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Cre47
Aug 19, 2009, 6:55 PM
This forum has recent photos from Late spring-early summer progression of the Kanata West/ Mattamy (near Maple Grove and I think Johnwoods Drive) subdivision (Page 4)

http://www.buildinghomes.ca/community/forums/showthread.php?t=10237&page=4

Cre47
Sep 8, 2009, 10:56 PM
Carp River area update


Committee OKs delay on building on Carp River basin


By Patrick Dare , The Ottawa CitizenSeptember 8, 2009 6:34 PM

OTTAWA — A brief moratorium on building near the Carp River passed city council’s planning and environment committee Tuesday but even the head of the committee said the action was little more than a gesture.

City councillors and staff have been struggling to react decisively on flood-risk issues since July 24, when an intense rainstorm flooded 1,200 west-end homes, some for the third time in 13 years.

Kanata South Councillor Peggy Feltmate initially proposed a general moratorium on building on lands that are drained by the Carp River or its creeks. Feltmate's ward includes the Glen Cairn subdivision that was hardest hit by floods this summer.

By Tuesday, her motion was limited to a five-week delay in building until city engineers have had a chance to examine the storm model for future development with the latest data from the July storm. That modeling report is expected by Oct. 13.

Councillors were told the building delay might affect a couple of residential subdivisions, especially 100 homes to be built by Mattamy Homes. The motion goes to city council in two weeks.

Peter Hume, chairman of the committee, said he had misgivings about a motion that seemed largely symbolic.

But Feltmate said at least it was some action from the city for a part of town where people have lost faith in the city administration. She said the municipal changes to drainage in the Kanata area, coupled with climate change and a lot of development in nearby places like Stittsville, helped create the Kanata flood conditions.

Feltmate’s west-end council colleagues, Shad Qadri and Marianne Wilkinson, broke ranks with her, opposing the pause in development approvals. Wilkinson said the Carp River wasn’t responsible for the July flooding, so there’s no reason to stop development on land near it.

However, the city’s senior engineer in these matters, Dixon Weir, said stormwater in places like nearby Stittsville did contribute to the flooding problems of Kanata.

Feltmate said her colleagues are under a lot of pressure from landowners to get projects approved by the city.
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

waterloowarrior
Sep 11, 2009, 2:39 PM
Richardson Ridge (Regional Group + Uniform) (http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__7PI94P)
Future Terry Fox @ Richardson Side Road

http://wwuploads.googlepages.com/richardsonridge.jpg




Riverside South Phase 5 (application page) (http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__7NPI76)

To create 29 local streets, the extension of Spratt Road to the LRT corrider, 508 lots for single detached dwellings, 36 blocks for street townhomes, one institutional block, 2 park blocks and one block for an elementary school

http://wwuploads.googlepages.com/RS5_2.jpg
Click to enlarge plan of subdivision
(http://webcast.ottawa.ca/plan/All_Image%20Referencing_Subdivision_Image%20Reference_Draft_Plan_of_Subdivision_D07-16-09-0009.PDF)

waterloowarrior
Sep 22, 2009, 7:20 PM
Minto seeks to build up Barrhaven
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/business/Minto+seeks+build+Barrhaven/2017728/story.html
Courts committee approval for multi-storey office, residential buildings

By Patrick Dare, The Ottawa CitizenSeptember 22, 2009

http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/www.ottawacitizen.com/business/minto+seeks+build+barrhaven/2017728/2017730.bin (http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:void%280%29;)


OTTAWA — Minto intends to put a little bit of downtown into South Nepean with a town centre project that will start construction by next year.

The plans, which go to the planning and environment committee Oct. 27, call for moderately dense development on 12.6 hectares of the Chapman Mills town centre lands.

That Minto property, south and east of the Riocan Marketplace big-box stores in Barrhaven, would see four-storey residential buildings with units of 1,000 or 1,200 square feet. The plans also include four-storey office buildings now, and perhaps taller office buildings later; 12-storey residential buildings would be built later.

“This is really bringing the urban to the suburban,” said Marcel Denomme, director of land development at Minto.

Plans for a Barrhaven town centre have been talked about since the days of Ben Franklin, the late mayor of Nepean. In the 1990s, he planned for that section of South Nepean to be a more lively, walkable and densely built neighbourhood than the rest of Barrhaven.

The Minto project requires minor zoning changes to permit office buildings of four storeys, rather than six, and a residential tower of 12 storeys rather than six.

One thing that’s making this more dense development possible is the $52.6-million extension of the Southwest Transitway from Fallowfield Station south to the Chapman Mills town centre.

Denomme says that expansion of bus-transit service means that Minto will be able to build homes with one parking space, rather than two, because bus travel will be so convenient.

There would be about 1,200 residential units in this phase of the town centre.

While the Minto plans show blocks of residential and commercial buildings at Chapman Mills town centre, the plan also calls for a large civic square with fountains and a winter rink, and perhaps a city building.

Steve Desroches, the councillor for Gloucester-South Nepean, says this is part of South Nepean “picking up the pieces” from the cancellation of the north-south light-rail project.

He says recent growth in the suburbs has used less land and this is another significant step toward being wiser in urban development.

“There’s a recognition out there that we do need to build smarter communities,” said Desroches. “I like what I see. I think we’re on the right track.”

There will be an open house on the town centre project tonight from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Walter Baker Sports Centre in Barrhaven.
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen



Plans are on the previous page of this thread

Cre47
Sep 24, 2009, 9:11 PM
Kanata West update


Development moratorium nixed


By Patrick Dare, The Ottawa CitizenSeptember 24, 2009


An attempt to place a three-week moratorium on development near the Carp River failed at city council on Wednesday.

Councillors voted 10-6 against the measure, which Kanata South Councillor Peggy Feltmate wanted as an initial pause in building in an area that has experienced flooding and controversy over development approvals.

The moratorium would have halted development in the Kanata West area, where land drains to the Carp River or its creeks. It would also have delayed construction of some houses in Kanata West.

The moratorium would have been brief, only lasting until Oct. 13, when a report on the latest flood data is to be received by the city.

Feltmate is concerned about not only the Glen Cairn neighbourhood in her ward, where 800 homes were flooded with sewage after a huge July 24 rainstorm, but also other lands near the Carp River that might be in floodplain.

One-third of a new road being built by the city -- the Terry Fox Drive extension -- is being constructed through floodplain.

Feltmate said her residents no longer trusted City Hall staff or developers in the Kanata area.

After the meeting, Feltmate said she would like to see the Ontario Ministry of the Environment brought in to assess the engineering issues.

Most city councillors weren't buying the notion that the moratorium would make any difference.

Kanata North Councillor Marianne Wilkinson said it appeared that development along the Carp River was not strictly responsible for the flooding in July. She did say, however, that development around Glen Cairn almost certainly was a cause of the flooding since that neighbourhood did not have such flooding many years ago.

The city is working at finding solutions to flooding issues in Kanata. A consulting engineers' report in 2003 warned some streets in Glen Cairn were especially low-lying and prone to flooding.

Towers approved

A neighbourhood redevelopment involving three mid-rise towers was approved by city council Wednesday. Residents and neighbours of the Redwood community -- bounded by Baseline Road, Morrison Drive and Draper Avenue -- were upset about the development, which originally had a tower of 20 storeys. The Regional Group brought the buildings down to 12-, eight- and six-storey buildings. The 334 condominiums will replace 84 townhouses.
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

waterloowarrior
Oct 7, 2009, 2:46 PM
Citiplace neighbourhood (http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=ottawa,+on&sll=43.640051,-79.881592&sspn=0.926255,1.766052&ie=UTF8&t=h&layer=c&cbll=45.347557,-75.707661&panoid=NVxgWZPALfnxONCtoY5iuA&cbp=12,304.06,,0,0.61&hq=&hnear=Ottawa,+Ottawa+Division,+Ontario&ll=45.345781,-75.6955&spn=0.014056,0.043945&z=15)

Cre47
Oct 7, 2009, 8:42 PM
With the new Street View feature I might try eventually to post links to new development areas. I'm just quite busy for the next little while.

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.45128,-75.482383&spn=0,359.947686&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.450737,-75.482076&panoid=jyd171iF3tGnDWD03532ow&cbp=12,260.47,,0,-1.64

waterloowarrior
Oct 9, 2009, 2:48 AM
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/City+goes+court+fight+Manotick+expansion/2081949/story.html
Municipalities’ power at stake in OMB case
Judges set to review Manotick decision under provisions of Planning Act
Kate Jaimet, The Ottawa CitizenOctober 9, 2009 12:02 AM
OTTAWA — The city went to court Thursday in a bid to rein in the power of the Ontario Municipal Board to approve developments that city council has voted down.

The city asked a panel of three divisional court judges to overturn a recent OMB ruling that allows Minto Communities to build 1,400 new houses on the outskirts of Manotick. The proposed development was supported by city staff but voted down by council after objections by Manotick residents.

“What’s important here at the heart of it is: Who gets to decide the public interest of the City of Ottawa?” said Paul Webber, a lawyer for the city.

But Minto’s lawyer Bob Doumani urged the judges to let the OMB ruling stand, and said the board has the right to decide if a city council’s decision on
development is right or wrong. “If the application (for development) demonstrably has merit … then I suppose those who didn’t think it had merit were wrong,”
Doumani said.

The case — which, if decided in the city’s favour, could give Ontario municipal councils greater powers to control development — will focus on interpretation of changes to the provincial Planning Act, brought in by the McGuinty government in 2007.

The city’s lawyer argued that prior to the changes, the OMB was an independent decision-making body that could override the will of municipal councils. But the province amended the Planning Act to change that situation, Webber argued.

Now, he said, the OMB should only be able to overrule a council’s decision if the proper procedure was not followed, the decision was unreasonable, or the
decision was inconsistent with provincial policy or the city’s own official plan.

Webber argued the greater power that the province meant to confer on municipalities is expressed in the wording of the 2007 law, which states that the OMB “shall have regard to the decision of council” in deciding any case.

“The reform was exactly to make the decision of council meaningful,” Webber said.

But Minto’s lawyer argued that the 2007 amendments were merely tinkering by the provincial government and did not substantially change the power of the OMB to overturn decisions by municipal councils.

Doumani said that “have regard to” is a weak phrase, and that if the province had really meant to empower municipalities, it would have written stronger language into the law.

Minto’s vice-president of development, Jack Stirling, who attended the hearing, said that if the court agrees with the city, it will take away the rights of those who disagree with a city planning decision to make an argument to an independent body.

He said that the OMB has shown itself more likely to heed professional advice, as opposed to council, which can be swayed by the emotions of citizens. In the Manotick case, he pointed out, the city staff had recommended in favour of Minto’s proposal, before being overturned by council.

“They listened to a bunch of angry citizens who had no professional expertise and they turned it down,” Stirling said.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

Dado
Oct 9, 2009, 4:00 AM
City goes to court to fight Manotick expansion



http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/City+goes+court+fight+Manotick+expansion/2081949/story.html



By Kate Jaimet , The Ottawa CitizenOctober 7, 2009


...

Webber argued the greater power that the province meant to confer on municipalities is expressed in the wording of the 2007 law, which states that the OMB “shall have regard to the decision of council” in deciding any case.

“The reform was exactly to make the decision of council meaningful,” Webber said.

But Minto’s lawyer argued that the 2007 amendments were merely tinkering by the provincial government, and did not substantially change the power of the OMB to overturn decisions by municipal councils.

Doumani said that “have regard to” is a weak phrase, and that if the province had really meant to empower municipalities, it would have written stronger language into the law.

“It does not counsel deference or obeisance,” he said.



Whoa... that's what Minto's lawyer is going to argue in court? That the Province didn't really mean to do anything, it just wanted to fool around a bit? I realize Lansdowne Live has been a distraction and all, but really.

I can see it now:

Webber [to witness]: "Were you the Minister of Municipal Affairs when the Planning Act was amended in 2007 to add the phrase 'shall have regard to' with respect to the powers of the OMB?"
Witness: "Yes, I was"
Webber: "And was the purpose of this amendment to confer greater authority on the municipalities of Ontario, or was it just to 'tinker' a bit"?
Witness: "The former, sir."
Doumani [under breath]: "Damn"

blackjagger
Oct 9, 2009, 12:21 PM
Whoa... that's what Minto's lawyer is going to argue in court? That the Province didn't really mean to do anything, it just wanted to fool around a bit? I realize Lansdowne Live has been a distraction and all, but really.

I can see it now:

Webber [to witness]: "Were you the Minister of Municipal Affairs when the Planning Act was amended in 2007 to add the phrase 'shall have regard to' with respect to the powers of the OMB?"
Witness: "Yes, I was"
Webber: "And was the purpose of this amendment to confer greater authority on the municipalities of Ontario, or was it just to 'tinker' a bit"?
Witness: "The former, sir."
Doumani [under breath]: "Damn"

I have a feeling that they will argue the later part of the article.

"He said that the OMB has shown itself more likely to heed professional advice, as opposed to council, which can be swayed by the emotions of citizens. In the Manotick case, he pointed out, the city staff had recommended in favour of Minto’s proposal, before being overturned by council."

In that city staff recommended that proposal. As well the city has just increase services to Manotick which I'm sure won't help their case either.

Just as the article says these type of decisions are what the OMB is for, to overturn city councilors who let bias and reelection get in the way of making decisions.

On a side note I don't know if I support this development. I think that it will cause additional chaos in the south end due to lack of roads but we are talking about 10-20 years here, not tomorrow I start building and poof 1,400 houses are up. Though I’m still waiting for Barrhaven to have a downtown so maybe I’m not a good judge…lol.

Cheers,
Josh

Dado
Oct 9, 2009, 5:12 PM
:previous:

That part of the article wasn't there when I posted; WW added it later after a revised version appeared.

The "emotional citizens" argument is not much better than the "provincial tinkering" argument. Municipal councils exist to represent the will of the tax-paying populace, emotional or not. If the OMB is always going to rule in favour of the advice of professional staff then there is no point in having municipal councils, or, indeed, the public, involved in the planning process. And that would be wrong because the rationale for the involving the public through its elected representatives is that they bear the ongoing costs of development through taxation, increased environmental degradation and diminished quality of life.

Manotick is not a cut-and-dry case for either side. We have to remember it was Minto who requested a change to the status quo of the existing secondary plan; staff agreed with the change, Council didn't. For Minto to say that this is "overturning" is a bit of a stretch: staff has no statutory powers to decide anything of this sort so their advice can't be "overturned" - only accepted or ignored (suppose for example that it was a small township with no planning staff - Council would have to decide on its own with no advice to go on). Council nevertheless approved a change to the status quo, but not the change Minto wanted. Minto didn't like that, went to the OMB, which then agreed with Minto and "overturned" the Council decision. Then the City appealed that to the Courts on the basis that the OMB is not having regard to decisions of Council (arguably two decisions of Council - the previous Rideau Township decision creating the Secondary plan and the later Ottawa Council decision to alter it).

I recall looking at the OMB decision and it is certainly the case that they never even addressed the Council decision. I would say that "having regard to" does not necessarily mean being bound by it, but it does mean the OMB can't just go out and ignore it either, which is effectively what they've done.

In the end, I figure this will be tossed back to the OMB and they'll be instructed to rehear the case but this time to actually address the Council decision. If Minto has any sense they'll point out it was another decision of Council that extended services out to Manotick and that it is not self-financing. The OMB would then have to arbitrate between two decisions of Council. It's not hard to figure out which way that would go - but at least it would be the right decision for the right reasons rather than the right decision for the wrong reasons.

It would also mean that Council will have to be a lot more careful when it approves the extension of heavy municipal infrastructure - and a lot more careful about blindly accepting staff advice on the extension of such infrastructure. That's the irony in all this - we got to this point by Council following staff advice.

Cre47
Oct 12, 2009, 1:06 AM
First new area posted. More to come tomorrow or sometime this week.

First part - the Orleans area



West of Tenth Line and Blackburn By-Pass

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.45128,-75.482383&spn=0,359.947686&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.450737,-75.482076&panoid=jyd171iF3tGnDWD03532ow&cbp=12,260.47,,0,-1.64

Trim Road south of Innes Road

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.464465,-75.446484&spn=0,359.973843&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.464409,-75.450765&panoid=3uP-1PJSvgW_ze1yFZJxbQ&cbp=12,192.56,,0,4.93

Vistapark Drive (Avalon)

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&layer=c&cbll=45.450149,-75.473524&panoid=TY1CrNWWsIBWBQEe1kwlcQ&cbp=12,198.25,,0,1.01&ll=45.453734,-75.464723&spn=0,359.973843&z=16

Lakeridge & Brenthaven (Avalon)

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.446704,-75.47071&spn=0,359.973843&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.448316,-75.475201&panoid=GJYwvgVA9A3R6NuwdvebLQ&cbp=12,143.16,,0,5

Just off Navan Road east of Orleans Boulevard

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.431467,-75.499163&spn=0,359.895372&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.432934,-75.526812&panoid=Scp1Xwqwu_A4zcRKiZEeCw&cbp=12,190.42,,0,5

Innes & Frank Kenny Road

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.476503,-75.438266&spn=0,359.947686&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.473729,-75.441605&panoid=gKAx4IMVZtlJGHJ825iVpw&cbp=12,275.72,,0,5

Near Valin & Portobello

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&layer=c&cbll=45.473252,-75.46506&panoid=wwMPCyjPYSriqOEYxhfidA&cbp=12,57.22,,0,5&ll=45.476217,-75.463221&spn=0,359.973843&z=16

Watters Road east of Trim

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.480054,-75.46277&spn=0,359.947686&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.484254,-75.469658&panoid=_o80dfsPWiahsng-E9w-4w&cbp=12,197.42,,0,5

waterloowarrior
Oct 13, 2009, 10:55 PM
Thanks for the links Cre47!

Kanata West go ahead
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Kanata+West+development+gets+ahead/2097608/story.html

bradnixon
Oct 14, 2009, 1:49 AM
South Ottawa:

Findlay Creek (from Findlay Creek Dr & Bradwell Way) (http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&layer=c&cbll=45.315402,-75.604653&panoid=PBAv3tPlGVZCk8wX6K1OpQ&cbp=12,296.36,,0,-9.89&hq=&hnear=Ottawa,+Ottawa+Division,+Ontario&ll=45.3154,-75.60482&spn=0,359.951248&t=h&z=14)

Findlay Creek (Bank & Analdea) (http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&layer=c&cbll=45.323761,-75.595639&panoid=5v240qWTaQ35uHEjPLrg6g&cbp=11,219.83,,0,4.84&hq=&hnear=Ottawa,+Ottawa+Division,+Ontario&ll=45.323789,-75.595636&spn=0.011406,0.048752&t=h&z=14)

New Rotary Home on Bank Street (http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&layer=c&cbll=45.326789,-75.597403&panoid=urZjmxv2KSC271jv0PTbRg&cbp=11,80.87,,0,-2.92&hq=&hnear=Ottawa,+Ottawa+Division,+Ontario&ll=45.326806,-75.597439&spn=0.011405,0.048752&t=h&z=14)

Riverside South- new St Francis Xavier HS (Limebank & Spratt) (http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&layer=c&cbll=45.288946,-75.671701&panoid=YrMvmWObXnJoMn4vbUuSFg&cbp=11,52.82,,0,-2.13&hq=&hnear=Ottawa,+Ottawa+Division,+Ontario&ll=45.290165,-75.667219&spn=0.011412,0.048752&t=h&z=14)

Riverside South- Earl Armstrong & Canyon Walk (http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&layer=c&cbll=45.277382,-75.677327&panoid=FpViCiLapqbPFDt-0W97QA&cbp=11,4.81,,0,-2.76&hq=&hnear=Ottawa,+Ottawa+Division,+Ontario&ll=45.279235,-75.681896&spn=0.011415,0.048752&t=h&z=14)

Cre47
Oct 16, 2009, 7:58 PM
Part 2: Barrhaven

Strandherd east of Longfields

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.275792,-75.729017&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.275919,-75.729412&panoid=3j1ICRCR5Ak72ruqauwKmg&cbp=12,172.57,,0,5

Beatrice & Chapman Hills Drive

http://maps.google.ca/maps?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.269239,-75.723739&spn=0,359.982018&t=h&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.271743,-75.725924&panoid=bW0MT3_jqPhq4UVBi0Ppyg&cbp=12,172.69,,0,5

Near Woodroffe and Cresthaven (west of the intersection)

http://maps.google.ca/maps?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&layer=c&cbll=45.270823,-75.7165&panoid=AG6MMCmpqY6m-SZvnyYv2Q&cbp=12,241.59,,0,5&ll=45.270719,-75.717516&spn=0,359.982018&z=15

Woodroffe south of Strandherd (east side of road)

http://maps.google.ca/maps?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&layer=c&cbll=45.273887,-75.717527&panoid=dNBVpDGAYZlbeOQ3tzyWjg&cbp=12,97.31,,0,5&ll=45.274041,-75.7161&spn=0,359.982018&z=15

Looking west of Greenbank at Cambrian (Half Moon Bay)

http://maps.google.ca/maps?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&layer=c&cbll=45.25413,-75.736538&panoid=iscj88Bwz3DN1zBujoQiJQ&cbp=12,221.99,,0,5&ll=45.252867,-75.739832&spn=0,359.982018&z=15

Cambrian between Greenbank and Jockvale

http://maps.google.ca/maps?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&layer=c&cbll=45.254998,-75.731523&panoid=ak4OKr-DTLTYi1pFltxCFg&cbp=12,153.39,,0,5&ll=45.25486,-75.736527&spn=0,359.982018&z=15

Strandherd west of Jockvale

http://maps.google.ca/maps?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&layer=c&cbll=45.265454,-75.756472&panoid=bsGCNTcRFkzzeoX-OFGpSQ&cbp=12,132.17,,0,5&ll=45.264134,-75.757599&spn=0,359.928074&z=13

Strandherd near Kennevale

http://maps.google.ca/maps?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&layer=c&cbll=45.265268,-75.777935&panoid=eOM8mYNpYq3FkS6yscUy7w&cbp=12,50.23,,0,5&ll=45.265765,-75.775452&spn=0,359.991009&z=16

Cedarview south of Jockvale

http://maps.google.ca/maps?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&layer=c&cbll=45.269602,-75.774484&panoid=6UtC7m6MP3rMCNTQthimMw&cbp=12,244.3,,0,5&ll=45.269178,-75.775698&spn=0,359.995505&z=17

Proof Sheet
Oct 16, 2009, 8:48 PM
Part 2: Barrhaven


great links, but some of them are quite depressing. Just my opinion.

Cre47
Oct 16, 2009, 9:33 PM
Part 3: Kanata (unfortunately lots of areas were not visited by Google including Kanata North, Kanata West as well as all of Stittsville)

One thing noticeable in these areas (like Orleans and Barrhaven but surprisingly not Riverside South yeah sure Spratt Road is only a 5 minutes or less walking from every home) like many others is the lack of small commercial areas nearby

Fernbank near Eagleson

http://maps.google.ca/maps?client=firefox-a&hl=en&ie=UTF8&t=h&layer=c&cbll=45.277015,-75.864928&panoid=RX46mAdHqa3sw7tug9nm1Q&cbp=12,167.14,,0,5&ll=45.276698,-75.865402&spn=0,359.991009&z=16

Goulbourn Forced Road & Kanata Avenue

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.322169,-75.926625&spn=0,359.928074&z=13&layer=c&cbll=45.322169,-75.926625&panoid=icBOpaC7IMMRdeC6kwT_Qg&cbp=12,252.78,,0,5.21

Terry Fox south of Richarson Side (future development)

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.313318,-75.930419&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.314511,-75.931798&panoid=WFrJHn2-iQ3M1v9FuEhctQ&cbp=12,285.34,,0,5

Note: I will be doing the Gatineau side next week

Cre47
Oct 18, 2009, 1:09 PM
Part 4: Aylmer/Le Plateau

Near Front/Des Allumettieres

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.412231,-75.855103&spn=0,359.997752&z=18&layer=c&cbll=45.412545,-75.855413&panoid=Jx0eDy8_RR6RTtguJMuMyw&cbp=12,102.6,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.409583,-75.854373&spn=0,359.991009&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.409284,-75.857196&panoid=pF6iKIGmEzVgY-hKev1_NA&cbp=12,43.31,,0,5

Near Klock/Des Allumettieres

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.411496,-75.849169&spn=0,359.995505&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.411817,-75.848792&panoid=CfffwyeF6oHr8HKA9QLuyQ&cbp=12,353.47,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.414238,-75.84918&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.416425,-75.847181&panoid=6AKMA51Pcr38bf5MLqsGpQ&cbp=12,222.53,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.415368,-75.847828&spn=0,359.991009&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.416286,-75.849525&panoid=ikM6cY06H96q2MxiDVFrlw&cbp=12,223.89,,0,5

Near Fraser/De Lucerne

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.384135,-75.824633&spn=0,359.991009&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.383855,-75.822576&panoid=D8vXMj7dOAAJpkNjaT6sMg&cbp=12,249.32,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.383954,-75.82725&spn=0,359.991009&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.385231,-75.830389&panoid=VsY4Fw6Jgw6Rj0GXAezhtQ&cbp=12,93.32,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.383441,-75.832829&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.383462,-75.832698&panoid=wwfs19Z6Aye1V_8DTmFXLw&cbp=12,89.08,,0,11.28

Near Aylmer Road and Victor Beaudry

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.395075,-75.81708&spn=0,359.991009&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.393002,-75.815904&panoid=YRuuvH5fOJyHMWzXABGDSA&cbp=12,153.46,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.388264,-75.81193&spn=0,359.964037&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.385888,-75.812859&panoid=nGW9WtQU110whIJcG5C0_A&cbp=12,0,,0,5

Near Vanier Road/Des Allumettieres

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&layer=c&cbll=45.416395,-75.800376&panoid=iW-uXfb1zlFOMIGyhlH5_A&cbp=12,138.69,,0,5&ll=45.413334,-75.798025&spn=0,359.964037&z=14

Near the Champlain Bridge

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.412069,-75.771675&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.410395,-75.772469&panoid=pvRfubjU3EXUGWpAAOAAHA&cbp=12,237.64,,0,5

Near Vanier and Le Plateau

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.42285,-75.810568&spn=0,359.998876&z=19&layer=c&cbll=45.42285,-75.810568&panoid=QzZLNmc7suVhWkRHVhbssQ&cbp=12,37.59,,0,3.93

Near Pink & L'Europe

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.441134,-75.804806&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.440361,-75.798398&panoid=GzHF_-p2UJmYbGOhoKlJ2g&cbp=12,296.73,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.435683,-75.796781&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.437152,-75.798456&panoid=ihjT5QtVrugEWys3swOg9A&cbp=12,321.97,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.441314,-75.79206&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.442264,-75.79301&panoid=i7Q9xQqrgUE9Qz1SuuH94g&cbp=12,104.14,,0,5

Near le Plateau/De L'Atmosphere

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.433364,-75.790944&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.433731,-75.795236&panoid=oa9pK4Uim-W53uj10xT9Fw&cbp=12,132.15,,0,5

Cre47
Oct 18, 2009, 1:28 PM
Part 5: Gatineau (east of Gatineau River)

Near St-Louis & Des Erables

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.500271,-75.750904&spn=0,359.964037&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.500823,-75.750526&panoid=s46cZFRAwKpVpJVPGBGxuw&cbp=12,217.16,,0,5

Just off Greber Blvd between La Verendrye and Paiement

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.500873,-75.686874&spn=0,359.964037&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.502813,-75.692998&panoid=GPwgfVGm6ky1MASmHPzGjA&cbp=12,314.99,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.502926,-75.702764&spn=0,359.995505&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.503056,-75.702037&panoid=h55utU4nqfsR8EE1rFZ8HQ&cbp=12,165.04,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.502091,-75.7033&spn=0,359.995505&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.500936,-75.704665&panoid=uH2-9qwqnK8Jq3Os01Nuuw&cbp=12,111.58,,0,5

Near La Verendrye & Paiement

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.495849,-75.680845&spn=0,359.991009&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.495831,-75.680004&panoid=wgfwBESeKFHEwe3m9zOt4w&cbp=12,205.07,,0,5

Davidson & La Verendrye

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.501513,-75.63538&spn=0,359.991009&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.501598,-75.635444&panoid=pJboBgEHI_dl6gm8-rdKBg&cbp=12,93.48,,0,5

Near Lorrain & St-Rene

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.505054,-75.609112&spn=0,359.982018&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.504674,-75.609057&panoid=wIGCOJVN4VWO-kQwN7s2YQ&cbp=12,279.39,,0,5.23

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.503159,-75.610785&spn=0,359.991009&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.5042,-75.612593&panoid=7ET2qOMJAj7Lx76rrP_IQg&cbp=12,255.42,,0,5

Proof Sheet
Oct 18, 2009, 5:20 PM
Part 4: Aylmer/Le Plateau

Near Front/Des Allumettieres
http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.412231,-75.855103&spn=0,359.997752&z=18&layer=c&cbll=45.412545,-75.855413&panoid=Jx0eDy8_RR6RTtguJMuMyw&cbp=12,102.6,,0,5


Is this subdivision not finished yet or do the homes not come with a fully paved driveway.

btw cre47 great links to the edges of the NCR.

Acajack
Oct 20, 2009, 2:46 PM
Is this subdivision not finished yet or do the homes not come with a fully paved driveway.

btw cre47 great links to the edges of the NCR.

It looks like they still have to put the curbs in, but contrary to Ottawa not all new homes in Gatineau come with a paved driveway. It’s often up to the developer as there is no city-wide rule that requires paved driveways on all new homes. (Though many neighbourhoods have local bylaws that require them.)

Same with lawn sod: the legal requirement for developers covers the front lawn only. The sides and back are the owner’s responsibility (and you can’t leave it unsodded or full of weeds too long or the city will fine you). Most people either just pay a bit of extra to the developer for them to do the whole lot, or do it themselves a few weeks after they move in.

waterloowarrior
Oct 28, 2009, 3:49 AM
Committee OKs funding plan for sewer upgrades

Kanata West, Fernbank developers would get back $1.6M cost of work, study
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Committee+funding+plan+sewer+upgrades/2152201/story.html
BY KATE JAIMET, THE OTTAWA CITIZENOCTOBER 27, 2009 11:31 PM


OTTAWA — Controversial housing developments that could affect the flood-prone Glen Cairn neighbourhood edged closer to reality Tuesday as the city’s planning and environment committee approved a funding arrangement with developers for sewer upgrades in the area.

The upgrades are to allow for the eventual construction of 17,000 homes, as well as offices and retail stores, in the Fernbank and Kanata West areas.

Critics argue that the city should not aid development in this area — or perform any work on the sewer system — until it has understood and addressed the causes of flooding to existing communities nearby.

Those communities could be prone to even more flooding if new developments add pressure to the sewage system.

“Why are we building houses here?” said Capital Councillor Clive Doucet. “When this place experiences difficulties in terms of evacuating the sewage and controlling the waterflow, who is going to be liable? Because I’m sure it’s going to happen.”

The committee approved an arrangement that would allow the development companies that own the Kanata West and Fernbank lands to fund a new pump and pipe at the existing Hazeldean sewage pumping station, and to pay for a design study of a new sewage pumping station in Kanata West.

The $1.6 million cost would be refunded to the developers through development charges collected by the city.

Guy Bourgon, a program manager with the city, said these improvements are needed to accommodate future development, no matter the outcome of the investigation into the causes of the July 24 flood that swamped Glen Cairn and other neighbourhoods on the city’s west side.

That report is to be completed in August 2010.

Bourgon said any suggested sewer improvements that emerge as a result of that review will be carried out “in lock-step” with these works.

“We’re doing a co-ordinated approach on design. We’re looking at the short term and the long term. (The long-term solution) doesn’t preclude works from taking place in the interim.”

But engineer Ted Cooper, a persistent critic of the watershed planning in Kanata, argued that the approach can’t be co-ordinated, as the city claims, if the sewer works go ahead before the investigation is complete.

“It comes down to timing,” he said. “It takes a matter of months to replace the pumps. It’s going to take years to come up with an effective solution that protects the Glen Cairn residents from basement flooding.

“It all has to not only be planned concurrently, it has to be implemented concurrently.”

The development of the Kanata West area is contingent on approvals from the provincial Ministry of the Environment.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

waterloowarrior
Nov 3, 2009, 6:32 PM
Plan pits villages against developers
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Plan+pits+villages+against+developers/2175185/story.html
Confused planning policy clear in Richmond dispute with Mattamy

BY RANDALL DENLEY, THE OTTAWA CITIZENNOVEMBER 3, 2009COMMENTS (13)


STORYPHOTOS ( 1 )



Randall Denley
Photograph by: The Ottawa Citizen, The Ottawa Citizen
People in the village of Richmond are on the receiving end of what is surely the most contradictory planning policy the City of Ottawa has. The city won't expand its urban boundary on the grounds that suburban sprawl must be stopped. It's a reasonable position, but the city contradicts it with an aggressive plan to direct growth to rural villages instead. If new development doesn't make sense on the urban edge, why is it better 10 kilometres down the road where there is no municipal water, an inadequate sewage system and a lack of road capacity?

That's what people in Richmond are trying to figure out as they cope with a plan by Mattamy Homes that could ultimately more than double the size of their village. While people were initially open to developing Richmond, there are now signs that it could end up like Manotick, where villagers have waged a long, bitter fight to slow development.

Mattamy and local residents are working on a plan for the community, but some village leaders say that it's just a device to further Mattamy's development plans. Mattamy has brought in a team of consultants to create "a pie-in-the-sky vision of what Richmond could be like, while acting as a smokescreen to distract us from the real issue, which is the proposed doubling in size of our village," says Elaine Morgan, who is vice-chair of the committee working on the community plan. If Mattamy's development goes ahead, "We're going to become another Barrhaven, another Stittsville," Morgan says.

Bruce Webster, head of the Richmond Village Association, is concerned that greater density in the Mattamy development will change the character of the village. It's urban development outside the urban area, he says.

Although Mattamy purchased or took options on more than 300 acres 18 months ago, basic questions about servicing the development remain unanswered, Webster says.

One can certainly see why people in Richmond would be alarmed. The community plan that's meant to set the tone for the village's development is being paid for by Mattamy. Councillor Glenn Brooks promised the plan during the last election, but subsequently discovered that the city couldn't afford the $750,000 project. Even for a developer with the best of intentions, that sounds like putting the fox in charge of henhouse security.

The city anticipates that about nine per cent of its growth over the next 20 years will go to rural areas and most of that will be directed to villages. City planners say the growth will make the villages more "sustainable," by adding enough new bodies to allow retail expansion, keep up the numbers of students in schools and justify additional city services.

In other words, the city is determined to make villages larger for their own good, even though they are communities that many chose to move to because of their small size.

The door is open to making villages bigger because they typically have land within the village boundary that was set aside years ago for future expansion. In the case of Richmond, a larger village was envisioned by the former Goulbourn Township. Back in the day, rural councillors liked rural growth because it brought in more tax dollars. The justification for it in the amalgamated city is more difficult to see.

To some extent, Mattamy is caught in the crossfire between villagers and the city, which has adopted village policies that aren't universally popular. The company is exercising the development right that comes with the land it bought and it is convinced that Richmond will be changed for the better, Mattamy spokesman Frank Cairo says. He argues that his company's development will deliver more retail, better water and sewer service, better roads and better transit.

The development will add between 1,700 and 2,300 housing units to the 1,400 in the village now, Cairo says, but that growth will take place over many years and it will be in a style that suits Richmond.

"Our plan is not to build Kanata all over again in Richmond," Cairo says. "Mattamy looks at this as a legacy project."

The Mattamy-led planning exercise is exactly the kind of overview that Richmond would have benefited from years ago. The village's growth has been slow and organic, but it's also unfocused and sometimes not very attractive. This isn't one of those quaint little villages people like to visit on weekends.

While Mattamy's plan talks about concepts and visions, sewers and dollars will drive the village's future. Its sewer system is nearly maxed out now. To develop, Mattamy will have to spend a lot of money on sewer improvements and the creation of a communal well system. Having spent that, the company will need a substantial number of units to make a profit.

What Mattamy proposes is likely to fit squarely within the city official plan. Too bad that plan doesn't make sense or please people who like quiet village life.

Contact Randall Denley at 613-596-3756 or by e-mail, rdenley@thecitizen.canwest.com

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

waterloowarrior
Nov 14, 2009, 6:54 PM
Minto development in Manotick gets green light
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Minto+development+Manotick+gets+green+light/2220922/story.html

BY KATE JAIMET , THE OTTAWA CITIZENNOVEMBER 13, 2009

A 1400-home development that will radically expand the village of Manotick got the green light from the Ontario Superior Court Friday, as a two-to-one majority of judges ruled against the city's appeal of the OMB decision allowing the development.

The city had argued in court that the OMB did not have the right to allow the Minto development in Manotick to go ahead, after council had rejected the development by a 14 to 5 vote. The city based its argument on the new provincial Planning Act, passed in 2007, which states that the OMB must "have regard to" the decisions of municipal councils.

Writing for the majority, Justice Aston stated in his decision that the phrase "have regard to" only required the OMB to have "minimal deference" to the decisions of council.

But in a dissenting opinion, Justice Matlow wrote that the city's decision about the development should have superseded the OMB's. He stated that the OMB's move in overturning Council's decision was a

"stunning rejection of the movement towards greater municipal autonomy that Bill 51 was intended to advance."

Rideau Councillor Glenn Brooks said he was "disappointed" but not entirely surprised by the court's decision. He said he intends to advance a motion at City Council, asking Premier Dalton McGuinty to clarify the law, and especially the meaning of the words "have regard to."

"This is a province-wide piece of legislation, so now we know that the decisions of council can in fact be given lip service by the OMB," Brooks said. "This bill has not changed anything, and the premier, when he brought forward this bill, said this would be a big step forward in empowerment of municipal councils."

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

waterloowarrior
Nov 17, 2009, 8:35 PM
by Southfacing... who's the developer for this project, Claridge?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/23575605@N08/4047410647/
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3478/4047410647_3d0e84196b.jpg

Dado
Nov 17, 2009, 11:05 PM
:previous:

Probably. As far as I know they own all the land between the yard and Johnston Road. I don't know whose bright idea it was to rezone that to residential, but the rest is to remain as industrial (from heavy to light, except the yard itself, which is to remain heavy) due to the Provincial Policy Statement.

waterloowarrior
Nov 25, 2009, 12:14 AM
as you mentioned, the Johnston Road Land Use Study (http://www.ottawa.ca/residents/public_consult/johnston/index_en.html) is now proposed to be industrial lands due to PPS/new OP
http://www.emcottawasouth.ca/20091120/news/Residents+view+changes+to+land+use+plans


Residents view changes to land use plans

Posted Nov 20, 2009 By Sheena Bolton (http://www.emcottawasouth.ca/author/Sheena+Bolton)
http://www.emcottawasouth.ca/media/img-mail.gifEmail (http://www.emcottawasouth.ca/send_to_friend.asp?KeepThis=true&TB_iframe=true&height=250&width=420) http://www.emcottawasouth.ca/media/img-print.gifPrint (http://javascript%3Cb%3E%3C/b%3E:window.print%28%29;) http://www.emcottawasouth.ca/media/img_tweet.gifTweet This (http://twitter.com/home/?status=Residents+view+changes+to+land+use+plans+http://tinyurl.com/yllcw3z+from+%40EMCNews)


EMC News The Johnston Rd. land use study has changed substantially residents learned during the recent fourth and final open house regarding the project.

At the last open house in June, residents were asked to vote on elements of three different proposals, each including industrial, residential and commercial areas.

The study now proposes that the entire area under consideration be zoned as light industrial.

"The big reason for the change is due to the provincial policy statements and our own Official Plan policies just came into effect in June this year, right after our last public open house," explained Cheryl Brouillard, a planner with the City of Ottawa. "These policies say to keep employment lands for employment."

While the option did exist to maintain the land as zoned for heavy industrial, those involved with the study recommend a change to light industrial due to the area's close proximity to residential.

The light industrial designation would allow for businesses such as an animal hospital, automobile dealership, catering facility and office space, as well as a warehouse, technology and research centre, and instructional facility.

The majority of questions at the recent open house surrounded traffic and how it will impact the existing communities. However, as there is no connection to Johnston Rd. planned, the city does not foresee additional congestion in the area, noting that the project could even relieve some of the traffic, as drivers will have two more options to cut from Conroy Rd. to Albion Rd.

This proposal still will not permit trucks to travel south on Albion Rd., however.

Gloucester-Southgate Coun. Diane Deans informed the community that the intersection of Johnston Rd. and Albion Rd. has met the warrant for a traffic control signal or roundabout and she is trying to have that funded in the 2010 budget.

She also explained that Johnston Rd. and Southgate Rd. has not yet met this warrant, but is close.

waterloowarrior
Nov 25, 2009, 12:17 AM
http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__6B59B7
Findlay Creek Properties Co-Tenancy
Approval is being sought for the development of 60 apartment styled condominium units. There will be 5 buildings, each containing 12 units (2.5 storeys)

waterloowarrior
Nov 28, 2009, 1:16 AM
Here's the Minto Manotick court decision (http://www.canlii.org/en/on/onscdc/doc/2009/2009canlii65802/2009canlii65802.html)for anyone interested

waterloowarrior
Dec 1, 2009, 7:30 PM
Councillor Harder wants to delete some sidewalks in the Mattamy Half Moon Bay development. These proposed sidewalk deletions have been suggested by the developer in accordance with the intent of the Councillor's expression of concern regarding the relationship between pedestrian sidewalks and vehicular driveways. Staff is against these sidewalk deletions
http://ottawa.ca/calendar/ottawa/citycouncil/pec/2009/12-08/8%20-%20ACS2009-CCS-PEC-0032-%20Community%20Sidewalks%20Mattamy%20Subdivision%20Half%20Moon%20Bay.htm

eternallyme
Dec 1, 2009, 7:59 PM
Councillor Harder wants to delete some sidewalks in the Mattamy Half Moon Bay development. These proposed sidewalk deletions have been suggested by the developer in accordance with the intent of the Councillor's expression of concern regarding the relationship between pedestrian sidewalks and vehicular driveways. Staff is against these sidewalk deletions
http://ottawa.ca/calendar/ottawa/citycouncil/pec/2009/12-08/8%20-%20ACS2009-CCS-PEC-0032-%20Community%20Sidewalks%20Mattamy%20Subdivision%20Half%20Moon%20Bay.htm

They should look into back laneways like they do in some cities such as parts of Winnipeg, Edmonton and Calgary...that way, sidewalk spacing is not a negative issue as vehicle access and garages are redirected to the back...

waterloowarrior
Dec 1, 2009, 8:20 PM
Developer redesigns contentious site plan
http://www.eastottawa.ca/article-406413-Developer-redesigns-contentious-site-plan.html
by Patricia Lonergan
View all articles from Patricia Lonergan
Article online since November 27th 2009, 10:34
Be the first to comment on this article
A Fallingbrook development that originally raised the ire of local residents is now getting a thumbs up from the community.
In what Cumberland Coun. Rob Jellett termed a neighbourly move, Claridge scrapped its plans to build low density, stacked townhomes at 2000 Valin and is instead proposing to construct two-storey townhomes.

“It’s 10 times better,” Jellett said of the new site plan, which proposes building 46 townhomes in nine blocks on the southwest corner of Valin and Trim roads.

The first plan proposed 96 stacked townhouses, or eight 12-unit buildings, on the site. Jellett indicated they were three- to five-storey walk-up apartments that would’ve overlooked existing nearby townhomes.

“(Residents) would sit in their backyard and look up at a monstrosity,” Jellett said of the initial plan’s impact on the neighbourhood.

Residents rallied to protest the first proposal, expressing concerns about too-high density, traffic congestion and increased shading on existing homes.

According to city documents, the planning and environment committee determined the proposed development was incompatible with the surrounding neighbourhood in terms of land use, height, density and setback. In the end, the city voted down the proposal.

“I’m glad to see the developer didn’t challenge it at the (Ontario Municipal Board),” Jellett said following the Nov. 19 public meeting where the newest plan was presented to residents, adding the developer listened to residents and “came back with a better plan.”

Residents at the meeting also expressed their preference for the revised proposal.

“It’s a lot better,” commented Henry Skalski, whose home backs onto the proposed site, although he noted the plan is still a little dense in comparison to the surrounding community.

Despite the new plan, residents are still looking for some concessions from the developer. They are asking Claridge to consider moving two blocks of townhomes a metre farther from the property line. Residents are also requesting a two-foot lattice extension be added to the wooden fence separating existing homes from the proposed development.

“If they pop (the townhomes) back another metre I’d be happy,” Skalski said, adding the lattice extension would be nice because it’ll help block out the development.

Jellett indicated if the developer can increase the setback and work on the fence, he could approve the proposal this time. And if not, “we’ll have another discussion,” he said.

Dado
Dec 2, 2009, 2:35 AM
They should look into back laneways like they do in some cities such as parts of Winnipeg, Edmonton and Calgary...that way, sidewalk spacing is not a negative issue as vehicle access and garages are redirected to the back...

Back laneways don't seem to find favour here, unfortunately, probably because it's more road to maintain and that they might not be able to drive grader snowplows down them.

waterloowarrior
Dec 3, 2009, 10:55 PM
Residents view plans for future subdivision
Posted Nov 27, 2009
BY SHEENA BOLTON
http://emcottawasouth.ca/20091127/news/Residents+view+plans+for+future+subdivision

EMC News The types of buildings and traffic impacts were the main concerns expressed by many residents during a recent meeting for a proposed new subdivision in Riverside South.

The area under consideration is between River Rd. and Spratt Rd.

The new subdivision proposal includes 141 single lots, 180 street town units, two apartment-style blocks (mixed-use residential), a school area, public park and commercial section.

Following concern from some in attendance at the meeting about the notion of including apartments in the area, Jim Burghout, development manager for Claridge Homes, noted that the mixed-use buildings would not be the traditional idea of apartments.

"It's three or four bungalows on top of each other," he explained. "There will be no high-rises in the area."

Plans have not yet been finalized for the six-acre commercial area.

"We will have to do a site plan application for the commercial area," Mr. Burghout said. "The commercial area will be scrutinized to a much higher degree than the townhouses would be."

The entire subdivision plan follows the Riverside South Community Design Plan (CDP), which was approved by city council in 2005.

Residents across River Rd. from the planned site remarked about concern regarding access into their community. Mr. Burghout explained there is a plan to have a cul-du-sac out to River Rd., which the builders would like to use as a road during construction but would be closed off after. If the plans are approved by the city, residents neighbouring the site could see servicing commence as early as late spring or early summer.

Many residents were concerned about the flow of water and sewers on the site.

Cathlyn Kaufman, planner with the city, explained the flow will be engineered to flow north naturally and will not be pumped. This could happen by raising the grade on the site, possibly by two metres, however no nearby residents will be impacted by the change.

Gloucester-South Nepean Coun. Steve Desroches explained the neighbouring community's of Rivers Bend and Honey Gables were raised in a similar fashion so everything would flow properly.

"I think we've heard some feedback from the adjacent residents on River Rd. and I understand the concerns they are facing, it's a lot of change in the community as a result of the development for the future of Riverside South," noted the councillor.

While there will be no more public meetings about this proposal, Ms. Kaufman will be accepting comments until final approval. She can be reached at cathlyn.kaufman@ottawa.ca.

waterloowarrior
Dec 7, 2009, 7:12 PM
developers trying to end Fernbank appeal early...
Kizell says no land-use planning grounds on which the board could allow an appeal are contained in the greenspace organization’s appeal. The appeal is only meant to delay matters, Kizell says.



http://www.ottawacitizen.com/entertainment/motion+could+pave+Fernbank+development/2310476/story.html

waterloowarrior
Dec 9, 2009, 5:46 AM
Staff, councillors to debate sidewalks in the suburbs

By Neco Cockburn, The Ottawa CitizenDecember 9, 2009 12:02 AM
OTTAWA — City staff and councillors will review development standards for sidewalks, lights and other aspects of suburban subdivision design.

The review stems from a discussion over sidewalks in a new Barrhaven subdivision that occurred during Tuesday’s meeting of the planning and environment committee.

Barrhaven Councillor Jan Harder brought forward a report recommending that certain proposed sidewalks be cut from a Mattamy development in the Half Moon Bay subdivision.

The committee heard that the issue arose after a young boy riding a tricycle on the sidewalk was almost hit by a van pulling out of a driveway in a high-density area where there is little set-back between homes and sidewalks.

The city’s current policy is to have as many sidewalks as possible on streets, staff said.

Harder said policies should be modified in high-density areas and certain areas should not have sidewalks if there are safety concerns.

“We have policies in place for the whole city,” she said, adding that policies are sometimes changed for rural areas. In suburban areas, “all of the policies will not work.”

After the committee discussions shifted to high-level issues involving sidewalks, standards and policies that are applied to suburban developments, the committee deferred the Half Moon Bay decision until April.

That’s when staff and councillors are to report back after reviewing development standards and how they should apply to suburbs.

The committee’s chairman, Alta Vista Councillor Peter Hume, said it will deal with suburban development standards as a whole, rather than “one-offing” the Half Moon Bay case and having other suburban councillors come forward with similar issues.

“Clearly there’s an issue with the suburban development standards,” Hume said in an interview. “We want sustainable, pedestrian-friendly, bicycle-friendly communities, but does a single standard get us where we need to go? Should staff have more flexibility to tailor the standards to each individual community?”

Harder, Stittsville Councillor Shad Qadri, and a group of developers have also been looking streetlights, sidewalks, winter parking, landscaping and other issues in high-density developments.

“We need to test-drive the policies that we have in place,” Harder said.

Qadri said building some homes in an area and testing what works would be the best approach.

“It’s great to have sidewalks on every street, but if it creates a safety issue, then you’re defeating the purpose of having a sidewalk,” he said.

During the committee’s discussions, Somerset Councillor Diane Holmes said she could not vote to remove sidewalks from a community, citing the need for people to walk and use transit.

“The fact that we have designed suburbs that force people into cars and do not allow them the choice, often, of walking and their children walking, has not served us well,” she said. “We need to redesign our suburban areas.”

Capital Councillor Clive Doucet grappled with the issue, but said, “it’s hard for me to vote against sidewalks.”

Sidewalks are not necessary to make certain parts of neighbourhoods pedestrian friendly, said Knoxdale-Merivale Councillor Gord Hunter. “Where there are no sidewalks ... the pedestrians control the streets.”

Kanata South Councillor Peggy Feltmate said she was torn on the issue, but noted that people in her ward complain about a lack of sidewalks and how it makes them feel unsafe, especially in winter. “I’m not sure that not having the sidewalks makes it safer,” she said.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen
if
A driver didn't look when they backed up and almost hit someone, so the pedestrians are punished.... councillors trying their hand at city planning.... somehow I'm not so sure about these planned Harder/Qadri suburban development standards, at least based on the information in the article and previous staff report. However you can appreciate that there may be a need for more flexibility and that not all the current standards make sense.

For a developer it's much easier to just follow the city standard rather than trying to convince everyone your townhouse project's driveway should be less than 6.7 m/22 ft(!) or attempting to build something like these more pedestrian friendly options for non-sidewalk neighbourhoods (shared space/home zone, slower traffic, narrower roads).

http://transportehumano.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/woonerf-a.jpg

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Img/76169/0019262.jpg

There are lots of good options out there for better suburban streetscapes/standards, but it may be difficult getting buy in from city engineers, transportation planners/engineers, utilty companies, fire department, waste management, parks/rec/environmental planners, public works/snow removal, councillors, residents and city planners. Every group has their own priorities, POV, and constraints.

A lot of these elements may require a total rethink... smaller fire/garbage trucks, different ways of collecting garbage, slower speed limits, narrower streets, different utility configurations, potentially allowing on-street parking for resident parking, allowing different parking configurations and smaller driveaisles in PUDs..... these changes affect the other groups so you need buy in from everyone. I don't know if the city is looking at a total rethink of some of these elements or making more minor updates to policy.


for anyone interested, here's the UK's Manual for Streets, I'd be interested to see a similar document for the Netherlands or other northern european countries
http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/sustainable/manforstreets/

Dado
Dec 9, 2009, 5:55 PM
:previous:

The Fire Department and the Road Operations department (snow) would have a fit if they saw these, especially the first.


I'm not aware of the City having yet done any work on new residential street design guidelines; they've got some for urban collectors and rural roads as well as greenfield development design guidelines, but none specifically for residential streets at the moment. The greenfield guide only mentions that an appropriate width for the right-of-way should be selected, but goes no further than that (which is fair enough, since that choice should be the subject of a bunch of other guidelines). If and when residential street design guidelines are developed, that would be the time to carry out the major rethink you discuss.

I think the only way to get narrower streets at present is to create them as private roads in a condominium development. The Fire Department still gets its say, but most of the rest can be more or less pushed aside since it's no longer the city's responsibility.

Incidentally, if this kind of thing becomes widespread in new developments eventually there would be a sort of defacto two-tier municipal government in place again in new suburbs. Condominiums are, after all, a form of government - more limited in power than a municipality to be sure but still with the basic requirements to be considered a government: legally constituted powers of taxation whereby 'fees' (i.e. taxes) can be raised in pursuit of common objectives arrived at through a democratic process.

RTWAP
Dec 9, 2009, 10:14 PM
Someone needs to invent a snowplow that compresses snow instead of shoving it.

Actually, it would be nice if we had the following.

Suburban snowplow: Uses GPS and video processing software to spray snow onto lawns as the plow drives down the street. This avoids the need to remove snow (saving money) and prevents snow rows at the end of driveways (saving shovelers' sanity).

Urban snowplow: Use the same GPS and video technology and a compression mechanism to deposit 3'x3'x6' blocks of heavily compressed snow at the roadside, avoiding driveways, crosswalks, bus stops, super mailboxes and bike lanes.

waterloowarrior
Feb 1, 2010, 11:00 PM
Corvinelli Homes has a map of their next few phases of Solidex Place/Station (http://www.corvinellihomes.ca/Solidex_place_2010.pdf) in Russell, which is ready to boom as City of Ottawa water is coming in February and they are building more wastewater infrastructure

waterloowarrior
Feb 2, 2010, 6:57 AM
City ordered to pay Minto $50K
By JON WILLING, CITY HALL BUREAU
Last Updated: 1st February 2010, 7:53pm
http://www.ottawasun.com/news/ottawa/2010/02/01/12700436.html

A court has ordered the City of Ottawa pay $50,000 in costs to local developer Minto after the city unsuccessfully challenged a housing plan in Manotick.

The divisional court issued the award Monday.

Last November, the court upheld a decision by the Ontario Municipal Board allowing Minto to build 1,400 homes in Manotick. The board found that the development wouldn’t have an adverse impact on the village.

Minto asked the court to award $112,100 in costs, but the city argued the company should only receive $30,000.

The city has also learned that Minto wants to be awarded costs related to the municipal board hearing. City solicitor Rick O’Connor has informed councillors that Minto has not yet indicated how much money it’s seeking.

In a memo to councillors, O’Connor says parties at a municipal board hearing are not traditionally entitled to costs unless a party’s actions calls for a sanction. The city doesn’t believe any of its actions in this case justify the awarding of costs, O’Connor says in the memo.

Ouch!

Ottawan
Feb 2, 2010, 4:05 PM
:previous:

In other words, both developers and courts are tired of the City fighting legal battles against projects where there is no legal ground for a challenge.

If only something like awarding costs against the City would help it learn...

Acajack
Feb 2, 2010, 4:23 PM
Corvinelli Homes has a map of their next few phases of Solidex Place/Station (http://www.corvinellihomes.ca/Solidex_place_2010.pdf) in Russell, which is ready to boom as City of Ottawa water is coming in February and they are building more wastewater infrastructure

Solidex Place/Station^ :shrug: Anyone know where they got that name? I guess "station" comes from the fact that it is near the nature trail that used to be the New York Central Railway. But Solidex?

waterloowarrior
Feb 2, 2010, 5:00 PM
Solidex Place/Station^ :shrug: Anyone know where they got that name? I guess "station" comes from the fact that it is near the nature trail that used to be the New York Central Railway. But Solidex?

It's originally called Solidex Place but that map says Solidex Station, so maybe they are changing it... a lot of the street names are train related. Solidex is from "Solidex Holdings" which I think is the construction company started by the developer's father http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/homes/story.html?id=346ab7c5-2357-4757-83be-e9d0d8ec1cda

Acajack
Feb 2, 2010, 5:09 PM
It's originally called Solidex Place but that map says Solidex Station, so maybe they are changing it... a lot of the street names are train related. Solidex is from "Solidex Holdings" which I think is the construction company started by the developer's father http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/homes/story.html?id=346ab7c5-2357-4757-83be-e9d0d8ec1cda

Good sleuthing there! :tup:

Dado
Feb 2, 2010, 10:06 PM
:previous:

In other words, both developers and courts are tired of the City fighting legal battles against projects where there is no legal ground for a challenge.

If only something like awarding costs against the City would help it learn...

The outcome of this case is not exactly good for municipalities anywhere in the province. This case, if you recall, while it started off as a pissing match between the City and Minto, was actually about whether the OMB is required to "have regard to" decisions of Council in arriving at its decisions, something that the Provincial cabinet had changed a few regulations a few years' back to ensure. What this case has shown is that that was all for naught, if it was indeed for real at all.

What I had expected, given the clear lack of regard the OMB had for Council's decision and due to the provincial regulation change, was that the Court would punt the case back to the OMB with instructions to the OMB to rehear the case in accordance with the provincial regulations. There I expected the OMB to come to the same decision in the end, but only after it sorted out a bunch of conflicting Council decisions. The City would have won on the principle that the OMB has to pay attention to Council while Minto would have won on the grounds that Council was nuts. Instead what we've got is that every single growth-limiting decision by any municipal council anywhere in the province is pretty much worthless as far as the OMB is concerned.


And we still see Minto pushing its luck after all this - it is crystal-clear that costs at an OMB hearing cannot be awarded except under the most unusual of circumstances, and simply defending a provincially-approved secondary plan is not one of those circumstances.

waterloowarrior
Feb 2, 2010, 10:49 PM
The outcome of this case is not exactly good for municipalities anywhere in the province. This case, if you recall, while it started off as a pissing match between the City and Minto, was actually about whether the OMB is required to "have regard to" decisions of Council in arriving at its decisions, something that the Provincial cabinet had changed a few regulations a few years' back to ensure. What this case has shown is that that was all for naught, if it was indeed for real at all.

What I had expected, given the clear lack of regard the OMB had for Council's decision and due to the provincial regulation change, was that the Court would punt the case back to the OMB with instructions to the OMB to rehear the case in accordance with the provincial regulations. There I expected the OMB to come to the same decision in the end, but only after it sorted out a bunch of conflicting Council decisions. The City would have won on the principle that the OMB has to pay attention to Council while Minto would have won on the grounds that Council was nuts. Instead what we've got is that every single growth-limiting decision by any municipal council anywhere in the province is pretty much worthless as far as the OMB is concerned.

And we still see Minto pushing its luck after all this - it is crystal-clear that costs at an OMB hearing cannot be awarded except under the most unusual of circumstances, and simply defending a provincially-approved secondary plan is not one of those circumstances.

The PPS used to say "have regard to" but it was changed to "shall be consistent with (http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/AssetFactory.aspx?did=4587)" because it didn't really mean too much.

http://www.localgovernment.ca/show_bulletin.cfm?id=168

First, Bill 51 requires that the OMB shall “have regard to the decision of the municipal council.” OMB hearings are almost always a question of whether the municipal decision will stand or not, so the current practice has been for the OMB to have regard to the municipal decision even if it decides to set it aside. This particular amendment therefore changes nothing. But the irony of the words “have regard to” should not be missed. It used to be that the OMB was required to “have regard for” provincial policy statements but that was considered so weak that the government has since required that decisions “be consistent with” provincial policy standards. Bill 51 doesn’t give the local decision the status of provincial policy, just a “have regard to” status. The government touts this as a major recognition of local councils, but it is nothing of the sort.

Ottawan
Feb 3, 2010, 3:31 AM
Exactly. The court was determining how much deference was required by the standard of "have regard to". I don't think the court made a very serious mistake. As to the outcome, I actually feel that OMB decisions are almost always more fair to all parties involved than those of Council, and from that pragmatic viewpoint, would rather that their having regard to the decisions of Council does not mean that they must do more than consider them. If most people disagree with me, the province can always change the legislation.

harls
Feb 15, 2010, 2:37 PM
There's new development signs up in Aylmer at Robert Stewart/Lucerne for Faubourg du Rivage Condos, townhomes etc. They've already bulldozed a bit on the north side of Lucerne.

there was a website on the billboard .. www.faubourgdurivage.com

bradnixon
Feb 16, 2010, 3:28 AM
Minto TrailsEdge
http://www.minto.com/buy-a-home-in-ottawa/TrailsEdge/main.html

Offering in its initial phase a limited collection of only 117 executive townhomes, TrailsEdge presents to you an attractive setting close to both urban amenities and natural attractions.

Located on the southwestern edge of Orleans, just east of Minto's Chapel Trail (where Page Road and Renaud Road intersect), TrailsEdge offers you four different models of Minto's sought-after executive townhomes.

Owning an exceptionally well-designed Minto townhome in TrailsEdge will give you an inspiring place to enjoy life.

Trails Edge is an “all ENERGY STAR” community built in Ottawa by Minto Communities. It is adjacent to a future community of residential, schools, parks and retail. With good access to a future rapid-bus transit system (and future light rail), nature trails of Mud Creek and close to Mer Bleue and the NCC lands, as well as access to some commercial areas – it will be part a future diverse community of people and businesses.

Natural resource conservation is a priority for Minto – including energy, water and reduction in construction materials and waste. With the increasing cost of energy and awareness of the impacts of energy production on our natural environment and climate – the demand for energy efficient solutions in all industries has never been stronger.

TrailsEdge is an open community with public access to sidewalks and parks. With a compact footprint of 19 DU/Acre, this helps make efficient use land inside the urban boundary and supports efficient use of transit.

Some other features:

- landscape design to eliminate traditional sod (using lower-water use and non-invasive sod) – called RTF, ‘rhizome turf fescue grass’

- for reduced water use: low-flow shower heads, toilets, and lavatory faucets. Reduced water use will also be achieved through lower water use landscaping design.

- low VOC paint and Green label Plus Carpets as standard – this will enhance indoor air quality.

- Design the community for pedestrians

o Build bike / pedestrian connections to the future bus transitway, along the creek system and connecting to the future school and park sites.

o Strong pedestrian connections east-west to future to future development areas

o Public active and passive parks and open spaces are focused centrally to the communities and passive park areas are provided along the creeks. Storm water management ponds will be adjacent to open spaces to provide more public open space – these parks will be a feature of the community.

o Walkable access to schools, parks and future retail

- Construction waste will be separated on site for recycling and a diversion rate exceeding 75% of construction waste from landfill will be established

- Materials with a recycled content and/or which are extracted and manufactured locally are preferred.


Unfortunately no site plan available (and nothing on the city's maps)... environmental features seem quite good though. If my calculations are right, 19DU/Acre=47units/hectare, which is well above the OP target of 30 units/hectare for suburban development.

Requin
Feb 16, 2010, 2:09 PM
There has been some bulldozing happening during the past couple of weeks on the west side of 10th Line at Harvest Valley, just south of Tamarack's Chaperal development, near some kind of brick utility-type building. Anybody know what's going on there?

eternallyme
Feb 16, 2010, 9:27 PM
19/acre would be your average mixed condo/low-rise apartment complex. There aren't any in Orleans that I can find like that, but some in east Ottawa for sure.

Right now in Orleans, the highest densities I can find are in central Chapel Hill, which looks to be about 12 units/acre. The lowest are in parts of Convent Glen, which appear to be about 3 units/acre.

waterloowarrior
Feb 22, 2010, 10:24 PM
Fernbank subdivisions are starting to come in
http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__7UMMK1

bradnixon
Feb 23, 2010, 2:49 PM
Mattamy Half Moon Bay Phase 2...
http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__7XWO9P

Mattamy seems to be going downhill in terms of subdivision design. Their previous plans have featured rear-lane townhomes, single-loaded streets, lots of walkway blocks, and have generally been very attractive.

This plan is full of rear-lotting along arterials, something the city has been trying to get away from. They even have a long stretch (over 220m) of rear lotting, without even a walkway block, along New Greenbank Rd, which is supposed to be a future transit corridor. How those people will actually to get said transit, I don't know...

I'm hoping this gets significantly changed.

eternallyme
Feb 23, 2010, 7:30 PM
Mattamy Half Moon Bay Phase 2...
http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__7XWO9P

Mattamy seems to be going downhill in terms of subdivision design. Their previous plans have featured rear-lane townhomes, single-loaded streets, lots of walkway blocks, and have generally been very attractive.

This plan is full of rear-lotting along arterials, something the city has been trying to get away from. They even have a long stretch (over 220m) of rear lotting, without even a walkway block, along New Greenbank Rd, which is supposed to be a future transit corridor. How those people will actually to get said transit, I don't know...

I'm hoping this gets significantly changed.

I can understand the rationale for not having any houses or driveways directly facing Greenbank (it would also be the edge of the community), but there should be frequent walkway blocks as long as higher-level transit is forced onto Greenbank (until the ultimate transit corridor - see below - is built). Commercial, institutional (i.e. schools, churches) and multi-family establishments should have direct access though.

I would personally move the transit corridor to the existing Greenbank Road corridor, to allow for more TOD along the central part of the communities and better access from Stonebridge as well. The existing Greenbank Road should become a mainstreet arterial with community mixed-use.

If the design is as planned, the ideal design:

Existing Greenbank (new mainstreet minor arterial) - 2 lanes, a transit corridor on-street and parking lanes, 50 km/h speed limit

New Greenbank (new suburban arterial) - 4 lanes and dedicated on-street bicycle lanes, 70 km/h speed limit (may be lowered to 60 km/h depending on development)

waterloowarrior
Feb 23, 2010, 7:44 PM
I can understand the rationale for not having any houses or driveways directly facing Greenbank (it would also be the edge of the community)

It's the edge as currently planned, but Minto owns a bunch of land there (some of which was recommended to be added in the OP review), so it likely won't be like that forever.. I believe the Greenbank/Barrhaven South plans are too advanced to shift that to the transit corridor... The schools/commercial uses are going to be concentrated near the new Greenbank, while the current Greenbank is going to have things like single loaded roads and parks.

http://www.ottawa.ca/residents/planning/community_plans/completed/barrhaven_south/chapter_5_en-2.jpg (http://www.ottawa.ca/residents/planning/community_plans/completed/barrhaven_south/images/fig17_en.jpg)

eternallyme
Feb 23, 2010, 8:00 PM
Some other things I would change:

Transit network

Routes 171 and 177 should have all-day service available this fall - from 5 am to midnight Monday to Friday, from 7 am to midnight Saturday and from 8 am to 10 pm Sunday (which should be always the minimum span of service). However, since the ridership potential is very low, both routes should go on a demand-responsive basis (something I would expand to many developing suburban areas) in the evenings and on weekends. 30 minute service would likely be feasible from about 9 am to 3 pm weekdays and 15 minute service at rush hour.

Ultimately, those routes would be enhanced, with rapid transit along a new Transitway (ultimate LRT) corridor along the existing Greenbank (which should only have 2 traffic lanes as opposed to 4 for a normal arterial to accomodate the transit). The new industrial area I have thought of would have a separate route. A mini-hub would be at Barnsdale Road.

A solid option would exist to incorporate commercial development at HMB Phase 2 and Stonebridge Phases 11 and 12, particularly at the Cambrian and Barnsdale intersections (both would be roundabouts).

South of Barnsdale and west of the new Greenbank

Keeping the fact that a transit corridor should run along the existing Greenbank, if development were to continue southward, such a design should continue with mixed use along the existing Greenbank as far as Bankfield Road. Any residential area should maintain a minimum 400m green area surrounding Manotick though.

Areas west of the new Greenbank corridor should ultimately - if released for development - be industrial/limited commercial (i.e. restricted to highway-specific uses like hotels) south of Cambrian, as the presence of Highway 416 would keep such traffic out of the community for the most part.

eternallyme
Feb 23, 2010, 8:02 PM
It's the edge as currently planned, but Minto owns a bunch of land there (some of which was recommended to be added in the OP review), so it likely won't be like that forever.. I believe the Greenbank plans are too advanced to shift that to the transit corridor... The schools/commercial uses are going to be concentrated near the new Greenbank, while the current Greenbank is going to have things like single loaded roads and parks.

http://www.ottawa.ca/residents/planning/community_plans/completed/barrhaven_south/chapter_5_en-2.jpg (http://www.ottawa.ca/residents/planning/community_plans/completed/barrhaven_south/images/fig17_en.jpg)

How many lanes is the existing Greenbank planned for? It appears to be marked as an arterial, which usually suggests ROW for at least 4 lanes - they could narrow it to 2 lanes in the ultimate plan. They could move the "community core" into the grid on the existing Greenbank with transit stations at Cambrian, Barnsdale and halfway between them.

Also I'd reduce the number of Public Elementary schools from 3 to 2 (replace the SW one with a private school) since they are seriously declining in attendance.

waterloowarrior
Feb 23, 2010, 8:20 PM
How many lanes is the existing Greenbank planned for? It appears to be marked as an arterial, which usually suggests ROW for at least 4 lanes - they could narrow it to 2 lanes in the ultimate plan.

Not sure about the final decision but here's what the CDP (http://www.city.ottawa.on.ca/residents/planning/community_plans/completed/barrhaven_south/chapter_5_en.html#P496_29513) says

The ongoing EA of Greenbank Road has identified a “preferred” alternative location to the west of existing Greenbank Road, including a new location of a bridge over the Jock River. This new Greenbank Road corridor should be protected for a four-lane arterial road cross-section as far south as Cambrian Road. Combined with the rapid transit corridor requirement, the total recommended right-of-way is 41.5m.

In order to accommodate the potential of an urban boundary expansion beyond that currently rationalized in the Barrhaven South CDP, the right-of-way of new Greenbank Road south of Cambrian Road, as a potential future arterial, should be protected to accommodate four arterial lanes and two rapid transit lanes, all in a 41.5m right-of-way.

South of Cambrian Road, existing Greenbank Road should be protected for a four-lane arterial cross-section to Barnsdale Road with a right-of-way of 37.5m.Ultimately, a right-of-way somewhere between 32.0m and 37.5m for a four-lane undivided roadway, is the likely scenario, as the arterial function of this roadway is expected to change in the long-term.



They could move the "community core" into the grid on the existing Greenbank with transit stations at Cambrian, Barnsdale and halfway between them.

Problem is that in many cases along existing Greenbank the land is already subdivided/zoned (http://www.city.ottawa.on.ca/calendar/ottawa/citycouncil/occ/2009/02-11/pec/ACS2009-ICS-PLA-0018.htm) and some houses already exist (http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=ottawa,+on&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=43.928609,114.169922&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Ottawa,+Ottawa+Division,+Ontario&ll=45.252897,-75.735798&spn=0.046586,0.111494&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.25299,-75.735851&panoid=UZAcqV7AKZSoZCYdHXTu1g&cbp=12,219.15,,0,8.12)/have been sold/servicing is in place

The east side (Monarch) has already undergone planning approvals (http://www.ottawa.ca/calendar/ottawa/citycouncil/occ/2009/12-09/pec/2-ACS2009-ICS-PGM-0211-%203661%20Greenbank%20Road.htm)

http://www.ottawa.ca/calendar/ottawa/citycouncil/occ/2009/12-09/pec/2-ACS2009-ICS-PGM-0211-%203661%20Greenbank%20Road_files/image002.gif

http://www.ottawa.ca/city_hall/ottawa2020/official_plan/vol_2a/former_nepean/south_nepean/area_13/schedule_a_en.jpg

^ brought to you by the former City of Nepean ;)

waterloowarrior
Feb 23, 2010, 8:34 PM
Tamarack also recently filed plans for Barrhaven South lands (between phase 1 and 2 of HMB
http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__7UNQBA

You can see a map of ownership in Barrhaven South here (p. 3)
http://webcast.ottawa.ca/plan/All_Image%20Referencing_OP%20Amendment%20Application_Image%20Reference_Planning_Rationale_D01-01-09-0007.PDF

bradnixon
Feb 23, 2010, 10:38 PM
It's the edge as currently planned, but Minto owns a bunch of land there (some of which was recommended to be added in the OP review), so it likely won't be like that forever.. I believe the Greenbank/Barrhaven South plans are too advanced to shift that to the transit corridor... The schools/commercial uses are going to be concentrated near the new Greenbank, while the current Greenbank is going to have things like single loaded roads and parks.


As I was complaining about in my earlier post, Mattamy's HMB south submitted subdivision plan proposes mostly rear-lotting along both New AND Existing Greenbank roads, which is pretty much the worst of all worlds.

Ideally Existing Greenbank would be flanked by parks and single loaded roads, and New Greenbank would have things like schools, commercial, or higher density residential (e.g. stacked/rear lane townhomes).

(Unfortunately the location of the new Barrhaven south rec complex is going to be at the SW corner of Cambrian and Existing Greenbank... it's too bad that it won't be directly on the transit corridor.)

Rear-lotting low density residential with no walkway blocks along New Greenbank (as proposed) is pretty much the worst thing they can do.

bradnixon
Feb 23, 2010, 10:42 PM
And here is the EA for New Greenbank/transit corridor (approved in 2006):

http://www.ottawa.ca/calendar/ottawa/citycouncil/occ/2006/06-28/trc/ACS2006-PGM-POL-0044.htm

bradnixon
Feb 23, 2010, 10:54 PM
I can understand the rationale for not having any houses or driveways directly facing Greenbank

My point is that there are a number of alternatives to this other than rear-lotting, including single-loaded roads and "eyebrows" (where the houses front onto a common driveway parallel to the actual road).



Both of these approaches are used in HMB North, as shown on the site plan:
http://www.mattamyhomes.com/Ottawa/Communities/Barrhaven/HalfMoonBay/images/SiteMap1.pdf

(Sunset Cove circle along Existing Greenbank is single-loaded; the houses along Cambrian are in eyebrows.)

There are a number of benefits to this, including a less sterile-looking community, and better pedestrian connectivity to transit routes. When rear lotting is used, residents who back onto the street with transit service must walk a very circuitous route to actually get to that street. I have been advised by a planner at the city that the rear-lotting on Riverboat street along New Greenbank (shown on the above link) has NOT been approved-Mattamy jumped the gun putting it on their siteplan.

waterloowarrior
Feb 24, 2010, 7:34 PM
Council approves development concept plan (http://ottawa.ca/calendar/ottawa/citycouncil/ara/2010/02-11/01%20-%20Mahogany%20Doc%201.pdf) for Minto's new community in Manotick
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/Plan+Manotick+expansion+clears+council/2607634/story.html

waterloowarrior
Feb 26, 2010, 3:44 AM
A few new neighbourhoods...

Woodhaven (http://www.tamarackhomes.com/woodhaven-community-home.html)in Kingston (Tamarack) grand opening on Saturday

Bradley Terrace and Hillside Vista coming soon from Phoenix Homes (http://www.phoenixhomes.ca/communities/communities_future.cfm)

The Links at Stonebridge (http://www.monarchgroup.net/610,19-new-homes-CA-K2J-0G6-ON-Nepean-The-Links-at-Stonebridge-Community.aspx)is coming in 2010 (Monarch)

Mattamy's new community in Orleans is called The Orchard in Orleans and will launch Summer 2010. Not sure if the orchard is the thing they are cutting down in order to build the development.

blackjagger
Feb 26, 2010, 12:56 PM
A few new neighbourhoods...

The Links at Stonebridge (http://www.monarchgroup.net/610,19-new-homes-CA-K2J-0G6-ON-Nepean-The-Links-at-Stonebridge-Community.aspx)is coming in 2010 (Monarch)
.

The Links is going to be a group of stacked townhouses at the northwest corner of Jockvale and Cambrian. There talking about 100-160 units it will be interesting to see what price point they come in at.

Cheers,
Josh

Cre47
Feb 26, 2010, 11:26 PM
With Streetview now in the rest of the suburbs, I was thinking of adding more shots of the newly or currently under construction areas.

Part 1 Kanata West/Stittsville

Near Stittsville Main Street north of Hazeldean

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.28304,-75.908661&spn=0,359.895372&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.275999,-75.932428&panoid=NgM2GkYUkWjmQeYXoWgKVw&cbp=12,90,,0,5

Huntmar Road between Hazeldean and Maple Grove with a roundabout

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.286542,-75.89613&spn=0,359.895372&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.286235,-75.917066&panoid=coD7_2vVRbDtKi7YS26qdA&cbp=12,319.78,,0,5

Just north of the Huntmar/Maple Grove intersection

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.289501,-75.921106&spn=0,359.895372&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.289407,-75.920966&panoid=nNLNag0uCHahNaxEfI5-7A&cbp=12,175.48,,0,5

On a side street of the Fairwinds subdivision

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.288354,-75.913317&spn=0,359.973843&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.289426,-75.916705&panoid=5M9c1PwUPm8IEZkRFiiuVw&cbp=12,163.91,,0,5

Residential area northeast of Hazeldean/Carp Road

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.272168,-75.938637&spn=0,359.973843&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.272876,-75.943319&panoid=WnWpqJczgeVRf1TNiyi2aw&cbp=12,319.43,,0,5

On the west side of Carp Road

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.267457,-75.945375&spn=0,359.973843&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.270054,-75.947451&panoid=36LSma2U39scVZXwqGKyBg&cbp=12,143.78,,0,5

WEstridge Drive north of Fernbank

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.250661,-75.922351&spn=0,359.973843&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.247271,-75.923477&panoid=W0ydT-SzChNvIPwObviakw&cbp=12,198.29,,0,5

South of Fernbank/Stittsville Main

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.24421,-75.906644&spn=0,359.973843&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.244911,-75.908909&panoid=sA1W8_IVcNWXEc3IL-o-zQ&cbp=12,291.23,,0,5

Cre47
Feb 26, 2010, 11:32 PM
Part 2 Kanata North

Near March/Old Carp (west side)

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.354558,-75.938466&spn=0,359.973843&z=16&layer=c&cbll=45.356726,-75.937375&panoid=Z6bdrgdUKrg47pY3SkJS3A&cbp=12,128.94,,0,5

East side of March/Old Carp/Klondike

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.36086,-75.929797&spn=0,359.986922&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.360505,-75.932143&panoid=hAUoJujh6dd4I2bimsj-lw&cbp=12,218.26,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.362481,-75.926996&spn=0,359.986922&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.363279,-75.930481&panoid=SM9wch5FDJsqP5s41ZqoXw&cbp=12,232.64,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.359172,-75.926439&spn=0,359.986922&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.358833,-75.927165&panoid=DQSQpva4gGbLfF4LKs2Mvw&cbp=12,174.27,,0,5

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.355832,-75.924733&spn=0,359.986922&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.356165,-75.922778&panoid=T5ZhToVKsJLM2dEhMU-wQw&cbp=12,64,,0,5

Cre47
Feb 26, 2010, 11:37 PM
Extra ones

Greenbank Road in South Barrhaven - do a 360 to see how the area on both side have developped especially on the eastern side.

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.250117,-75.700006&spn=0,359.895372&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.251101,-75.734705&panoid=rEeBv1Cz73PA2sbwLLZvrA&cbp=12,64.27,,0,5

Off Tenth Line in Orleans - further south then the shot given a few months ago.

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.442699,-75.46586&spn=0,359.947686&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.44199,-75.476986&panoid=2Nlb2_w_NcBb74jsgujMyQ&cbp=12,27.8,,0,5

Renaud Road

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.425323,-75.513668&spn=0,359.895372&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.426701,-75.524226&panoid=icQboX-rZjAuqObFGdT6Xw&cbp=12,132.96,,0,5

Trim Road further south

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.459167,-75.436935&spn=0,359.895372&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.462537,-75.44973&panoid=bDTfUJtlFj66JBD0nmcNMQ&cbp=12,222.96,,0,5

Along North Service Road (only a sign)

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.496631,-75.472341&spn=0,359.947686&z=15&layer=c&cbll=45.492605,-75.495146&panoid=5UdianSBTDULeK-ddtbWiA&cbp=12,166.85,,1,-4.3

And in Gatineau on Hwy 307 near the Cantley limits (closest SV shot of the new area)

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=45.498286,-75.783262&spn=0,359.895372&t=h&z=14&layer=c&cbll=45.50411,-75.761709&panoid=eknPtKzKPxOoTvzLc7BlNQ&cbp=12,32.87,,0,5

waterloowarrior
Mar 2, 2010, 9:23 PM
here's the HMB South plan for reference
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4059/4384925899_3cdd1a263a_o.jpg

Dado
Mar 3, 2010, 12:36 AM
:previous:

How wide are these residential streets? Are all these corner triangles really necessary? (that's probably a rhetorical question)

waterloowarrior
Mar 3, 2010, 12:58 AM
16.5 m

Dado
Mar 3, 2010, 10:11 PM
So they shaved about 3' off either side of RoW compared to the traditional 60' RoW... that would not seem to me to be anywhere near enough to justify having corner triangles.

waterloowarrior
Mar 3, 2010, 10:20 PM
Maybe the city prefers to own corner visibility triangles rather than potentially have the homeowner put up a fence or vegetation there.

harls
Mar 10, 2010, 1:12 PM
took a shot of the Faubourg du rivage site this weekend from my car. I got about 20 hits on this picture within one hour of posting it according to flickr stats - from an unknown source (probably someone is emailing the link)

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2766/4420166658_2d09714e8f_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/blix613/4420166658/in/photostream)

Cre47
Mar 18, 2010, 9:01 PM
Look what they might do near Lake Leamy

http://www.cyberpresse.ca/images/bizphotos/435x290/201003/17/155506.jpg

Possibly up to 2000 units and planned by Groupe Bathurst

http://www.cyberpresse.ca/le-droit/actualites/gatineau-outaouais/201003/17/01-4261694-nouveau-quartier-pres-du-lac-leamy-.php

Ottawan
Mar 19, 2010, 3:06 AM
:previous:

Definately a fan of that! Has anyone heard of Groupe Bathurst? Is this going to happen (and is 2013 a reasonable date for occupancy?)

waterloowarrior
Mar 19, 2010, 3:36 AM
Builder puts Kanata plans on full hold
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Builder+puts+Kanata+plans+full+hold/2699446/story.html

Mattamy shuts Fairwinds sales office, lays off staff, citing delays ‘we don’t control’ in Hazeldean sewage-pumping station

BY NECO COCKBURN, THE OTTAWA CITIZENMARCH 18, 2010 11:04 PM


OTTAWA — A much-delayed Kanata housing development has now been “fully put on hold,” according to the developer, and some home buyers face a tight deadline as they try to figure out what to do.

Home buyers in Phase 5 of the Fairwinds community have been told that Mattamy Homes can’t predict when the project can go ahead because it needs approvals beyond its control in order to get the ball rolling, according to Frank Cairo, Mattamy’s senior vice-president of land development and marketing.

Some buyers previously had closing dates pushed back, but Mattamy has now closed its sales office in Fairwinds and reallocated or laid off the development’s construction-related staff, and says it doesn’t know when the homes will be built.

Mattamy says it needs upgrades to the city’s Hazeldean sewage-pumping station tobe finished before it can go ahead with getting necessary municipal and provincial approvals on its plans to expand its own Fairwinds pumping station and service the site. The company can’t apply for building permits until the site is serviced, said Cairo.

“We’ve basically told our homeowners that in light of these external approvals that we don’t control, we can’t predict closing dates at this time, and we can’t even predict the duration of delay. We’ve tried to do that in the past and we’ve been incorrect in our assumption,” Cairo said, adding that about 40 home buyers are affected.

Cairo said residents have three choices. They have until March 25 to leave the deal and get their deposits back, or to transfer to a lot in Mattamy’s Half Moon Bay development in Barrhaven. Or they can stay in the current agreement and essentially remain in limbo.

But if their current closing date is reached and the company can’t set a new one, it won’t meet legal obligations under the agreement and the deal is “null and void,” said Cairo.

“Mattamy is looking to work with our homeowners and if there’s another option available to us prior to the closing dates terminating to keep the deals alive, we will.”

Cairo said a deadline was set because the company wants to give buyers first dibs on a new housing phase that’s opening up in the Half Moon development. Cairo said most of the buyers have taken the company up on its offer to transfer to the development or get their deposits back.

But some residents aren’t happy with the situation and feel they’re being pushed out of the deal.

R.J. Rousseau, who’s had his closing date pushed back twice after putting $25,000 down on a house in February 2008, said the company hasn’t presented him with the option to stay in the deal past his closing date in December. A letter sent to him by Mattamy last week offers only the cancellation or transfer options.

Despite being offered a discount on a Barrhaven home, Rousseau said that subdivision is “considerably” more expensive, and today’s housing prices are higher than when he first signed on to Fairwinds two years ago.

The delays have had “considerable” impact, he said. “This is my life they’re playing with.”

Cairo said, “We appreciate and feel for our homeowners deeply. There’s nothing more we want to do than deliver these houses.”

Development in Kanata West has been bogged down in controversy and delay for more than eight years.

The land drains into the Carp River. Council halted most Kanata West development in May of 2008 after it came to light that computer models of potential flooding of the Carp were flawed, though Fairwinds was allowed to continue.

In July 2008, Ontario’s environment ministry put its own hold on Kanata West — including the Fairwinds Phase 5 area south of Poole Creek — pending a more thorough environmental assessment.

After an independent engineering firm came up with a report that called for additional water storage capacity to be created on the land in order to guard against flooding, various west-side projects were put back on the planning track.

The provincial order was lifted late last year, Cairo said, adding “there are still outstanding approvals in the watershed that need to be resolved.”

Stittsville-Kanata West Councillor Shad Qadri said the Hazeldean pumping station upgrades should be finished by year’s end, and he’s trying to set up a meeting between city officials and the would-be homebuyers.

One of his concerns “is with the provincial government.”

“Why are we allowing the developers or the builders to sell building lots before they are approved (for construction)?” he said. “That’s where the consumer unfortunately gets caught in the middle, and this is a classic example of that.”

ncockburn@thecitizen.canwest.com

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

waterloowarrior
Apr 12, 2010, 10:51 PM
coming soon from Claridge - Sundance at Findley Creek
http://www.claridgehomes.com/images/logos/homes/sundance.png
http://www.claridgehomes.com/Coming%20Soon/index.html


links to the plans for that subdivision and Tartan's "Roof Truss" lands are available here. Tartan is proposing to reduce the size of the commercial area and add more residential units
http://www.findlaycreek.org/fcca/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=235&Itemid=28

Uhuniau
Apr 13, 2010, 5:20 PM
Is there some kind of competition going on for tackiest subdivision name?

Dado
Apr 13, 2010, 7:52 PM
:previous:

No, that would imply a modicum of creativity. Rather, they just use a variation of this:

http://www.denverinfill.com/images/blog/2006-09/2006-09-01_subdivision_names.jpg

http://denverinfill.com/blog/2006/09/guide-to-suburban-denver-subdivision.html

Uhuniau
Apr 13, 2010, 10:06 PM
That can't be right. "The at [BLANK] [BLANK] [BLANK]"?

First off, sometimes it's "The [BLANK] [B]of [BLANK] [BLANK]" or even "The [BLANK] [B]on [BLANK] [BLANK] [BLANK]".

And second, sometimes there are only two [BLANK]s after the preposition, not three.

And of course, in Ottawa, sometimes there's the Fake French Crap going on. (Not that French is crap; Fake French is crap. Example: "Strathcona on the Parc".

It should be "The [BLANK] [preposition] [BLANK] [BLANK] ([BLANK])".

Dado
Apr 13, 2010, 10:13 PM
That can't be right.

I did say it was a "variation of"...


It should be "The [BLANK] [preposition] [BLANK] [BLANK] ([BLANK])".

Nearly:

"(The) [BLANK] [preposition] [BLANK] [BLANK] ([BLANK])"

... since the definite article isn't always present.

bradnixon
Apr 14, 2010, 11:18 AM
coming soon from Claridge - Sundance at Findley Creek
http://www.claridgehomes.com/images/logos/homes/sundance.png
http://www.claridgehomes.com/Coming%20Soon/index.html


links to the plans for that subdivision and Tartan's "Roof Truss" lands are available here. Tartan is proposing to reduce the size of the commercial area and add more residential units
http://www.findlaycreek.org/fcca/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=235&Itemid=28

Of course, it would help if they knew how to spell Findlay Creek.

Dado
Apr 14, 2010, 1:38 PM
There was a time when I thought that "Morgan's Grant" in Kanata was a dumb name, but given some of the others about it's not all that bad on reflection. It's conceivable at least that someone named "Morgan" once received a grant of land in the area. Or it could be entirely made up - but at least it has an air of plausibility to it. It also has the benefit of not being named after mythical nature that was consumed in the building of the subdivision.

Uhuniau
Apr 14, 2010, 6:14 PM
Or it could be entirely made up - but at least it has an air of plausibility to it.

Like Häagen-Dazs. Or Dasani.

c_speed3108
Apr 15, 2010, 11:37 AM
With the aging population, it seems there will be increasing demand bungalows. This response is certainly going to drive developers to build many more:


Bunked out for bungalows

People sleep outside to be first to buy homes

By Katie Stewart, The Ottawa CitizenApril 14, 2010


OTTAWA — Ginette Boivin has been sleeping outdoors in a lawn chair since Monday night in the hopes that she will eventually sleep in a bungalow town home.

“The chair is pretty comfortable,” said Boivin chuckling.

She is one of 10 people sleeping under the stars as they await the release of 18 bungalow-style homes at Tenth Line Road and Lakepoint Drive in Orléans.

Bungalows in The Chaperal, an adult lifestyle community by Tamarack Homes, go on sale Friday morning at 8 a.m.

Deborah Denison, Chaperal sales representative, said she was surprised to see people on the sales centre doorstep on Monday.

“I expected people to line up on Thursday,” said Denison.

As baby boomers approach retirement, bungalows have become more popular, Denison said. She has seen lineups at similar lot releases, but never this early.

“There has been a pent up demand over the last two years. That’s what has created this lineup.”

People who were interested in the homes have been on a waiting list for two years. When they were notified of Friday’s release, many decided to show up early and wait.

“It’s the only adult community in the east end,” said Boivin. “There is going to be a big health centre and it’s close to everything.”

Boivin has two sleeping bags to keep out the night-time chill and her sister gives her a four-hour break each day.

“When you want something, you want it,” said Elaine Parent, Boivin’s sister.

Some people carry on friendly chats, others eat snacks from their coolers and many read to pass the time. People were able to soak up the sun Wednesday afternoon, but today there is rain in the forecast, which makes Denison slightly nervous.

“We’re concerned about the weather,” she said. “It’s not really our policy to have people waiting outside. We never want people to be out in the pouring rain, so we’re trying to work out the details.”

Tamarack has given those in the lineup numbered tickets to allow them to take short breaks and still preserve their spot in line. On Friday, buyers will sign purchase agreements on a first-come, first-served basis. Prices start at $298,000 and the expected move in date is spring 2011.

Gwen Campbell arrived Wednesday morning, after she saw the people already in line.

“I’ve been waiting for them to be released for two-and-a-half years, before they even started building,” she said. “There’s lots in the west end, but there’s nothing like it in Orléans.”

Around noon, Campbell was waiting for her son-in-law to bring her lunch. He also agreed to take the overnight shift for her.

“I have a team in place,” she said laughing.
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

Acajack
Apr 15, 2010, 1:50 PM
There was a time when I thought that "Morgan's Grant" in Kanata was a dumb name, but given some of the others about it's not all that bad on reflection. It's conceivable at least that someone named "Morgan" once received a grant of land in the area. Or it could be entirely made up - but at least it has an air of plausibility to it. It also has the benefit of not being named after mythical nature that was consumed in the building of the subdivision.

I especially hate subdivision names that come straight out of pop culture, as if the builder had seen a movie or a TV show and decided to name his project after it.

Notting Gate in Orleans, which was planned and built around the same time as the movie Notting Hill (Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant) came out, is a classic example.

What does Notting Hill/Gate in London have to do with Orleans in east end Ottawa?

Soooooo tacky.

I also found Havenlea (rhymes with "heavenly", what a coicidence) in Barrhaven pretty tacky.

Still, I think if we did some research we would find that a lot of our suburban development names aren't totally out of character.

Some people may think that Chapel Hill in Orleans was named by someone at Minto who watched too much NCAA March Madness, but in fact it is built on a hill right behind the chapel of the Grey Nuns. Convent Glen in this same area also refers to the nuns, who owned much of the land on which the whole western part of Orleans was built.

c_speed3108
Apr 15, 2010, 2:29 PM
I especially hate subdivision names that come straight out of pop culture, as if the builder had seen a movie or a TV show and decided to name his project after it.

Notting Gate in Orleans, which was planned and built around the same time as the movie Notting Hill (Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant) came out, is a classic example.

What does Notting Hill/Gate in London have to do with Orleans in east end Ottawa?

Soooooo tacky.

I also found Havenlea (rhymes with "heavenly", what a coicidence) in Barrhaven pretty tacky.

Still, I think if we did some research we would find that a lot of our suburban development names aren't totally out of character.

Some people may think that Chapel Hill in Orleans was named by someone at Minto who watched too much NCAA March Madness, but in fact it is built on a hill right behind the chapel of the Grey Nuns. Convent Glen in this same area also refers to the nuns, who owned much of the land on which the whole western part of Orleans was built.

Fallingbrook was obviously named after the series of waterfalls in the area.

I think where the developers ran into trouble was as they got further back into the fields and brush lands.

Dado
Apr 15, 2010, 2:46 PM
I especially hate subdivision names that come straight out of pop culture, as if the builder had seen a movie or a TV show and decided to name his project after it.

Notting Gate in Orleans, which was planned and built around the same time as the movie Notting Hill (Julia Roberts and Hugh Grant) came out, is a classic example.

What does Notting Hill/Gate in London have to do with Orleans in east end Ottawa?

Soooooo tacky.

Maybe it's "authentic" in a roundabout way; i.e. tacky is authentic.


I also found Havenlea (rhymes with "heavenly", what a coicidence) in Barrhaven pretty tacky.

Still, I think if we did some research we would find that a lot of our suburban development names aren't totally out of character.

Barrhaven itself is such an example. Mel Barr was the name of the first developer, so using 'Barr' in the name at least got off to a good start. Unfortunately, of all the suitable settlement suffixes available in English, he chose instead one that actually refers to a marine locale suitable for an anchorage (i.e. a natural harbour, and sometimes turned into a real one, e.g. Copenhagen = København). So while we could have had Barrburg, Barrboro/Barrborough, Barrville, Barrton, Barrham, Barrholm/Barrholme, Barrby (:D ), Barrthorpe, Barrstoke or the like, we ended up with Barrhaven. That said, I think something based on the Jock River would have been better anyway, be it Jockvale (as in the road) or something like Jockborough or Jockford.

But no... the originality bar was set by 'Barrhaven', and has been lowered ever since. It's too bad in a way that the name Barrhaven has largely displaced Nepean, which was an amorphous entity at the best of times; ironically, if the old Ottawa had annexed all of Nepean inside the Greenbelt, chances are that today we would refer to Barrhaven as Nepean (since 'Barrhaven' technically only refers to a small part of what is referred to as "South Nepean").


Some people may think that Chapel Hill in Orleans was named by someone at Minto who watched too much NCAA March Madness, but in fact it is built on a hill right behind the chapel of the Grey Nuns. Convent Glen in this same area also refers to the nuns, who owned much of the land on which the whole western part of Orleans was built.

Glen Cairn in Kanata is an actual original name too, as it predates suburbanization.


It can't possibly be too difficult to dig through the old land registries and come up with names based on early settlers. That would at least give these suburbs an authentic name.

Uhuniau
Apr 15, 2010, 2:46 PM
What does Notting Hill/Gate in London have to do with Orleans in east end Ottawa?

Soooooo tacky.

Like the seventeen "Sohos"?

citizen j
Apr 15, 2010, 3:06 PM
Like the seventeen "Sohos"?

Hmm, I dunno. Soho fits half the time it's used, if one infers the acronym as short for "Sort of horrible."

Acajack
Apr 15, 2010, 3:16 PM
Fallingbrook was obviously named after the series of waterfalls in the area.

I think where the developers ran into trouble was as they got further back into the fields and brush lands.

Not sure if people would call them "faux French" since it was originally a francophone community, but a lot of the Orleans developments have (or had) a specific French name with an English "generic" tacked onto it:

Châteauneuf Estates
Côteaux Ridge
Châtelaine Village
Orléans Gardens
Orléans Wood

One of the newer areas in Orleans, Bradley Estates, seems to have been named for the Bradley family which is a big school bus operator (M.L. Bradley Ltd.) in the Orleans area. Since the Bradleys were based in the rural area between Orleans and Navan, perhaps the builders bought the land off the family.

Uhuniau
Apr 15, 2010, 3:54 PM
Hmm, I dunno. Soho fits half the time it's used, if one infers the acronym as short for "Sort of horrible."

I tried to promote "SoSo" for the area South of Somerset... until it gentrified.

citizen j
Apr 15, 2010, 5:59 PM
I tried to promote "SoSo" for the area South of Somerset... until it gentrified.

Brilliant!

waterloowarrior
Apr 30, 2010, 5:14 PM
http://www.juteaujohnsoncomba.com/ms_february2010.htm


The most notable sale was for 400 acres (346 acres are developable) of residential land for a consideration of $43,290,000 or $107,994/acre ($124,946/acre developable). The property is located on the south side of Abbot Road, east of Shea Road and north of Fernbank Road, to the southeast of Stittsville. It was purchased by CRT Development Inc. from Brookfield Homes (Ontario) Ltd.

hmmm, I wonder who "CRT Development Inc?" really is?

another Fernbank subdivision is in... Cardel and Monarch
http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__7YJIDS

also from the same report:
Uniform Urban Developments Ltd. purchased 19 acres of future growth land located at 3699 Jockvale Road, in Nepean from a private individual for $3,400,000 or $177,611/acre of site area. The site is located to the south of existing development and is to be developed in approximately 18 months.

I think this is apple orchard on Jockvale
http://www.buildinghomes.ca/community/forums/showthread.php?p=115443

Cre47
May 2, 2010, 4:05 PM
Still some infighting in Old Chelsea about the recreation centre as well as the Chelsea Creek development. One resident thinks that the southern part of Chelsea should be merged with the city of Gatineau.

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/life/Troubled+times+Chelsea/2976562/story.html

Troubled times in Old Chelsea

The village is a house divided over future expansion that would change its idyllic nature, Dave Rogers writes.

By Dave Rogers , The Ottawa CitizenMay 2, 2010

After two referendums and a civic election, Chelsea residents are still fighting over a planned $9.8-million recreation centre and proposals for a housing development in the village of Old Chelsea.

The municipality’s new mayor, Caryl Green, says she wants public discourse to be based on civility and respect. But sometimes squabbling or threats of lawsuits replace the polite behaviour the mayor hopes to promote.

The municipality is divided into two factions: those who want the recreation centre, more housing and urban water and sewer services and their opponents who want to preserve Chelsea’s idyllic character and curb spending.

Some residents, such as former mayor Judy Grant, complain that their property taxes have doubled to almost the amount they would pay in Ottawa. Others are worried that Chelsea may not be able to afford expensive infrastructure because the community has only 7,000 residents and the municipal debt has increased to $10 million from $1 million during the last eight years.

An example of the level of acrimony is the lawsuit launched by deputy mayor Luc Poulin against Douglas Griffin, a defeated candidate in November civic election.

Poulin says in his statement of claim that Griffin falsely claimed in an Oct. 26, 2009 e-mail message to at least 51 residents that Poulin was participating in a cover-up and was lying about recreation centre funding.

Griffin’s counterclaim said Poulin’s libel action violates Quebec’s new law that makes it illegal to file lawsuits that are intended to stifle debate on issues of public interest.

Poulin is seeking $9,000 in damages plus legal costs while Griffin has asked the court to award him $1.25 million.

Griffin said he “took exception to the campaign strategy of Poulin and Green which was to pretend that the funding for the centre was secure.”

However, Green says $6.1 million in federal and provincial infrastructure grants are still available for the centre even though construction hasn’t started and it can’t be finished by the March 31, 2010 deadline. She added the project will have to be scaled back or completed in stages because soil tests show the site is too sandy.

Chelsea residents approved the Meredith Centre by a vote of 53 per cent to 49 per cent in a referendum in June 2009.

Named after the family that donated the land, the centre is to be built on property near Chelsea Elementary School on Old Chelsea Road.

Part of the site is already used for soccer fields and a farmers market during the summer. Plans call for an NHL-size hockey arena, a double gym and a meeting hall with a capacity of 400.

Former mayor Grant said the size and cost of the recreation centre needs to be reduced.

“Most of the older people feel that the Meredith Centre is far too grandiose for the municipality, particularly when there is a need for a sewage system, which I believe is much more important. You need recreation to keep kids in our own back yard but it doesn’t need to be something with a price tag like the Meredith Centre.”

Green said the project is expected to go to tender at the end of April.

“The community is waiting to see a design that comes out of the design-build process,” Green said. “It is an accepted fact that this recreation and cultural centre is going ahead.

“The community groups are looking forward to when construction begins and we will be able to use this as the gathering place for the community. I think it will be welcomed and the hope is that it will be built by July 2011.”

A spokeswoman for foreign affairs minister Lawrence Canon, whose riding includes Chelsea, said the minister is committed to the project.

Another area of contention is the Chelsea Creek housing development that was approved by a vote of 41-39 in a referendum on Jan. 25, 2009.

Opponents who live near the site at Old Chelsea Road and Highway 5 worry their wells will dry up unless the new houses are connected to a water treatment plant.

Chelsea resident Jacques Cayer said projects such as the recreation centre and water and sewer services are so expensive that it would make economic sense for Gatineau to annex the southern part of the municipality.

“If we don’t do something Gatineau is going to want all the land south of Old Chelsea Road,” Cayer said. “They have water and sewer services up to the former Hewlett-Packard building on Highway 5.

“Somebody is going to ask why we should spend more than $15 million on water and sewer service in Chelsea when all we have to do is hook onto Gatineau’s pipes.”

Perhaps nothing demonstrates the level of contention in Chelsea than an incident at the April 6 council meeting.

Chelsea resident Kurt Burgstaller, 82, said the mayor told him not to interrupt when he asked for an English translation of a French-language septic tank contract. Burgstaller said the mayor then added that council business is normally conducted in French.

Burgstaller, a retired construction consultant, said he had asked for an English-language explanation about the contract because it didn’t make economic sense to have septic tank inspections done at an hourly rate.

“The council minutes were read in French and my French is limited so I asked the reader to repeat it in English which he did,” Burgstaller said. “I thought that giving out an hourly contract would be like inviting the fox into the henhouse. Then the mayor said the public is not invited to interrupt the reading of the minutes.

“She said in Quebec municipalities all proceedings are in French only, which is news to me. My intervention was on behalf of all taxpayers, not just those who speak French or English.”

When asked why Burgstaller was told to sit down and keep quiet, Green said it was all about respect.

“The issue had nothing to do with language or the septic tank issue,” Green said. “My reason for asking Burgstaller to refrain had to do with respect, the tone and the level of civility.

“My role is to ensure in the council that there be a certain decorum. I have said that we won’t tolerate personal attacks. We will welcome questions on issues to do with the business of the municipality and of course there will be differences in opinion.”

Green said people are allowed to ask questions at the start of each council meeting and questions of clarification are allowed in French or English as the resolutions are read.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen

blackjagger
May 3, 2010, 4:54 PM
http://webcast.ottawa.ca/plan/All_Image%20Referencing_Site%20Plan%20Application_Image%20Reference_Traffic%20Impact%20Brief%20D07-12-10-0082.PDF

Development App is up for the first phase of Minto's Barrhaven TownCenter Site.

Includes 272 units, 160 stackedtownhouses with undergound parking and 112 condo flats with covered/uncovered parking. The have left park of the site open for future mixed use along Marketplace Ave.

've seen worst and am glad that there is both onstreet and undergroud parking, alittle too much surface parking but it could be worst.Most units front the street. I am a little confused with how the underground parking is accessed by foot.

Cheers,
Josh

waterloowarrior
May 7, 2010, 3:54 PM
Barrhaven residents balk at developer's study

Change to multi-unit buildings draws concern

BY TONY SPEARS, THE OTTAWA CITIZEN MAY 7, 2010


Irate Barrhaven residents gave developers an earful about 12 proposed low-rise apartment-style buildings they say will destroy the character of their suburban neighbourhood and risk the lives of children at the nearby school by dramatically increasing traffic.

Richcraft has owned the currently empty, six-acre lot on Mountshannon Drive, southwest of Fallowfield Road and Woodroffe Avenue, for about five years.

The developer had originally planned to fill the lot with townhomes, but they now hope the City of Ottawa will grant them official plan and zoning amendments to allow construction of three-and-a-half-storey buildings containing 16 and 19 residential units.

Thursday's 7 p.m. meeting was a public consultation into the proposed changes attended by city staff.

The audience of about 70 waited patiently through a 45-minute presentation by Richcraft's planning consultant, Miguel Tremblay, before launching into questions and accusations.

A traffic study showing that existing roads would be able to handle the extra traffic elicited derision. Residents pointed to the fact that it had been done in January -- hardly peak season for pedestrians and cyclists.

"We already have a traffic problem," said resident Neville Brisson.

Tremblay sought to reassure the crowd.

"We're talking months of back and forth with the city" before the traffic study is finally approved, he said.

Others were concerned for children playing in the abutting Mulligan Park and at St. Luke Elementary School. One woman said student traffic guards had been sworn at by speeding drivers.

"To add 200 units ... is absolutely inconceivable," she said.

Brisson also demanded to know what would happen to the value of his property, saying he had purchased his home believing the land would become townhouses.

"It's really early in the process," Richcraft staffer Kevin Yamm said.

To jeers, Yamm said he wouldn't speculate on the planned selling price of the units. :duh [me: Richcraft's Jade Condo Flats start at 199k, price of townhomes in area is 250k] Even in the best-case scenario, the units would not be built before 2012, he added.

Resident Lindsay Whitmore was not impressed by planned parking lots that would be visible from Daventry Crescent.

"I know that they're going to build there and I think that's OK, (but) it has to be something that fits in with the environment," she said. "That's single-family homes and townhomes."

The public consultation was organized by Barrhaven Councillor Jan Harder, who was not able to attend.

Through a note distributed to the throng, she pledged to attend the next consultation, tentatively set for mid-June. She could not be reached for comment Thursday evening.

© Copyright (c) The Ottawa Citizen


Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/Barrhaven+residents+balk+developer+study/2996849/story.html#ixzz0nG9DNXW7


Here's the OPA from the city's site (there's also an ZBL amendment)
http://app01.ottawa.ca/postingplans/appDetails.jsf?lang=en&appId=__7XE0TL

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4035/4586387373_b577a176f4_o.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3326/4586387825_16cb26a0d7_o.jpg

Ottawan
May 7, 2010, 4:56 PM
Barrhaven residents balk at developer's study

Change to multi-unit buildings draws concern

BY TONY SPEARS, THE OTTAWA CITIZEN MAY 7, 2010


Irate Barrhaven residents gave developers an earful about 12 proposed low-rise apartment-style buildings they say will destroy the character of their suburban neighbourhood and risk the lives of children

Proof that NIMBY philosophy evolves over time. It has moved on from the hectic but vague pleas to "think of the children!" to stating "if this development goes ahead, it could kill children".

What kind of peron would mindlessly slaughter children? Developers must be devils. Especially the same developers that catered to all of those residents now complaining by putting them in their suburban single-family homes.

Proof Sheet
May 7, 2010, 6:55 PM
Proof that NIMBY philosophy evolves over time. It has moved on from the hectic but vague pleas to "think of the children!" to stating "if this development goes ahead, it could kill children".

What kind of peron would mindlessly slaughter children? Developers must be devils. Especially the same developers that catered to all of those residents now complaining by putting them in their suburban single-family homes.

The irony that the existing homeowners complain about the existing (i.e background traffic) traffic levels is often lost on them. The cynic in me says that the developer and his consultant nodded politely, deflected blame on the City and their requirements, and then post meeting had a rant about the small mindedness and NIMBYism over the people at the meeting over a beer at some pad mounted restaurant in Barrhaven.