM
Anyone know which superstore that was? Great images, although I was a little disappointed not to see Quinpool or Spring Garden. Seems its rare to see images from those areas in the 90's.

-Harlington-
Jan 12, 2012, 9:34 PM
I believe the Superstore is Downsview in Sackville judging by the picture

Kinda funny seeing those in comparison to now .

Keith P.
Jan 12, 2012, 9:51 PM
I liked the Scania buses as a passenger. They had a lot of get up and go, but I gather they were troublesome and needed frequent repair.

The old GMC fishbowls were crude by today's standards, but built like tanks and lasted forever.

The later GM/MCI "classics" were nowhere near as good, though all were far superior to today's low-floor buses as they actually had usable seating capacity instead of all the wasted space the low-floors use for the occasional passenger in a wheelchair. A prime example of govt standards being set unrealistically for a tiny squeaky-wheel minority that negatively impacts the vast majority who pays the freight.

spaustin
Jan 12, 2012, 10:07 PM
The later GM/MCI "classics" were nowhere near as good, though all were far superior to today's low-floor buses as they actually had usable seating capacity instead of all the wasted space the low-floors use for the occasional passenger in a wheelchair. A prime example of govt standards being set unrealistically for a tiny squeaky-wheel minority that negatively impacts the vast majority who pays the freight.

Yep those people in wheelchairs get all the breaks :rolleyes:

pblaauw
Jan 12, 2012, 11:27 PM
The later GM/MCI "classics" were nowhere near as good, though all were far superior to today's low-floor buses as they actually had usable seating capacity instead of all the wasted space the low-floors use for the occasional passenger in a wheelchair. A prime example of govt standards being set unrealistically for a tiny squeaky-wheel minority that negatively impacts the vast majority who pays the freight.

It's not as great as it sounds, especially when you're on the 14 and it stops at SMU, taking on 15-20, and they all stand around you and don't "move to the back of the bus" like the driver tells them too.

The new Artics are nicer, in that they don't need BOTH seats to be up, in order for a wheelchair to be there. At least, not my Quickie. The trade-off is the crappy one-belt tie-down system, and the fact that there seems to be no uniform way of using it.

I'm really hoping MT gets NewFlyer DE60 ALFs next time they go shopping for buses. The two blue buses are great for transporting chairs.

As for having to stand up because a wheelchair is using the seats: people with the ability to use their legs should, uh, use them once in a while. ;P (Just like I sometimes use crutches when I go out with friends.)

alps
Jan 13, 2012, 12:42 AM
Great collection of photos! The front of the Scania is pretty unique looking. In case anyone didn't notice, there are some other NS photos (http://www.flickr.com/photos/49744222@N08/collections/72157628705302387/) on that Flickr page. Not too many photos of the cities and towns themselves but some interesting stuff nonetheless.

Keith P.
Jan 13, 2012, 12:59 AM
Yep those people in wheelchairs get all the breaks :rolleyes:

Of course not. But you are disadvantaging 99% of the public and spending tons of extra money on something that could be far better and more efficiently done by other means at less cost. One size does not fit all.

-Harlington-
Jan 31, 2012, 7:18 PM
Not an official source but a lot of people on my Facebook are saying that the Metro Transit strike is going to start on Thursday .

fenwick16
Feb 25, 2012, 1:41 PM
Here is a link to the story about the Transit workers rejecting the city's offer - http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2012/02/24/ns-strike-vote-reject-hrm-offer.html. Good for the city and Mayor Kelly for standing up to this unreasonable union.

This seems like an excellent time for the city to sell off some of its buses and plan an all automated LRT system.


Striking transit union votes 78% against HRM offer
CBC News
Posted: Feb 24, 2012 5:03 PM AT
Last Updated: Feb 24, 2012 11:00 PM AT


Members of the Amalgamated Transit Union local 508 have rejected the city's latest contract offer by a margin of 78 per cent, thus continuing the three-week old Metro Transit strike.

Halifax Regional Municipality has also enforced its bylaw banning burning barrels, which some of the picket workers have done to keep warm and cook food.

The fine for open-air burning is a minimum $250.

The reason for rejecting the offer, said Ken Wilson, the union's president, was that they want control of shift scheduling, called rostering.

Halifax Regional Municipality presented what Mayor Peter Kelly called its "final" offer Thursday.

HRM's offer was reached with the union and a conciliator – a five-year collective agreement, $1,500 signing bonus and 2.25 per cent increase in each of the last four years.
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Some of these strikers think they have the right to ignore city by-laws and make wood sheds of bus shelters.


(source: http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/66971-city-douses-burn-barrels-striking-transit-workers)
City douses burn barrels for striking transit workers
February 25, 2012 - 4:31am By PATRICIA BROOKS ARENBURG Staff Reporter

http://thechronicleherald.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/ch_article_main_image/tk021712strike.jpg
Striking Metro Transit workers have kept fires burning in barrels at various picket lines since the strike began on Feb. 2. But on Friday, HRM ordered the ATU to put out the flames. (TIM KROCHAK / Staff)



The city has thrown cold water on a three-week-old fire.

Striking Metro Transit workers have kept fires burning in barrels at various picket lines since the strike began on Feb. 2.

But on Friday afternoon, the Halifax Regional Municipality ordered the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 508 to put out the flames.
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.

Jstaleness
Feb 25, 2012, 4:10 PM
The one at the Burnside Bus Garage is still burning as of 12pm today.

Keith P.
Feb 25, 2012, 8:20 PM
The one at the Burnside Bus Garage is still burning as of 12pm today.

They're probably hoping some sparks stray and burn down the garage.

W.Sobchak
Feb 25, 2012, 8:57 PM
This seems like an excellent time for the city to sell off some of its buses and plan an all automated LRT system.


An excellent idea!

someone123
Feb 25, 2012, 9:43 PM
This seems like an excellent time for the city to sell off some of its buses and plan an all automated LRT system.

I've been thinking that myself this whole time!

Hali87
Feb 25, 2012, 11:55 PM
This seems like an excellent time for the city to sell off some of its buses and plan an all automated LRT system.

I was thinking the same thing. The problem with automated though is that it has to be fully grade-separated, to eliminate any potential interaction (read: collisions) with vehicles that are not on its system. This substantially increases capital costs, and takes a lot longer to build than simply laying tracks. Plus, where would it go?

someone123
Feb 26, 2012, 1:01 AM
It probably won't be too long (10-20 years barring political interference, I would guess) before we see an automated transit system that can handle some degree of mixed traffic.

There's already a pretty successful Google/Stanford project that has constructed automated cars that can handle mixed traffic. The problem of driving a transit vehicle along a roughly fixed path would be somewhat easier.

halifaxboyns
Feb 26, 2012, 9:13 AM
Not knocking the idea of automated LRT - but doesn't the sky train use a linear induction motor which powers the train from below? Wouldn't that necessitate that HRM build elevated guideways like Vancouver?

Those are expensive and the maintenance in 50-60 years is going to be hefty. There is already concern here in Calgary for the portion of the West LRT which is elevated because of the future costs.

While I'm not a fan of transit unions, wouldn't running a system that could interface with traffic or run at grade be cheaper versus elevated guide ways or tunneling?

Jstaleness
Feb 26, 2012, 3:20 PM
I did some number checking. Vancouver had a population of 514,000 and a CMA of over 1.8 million in 1986. That was the year their automated skytrain went into service. I'm an optimistic person but I don't think Halifax at around 400,000 and a much, much smaller CMA could support such a system yet. Commuter Rail and buses are going to be our norm for the near future.

fenwick16
Feb 26, 2012, 3:44 PM
Maybe Halifax should consider separating the ferry service from Metro Transit so that in case of a Transit strike there will still be cross harbour transit alternatives (however, it would have to be a separate labour union).

DigitalNinja
Feb 26, 2012, 3:53 PM
Yeah Halifax won't get an automated LRT route anytime soon. The only way that we would get an LRT route is by using esisting track that would require little start up costs.

I was thinking. I believe that Halifax could potentially have a very good BRT system that uses (at least some) trolly busses. Trolly busses, make no noise, are environmentally friendly, and cheap to operate. (Potentially having automated trolly buses with little extra cost down the road.)

Routes could easily be served by having conventional buses that go to a BRT station. Building a real exclusive bus road would be cheap, and electric trolly buses can easily navigate hilly terrain.

Keith P.
Feb 26, 2012, 6:04 PM
Whenever you are dealing with a militant, intransigent, largely unmanageable unionized workforce, any investment in automation that reduces headcount is a wise use of capital. Eventually one hopes that MT will be entirely automated and have no need for very many ATU members. Or alternatively, that council fires the lot and starts over with a new model that does not require the ATU at all.

someone123
Feb 26, 2012, 7:54 PM
Yeah Halifax won't get an automated LRT route anytime soon. The only way that we would get an LRT route is by using esisting track that would require little start up costs.

I agree that Halifax probably can't afford a SkyTrain-like system, but disagree that LRT can only be viable in Halifax if existing tracks are used. The preoccupation with using existing track has been a kind of straightjacket that has held council and others back from discussing the full range of possibilities.

Building new track at grade is not unreasonable in a city that can afford highways. It may make sense given the problems of the existing tracks. It's not even clear that the city can use the CN right of way, for example, and if it is made available it still won't be a great route. The attitude that any old infrastructure sitting around is a huge windfall is not correct -- often it's obsolete or problematic in some way and better to instead build something new that works properly.

We really need to get away from the "this is Halifax! We can't afford nice things here!" mentality and start actually considering the possibilities.

DigitalNinja
Feb 26, 2012, 8:42 PM
I'm just unsure of where another track would go considering the terrain.

someone123
Feb 26, 2012, 10:01 PM
Tracks can go along the middle of boulevards or on top of existing road lanes. Using up 1-2 road lanes along one major corridor wouldn't affect other traffic much and could be positive if it meant eliminating bus traffic.

A street like Robie by the North Common could have rail tracks on the Common side and completely separated vehicle traffic. At bottlenecks either signaling or short tunnels/overpasses could be used. As a modest starting point an LRT/streetcar system might serve only the core and then get out to a terminal like Mumford, where bus service would begin. This sort of hybrid approach makes more sense than thinking about a 100% elevated system vs. at-grade.

Long term plans could include stuff like a short tunnel with underground stations along Spring Garden Road or rail on one of the bridges, particularly if a third crossing is built. Imagine how great a neighbourhood like south Barrington/Hollis and the seawall would be with comfortable rail service and zero truck traffic. Getting ugly diesel buses off of Barrington and Spring Garden Road would also be great.

DigitalNinja
Feb 27, 2012, 9:05 AM
Our favorite journalist posted a well done article about the transit strike. He got some copies of current and proposed scheduling systems and compared them and explained how they are used. Overall it is a very good article and worth a read.

I posted links at the bottom of this post to the article as well as PDF's of the schedules. The PDF's are quite large, first is 120mb second is 88mb.


In context: What a bus driver's day looks like
Plus: why are the buses never on schedule?
The Coast
Posted by Tim Bousquet
Sun, Feb 26, 2012 at 3:59 PM


It's frustrating that for the duration of the transit strike, now in its 24th day, we---the public---are left hearing competing versions of the scheduling and overtime issues that are at the heart of conflict, but haven't been provided with much information beyond talking points.

Fortunately, yesterday a bus driver gave me the actual scheduling documents used to assign shifts, called the "run cut," and the proposed documents that the city wants to use. I don't know why neither the city nor the union made these documents public before, but now people can look at the documents and form their own conclusions.

In the interest of getting as much information in the hands of readers as possible, yesterday I scanned in the dozens of pages and uploaded them to our website. But be forewarned: these are very large PDF files, and will take a while to download. I suggest opening them in another tab, and reading further as they download to your computer. (And please forgive the low quality of these scans-- it's the weekend and The Coast's tech people are out of the office; I'll try to improve them tomorrow.)

There are two documents. The first is a list of the existing bus driver shifts, as of November 2011, found here (PDF, 120 MB). The second is an example of the proposed "roster" of shifts the city is putting forward, as presented to drivers, and is here (PDF, 88 MB).

.

.

.


The whole article can be found here http://www.thecoast.ca/RealityBites/archives/2012/02/26/in-context-what-a-bus-drivers-day-looks-like

With sample files of schedules here:

Existing system, Nov. 2011 (http://www.thecoast.ca/general/pdfs/ExistingScheduling.pdf)

Proposed rostering system (http://www.thecoast.ca/general/pdfs/CityProposal.pdf)

Hali87
Apr 3, 2012, 7:05 PM
Metro Transit wants to add, cut routes (http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/80534-metro-transit-wants-add-cut-routes)

Or alternately, Metro Transit hates seniors, leading them to cut redundant routes with no ridership (http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/80534-metro-transit-wants-add-cut-routes)

Or, Who would pay $3 to get to the airport when you can get a cab for $50? (http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/80534-metro-transit-wants-add-cut-routes)

spaustin
Apr 3, 2012, 8:01 PM
Other tidbits from Metro Transit is they're finally going to make the routes on Portland Street make sense. Instead of following each other in a parade, they're going to space them out, effectively giving 10 minute frequency on Portland from Portland Hills to the bridge. I didn't see it in the media report, so maybe it got dropped, but Metro Transit's presentation to council also indicated that they're going to cut the later ferry runs. That seems counterproductive. The ferry isn't just a bus that runs along a road, it's an alternative route that doesn't exist when it's not there. The last run will be 10:30 instead of 11:30. They should be heading in the opposite direction. Maybe cut later runs on Monday-Thursday, but on Friday and Saturday nights when people are out and there are events Downtown or at Alderney, the ferry's should go later into the evening. If we want a vibrant centre, we should be trying to ensure that Halifax and Dartmouth's respective Downtowns compliment each other. The ferry offers a good connection between the two and it's actually fun for people to ride (people who won't ride a bus will happily hop on the ferry). With Downtown Dartmouth now coming into its own, this seems like the wrong decision. They're also going to ditch Sunday mornings.

http://www.halifax.ca/council/agendasc/documents/120402cow3transit.pdf

someone123
Apr 24, 2012, 1:04 AM
Ferry service is being cut (http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/89468-metro-transit-cuts-back-halifax-dartmouth-ferry-service). Service will end at 10:30 p.m. on weekdays and Saturday, and Sunday service won't start until 11:30 a.m. Apparently this is related to a 290 passenger per hour target set by council a few years ago.

Of course this comes on the heels of a protracted transit strike. In the end the result seems to be that if you're in Halifax you can't rely on transit -- better get a car if you can afford it.

I wonder if they purposefully chose to include a picture of King's Wharf with the article:

http://thechronicleherald.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/ch_article_main_image/articles/tk122811weather1_0.jpg

Keith P.
Apr 24, 2012, 9:34 PM
Apparently the late-night runs often have 10 or 20 passengers on a boat that can hold something like 400.

The service standard was approved by Council a few years ago.

The cut was included in MT's budget submission to Council last month. Apparently not a single councillor bothered to read it.

What does this say about our standard of governance and oversight?

1. Council sets a standard and directs MT to meet it.
2. MT decides that a service is not meeting aid standard and reduces service as a result.
3. MT submits its plans to Council and nobody complains.
4. A month later it gets noted in the press and all hell breaks loose.

No bloody wonder nobody wants to be the boss at MT.

beyeas
Apr 26, 2012, 4:09 PM
Apparently the late-night runs often have 10 or 20 passengers on a boat that can hold something like 400.

The service standard was approved by Council a few years ago.

The cut was included in MT's budget submission to Council last month. Apparently not a single councillor bothered to read it.

What does this say about our standard of governance and oversight?

1. Council sets a standard and directs MT to meet it.
2. MT decides that a service is not meeting aid standard and reduces service as a result.
3. MT submits its plans to Council and nobody complains.
4. A month later it gets noted in the press and all hell breaks loose.

No bloody wonder nobody wants to be the boss at MT.

Yeah I had the exact same thoughts.

It also "amused" me (in a black humour sense) that Gloria & Sloane were both wound up about how horrible this was for their respective fiefdoms, and yet didn't care at all about cutting other routes. The entire operation of this council revolves around screaming about "oh my poor area, boo hoo, we are so hard done by" and all the while expecting other areas to be held to performance targets which are only fine as long as they aren't applied to you.

They need to either be for target based efficiency measures, or not, but they can't be selectively against them only when it affects their fiefdom.
MT is never going to be able to move forward and grow in an operationally efficient way unless councillors get out of the way of the operations and stick to creating performance goals while letting MT decide how to best meet them (Unless Gloria went out and got a degree in transportation management when I wasn't looking).

This is a prime example of what was discussed at the Progress Magazine's forum on innovation yesterday. We were asked what qualities make an organization innovative, and in our group we turned it around and said that we wanted to start by identifying qualities that make organizations anti-innovation. One major example of the latter was a bureaucratic structure in which the upper decision makers ignore the expertise of the people they hired and hence overrule them, rather than simply defining what you want to achieve and leaving it to the experts that you hired to find and implement the best solutions whatever that might be.

armorand93
May 7, 2012, 4:16 AM
I agree that Halifax probably can't afford a SkyTrain-like system, but disagree that LRT can only be viable in Halifax if existing tracks are used. The preoccupation with using existing track has been a kind of straightjacket that has held council and others back from discussing the full range of possibilities.

Building new track at grade is not unreasonable in a city that can afford highways. It may make sense given the problems of the existing tracks. It's not even clear that the city can use the CN right of way, for example, and if it is made available it still won't be a great route. The attitude that any old infrastructure sitting around is a huge windfall is not correct -- often it's obsolete or problematic in some way and better to instead build something new that works properly.

We really need to get away from the "this is Halifax! We can't afford nice things here!" mentality and start actually considering the possibilities.

You guys and us Winnipeggers have the same LRT issue. :P

jasonashhh
May 19, 2012, 10:37 PM
Did anyone see a picture of the new metro x buses for the airport run? Their a smaller size than the new double buses we have now they look pretty nice :) if anyone has a photo pls post

worldlyhaligonian
May 20, 2012, 4:43 AM
You guys and us Winnipeggers have the same LRT issue. :P

Its a problem all across Canada. We are one of the most wealthy countries in the world. WTF.

Its psychology, not reality. We need to put more attention toward public transport that isn't buses in existing traffic. Its a no brainer... but we have all these assholes talking about costs like we are under Greek austerity or something.

The federal government should really roll out an innovation strategy centered around public transportation. I'm not into conspiracies, but our politicians must be buying into some kind of car culture argument. I believe in cars, especially with the way things are going with new engine formats. But there has to be some sort of diversion away from rural roads to urban transport.

Let's be honest, the usage would be way higher in Halifax. Fuck politics, lets deal with realities.

Nouvellecosse
May 21, 2012, 8:46 PM
Did anyone see a picture of the new metro x buses for the airport run? Their a smaller size than the new double buses we have now they look pretty nice :) if anyone has a photo pls postI'm so excited! The shuttle is supposed to launch the 31st and I plan be be on it. I'm not going anywhere; I'll just go out, sit around the airport for an hour, then go back. :P

someone123
May 21, 2012, 11:05 PM
The federal government should really roll out an innovation strategy centered around public transportation. I'm not into conspiracies, but our politicians must be buying into some kind of car culture argument. I believe in cars, especially with the way things are going with new engine formats. But there has to be some sort of diversion away from rural roads to urban transport.

Even if there were no pollution problems with cars there would still be space problems. In bigger cities there isn't enough space for everybody to drive around -- you can't have Midtown Manhattan and yet also have everybody drive their own car. In small towns you can get away with surface and street parking.

I think part of the problem is that Halifax is transitioning between small town and bigger city. City Hall in a lot of ways still hangs on to the small town mentality and moves at a small town pace when more ambitious solutions are needed. There are many parts of the city where fiddling with street parking or adding buses is really not going to solve anything, for example.

One weird aspect of this is that the province and HDBC managed some highway planning and bridges, so there's a big disconnect between different types of transportations proposed. We might get a 6-lane 102, 113, third bridge, there's that 10-lane Dartmouth highway, etc., but HRM can't even handle Bayers Road. If transit planning were done at the same scale as highways and bridges Halifax would be in a much better state.

Nouvellecosse
May 21, 2012, 11:38 PM
Ever consider coming back and running for council? ;)

spaustin
May 22, 2012, 2:20 AM
The federal government should really roll out an innovation strategy centered around public transportation. I'm not into conspiracies, but our politicians must be buying into some kind of car culture argument. I believe in cars, especially with the way things are going with new engine formats. But there has to be some sort of diversion away from rural roads to urban transport.

On transit, the federal government is completely ineffective. The federal answer to public transit was to give everyone a transit tax credit that has taken billions out of the federal treasury over the last several years. No one is going to start taking transit because they'll get some tiny tax break several months down the line, so the public transit tax credit basically rewarded people for doing something they were going to do anyway. In other words, it has zero impact. Now consider if they had taken that money that was given up on the wasted tax credit and actually invested it in public transit. That would have produced way more bang for the buck! Even if widely spread across the country, it could still have made a difference because municipalities and provinces would have matched the funds. Our Metro Link routes are a good example of that. They came about because of fairly modest federal investments. Don't expect the Tories to change tact anytime soon though as tax credits are their answer to everything (even when they don't work).

scooby074
May 22, 2012, 2:23 AM
Sort of on the LRT front.

Anybody notice the new walking trail from Upper Water (near the sewage plant) to the MacDonald bridge?

Paved too.

That would have been a great location for the LRT corridor to the dockyards.

Gotta wonder why the heck spend the money on a new, paved walking trail, complete with wooden guardrails and planted trees when there is a sidewalk not 10' away :koko: Only in Halifax

gm_scott
May 22, 2012, 9:27 PM
^ I hate this new path. Seems so out of place in an urban setting

someone123
May 22, 2012, 10:00 PM
On transit, the federal government is completely ineffective. The federal answer to public transit was to give everyone a transit tax credit that has taken billions out of the federal treasury over the last several years. No one is going to start taking transit because they'll get some tiny tax break several months down the line, so the public transit tax credit basically rewarded people for doing something they were going to do anyway. In other words, it has zero impact. Now consider if they had taken that money that was given up on the wasted tax credit and actually invested it in public transit. That would have produced way more bang for the buck! Even if widely spread across the country, it could still have made a difference because municipalities and provinces would have matched the funds. Our Metro Link routes are a good example of that. They came about because of fairly modest federal investments. Don't expect the Tories to change tact anytime soon though as tax credits are their answer to everything (even when they don't work).

There's a huge amount of inequality between different parts of the country because of the ad hoc nature of federal transit funding. Projects are not necessarily treated equally based on their merits, so they are often funded based on political opportunism and sexiness.

On top of this in NS the provincial government does not fund Halifax projects in the same way that BC, Ontario, or other provinces fund their major cities. It is amazing how much of a difference in attitude there is between BC and NS despite the fact that BC covers a larger geographic area.

To put things into perspective, you can look at financing of specific projects. MetroLink was a $13.3M project. HRM paid $8M of that, the federal government picked up $4M, and the province picked up about $1M.

In Vancouver the Canada Line received $450M from the federal government. That is like about 8 MetroLink projects, if we correct for the population of the two cities. The Canada Line opened in 2009 and they are already building another line, the Evergreen Line, in 2012. The Evergreen Line is getting $400M from the federal government, $600M from the province of BC, and $400M from Translink. Of Translink's money, a good chunk is from special parking and fuel taxes.

This disparity is enormous. No wonder why Vancouver has better transit -- Translink is receiving 10 to 20 times more money per capita from the province and federal government for capital expenses. On top of that, Translink has extra powers of taxation.

Part of the blame lies with the federal government, part of it lies with the province for pandering to rural NS, and part of the blame lies with HRM for failing to propose and go after funding for larger projects. HRM leaves a tremendous amount of money on the table due to its lack of vision, direction, and competence.

someone123
May 22, 2012, 10:12 PM
Ever consider coming back and running for council? ;)

Not really. That would mean campaigning for the possibility of winning a job with lower pay, longer hours, and many terrible coworkers. I'd be leaving my current career, which could cause problems after one or two terms as a councillor. Realistically as a councillor there's also not a ton of opportunity to make a difference on more than a really small level. If I wanted to have a positive impact on the city I'd be better off starting a business and moving back. I think hiring a dozen people and, say, moving a tech company into downtown offices is a far bigger impact than the cat and chicken bylaws.

I can understand why it's not a very appealing job and why we have councillors getting acclaimed or winning with 1,000 votes. Maybe it will get better with the smaller council.

Nouvellecosse
May 23, 2012, 12:56 AM
Wow, that sounds pretty dire...

But on the bright side, you sound pretty successful. So kudos for that! :cool:

DB15
May 23, 2012, 9:01 AM
Sort of on the LRT front.

Anybody notice the new walking trail from Upper Water (near the sewage plant) to the MacDonald bridge?

Paved too.

That would have been a great location for the LRT corridor to the dockyards.

Gotta wonder why the heck spend the money on a new, paved walking trail, complete with wooden guardrails and planted trees when there is a sidewalk not 10' away :koko: Only in Halifax

It is a multiuse pathway. Cycling on Barrington is a death trap to most. This was badly needed.

Waye Mason
May 23, 2012, 3:55 PM
It is a multiuse pathway. Cycling on Barrington is a death trap to most. This was badly needed.

QFT.

Also - I think the LRT should go down the old railway cut, or the middle of a widened Upper Water Street/Lord Provost Drive.

someone123
May 23, 2012, 6:54 PM
I believe that path was also built on top of a natural gas line and paid for by a private company.

Nouvellecosse - yeah, I was being negative, mostly because I find it interesting to point out that municipal politics are only really attractive for a narrow subset of the population. I think that's why HRM regional council has such narrow demographics. I'm also not sure that I'd personally be suited to the job.

alps
May 23, 2012, 9:25 PM
Does that trail alongside Barrington still end abruptly at a concrete barrier at Upper Water street?

Here's a fantasy LRT map I posted a couple years back that uses both that right-of-way, and the rail cut, for LRT:

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5015/5536240233_3e0b34b1f2_b.jpg

someone123, if you don't mind me asking: what field do you work in?

DigitalNinja
May 24, 2012, 3:59 AM
That map is really well done!

Even if we just got B line it would work out really well IMO for Halifax and would get a lot of riders!

scooby074
May 24, 2012, 4:14 AM
It is a multiuse pathway. Cycling on Barrington is a death trap to most. This was badly needed.

The path is what, 1km at most? How is that improving cycling on Barrington? You still have to merge with traffic both before and after the new trail.

Frankly, I say screw the cyclists.. They bitched and moaned trying to get a bike lane along Agricola that would interfere with established businesses and customers.. You know the ones paying taxes there.

Cyclists.. yet another special interest group in halifax

That corridor used for LRT would be much more beneficial to the majority of citizens compared to its current use.

scooby074
May 24, 2012, 4:24 AM
I believe that path was also built on top of a natural gas line and paid for by a private company.
.

Not sure if it's over a gas line or not. I'll look for markings next time i'm by.

Also unsure of who is paying for it. Land is owned by HRM. Estimated Budget for the project that I saw,was $147,000. Its almost comical. No mention of private partnership that I saw.

spaustin
May 24, 2012, 4:47 AM
The path is what, 1km at most? How is that improving cycling on Barrington? You still have to merge with traffic both before and after the new trail.

Frankly, I say screw the cyclists.. They bitched and moaned trying to get a bike lane along Agricola that would interfere with established businesses and customers.. You know the ones paying taxes there.

Cyclists.. yet another special interest group in halifax

That corridor for LRT would be much more beneficial to the majority of citizens compared to its current use.

Right, because all cyclists are leaches :rolleyes: Have you ever looked at the bridge in the morning during rush hour? It's quite a constant string of bikes commuters going to jobs Downtown. Cycling is something we should be promoting. Our climate isn't that bad compared to a lot of places because we don't get a lot of really bone chilling cold and the snow tends to come and go. We're also blessed with a nice and compact old city that makes cycling a good way to get around. Bicycle lanes cost very little to install and maintain compared to roadways and carry obvious benefits to society in terms of moving people around efficiently and promoting healthy living. Pretty much anyone can afford a bike so they're great for those who don't have a lot of cash but still need to get around. The whole bikes versus cars or the now even sillier bikes versus LRT debate is tiresome. One does not preclude the other. If we ever had an LRT built along Barrington, the cycling lane could easily be moved. Although you're absolutely right about HRM's tendency towards useless infrastructure. HRM's scattershot approach to cycling really helps no one. We don't have an active transportation network, we have a bunch of unconnected pieces. Where do they think cyclists go when the lanes just vanish or there's no easy way to get to them? When I cycle in from Dartmouth, I come off the bridge and immediately head up Artz to Brunswick as Barrington just isn't worth going near!

cormiermax
May 24, 2012, 5:31 AM
The path is what, 1km at most? How is that improving cycling on Barrington? You still have to merge with traffic both before and after the new trail.

Frankly, I say screw the cyclists.. They bitched and moaned trying to get a bike lane along Agricola that would interfere with established businesses and customers.. You know the ones paying taxes there.

Cyclists.. yet another special interest group in halifax

That corridor used for LRT would be much more beneficial to the majority of citizens compared to its current use.

Rob Ford? Is that you?

scooby074
May 24, 2012, 2:37 PM
Take a drive some summer day from Tantallon to Hubbards along St. Margrets Bay Rd. and you'll learn all you need to know about the cyclist mentality..

3 wide, unwilling to move over and let a car by, flipping you the bird and giving dirty looks when you dare pass, because you dont want to drive 15Kph all the way back to Tantallon

Yeah.. well my fuel taxes and licensing paid for a lot of that highway.

Bikers should be required to have plates and pay license fees as well. At least if they had plates one could report their ignorant asses.

Im sure there are respectful bicyclists out there, but a few run ins with the ignorant ones can sour you for the whole breed.

someone123
May 24, 2012, 7:28 PM
someone123, if you don't mind me asking: what field do you work in?

Software stuff. Really nothing to do with politics.

Phalanx
May 24, 2012, 9:49 PM
Im sure there are respectful bicyclists out there, but a few run ins with the ignorant ones can sour you for the whole breed.

The same can be said for plenty of drivers...

W.Sobchak
May 24, 2012, 9:52 PM
Bicycles, are just another bulwark towards less cars on the road.

While I agree that some attitudes of bicyclists, walk the line of privilege, instead of a right to share the road.

While Halifax has been lucky to this point with a strong grass roots bicycle user base, who have had to knuckle down and deal with a very car focused city. The recent explosion over the last ten years of bicyclist, is a symbol of the times, and a sign for the city to take pro-active steps to encourage this trend of active transportation.

I :heart: Portlands multi-modular "bike" lanes.

http://www.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/02_11/port-bikebox_1.jpg

I feel that Portland is an example of decisive long term approaches, to the North American Urban regression we've experienced, since 1949.

RyeJay
May 29, 2012, 11:33 PM
Gen Y doesn't buy cars: study

Kids these days. That’s the phrase on the mind of automakers looking at recent trends showing the lack of enthusiasm young people have for purchasing a car. According a recent report by CNW Group, only 27 percent of youths aged 21-34 purchase a new car, compared to 28 percent in 1985. For drivers under the age of 19, the numbers are even worse, having dropped down two thirds from only 1998.

So what’s at the root of young people’s apathy? There are plenty of theories, everything ranging from the economy to mounting student debts to low-paying jobs straight out of school. The answer is most likely a combination of factors.

For young adults coming out of school, many of who have incurred healthy debts, the idea of buying a car and adding to their debt leaves a bad taste in their mouths. Paying off student debts is seen as a priority, while owning a new car is a luxury. Add into the equation low wages and high insurance prices, and you’ve got a potent mix of reasons not to buy a new car.

Link: http://ca.autos.yahoo.com/p/2496/gen-y-doesnt-buy-cars-study

someone123
May 30, 2012, 12:37 AM
There are a lot of generational differences growing that people seem slow to recognize. Most older people I know for example think that younger people have more opportunity now, but I'm not sure how true that really is. With high student debt loads and high costs for things like housing and cars I think we will see lower purchasing power for younger people, delayed child birth, etc. There might be more debt-fuelled spending right now but over the long run that does not result in higher consumer demand.

There are also some big cultural changes, and many of them are good. Smoking for example used to be the thing the cool kids did in 1980 or 1990 and it's just not anymore. Similarly I think suburban living has lost a lot of its appeal in certain cities. The vast majority of Canadian 19-30 year olds grew up in suburbia and consider it uninteresting. The answer to that used to be that the kids will grow up, have kids themselves, and then they will want the 2 car garage and minivan. Younger people aren't having as many kids though. If it weren't for immigration I don't even know if Canada's population would be growing. As it is the population in NS is not growing.

Halifax Hillbilly
May 30, 2012, 12:09 PM
Gen Y doesn't buy cars: study

Kids these days. That’s the phrase on the mind of automakers looking at recent trends showing the lack of enthusiasm young people have for purchasing a car. According a recent report by CNW Group, only 27 percent of youths aged 21-34 purchase a new car, compared to 28 percent in 1985. For drivers under the age of 19, the numbers are even worse, having dropped down two thirds from only 1998.

Link: http://ca.autos.yahoo.com/p/2496/gen-y-doesnt-buy-cars-study

That's a one percentage point drop - not even statistically significant :rolleyes: That's not to argue against the importance of transit, walking, or biking, just to point out the absurdity of the conclusions the article tries to draw about change from 'statistics' that say nothing changed.

RyeJay
May 30, 2012, 1:42 PM
That's a one percentage point drop - not even statistically significant :rolleyes: That's not to argue against the importance of transit, walking, or biking, just to point out the absurdity of the conclusions the article tries to draw about change from 'statistics' that say nothing changed.

:sly:

For drivers under the age of 19, the numbers are even worse, having dropped down two thirds from only 1998.

You kinda have to keep reading (the entire article) for context...

Good luck.

Halifax Hillbilly
May 30, 2012, 6:47 PM
:sly:

For drivers under the age of 19, the numbers are even worse, having dropped down two thirds from only 1998.

You kinda have to keep reading (the entire article) for context...

Good luck.

What percentage of all car owners are under 19? Very few. What percentage of high school age kids or university freshmen own their own car? Again, not too many. A big drop in new car purchases for what is probably the smallest group of car owners doesn't really say much to me.

Paying off student debts is seen as a priority

around 30 percent of Millennials move back in with their parents

Regardless, the rest of the article goes on to explain why people coming out of university don't buy cars. That would be the age group with the shocking 1% drop in new car ownership over the last 25 years. Adding many plausible reasons for a drop in car ownership among Gen Y doesn't change the fact that the stats they quote show no real change in car ownership for that age group.