PDA

View Full Version : Wateridge (Former CFB Rockcliffe Redevelopment) | U/C


Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 [6]

acottawa
Oct 27, 2017, 1:26 PM
Are transit plans in place for the development? I'm thinking that buses will run down both Montreal Rd and Hemlock/Beechwood?

From the future transit deck circulating on another thread it looks like there are two rush hour routes, one headed downtown via Beachwood and one to St. Laurent via Cummings/Donald.

kwoldtimer
Oct 27, 2017, 1:34 PM
From the future transit deck circulating on another thread it looks like there are two rush hour routes, one headed downtown via Beachwood and one to St. Laurent via Cummings/Donald.

That makes sense. Thanks!

caveat.doctor
Oct 27, 2017, 1:46 PM
.

bradnixon
Oct 27, 2017, 1:51 PM
Love all these new age developments with ZERO lot, garages that often don't hold full-sized vehicles, hog pens for back yards and unfinished basements...guess those granite countertops and stainless steel appliances make up for ALL of those other things...am I right?

Aren't many of these similar lot sizes to what is in the Glebe or OOS?

J.OT13
Oct 27, 2017, 3:49 PM
They should have shelved CFB Rockliffe for 50 years like they did with LeBreton Flats. Build up the lands with rapid transit access (the Flats, Tunney's, Hurdman, Confederation Heights) and leave this one vacant until we build a subway under Montreal in half a century.

MoreTrains
Oct 27, 2017, 4:37 PM
They should have shelved CFB Rockliffe for 50 years like they did with LeBreton Flats. Build up the lands with rapid transit access (the Flats, Tunney's, Hurdman, Confederation Heights) and leave this one vacant until we build a subway under Montreal in half a century.

Thats the problem with the CLC vice the NCC. CLC has to make money which means holding onto land is not in their best interest. Of course they should have sold to the NCC, so we could have vibrant ruins, but alas we instead get the scourge of Orleans in Rockliffe.

bradnixon
Oct 27, 2017, 5:48 PM
Thats the problem with the CLC vice the NCC. CLC has to make money which means holding onto land is not in their best interest. Of course they should have sold to the NCC, so we could have vibrant ruins, but alas we instead get the scourge of Orleans in Rockliffe.

I think there's a lot of over-reaction going on here to what is only the 1st phase. This is the only part of the entire Rockcliffe lands where there is a plan for single family homes. And most of the SFH's are on small lots.

I'm willing to give the next phases a chance- the plans for Mattamy's blocks are more dense than most anything being built outside the Greenbelt. And the addition of residents to the area make it more likely that there will be a commercial revival on Montreal Rd. I don't understand how leaving this land vacant would be a benefit to anyone.

acottawa
Oct 27, 2017, 6:16 PM
Thats the problem with the CLC vice the NCC. CLC has to make money which means holding onto land is not in their best interest. Of course they should have sold to the NCC, so we could have vibrant ruins, but alas we instead get the scourge of Orleans in Rockliffe.

I'm not sure I would call the NCC's sitting on Lebreton as a vacant field for 60+ years a best practice.

It's nowhere near Rockcliffe, despite the marketing. It is in the middle of a low density suburban part of the city. Any attempt to put high rises there would have a pretty dismal result. Even if a Montreal Road subway were built someday, most of the development would be a pretty extended walking distance form Montreal Road.

J.OT13
Oct 27, 2017, 8:52 PM
I'm not sure I would call the NCC's sitting on Lebreton as a vacant field for 60+ years a best practice.

It's nowhere near Rockcliffe, despite the marketing. It is in the middle of a low density suburban part of the city. Any attempt to put high rises there would have a pretty dismal result. Even if a Montreal Road subway were built someday, most of the development would be a pretty extended walking distance form Montreal Road.

Considering what had been proposed at LeBreton over the years, it really was "best practice" to just leave it there until we were able to propose something decent.

I would want to see the Montreal Road subway split near Aviation; one line north to CFB Roclkiffe (and maybe Gatineau if the Kettle Island Bridge gets built in one form or another), one line south serving La Cité and then connecting with Confederation at Blair.

Uhuniau
Oct 30, 2017, 6:32 PM
They should have shelved CFB Rockliffe for 50 years like they did with LeBreton Flats. Build up the lands with rapid transit access (the Flats, Tunney's, Hurdman, Confederation Heights) and leave this one vacant until we build a subway under Montreal in half a century.

Ottawa will be too busy paying off surface LRT extensions to suburbs in all three directions to build another underground LRT line before the end of this century.

It is baffling to me how people in Old Ottawa, inner urban, whatever you want to call them, communitiees, do not realize how completely they are getting screwed.

Uhuniau
Oct 30, 2017, 6:34 PM
I'm willing to give the next phases a chance- the plans for Mattamy's blocks are more dense than most anything being built outside the Greenbelt. And the addition of residents to the area make it more likely that there will be a commercial revival on Montreal Rd. I don't understand how leaving this land vacant would be a benefit to anyone.

The parts of Montreal closest to the development whose tacky name I refuse to repeat are not terribly commercial.

And if there is a commercial "revival" or fresh growth on the parts of Montreal anywhere near Tacky Named Development, the city is going to have to up its game if we are going to see anything other than more suburban-style crap built along Montreal east of St-Laurent.

1overcosc
Oct 30, 2017, 6:41 PM
Ottawa will be too busy paying off surface LRT extensions to suburbs in all three directions to build another underground LRT line before the end of this century.

It is baffling to me how people in Old Ottawa, inner urban, whatever you want to call them, communitiees, do not realize how completely they are getting screwed.

There are very few voices in these urban neighbourhoods who are even bringing up the idea of putting LRT on urban streets. Heck all the people in Westboro/Hintonburg all fought like hell against having the LRT on/around Richmond and tried to insist on putting on Carling instead. They actively **opposed** LRT in their own neighbourhoods.

Uhuniau
Oct 30, 2017, 7:01 PM
There are very few voices in these urban neighbourhoods who are even bringing up the idea of putting LRT on urban streets. Heck all the people in Westboro/Hintonburg all fought like hell against having the LRT on/around Richmond and tried to insist on putting on Carling instead. They actively **opposed** LRT in their own neighbourhoods.

There are other urban neighbourhoods which would kill to have 1/100th the capital transit spending that those NIMBYist morons are going to benefit from.

Even painted lines on a street are too much to ask, and too much for the city to spend.

J.OT13
Dec 1, 2017, 1:50 AM
Took a few years but they finally remembered that Canada has 2 official languages. Francophone version of the name; Village des Riverains

https://www.ledroit.com/actualites/francophonie/wateridge-changement-de-cap-linguistique-891da8d0dfa08821f0abb71234693203

Uhuniau
Dec 1, 2017, 5:33 AM
Took a few years but they finally remembered that Canada has 2 official languages. Francophone version of the name; Village des Riverains

https://www.ledroit.com/actualites/francophonie/wateridge-changement-de-cap-linguistique-891da8d0dfa08821f0abb71234693203

Why should a newly-coined *proper name* be "bilingual"?

Mind you, i'd also rather the "English" version have been a real name and not a fake one. Developers in this town are terrible at naming "communities" and should have that power taken away from them.

McC
Dec 1, 2017, 1:13 PM
“Village of Neighbours”? Well at least it bucks the trend of naming a development after one of the species it displaces.

1overcosc
Dec 1, 2017, 3:42 PM
Proper names (streets, neighbourhoods) shouldn't be bilingual. That's just irritating.

Uhuniau
Dec 1, 2017, 4:19 PM
Proper names (streets, neighbourhoods) shouldn't be bilingual. That's just irritating.

I look forward to the signs on either side of Beechwood, welcoming you to Winnower on the south, and Falaise-des-Roches to the north. :)

McC
Dec 1, 2017, 5:08 PM
Proper names (streets, neighbourhoods) shouldn't be bilingual. That's just irritating.
Brussels manages, so does Iqaluit.

Uhuniau
Dec 1, 2017, 5:27 PM
Brussels manages, so does Iqaluit.

Brussels manages because, as with most other major and old European place names, the place names have been nativized in both languages (and in the languages of other countries, for that matter), and the literal meaning of the place name is now lost to all but the etymologists.

Iqaluit is Iqaluit. That Inuktitut place name has completely superceded the former Frobisher Bay name, and one is not the translation of the other.

There is no need for a recently coined proper name, and especially not a cheesy developer one, to be translated or even translatable.

1overcosc
Dec 1, 2017, 5:51 PM
Iqaluit is Iqaluit. That Inuktitut place name has completely superceded the former Frobisher Bay name, and one is not the translation of the other..

This is becoming a convention with indigenous names.. for the English name to be abandoned and the indigenous name to be used in all languages.

Examples:
Kuujjuaq (formerly Fort Chimo)
Tuktoyaktuk (formerly Port Brabant)
Arviat (formerly Eskimo Point)
Naujaat (formerly Repulse Bay)
Haida Gwaii (formerly Queen Charlotte Islands)

It's becoming a convention in the UK in Celtic language speaking regions as well; for example the islands off the west coast of Scotland formerly known as the Outer Hebrides or Western Isles is now officially known as "Na h-Eileanan Siar" in both English and Gaelic.

acottawa
Dec 1, 2017, 7:08 PM
I certainly don't want to see the Curtain Falls, the Curtain River, Curtain Street, Curtain Hall, the Curtain Centre, the Curtain stop on the LRT, etc.

J.OT13
Dec 1, 2017, 9:27 PM
I agree Wateridge Village/Village des Rivrains is ridiculous but, considering that this is (was?) federal land in a part of town with a high French population, they should have come up with a name that didn't need translating. Or, maybe this would have been a good time to give a new neighborhood an indigenous name instead of naming a transit station, that should be reflect its geographical location, a name with no significance to the vast majority of the population.

Uhuniau
Dec 2, 2017, 3:48 PM
I certainly don't want to see the Curtain Falls, the Curtain River, Curtain Street, Curtain Hall, the Curtain Centre, the Curtain stop on the LRT, etc.

I totally call Rideau-things "Curtain"-thing all the time, just for badness! :haha:

Uhuniau
Dec 2, 2017, 3:49 PM
I agree Wateridge Village/Village des Rivrains is ridiculous but, considering that this is (was?) federal land in a part of town with a high French population, they should have come up with a name that didn't need translating. Or, maybe this would have been a good time to give a new neighborhood an indigenous name instead of naming a transit station, that should be reflect its geographical location, a name with no significance to the vast majority of the population.

How would giving the neighbourhood a name from an indigenous language be any more (or less) significant than doing so for an LRT station?

waterloowarrior
Dec 2, 2017, 5:19 PM
There is a mix of Algonquin and military names for the various streets. There's at least one French street name so far.

waterloowarrior
Dec 2, 2017, 5:22 PM
Mattamy's preview page is up
"Stylish townhomes and mid-rise condos surrounded by parkland in downtown Ottawa"
"Welcome to stylish downtown living in the heart of the nation's capital."
https://mattamyhomes.com/ottawa/communities/rockcliffe-wateridge-village.aspx

Luker
Dec 2, 2017, 7:22 PM
There are very few voices in these urban neighbourhoods who are even bringing up the idea of putting LRT on urban streets. Heck all the people in Westboro/Hintonburg all fought like hell against having the LRT on/around Richmond and tried to insist on putting on Carling instead. They actively **opposed** LRT in their own neighbourhoods.

Hintonburg? Did you mean to say Westboro/McKellar Park?

downtown_eddie_brown
Dec 3, 2017, 4:36 PM
Mattamy's preview page is up
"Stylish townhomes and mid-rise condos surrounded by parkland in downtown Ottawa"
"Welcome to stylish downtown living in the heart of the nation's capital."
https://mattamyhomes.com/ottawa/communities/rockcliffe-wateridge-village.aspx

By what definition could this area be called 'downtown'? Nice photo from Quebec on the page, there.

kwoldtimer
Dec 3, 2017, 4:53 PM
In Ottawa realestatese, everything inside the Greenbelt is "downtown", isn't it?

;)

Jamaican-Phoenix
Dec 3, 2017, 10:39 PM
This is going to be shit.

acottawa
Dec 3, 2017, 11:49 PM
By what definition could this area be called 'downtown'? Nice photo from Quebec on the page, there.

From the top of the hill you can see downtown on a clear day.

Uhuniau
Dec 4, 2017, 3:17 PM
By what definition could this area be called 'downtown'? Nice photo from Quebec on the page, there.

Developer: Model homes now available in beautiful Waaterfield Grôve. Just minutes from downtown!*







* Waaterfield Grôve is an hour and 17 minutes from downtown in good weather, just 77 minutes.

J.OT13
Dec 4, 2017, 9:23 PM
How would giving the neighbourhood a name from an indigenous language be any more (or less) significant than doing so for an LRT station?

Because a transit station should be named for a street, neighborhood or landmark so that people instinctively know where it is just by reading or hearing the name. A new neighborhood can take on any new name to form its own identity. That's a pretty basic concept.

Whether or not government consults with indigenous peoples in a sincere effort towards reconciliation or an empty gesture is debatable, but there are more logical circumstances when this can happen.

Uhuniau
Dec 4, 2017, 9:27 PM
Because a transit station should be named for a street, neighborhood or landmark so that people instinctively know where it is just by reading or hearing the name. A new neighborhood can take on any new name to form its own identity. That's a pretty basic concept.

As a general rule, yes, but the occasional exception isn't going to set the world on fire.

1overcosc
Dec 4, 2017, 9:43 PM
The Lebreton plan calls for the area to be developed as five distinct neighbourhoods and the one near Pimisi station is being called Pimisi. With both Pimisi station and Bayview station serving the flats the name makes sense.

J.OT13
Dec 4, 2017, 9:58 PM
The Lebreton plan calls for the area to be developed as five distinct neighbourhoods and the one near Pimisi station is being called Pimisi. With both Pimisi station and Bayview station serving the flats the name makes sense.

I'm slowly getting use to that idea; two stations at LeBreton need different names. Same could be argued with Westboro. Or Orleans Boulevard and Place d'Orleans stations, so on and so forth.

In addition, they should re-name Wellington north of the future Central Library Pimisi or RVL should name the road that will be built over the Confederation Line Pimisi. And I would like whichever is not named Pimisi be named Ahearn.

Still a little backwards to name a station and then scramble to try and stamp that identity on other things in the area.

1overcosc
Dec 5, 2017, 5:01 PM
I'm slowly getting use to that idea; two stations at LeBreton need different names. Same could be argued with Westboro. Or Orleans Boulevard and Place d'Orleans stations, so on and so forth.

In addition, they should re-name Wellington north of the future Central Library Pimisi or RVL should name the road that will be built over the Confederation Line Pimisi. And I would like whichever is not named Pimisi be named Ahearn.

Still a little backwards to name a station and then scramble to try and stamp that identity on other things in the area.

Yeah, agreed that process was a little wacked. IMO, Indigenous heritage should have instead been honoured by renaming Dominion Station to Kitchissippi Station with that station having an Indigenous theme, and the Lebreton station should have instead been renamed to 'Booth'.

J.OT13
Dec 5, 2017, 9:30 PM
Yeah, agreed that process was a little wacked. IMO, Indigenous heritage should have instead been honoured by renaming Dominion Station to Kitchissippi Station with that station having an Indigenous theme, and the Lebreton station should have instead been renamed to 'Booth'.

When the whole Pimisi thing came out, I emailed a few Councillors and suggested Kitchissippi for Dominion. The answer I got is that it would be too confusing because the Kitchissippi Ward has a few stations. :haha:

I bet they will end up doing it though.

rocketphish
Feb 3, 2018, 3:43 PM
CFB Rockcliffe site: New chance for builders to bid in Wateridge 'village within a city'

Megan Gillis, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: January 31, 2018 | Last Updated: January 31, 2018 10:52 AM EST

A year after sales launched at Wateridge Village, the former Canadian Forces Base Rockcliffe is starting to look like home. Residents are moving in, two new parks are already complete and even OC Transpo bus service is in place.

Meanwhile, the Canada Lands Company has issued a new invitation to bid on the remaining parcels of land in the project’s first phase before turning its sights to the next phase, senior director of real estate Jean Lachance said.

Details were unveiled Jan. 29 and developers have until March 29 to submit bids for the land east of Codd’s Road in what Lachance calls a “village within a city.”

Three builders – Uniform Urban Developments, Claridge Homes and Tartan Homes, the latter in partnership with the Algonquins of Ontario – were the first to start building on the 310 acre-site overlooking the Ottawa River.

They’re constructing 214 singles, semis and townhouses west of Codd’s Road. Two-thirds are sold and about 40 homeowners have moved in with the balance expected by this summer.

Mattamy Homes is slated to start construction in 2018 with plans for 650 housing units in townhouses, stacked towns and future mid-rise buildings east of Codd’s Road.

Also in 2018, CLC will begin construction of a large community park in the neighbourhood’s south end, featuring a splash pad, boarded hockey rink, tennis courts and a skateboard park.

A military-themed town square will be built at the intersection of Codd’s Road and Mikinak Road, the latter’s name one of the elements paying homage to the neighbourhood’s connection with the Algonquin people.

The completed Alliance Park commemorates the sesquicentennial with nearly 30,000 Canada 150 tulips. A parkette along Avro Circle and Lysander Place features a splash pad that will be ready for kids this summer.

A stormwater management facility on NCC land north of the site is visible from the George Etienne Cartier Parkway and features a striking waterfall that earned a Consulting Engineers of Ontario Award for DST Consulting Engineers as a “green solution.”

The project’s stewards are also proud of an early-servicing agreement with OC Transpo, which began service last month with weekday service for commuters to the Rideau Centre and St. Laurent Shopping Centre, the site of a future light-rail station, Lachance said.

“It’s only a 15-minute commute,” he said.

In 10 or 15 years, Wateridge is expected to house 10,000 residents with plans including numerous parks, open spaces and wooded areas plus retail and commercial space. There’s also land for future employers to set up adjacent to the National Research Council campus at the eastern edge of the site and reserved sites for future French and English public elementary schools and French Catholic elementary school.

Lachance regularly visits the community, which is known as Village des Riverains in French, and sees it coming in alive. In December, for example, security patrols told him that they’d been enjoying the music of passing Christmas carollers.

“It’s definitely starting to feel like a community,” Lachance said.

http://ottawacitizen.com/life/homes/new-chance-for-builders-to-bid-in-wateridge-village-within-a-city

TMA-1
Feb 3, 2018, 3:54 PM
Spiral descent over Wateridge as of the 21st of Jan. Get used to it, Community.


https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4717/39162306985_9b9ecd6b2f_k.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/22ED4tp)


D828485 community (https://flic.kr/p/22ED4tp) by Chuck Clark (https://www.flickr.com/photos/23575605@N08/), on Flickr





[QUOTE=rocketphish;8072217]CFB Rockcliffe site: New chance for builders to bid in Wateridge 'village within a city'

Megan Gillis, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: January 31, 2018 | Last Updated: January 31, 2018 10:52 AM EST

A year after sales launched at Wateridge Village, the former Canadian Forces Base Rockcliffe is starting to look like home. Residents are moving in, t

Jamaican-Phoenix
Feb 6, 2018, 6:05 PM
A site with such potential, utterly wasted...

Typical Ottawa... -_-

bradnixon
Feb 6, 2018, 8:24 PM
A site with such potential, utterly wasted...

Typical Ottawa... -_-

This phase is a pretty small piece of the overall site...

https://mattamyhomes.com/~/media/images/mattamywebsite/ottawa/communities/wateridge%20village%20at%20rockcliffe/plans/siteplan_wateridge_1600x10001.jpg

roger1818
Feb 6, 2018, 9:01 PM
A site with such potential, utterly wasted...

Potential? For what? Maybe a nature preserve or a giant urban park.

It might be close to downtown as the crow flies but getting anywhere from there without a helicopter will take forever. It is probably just as fast and even easier for me to get downtown from Stittsville than it will be from Wateridge.

I am not sure what OC Transpo will do there, but I don't expect it will be good (the buses will likely be snarled in traffic). As for by car, your options are city streets (which are already congested) or one of the two parkways that don't actually take you anywhere useful (174 east, 417 east or Rockcliffe Park).

I guess it would be good for those who work in Orleans, St. Laurant or Walkley.

McC
Feb 6, 2018, 9:11 PM
I guess it would be good for those who work in Orleans, St. Laurant or Walkley.
NRC, CSIS, CSEC, CMHC. There are some pretty big employers in the vicinity

acottawa
Feb 6, 2018, 9:15 PM
Potential? For what? Maybe a nature preserve or a giant urban park.

It might be close to downtown as the crow flies but getting anywhere from there without a helicopter will take forever. It is probably just as fast and even easier for me to get downtown from Stittsville than it will be from Wateridge.

I am not sure what OC Transpo will do there, but I don't expect it will be good (the buses will likely be snarled in traffic). As for by car, your options are city streets (which are already congested) or one of the two parkways that don't actually take you anywhere useful (174 east, 417 east or Rockcliffe Park).

I guess it would be good for those who work in Orleans, St. Laurant or Walkley.

I agree accessibility isn't great and any dreams of some sort of Vancouver-style condo neighbourhood are pretty fanciful.

Accessibility isn't that bad though. It is 20 minutes by bus to either the Rideau Centre (on the 17) or St Laurent (on the 27).

roger1818
Feb 6, 2018, 9:23 PM
I agree accessibility isn't great and any dreams of some sort of Vancouver-style condo neighbourhood are pretty fanciful.

Agreed. Metrotown came to be because of Skytrain. This is pretty far from the LRT.

roger1818
Feb 6, 2018, 9:26 PM
NRC, CSIS, CSEC, CMHC. There are some pretty big employers in the vicinity

True. So if you are single or both work for one of those...

roger1818
Feb 6, 2018, 9:40 PM
Accessibility isn't that bad though. It is 20 minutes by bus to either the Rideau Centre (on the 17) or St Laurent (on the 27).

The times on the 17 range from 20 to 25 minutes in the AM and 25-28 in the PM. Still not bad I guess. Eventually I assume it will run straight along Hemlock, once connected, and not detour to Montreal Rd, which should help.

J.OT13
Feb 6, 2018, 10:00 PM
Potential? For what? Maybe a nature preserve or a giant urban park.


I've said this before, but plans for the site should have been shelved for another 50 years until rapid transit gets to the area.

Right now, we have plenty of areas that could be or are in the plans for redevelopment on the Confederation Line (Lincoln Fields (pipe dream), Tunney's (in the plans), Bayview/LeBreton (close to reality), Hurdman (why isn't anyone talking about this)) and to a lesser extent due to capacity issues that won't be resolved even with 800 million in investment over 10 years, along the Trillium Line (Gladstone (affordable housing), Carling (Civic, Booth Complex), Confederation/Mooney's Bay (Office buildings surrounded by grass and parking)).

lrt's friend
Feb 6, 2018, 11:53 PM
I've said this before, but plans for the site should have been shelved for another 50 years until rapid transit gets to the area.

Right now, we have plenty of areas that could be or are in the plans for redevelopment on the Confederation Line (Lincoln Fields (pipe dream), Tunney's (in the plans), Bayview/LeBreton (close to reality), Hurdman (why isn't anyone talking about this)) and to a lesser extent due to capacity issues that won't be resolved even with 800 million in investment over 10 years, along the Trillium Line (Gladstone (affordable housing), Carling (Civic, Booth Complex), Confederation/Mooney's Bay (Office buildings surrounded by grass and parking)).

Rapid transit will not be built to this site in any of our lifetimes. It is within the city standard of 5 km. The city does not want competing lines that will draw passengers away from the Confederation Line. I suppose a new line will actually create new riders but that has not been a city priority since the optimization project.

Uhuniau
Feb 7, 2018, 1:31 PM
I've said this before, but plans for the site should have been shelved for another 50 years until rapid transit gets to the area.


There will be no rapid transit in that area in a 50-year horizon.

Hurdman (why isn't anyone talking about this))

Astronomical decontamination costs.

Uhuniau
Feb 7, 2018, 1:32 PM
The times on the 17 range from 20 to 25 minutes in the AM and 25-28 in the PM. Still not bad I guess. Eventually I assume it will run straight along Hemlock, once connected, and not detour to Montreal Rd, which should help.

How does the 17 manage to be so magically speedy? The 12 and 7 sure as hell are not.

Uhuniau
Feb 7, 2018, 1:33 PM
Rapid transit will not be built to this site in any of our lifetimes. It is within the city standard of 5 km. The city does not want competing lines that will draw passengers away from the Confederation Line. I suppose a new line will actually create new riders but that has not been a city priority since the optimization project.

I don't think competition is the issue. The city is just cheap and visionless, and has no plan to introduce higher-order transit along any urban artery, only suburban ones.

acottawa
Feb 7, 2018, 2:07 PM
How does the 17 manage to be so magically speedy? The 12 and 7 sure as hell are not.

Slowest part of Montreal/Rideau road is between St. Laurent and Charlotte, the 17 avoids that. The 7 takes a little jaunt through manor park, the 17 avoids that.

Uhuniau
Feb 7, 2018, 2:45 PM
Slowest part of Montreal/Rideau road is between St. Laurent and Charlotte, the 17 avoids that. The 7 takes a little jaunt through manor park, the 17 avoids that.

The Manor Park jaunt isn't what slows down the 7.

lrt's friend
Feb 7, 2018, 4:06 PM
A good portion of the old Rockcliffe streetcar right of way still exists and is separated from traffic. It would be a speedy way into downtown. Unfortunately, it would never pass the NIMBY test as a good portion of the old right of way is now parkland, just like the Byron linear park. It seems that North America cannot handle the European tramway model that works perfectly well in urban and suburban situations. We would not be able to handle streetcars running through neighbourhoods without everybody being killed crossing the tracks.

1overcosc
Feb 7, 2018, 5:18 PM
Park tramways also work well in Europe too.. plenty of places where you'll have a tram line running through green space, with the tracks embedded in the grass, and the green space and the transit line integrate well with each other.

McKellarDweller
Feb 7, 2018, 5:27 PM
Spiral descent over Wateridge as of the 21st of Jan. Get used to it, Community.

They won't notice it while they're busy enjoying Ottawans' favourite pastimes: Driving to box stores, and watching Netflix.

rocketphish
Feb 7, 2018, 6:40 PM
Hurdman (why isn't anyone talking about this))

They are:
https://ottawa.ca/en/transit-oriented-development-tod-plans

The PDF on that page shows some pretty impressive plans.

J.OT13
Feb 7, 2018, 8:04 PM
I don't remember Hurdman being included those TOD reviews...

TMA-1
Mar 3, 2018, 11:49 PM
From a couple of weeks ago, or so.



https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4709/40559049752_85055ccb5d_k.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/24N4Jrf)


D820007 Wateridge, Former CFB Rockcliffe Redevelopment (https://flic.kr/p/24N4Jrf) by Chuck Clark (https://www.flickr.com/photos/23575605@N08/), on Flickr

rocketphish
Apr 1, 2018, 4:34 PM
I noticed that Mattamy is building a Sales Centre on Montreal Rd. just east of Codd's Rd.

MD11
Apr 11, 2018, 6:22 PM
There are two lots that are/were selling on Montreal road, just east of Codd's. One was situated on the corner (serving a used car dealer known as Stars Car Sales), where the land is currently listed for approx. $1.4 million. I believe that Mattamy is building their sales centre on a nearby lot that was listed earlier for $2.55 million. It is quite evident that Wateridge is having an impact on re-development possibilities on the surrounding section of Montreal road.

J.OT13
Apr 11, 2018, 8:48 PM
Squandered by the lack of rapid transit.

rocketphish
Apr 12, 2018, 3:09 AM
There are two lots that are/were selling on Montreal road, just east of Codd's. One was situated on the corner (serving a used car dealer known as Stars Car Sales), where the land is currently listed for approx. $1.4 million. I believe that Mattamy is building their sales centre on a nearby lot that was listed earlier for $2.55 million. It is quite evident that Wateridge is having an impact on re-development possibilities on the surrounding section of Montreal road.

Welcome to the forum! :cheers:

There's more info on this over here:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showpost.php?p=8146165&postcount=5267

kwoldtimer
Apr 12, 2018, 12:00 PM
Squandered by the lack of rapid transit.

Squandered in the sense of higher density foregone?

acottawa
Apr 12, 2018, 1:22 PM
Squandered in the sense of higher density foregone?

It is surrounded by low density suburbs on all sides. Mass transit or not it would have taken 200 years to develop the land as a high density community.

kwoldtimer
Apr 12, 2018, 1:49 PM
It is surrounded by low density suburbs on all sides. Mass transit or not it would have taken 200 years to develop the land as a high density community.

Probably. I'm just trying to understand the "squandered". :shrug:

Arcologist
Apr 12, 2018, 5:15 PM
It is surrounded by low density suburbs on all sides. Mass transit or not it would have taken 200 years to develop the land as a high density community.

I disagree. Even though the site is surrounded by low-density residential, it's not in the suburbs or outlying areas; it's actually fairly central, and could easily be developed into a high-density community.

Coordination with all levels of government could have / should have identified this site as a prime location for high-density mixed-use, serviced by a new LRT line beneath Rideau & Montreal Roads.

Instead, we get single detached homes, some mid-density stuff, and sprawl continues out in the burbs...

acottawa
Apr 12, 2018, 5:57 PM
I disagree. Even though the site is surrounded by low-density residential, it's not in the suburbs or outlying areas; it's actually fairly central, and could easily be developed into a high-density community.

Coordination with all levels of government could have / should have identified this site as a prime location for high-density mixed-use, serviced by a new LRT line beneath Rideau & Montreal Roads.

Instead, we get single detached homes, some mid-density stuff, and sprawl continues out in the burbs...

It is inside the greenbelt, but it is certainly in the suburbs.

A really successful high-density project in Ottawa is maybe 1 tower per 2-3 years (even when there is mass transit nearby). How long would it take to fill out a 300 acre site? Do we just leave it as a field for decades (or longer)?

There is no shortage of develop-able land for high density developments (Lebreton, Hurdman, infill, the environs of nearly every Confederation Line station).

MD11
Apr 20, 2018, 1:29 AM
I think the debate how to categorize Wateridge (central or suburban) takes us nowhere. The point is that Wateridge is comparable to Alta Vista, Carlington and Westboro, in terms of distance (and driving/riding time) to the downtown core. However, one needs to also recognize that not everyone works in the core. The new community is very attractive for folks working at Montfort hospital, and nearby federal government sites. Otherwise, aside from going far from the core, Wateridge and Greystone are the only two new communities that offer housing options that are attractive for growing families.

I do not share the opinion that all open land within the Greenbelt should be subject to outright intensification. For what reason?

rocketphish
Apr 26, 2018, 5:36 PM
Mattamy has posted its renderings and floor plans, and appears to kicking off its sales effort this coming Saturday:

https://mattamyhomes.com/ottawa/communities/rockcliffe-wateridge-village.aspx

Prices appear to range from $330K - $615K (using the filtering in the Advanced Options panel)

Multi-modal
Jul 10, 2018, 4:11 PM
The development application for Block 19 (south of Hemlock and east of Codd's) is up... This is the first block that is within the designated "core" of the development.

Mattamy Homes is proposing 2 x 7 story and 2 x 6 story buildings with a central underground parkade / courtyard. The buildings include a total of 357 residential units and 2,088 m^2 of commercial space. The landscaping in the courtyard looks pretty spiffy (not shown properly in the 3d rendering), and the buildings themselves look serviceable if a little bland.

Here is the application:
https://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__A2P3D2

https://i.imgur.com/8kjyUct.jpg

rocketphish
Jul 11, 2018, 1:30 AM
Commercial on the ground floor of all 4 buildings too.

kwoldtimer
Jul 11, 2018, 1:16 PM
There was a blurb in the news the other day about a proposal for 40 units of housing for homeless veterans "at the former Canadian Forces Base Rockcliffe". Anybody know whether this is a reference to the Wateridge lands? I'm just wondering where this might be located, in relation to the community and local amenities.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/local-charity-proposes-veterans-home-at-rockcliffe-base-1.4734642

Multi-modal
Jul 11, 2018, 2:17 PM
There was a blurb in the news the other day about a proposal for 40 units of housing for homeless veterans "at the former Canadian Forces Base Rockcliffe". Anybody know whether this is a reference to the Wateridge lands? I'm just wondering where this might be located, in relation to the community and local amenities.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/local-charity-proposes-veterans-home-at-rockcliffe-base-1.4734642

There is a news article about this on page 24 of this forum. It is on block 23 I believe... south of Hemlock, about mid-way between Codd's and the extension of Burma Road.

rocketphish
Nov 21, 2018, 6:22 PM
Uniform Urban Developments has picked up another block in Wateridge. "Townhomes coming this Fall".

https://i.imgur.com/CThoSf8.png

https://uniformdevelopments.com/new-homes/wateridge-village-at-rockcliffe

waterloowarrior
Feb 28, 2019, 7:12 PM
Phase 1B, Block 15 (Mattamy)
245 Squadron Crescent - 192 units - mix of townhouses and stacked.

https://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__AC3LWU

this is just south of the current phase on their website
https://mattamyhomes.com/ottawa/communities/rockcliffe-wateridge-village.aspx

rocketphish
May 28, 2019, 5:19 PM
I just noticed that Mattamy has reconfigured their largest development block at Wateridge Village to increase the number of residential units by 50%.

https://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__AC3LWU

The revision to the Site Plan Control proposes an adjustment in site layout to accommodate for additional units. The previous application was composed of rear-lane townhouses, whereas the current plan proposes both stacked townhouses and back-to-back townhouses. The total number of units in the revised Site Plan Control application is 192, an increase of 67 units from the previous application.The revision also decentralizes the parking area from a main hub to a more distributed pattern.

Gone are the friendly green "pedestrian mews" with boardwalks and bioswales between the residential blocks, depicted here: https://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showpost.php?p=7954619&postcount=480

In their place? Many more tiny units and vast amounts of surface parking.


Before:

https://i.imgur.com/ln6SdEY.png


After:

https://i.imgur.com/hwnj0z9.png

Arcologist
May 28, 2019, 5:24 PM
Wonderful.

bradnixon
May 28, 2019, 5:44 PM
I just noticed that Mattamy has reconfigured their largest development block at Wateridge Village to increase the number of residential units by 50%.

Gone are the friendly green "pedestrian mews" with boardwalks and bioswales between the residential blocks, depicted here: https://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showpost.php?p=7954619&postcount=480

In their place? Many more tiny units and vast amounts of surface parking.




Too bad to lose the mews with the boardwalks and bioswales which would have been a unique feature.

OTOH, the design before seems to imply that the entire private street would be lined with garages, which would not exactly be a very pleasant environment. In the new design there is surface parking, but there are now front doors facing onto the private street.

And facing outward from the block onto the parkland and public roads, there are front doors as well.

They probably found that there was more of a market for smaller units rather than the larger 3-storey rear lane townhouses. It doesn't seem to be worth getting that upset over.