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202_Cyclist
Jun 25, 2012, 6:11 PM
Torti Gallas is a good local firm here in DC has has worked on several developments, including a mixed-use Safeway (http://dcmud.blogspot.com/2012/01/safeway-tries-again-with-revamped.html) that our group, Ward 3 Vision, is supporting.

colemonkee
Jun 25, 2012, 6:21 PM
^ Their work in D.C. is quite nice, and pleasantly contextual, without blending in too much. It kind of sucks that we get this relative schlock in L.A. Either they assigned a junior architect to the project, the developer cut every possible corner (and 12 more on top of that), or - and this is the most concerning - that "contemporary" L.A. architecture has become so cheap, boring, and bland, that stucco-laden shite like this is considered "contextual."

LosAngelesSportsFan
Jun 25, 2012, 7:43 PM
its atrocious

LAofAnaheim
Jun 25, 2012, 8:11 PM
The affordable housing complex above the MacArthur Park Red/Purple Line stop opened today, and Torti Gallas & Partners, one of the design architects on the project, has some pictures on their web site (displayed below). The finished project looks better than it did under construction (no surprise there), but ultimately it's aesthetically disappointing to me. I realize this is affordable housing, so there are budget limitations at play, but after seeing some images of recent social housing projects in the outskirts of Paris, I feel myself wanting for more.


In Paris, how much of the project's budget is dedicated to parking structure? Now, compare that budget to LA.

It's the parking costs that prevent us from building nice asthetic middle class/affordable housing projects. That's why our most beautiful buildings have to be super rich (i.e. JW Marriot/Ritz Carlton) and other cities, they don't need a parking garage to consume a significant portion of their budget.

Cut the parking and you'll see much better looking middle class/affordable housing projects.

Muji
Jun 25, 2012, 8:50 PM
The MacArthur Park apartments would've looked a whole lot better if they'd stuck with the blue and sand color for the whole building...the bright yellow and red just look disgustingly tacky. It's really a shame since it's otherwise a well-scaled building with a decently nice sidewalk presence, still a very positive addition to its immediate neighborhood. Phase 2 is supposed to add another building above the subway plaza facing Alvarado Street...we can only hope that it doesn't look any worse.

BrandonJXN
Jun 25, 2012, 9:17 PM
I look at this building all the time and while it's not the worst building on the planet, it looks cheap. The red actually takes away from it.

colemonkee
Jun 25, 2012, 10:13 PM
In Paris, how much of the project's budget is dedicated to parking structure? Now, compare that budget to LA.

Cut the parking and you'll see much better looking middle class/affordable housing projects.

Very true. And this project has a particularly offensive parking-to-unit ratio (almost 2-to-1!!!!!), considering it literally sits atop a Metro station. Hopefully the proposed State law goes through, removing some of these parking requirements for projects near mass transit.

JDRCRASH
Jun 26, 2012, 1:29 AM
Well, hope you're right, but last I heard the only street-facing retail in existence or proposed is on Little SM or just off it, between Ave of the Stars and Wilshire. The rest of CC MIGHT become sort of "resort urban" (tall buildings connected with meandering paths of greenery and occasional shops and cafes), but where is actual urban even proposed? I hope you don't mean the shopping center.

Didn't the developer of the Century Plaza Hotel project mention it's supposed to have street-facing retail on AotS?

The original idea was that Bloomingdale's would occupy the first 3 floors of the condo tower, with the Purple station having an entry into it (ala London and NY). The station would also feed Little SM and the new hotels and condos at the Beverly Hilton, but the station is presumably out now.

Not exactly. You're talking about a station portal, not about the station ITSELF. This should still be absolutely possible if the station is at Constellation.

edluva
Jun 26, 2012, 4:04 AM
LA just loves to fail. my rule continues to hold. Something about LA's lack of context befuddles perfectly decent architects into designing shit like this.

LA is such a lowbrow city it's comical. You can be working class, and classy (see chicago). LA is working class, and tacky. that's our heritage if we have one. we're destined to be a second rate city for the world to frown upon. it's in our DNA. everything from crass hollywood commercialism to garden variety soccer-mom urbanism ensures this city remains lame as hell for the forseeable future.

LA just doesn't get it.

citywatch
Jun 26, 2012, 5:23 AM
The MacArthur Park apartments would've looked a whole lot better if they'd stuck with the blue and sand color for the whole building...the bright yellow and red just look disgustingly tacky.

The red actually takes away from it.


I think the dark red makes the bldg "pop", while the beige color, esp on a stucco wall, is what makes it look generic & cheap. the dark blue, esp on the clapboard type walls, is ok to me, but the fact it clashes with the beige areas really makes the bldg look confused, while the yellow walls below those areas look way too mismatched & tacky.

btw, I happened to be on wilshire blvd yesterday, & very deep construction pits are visible at the SE corner of wilshire & la brea, & the SE corner of wilshire & vermont. So 2 large apt projs are very much underway in those locations. The new infill apt bldgs farther west in the miracle mile part of wilshire have really helped perk up that part of the city.

pesto
Jun 26, 2012, 4:30 PM
Very true. And this project has a particularly offensive parking-to-unit ratio (almost 2-to-1!!!!!), considering it literally sits atop a Metro station. Hopefully the proposed State law goes through, removing some of these parking requirements for projects near mass transit.

Shouldn't this be a local decision? Parking, affordable housing, density don't seem to be things that Sacramento can decide for every block in the state.

pesto
Jun 26, 2012, 4:39 PM
I think the dark red makes the bldg "pop", while the beige color, esp on a stucco wall, is what makes it look generic & cheap. the dark blue, esp on the clapboard type walls, is ok to me, but the fact it clashes with the beige areas really makes the bldg look confused, while the yellow walls below those areas look way too mismatched & tacky.

btw, I happened to be on wilshire blvd yesterday, & very deep construction pits are visible at the SE corner of wilshire & la brea, & the SE corner of wilshire & vermont. So 2 large apt projs are very much underway in those locations. The new infill apt bldgs farther west in the miracle mile part of wilshire have really helped perk up that part of the city.

Very true; the whole area from La Brea to BH has filled in nicely and continues to do so.

btw, I'll bet those buildings were called "tacky, low-class LA shit" too when they were being built.

LAofAnaheim
Jun 26, 2012, 10:24 PM
Shouldn't this be a local decision? Parking, affordable housing, density don't seem to be things that Sacramento can decide for every block in the state.

Sacramento already decided a high parking value. But now some Congress members are trying to get that reduced significantly. Interestingly, the Liberterian party is against the relaxation of parking requirements, when isn't parking requirements a government mandate?

JDRCRASH
Jun 26, 2012, 10:39 PM
Sacramento already decided a high parking value. But now some Congress members are trying to get that reduced significantly. Interestingly, the Liberterian party is against the relaxation of parking requirements, when isn't parking requirements a government mandate?

Maybe it's because Conservatives don't support pedestrian-oriented cities.

RST500
Jun 26, 2012, 11:56 PM
:previous::previous::previous:

I see all those low rise going up in Miricle Mile and just think that they are running out of space for highrises in the future "if" the market ever improves or when the subway finally opens. There are probably only about 5 spaces left for new highrises on Wilshire between La Brea and Fairfax.

Illithid Dude
Jun 27, 2012, 1:14 AM
:previous::previous::previous:

I see all those low rise going up in Miricle Mile and just think that they are running out of space for highrises in the future "if" the market ever improves or when the subway finally opens. There are probably only about 5 spaces left for new highrises on Wilshire between La Brea and Fairfax.

They could just demolish smaller buildings?

LosAngelesSportsFan
Jun 27, 2012, 2:30 AM
LABJ and curbed with confirmation that Westfield is indeed moving forward with the 39 story high rise in Century city (Bloomingdales on the ground floor) and the expansion of the mall.

http://la.curbed.com/archives/2012/06/westfield_finally_about_to_start_on_39story_century_city_tower.php

Kingofthehill
Jun 27, 2012, 2:53 AM
:previous::previous::previous:

I see all those low rise going up in Miricle Mile and just think that they are running out of space for highrises in the future "if" the market ever improves or when the subway finally opens. There are probably only about 5 spaces left for new highrises on Wilshire between La Brea and Fairfax.

There is actually a 5-ish story wood-frame building being constructed on one of the sidestreets. Like, two blocks past Hauser, maybe? Also, there is alot of potential for a hip commercial strip at that whole La Brea/8th St. nexus. Nice-looking and underutilized commercial Art-Deco and Spanish-Revival structures can be found all up and down that whole area.

BrandonJXN
Jun 27, 2012, 5:03 AM
I'm actually a big fan of those post-streamline (new architecture term?) apartments on Wilshire. Avalon Wilshire, 5600 Wilshire, and those similar prove that you can make a quality wood framed building.

colemonkee
Jun 27, 2012, 5:30 AM
LABJ and curbed with confirmation that Westfield is indeed moving forward with the 39 story high rise in Century city (Bloomingdales on the ground floor) and the expansion of the mall.

http://la.curbed.com/archives/2012/06/westfield_finally_about_to_start_on_39story_century_city_tower.php

Right, but they're offering current office tenants of 1801 Avenue of the Stars up to one-year extensions. So we're at least one year before they demolish 14 story and 5 story commercial buildings. So, best case scenario, they don't start construction of the condo tower for 12-18 months.

citywatch
Jun 27, 2012, 6:11 AM
I'm actually a big fan of those post-streamline (new architecture term?) apartments on Wilshire.

If I wasn't aware of what that hood was like in the past, I might have mistaken at least a few of those new post modern apt bldgs for rehabs of old art deco bldgs. of course, upon closer inspection most ppl will be aware of the difference. but at a quick glance, I could have easily thought the artificial old was actually built over 60 yrs ago.

and the new high school where the ambassador hotel once stood makes me think it can easily be the most $$$ looking campus in the city, or country. very fancy schmancy...I hope the kids going to school there appreciate what they've been given.

as for much of the wilshire corridor, if most streets in LA looked like that avenue, LA would be quite primo & easy to acclimatize to imho.

Illithid Dude
Jun 27, 2012, 8:05 AM
I'm actually a big fan of those post-streamline (new architecture term?) apartments on Wilshire. Avalon Wilshire, 5600 Wilshire, and those similar prove that you can make a quality wood framed building.

White I loathe 5600, I think Avalon is one of the best examples of a new type III apartment building in the city. Of course, I wish it was taller, but for what it is, it's great.



and the new high school where the ambassador hotel once stood makes me think it can easily be the most $$$ looking campus in the city, or country. very fancy schmancy...I hope the kids going to school there appreciate what they've been given.

Maybe so, but the fact that LAUSD destroyed such an important part of L.A. history sours any good thoughts I have about that campus.

pesto
Jun 27, 2012, 3:46 PM
:previous::previous::previous:

I see all those low rise going up in Miricle Mile and just think that they are running out of space for highrises in the future "if" the market ever improves or when the subway finally opens. There are probably only about 5 spaces left for new highrises on Wilshire between La Brea and Fairfax.

True, but there are many, many nondescript, half empty buildings just waiting to get axed. The 'hood did lose a few decos in the past but (in general) anything half-way decent is now protected and the rest are expendable.

In any event, high-rise is going to mostly huddle around the subway stops and I am not aware of any great demand for over 20-stories. between, say, Highland and BH. Same idea as Hollywood; there's miles of space and little new demand.

BrandonJXN
Jun 27, 2012, 6:17 PM
White I loathe 5600, I think Avalon is one of the best examples of a new type III apartment building in the city. Of course, I wish it was taller, but for what it is, it's great.


Not just on Wilshire but there are a lot of areas in Los Angeles that could benefit from a few of these types of apartment buildings.

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2628/3992629497_e6b6e9e8ba_z.jpg?zz=1
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2628/3992629497_e6b6e9e8ba_z.jpg?zz=1

Illithid Dude
Jun 28, 2012, 1:24 AM
I actually means 5550 Wilshire, but Avalon is nice too.

RST500
Jun 28, 2012, 8:00 PM
True, but there are many, many nondescript, half empty buildings just waiting to get axed. The 'hood did lose a few decos in the past but (in general) anything half-way decent is now protected and the rest are expendable.

In any event, high-rise is going to mostly huddle around the subway stops and I am not aware of any great demand for over 20-stories. between, say, Highland and BH. Same idea as Hollywood; there's miles of space and little new demand.

There will be the demand in the future, especially if/when the subway comes in. There is only a limited amount of locations for new highrises such as parking lots and low to mid rises with no historic value.

colemonkee
Jun 28, 2012, 10:31 PM
That image of that Wishire apartment building is borderline misleadingly flattering. In daylight the materials do not[I] hold up very well. The massing is there, and the vertical deco elements work well, but the use of stucco, window fenestration, and treatment of the balconies (with more stucco!) really cheapen the aesthetics of the building overall. Had this been clad in stone or terra cotta on the vertical columns, and even painted concrete on the interior spaces, with more streamline modern fenestration and curved insets on the balconies, this would have been a [I]far better building. But next to the office building next door, it looks like a cheap knock-off sold by a street vendor in Santee Alley.

blackcat23
Jul 3, 2012, 11:01 PM
Been lurking for a while, thought I'd contribute with some pictures of the Cedars-Sinai expansion that I took last week.

http://i47.tinypic.com/2vkkztc.jpg

http://i46.tinypic.com/jg5aiq.jpg

colemonkee
Jul 4, 2012, 1:29 AM
Welcome to the forum, blackcat23. Thanks for the pictures. I didn't know this addition would have a skybridge.

Mojeda101
Jul 7, 2012, 3:17 AM
The Vermont link says it's 25 and 30 stories?

Illithid Dude
Jul 7, 2012, 3:19 AM
The Vermont link says it's 25 and 30 stories?

Yes?

Mojeda101
Jul 7, 2012, 3:52 AM
Yes?

He has the towers listed as 22, and 28 stories in the thread.

Illithid Dude
Jul 7, 2012, 4:00 AM
He has the towers listed as 22, and 28 stories in the thread.

Just counted. The towers are 28 stories and 22 stories. The developers must have just rounded up, for marketing sake.

Illithid Dude
Jul 10, 2012, 4:10 AM
Hey circuit fiend, have they still been digging at the 1000 Danta Monica Blvd site, or was all that earth moving just a tease?

JDRCRASH
Jul 10, 2012, 5:39 PM
Danta Monica Blvd is one of my favorite streets in LA!! :D lol

circuitfiend
Jul 10, 2012, 7:04 PM
Hey circuit fiend, have they still been digging at the 1000 Danta Monica Blvd site, or was all that earth moving just a tease?

The dig now extends across the entire width of the property. Once that was accomplished, soil testing began in ernest. Other than that, nothing new.

I was on vacation all last week and upon my return, pretty much the same. The largest backhoe is gone, but we still have a smaller one and a bulldozer, although they've been parked on the side of the property and haven't moved. Workers have been in the trenches, cutting into the edges and drawing samples.

So, hopefully optimistic here. I can't imagine developers would go through with such an extensive dig without concrete plans to build something.

I'll post a pic later today, but it's nothing to get excited about. When activity picks up, I'll be sure to keep my fellow forumers informed.

Kingofthehill
Jul 12, 2012, 6:44 PM
The affordable housing development one block west of Hollywood/Western is appears to have topped out, and is now finishing up. Additionally, the row of one-story storefronts immediately to the east of that building are all surrounding by green fencing. I am not sre if they are being renovated or demolished. CIM did alot of work in this area.

Also, the huge La Brea/Wilshire project is, finally, at ground level.

sopas ej
Jul 13, 2012, 5:05 AM
From KCRW:

Will one of LA’s most notorious public housing projects get a makeover?
BY: SAUL GONZALEZ

Think “public housing” and likely bad things come to mind: gangs, drugs, despair and urban blight. Instead of clean and dignified places, where low-income individuals live temporarily until they get their lives together, public housing projects have become “warehouses of the poor,” where families live for generations in decaying housing units.

But over the last two decades there’s been a trend to knock down and rebuild some of the worst housing projects in the United States. Dangerous and decaying buildings with no amenities have been demolished and replaced with attractive housing units offering social services, green space and retail. There’s also been a move to open up public housing sites to people who want to buy or rent housing units in them at fair market, the big idea being when people of different incomes live together, healthier and safer communities are created.

This is exactly the plan for one of L.A.’s most notorious public housing projects, the sprawling Jordan Downs complex in the heart of Watts. Jordan Downs is home to more than two thousand people, who live in 700 barracks-style housing blocks. The Los Angeles Housing Authority wants to demolish the development and replace it’s calling an “urban village” model.

[...]

Read the rest here:
Will one of LA’s most notorious public housing projects get a makeover? (http://blogs.kcrw.com/whichwayla/2012/07/will-one-of-las-most-notorious-public-housing-projects-get-a-makeover/)

http://blogs.kcrw.com/whichwayla/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/jordandowns1-300x199.jpg

http://blogs.kcrw.com/whichwayla/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/DSC00510-1024x680.jpg
Jordan Downs today

http://blogs.kcrw.com/whichwayla/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/jordandowns2.jpg
Jordan Downs tomorrow?

LAsam
Jul 13, 2012, 4:55 PM
2/3s to be sold or rented at market? It's not really a housing project anymore at that point... where are all the displaced residents supposed to go? This looks to benefit developers and the city at the expense of it residents... am I missing something?

pesto
Jul 13, 2012, 5:57 PM
An interesting experiment, at least in some aspects.

It's long been understood that the facilities are not the problem. The people are the problem: parents and neighbors that replicate children to be just like themselves. Anyone with hope for their kids gets out even if it means working night and day for decades.

The key is to convince a reasonable number of the people with an interest in improving their lives to stay in the projects. Eventually, these form a neighborhood where some social pressure can be brought to bear on the really anti-social elements (the addicts, criminals, lazy, insane, violent, etc.) and some demand for living there can be created.

Kind of funny to see that even here, some are worried about the projects "gentrifying". All this means is that the hopeless poor die off or move out and the new generation who are not quite as poor move in. Happens everywhere, every day, every city, all over the world. It's called "economic progress". Setting the beam too high (by hoping to make the current poor into rich) destroys the possibility of any progress.

btw, this sort of thing has been done in Latin America for a couple of decades now. It was noticed that when the residents of dilapidated projects were moved into new projects, they became dilapidated within years, sometimes months. Everything valuable torn out and sold off for dope and alcohol. Now, community building takes precedence over construction with very good results.

llamaorama
Jul 13, 2012, 10:31 PM
There has been research done into what exactly happens when old projects in the city are torn down and their residents disperse into the suburbs. It's nice to talk about social pressure and conforming to some new middle class value system, but most of the time these people are still dysfunctional after they move.

Instead there really ought to be a more personal level of intervention, for better or worse maybe existing but renovated public housing developments makes that more realistic. Social services and outreach programs can be nearby. If kids aren't showing up to school, it's slightly easier if a truant officer can just go to the general vicinity of the projects and round them up.

DistrictDirt
Jul 13, 2012, 11:18 PM
An interesting experiment, at least in some aspects.

It's long been understood that the facilities are not the problem. The people are the problem: parents and neighbors that replicate children to be just like themselves. Anyone with hope for their kids gets out even if it means working night and day for decades.

The key is to convince a reasonable number of the people with an interest in improving their lives to stay in the projects. Eventually, these form a neighborhood where some social pressure can be brought to bear on the really anti-social elements (the addicts, criminals, lazy, insane, violent, etc.) and some demand for living there can be created.

Kind of funny to see that even here, some are worried about the projects "gentrifying". All this means is that the hopeless poor die off or move out and the new generation who are not quite as poor move in. Happens everywhere, every day, every city, all over the world. It's called "economic progress". Setting the beam too high (by hoping to make the current poor into rich) destroys the possibility of any progress.

btw, this sort of thing has been done in Latin America for a couple of decades now. It was noticed that when the residents of dilapidated projects were moved into new projects, they became dilapidated within years, sometimes months. Everything valuable torn out and sold off for dope and alcohol. Now, community building takes precedence over construction with very good results.


The problem with projects the way they've historically been done is that they concentrate poverty.

Hope VI (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HOPE_VI) projects are successful because they do the opposite- they create situations where income classes are mixed in the same housing development.

pesto
Jul 15, 2012, 4:08 PM
Generally agree with everything said, except for some details not material to this discussion.

Like it or not, the truly dysfunctional are unlikely to change; for sure they will not become middle class or rich. The real target is the new generation, and they are FAR more likely to do well in an old dilapidated building where there are community-minded people than in a brand new project with concentrated dope heads.

How you get there is not easy, and is a matter of practical thinking, setting the right incentives, putting a premium on self-reliance and a disincentive to stay in the welfare cycle.

Kingofthehill
Jul 16, 2012, 6:50 AM
The 6-story woodframe special going up at Wilshire/Barrington:

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8425/7580856292_121e65a1a9_b.jpg

pesto
Jul 16, 2012, 6:26 PM
Odd for a busy corner; you would think that more demand than that existed for "Brentwood adjacent". Maybe people prefer quieter streets.

StethJeff
Jul 17, 2012, 4:02 AM
NBCUniversal scraps plan to build housing on Universal back lot

Instead of developing apartments and condos on Universal Studios land, it now suggests adding more film and TV production facilities, enhancing the theme park and building an extra hotel.

http://www.latimes.com/media/photo/2012-07/71110184.jpg

NBCUniversal's new $1.6-billion proposal does not include housing. (NBC Universal / July 16, 2012)

By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
July 16, 2012, 6:10 p.m.

NBCUniversal has dropped controversial plans to build thousands of residences on its famous back lot and hopes instead to add movie and television production facilities and expand the Universal Studios Hollywood theme park.

The new $1.6-billion proposal was unveiled Monday just before the release of the final environmental impact report on the company's proposal to improve the sprawling studio and tourist attraction in the San Fernando Valley.

An earlier plan, valued at $3 billion, called for nearly 3,000 apartments and condominiums at the east end of the studio's property; they would have been served by proposed shops and restaurants. Many neighbors were opposed to the housing, and this year Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky called on NBCUniversal to ditch the residential component of its "Evolution Plan."

Housing development would have made economic sense for the company, Universal Studios President Ron Meyer said a meeting with The Times on Monday. Yaroslavsky and Los Angeles City Councilman Tom LaBonge, however, "urged us to focus on our core business," Meyer said, "and they are right."

Yaroslavsky and LaBonge attended the meeting at Universal and voiced support for what they called the "no-residential alternative" while stopping short of endorsing the new plan, which still faces city and county approval processes.

Eliminating a portion of the back lot to build housing would reduce television and motion picture production at Universal — potentially costing jobs — because there would be less room for filming, Yaroslavsky said. He also expressed sympathy for neighbors in the hills above the studio.

"If you lived over the back lot, you wouldn't want Park La Brea Towers erected in your backyard either," Yaroslavsky said, referring to a massive apartment complex in the mid-Wilshire area of Los Angeles.

LaBonge said he hoped Universal would continue to emphasize film and television production on the lot and the popular Universal Studios tour.

"This is an important tourist attraction," he said. "You see people outside smiling with anticipation."

Homeowner groups have been watching Universal's plans with interest over the years.

The president of the Hollywood Knolls Community Club, Daniel Savage, said dropping the housing component would be "a welcome change in terms of lessening the potential negative impacts on traffic and infrastructure such a housing complex would have, but also preserve to the greatest extent possible the historical Universal back lot and keeping it available for production, which is greatly needed in this city."

The new plan calls for adding 327,000 square feet of development to the theme park, which might include an expansion of the well-known tram tour and parking. The boundaries of the theme park would not grow.

The theme-park enhancements might seem to be a natural complement for the planned Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which NBCUniversal said in December would cost "several hundred million dollars" to create. The studio hopes to emulate the success of the attraction at Universal Studios Orlando in Florida.

But on Monday, NBCUniversal officials said they hadn't determined where they would place the "Harry Potter" attraction, which is expected to include a re-creation of the Hogwarts castle as well as Potter-themed rides, shops and restaurants.

A key revision of the proposal calls for construction of two 500-room hotels instead of one. The new plan also would bump up the amount of new production facilities and offices to 1.45 million square feet from 1.24 million square feet.

The revised plan calls for $100 million in transit and roadway improvements as originally proposed, said Thomas Smith, senior vice president in charge of real estate on the West Coast for NBCUniversal.

The budget would include a new ramp and other improvements on the 101 Freeway. About half the $100 million would be spent on improving traffic flow on nearby streets, intersections and freeways; the other half would be spent on transit programs, including shuttles, a Metro bus and employee and visitor incentives to forgo car trips.

The final EIR has deemed the no-residential alternative "environmentally superior," officials said, and NBCUniversal has asked the city and county to focus on that version of the plan for the upcoming approval process.

Comcast Corp., which owns a majority interest in NBCUniversal, supports the new plan, Meyer said. Public hearings on the final environmental impact report lie ahead. If the proposal is approved, construction will begin right away, he said.

The Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp., a business trade group, said it supports NBCUniversal's latest proposal, which would create thousands of construction jobs.

"Not only will these new attractions, destination spots and recreational options boost the economy around the Universal City facility, but they will significantly stimulate our entire region's hospitality and tourism industry," the group said.

StethJeff
Jul 17, 2012, 5:57 AM
From CurbedLA:
http://la.curbed.com/uploads/2012.02_evolution.jpg

JDRCRASH
Jul 17, 2012, 6:05 AM
"If you lived over the back lot, you wouldn't want Park La Brea Towers erected in your backyard either," Yaroslavsky said, referring to a massive apartment complex in the mid-Wilshire area of Los Angeles.


Uhhh, this is NOT Park La Brea. Try again, Zev.

Seriously, if the Times is so informative, why doesn't it correct guys like Yaroslavsky for making asinine statements like that?

pesto
Jul 17, 2012, 5:24 PM
Well, the real dynamic here appears to be that homeowners and landlords don't want additional housing in the area and the City Council is backing them.

From the careful wording, I am guessing that Universal isn't really expanding production much (if any); they certainly did not push that side for the last several years. Even hotel and office isn't assured since some homeowners will oppose that as well. However, the unions will be wholly behind it.

In general, this is center city land, which has no business being open air production facilities. The best uses are apparently in relatively dense housing or mid rise office, with the large production facilities moving further out. The only bright spots I see are the one hotel and some greater density in the amusement park.

Illithid Dude
Jul 21, 2012, 3:56 AM
I drove by 8500 Burton Way the other day, and took some pictures. These were all taken from a moving car, so excuse the quality.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7138/7613218708_a9ac0414ef_b.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8146/7613217736_36f1c292fc_b.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8164/7613218212_3cfd457d2d_b.jpg

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7278/7613219000_789dfe6338_b.jpg

It looks like they are cladding the base in marble slabs?

Kingofthehill
Jul 21, 2012, 5:54 AM
I recently biked past a fairly large multifamily development being framed out on the NW corner of 4th St. and Gramercy Place, just inside of Koreatown. The three venerable Craftsman homes on the site appear to have been knocked down for a larger, more urban apartment complex.

pesto
Jul 21, 2012, 3:41 PM
Pretty much inevitable in that area. Generally, only blocks with no existing apartment buildings should be strongly protected.

May they rest in peace in Craftsman heaven.

colemonkee
Jul 23, 2012, 6:44 AM
Drove by the Emerson College building on Sunset today. There's a crane up and rebar columns are above ground on both sides of the building, but the majority of the overall floor area of the lot is still below ground. Still, this one should get visually interesting over the next few months. No pictures as I was driving in pretty heavy traffic.

213
Jul 23, 2012, 8:16 AM
In general, this is center city land, which has no business being open air production facilities. The best uses are apparently in relatively dense housing or mid rise office, with the large production facilities moving further out.The land in question is elevated, remote and not easily connectable to areas surrounding it. Development would be isolated within the boundaries of the 101, Universal Studios and the Barham slope, with traffic funneled through two access points. Nothing built there is going to enhance or unify the urban fabric, or bring appreciable impact apart from several thousand additional cars. All considered, film production is not only an appropriate use of the land, but fairly ideal.

It bears note that Universal's housing plan had been on paper for many years, since well before the real estate crash. Given the current and foreseeable market, it probably took little effort to dissuade them of it.

pesto
Jul 23, 2012, 3:37 PM
The land in question is elevated, remote and not easily connectable to areas surrounding it. Development would be isolated within the boundaries of the 101, Universal Studios and the Barham slope, with traffic funneled through two access points. Nothing built there is going to enhance or unify the urban fabric, or bring appreciable impact apart from several thousand additional cars. All considered, film production is not only an appropriate use of the land, but fairly ideal.

It bears note that Universal's housing plan had been on paper for many years, since well before the real estate crash. Given the current and foreseeable market, it probably took little effort to dissuade them of it.

I understand your point but it doesn't seem that relevant. The developer proposed housing and seems to still want to do it. It would have been nice for it to be "urban" but that's not important. This is new quality housing within yards of Hollywood instead of in Santa Clarita.

Outdoor film production is a very doubtful use in this location. Again, most of the outdoor production lots are long gone from Hollywood. Intensive uses such as indoor shooting, production and post-production are fine, of course.

StethJeff
Jul 23, 2012, 11:27 PM
Drove by the Emerson College building on Sunset today. There's a crane up and rebar columns are above ground on both sides of the building, but the majority of the overall floor area of the lot is still below ground. Still, this one should get visually interesting over the next few months. No pictures as I was driving in pretty heavy traffic.

thanks for the heads up, that definitely'll deserve a drive by at some point toward the end of this summer. :tup:

WonderlandPark
Jul 25, 2012, 9:31 PM
The Vermont/Wilshire towers are in full swing, drove by it just now, tower cranes are going up as we speak and the rebar for both building cores is above the fence height.

http://i48.tinypic.com/6j2ipv.jpg

http://i50.tinypic.com/e85qpk.jpg

Mojeda101
Jul 25, 2012, 11:24 PM
They've made much faster progress than the Courtyard marriott in Downtown, i'll tell you that.

a9l8e7n
Jul 26, 2012, 1:56 AM
They've made much faster progress than the Courtyard marriott in Downtown, i'll tell you that.

I wish we had a webcam for the wilshire towers project so we can actually see how much progress is actually being made.

Mojeda101
Jul 26, 2012, 2:57 AM
I wish we had a webcam for the wilshire towers project so we can actually see how much progress is actually being made.

Agreed.

Are both towers being built at the same time or is one being focused on first? 22 and 28 stories are pretty tall for the area after all.

WonderlandPark
Jul 26, 2012, 2:32 PM
It looked to me like both are going up together. I saw the bases of 2 tower cranes and there are 2 definite cores already rising. (Although the base of the other crane could have been parts of the first one, it really looks like both are going up together)

pesto
Jul 26, 2012, 3:49 PM
The Vermont/Wilshire towers are in full swing, drove by it just now, tower cranes are going up as we speak and the rebar for both building cores is above the fence height.

http://i48.tinypic.com/6j2ipv.jpg



This is about the point where I really start believing that there will be something built!

That brick building next door isn't doing much for the 'hood. It will be interesting to see if there is any ripple effect in the area and toward Westlake.

202_Cyclist
Jul 26, 2012, 6:42 PM
This was posted on the Greater Greater Washington blog today (a bit late). I grew up near Seal Beach, next to the mouth of the LA river, so I certainly appreciate anything that can be done to reduce the amount of stormwater and polluted runoff that goes into the ocean.

A Los Angeles Parking Lot Becomes an Inner City Wetland

March 14, 2012

http://www.livingprinciples.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/wetlands1jpg.jpeg
Image courtesy of KCET.org.

"Before it was slathered in concrete, South Los Angeles was densely forested with oak trees interrupted only by a series of streams that fed the Los Angeles River. Now the industrial neighborhood is responsible for unchecked polluted storm water and a host of other environmental concerns. That’s why turning a former MTA bus parking lot into a nine acre wetland that efficiently processes storm water runoff is such a major turn of events. It took $26 million and nearly three years, but the city now has a way to deal with water pollution and residents have a dedicated, city-funded green space. Paths and boardwalks welcome neighbors to peruse the grounds, read about wetlands and engage in the education center and museum planned for construction..."

http://www.livingprinciples.org/a-los-angeles-parking-lot-becomes-an-inner-city-wetland/

BrandonJXN
Jul 26, 2012, 7:20 PM
This is about the point where I really start believing that there will be something built!

That brick building next door isn't doing much for the 'hood. It will be interesting to see if there is any ripple effect in the area and toward Westlake.

I hope so. I live in Westlake and this area, especially around 1100 Wilshire could see some new development.

colemonkee
Jul 26, 2012, 7:59 PM
^ That brick building is in Koreatown, nowhere near 1100 Wilshire. And there's a huge 7-story apartment building going up directly across the street from 1100 Wilshire.

JDRCRASH
Jul 27, 2012, 1:35 AM
This was posted on the Greater Greater Washington blog today (a bit late). I grew up near Seal Beach, next to the mouth of the LA river, so I certainly appreciate anything that can be done to reduce the amount of stormwater and polluted runoff that goes into the ocean.

You mean the San Gabriel River. ;)

Now that is a river that needs cleaning up. I recently rode down the adjacent bike path and the seal beach portion stinks bad.

Thanks for posting that article!

blackcat23
Jul 27, 2012, 4:47 AM
Curbed is saying that there is heavy equipment digging on the Old Spaghetti Factory site.

Illithid Dude
Jul 27, 2012, 6:25 AM
Curbed is saying that there is heavy equipment digging on the Old Spaghetti Factory site.

Yaaaay! Between that, the twin K-town towers, Emerson, and the tower in Century City, I'd say we finally have a decent amount of construction!

Steve2726
Jul 27, 2012, 2:28 PM
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-hollywood-tower-20120727,0,5161342.story

Ruling blocks construction of 20-story tower in Hollywood

The tower would be built at the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Gower Street, near the Fonda Theatre. It would include more than 150 apartment units, ground-level retail shops and a fifth-floor lap pool.

Render from page 1-

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4029/4468925950_14d397c49f_o.jpg

202_Cyclist
Jul 27, 2012, 3:41 PM
Isn't this near one of the Red line stations? People who pay more to live near rail transit drive much less and have lower car-ownership rates-- self-selection. More parking will only encourage more people to drive and will add to the cost of housing, making it less affordable.

BrandonJXN
Jul 27, 2012, 4:06 PM
^ That brick building is in Koreatown, nowhere near 1100 Wilshire. And there's a huge 7-story apartment building going up directly across the street from 1100 Wilshire.

Oh I know. I pass by that building all the time. But the area I meant when I said that Westlake could see some more development is right around 6th and Bixel. I know it's not the more glamorous areas but it would be great to see that area tie in with City West. I've always pictured City West as a interesting little area and I hope that happens.

pesto
Jul 27, 2012, 4:50 PM
Isn't this near one of the Red line stations? People who pay more to live near rail transit drive much less and have lower car-ownership rates-- self-selection. More parking will only encourage more people to drive and will add to the cost of housing, making it less affordable.

A couple of blocks from the Vine station. Certainly walkable for the healthy.

This is going the be the continuing battle and the reason that Hollywood is not going to be a city of highrises very soon. La Mirada and adjacent streets are very typical of Hollywood: small, old sfh's mixed with 2-4 story apartments (mostly shabby), parking lots and vacated light industrial. There will be some small hardship for the residents (some, presumably, long-term) if a highrise with inadequate parking is built down the block. But most of this can be handled with parking regulations.

If you can't build on Hollywood and Sunset between Vermont and Vine, there are very few areas with demand that you can build on. And it is hard to think of this as a "neighborhood" in the sense of kids on the street and neighbors chatting. That has long-since been replaced by tattoed young men hanging around pick-ups, chain link fences and barred windows. Certainly there is nothing of architectural note or historical interest. In fact, the entire 'hood would be well-served to be replaced by 3-5 story modern apartments.

pesto
Jul 27, 2012, 5:03 PM
Oh I know. I pass by that building all the time. But the area I meant when I said that Westlake could see some more development is right around 6th and Bixel. I know it's not the more glamorous areas but it would be great to see that area tie in with City West. I've always pictured City West as a interesting little area and I hope that happens.

Yeah, we're talking about the opposite ends of Westlake, but it's easy to think of them as one area surrounded by development that now extends to Vermont on the west and has hopped over the 110 on the east.

The whole area is really tied-in to Ktown, Hollywood, Echo Park and DT and should show some upgrading. At either end and around the parks most likely, but small projects could be anywhere.

Mojeda101
Aug 3, 2012, 11:34 PM
Drove by the Vermont. Decent work since those last pictures. I was driving so unfortunately I couldn't snap any pictures. I really hate that they is no live feed of the construction.

LosAngelesSportsFan
Aug 6, 2012, 6:03 PM
Apartment and retail complex at Wilshire and La Brea is underway

http://www.trbimg.com/img-501c5a03/turbine/la-fi-mo-wilshire-apts-underway-20120803-001/600


A rendering of the Wilshire at La Brea residential and retail complex, looking south on La Brea Avenue. (TCA Architects)
By Roger Vincent
August 5, 2012, 10:35 a.m.
Work is underway on a $105-million apartment and retail development at the crossroads of two major Los Angeles thoroughfares, Wilshire Boulevard and La Brea Avenue.

The six-story complex called Wilshire at La Brea is being erected by San Francisco apartment developer BRE Properties. It will house 480 residential units and fill the block at the southeast corner of the intersection.

“Through careful planning, this project comes to market at the right time and provides much-needed housing in an area already rich with valuable amenities and easy access to mass transit,” BRE Vice President John Selindh said.

The development is one of the first to take advantage of a new city planning policy that allows for replacement of obsolete structures to encourage higher density in urban infill areas, according to architect Thomas Cox, a principal at Los Angeles-based TCA Architects, who designed the project.

Over the objections of some preservationists, BRE razed a building that was completed in 1965 to house a Columbia Savings branch and was used most recently as a church. Its stained-glass ceiling was listed for auction in 2010.

Wilshire at La Brea will have shops and restaurants along both streets, said Steve Pellegren of Bernards, the Los Angeles contractor building the complex. It will include two swimming pools, a fitness center and 997 parking spaces in a subterranean garage.

“This is a very high-density project, directly in the middle of one of the city’s hottest redevelopment areas,” Pellegren said.

colemonkee
Aug 6, 2012, 11:38 PM
Ugh, this is disappointing for several reasons:

1. It's a horrible mish-mash of bad architecture, which will be made even worse with the inevitable poor quality materials choices that mar the SoCal landscape. Here's looking at you, stucco! Check the flyby render on TCA's website. The only thing remotely redeeming about this design is the not-so subtle nod to the streamline moderne stylings of the Firestone tire store at the corner of 8th and La Brea. If they build that part right, which they won't, it could look decent.

2. Despite the tone of the article, 480 units seems a bit low considering this will eventually sit on top of a Purple line stop. Sure, it's much more than what was there before, but this property is larger than the Angeleno site, which is entitled for something like 700 units.

3. 997 parking spaces. On top of a future heavy rail stop. 'Nuff said.

LosAngelesSportsFan
Aug 7, 2012, 6:14 AM
Ugh, this is disappointing for several reasons:

1. It's a horrible mish-mash of bad architecture, which will be made even worse with the inevitable poor quality materials choices that mar the SoCal landscape. Here's looking at you, stucco! Check the flyby render on TCA's website. The only thing remotely redeeming about this design is the not-so subtle nod to the streamline moderne stylings of the Firestone tire store at the corner of 8th and La Brea. If they build that part right, which they won't, it could look decent.

2. Despite the tone of the article, 480 units seems a bit low considering this will eventually sit on top of a Purple line stop. Sure, it's much more than what was there before, but this property is larger than the Angeleno site, which is entitled for something like 700 units.

3. 997 parking spaces. On top of a future heavy rail stop. 'Nuff said.

agreed Colemonkee. what a waste

edluva
Aug 7, 2012, 6:42 AM
so when are you guys going to come to the fact that los angeles just generally sucks a lot at being a city?

one disappointment after another, in prime areas of a supposed megacity. what opportunities are left to do things right? dumb people make dumb cities

Illithid Dude
Aug 7, 2012, 7:00 AM
Yeah, it's bad, but it's not offensive. Just bland. I'm more disappointed about the fantastic building that was demolished to bring us this new building.

202_Cyclist
Aug 7, 2012, 2:20 PM
Apartment and retail complex at Wilshire and La Brea is underway

http://www.trbimg.com/img-501c5a03/turbine/la-fi-mo-wilshire-apts-underway-20120803-001/600


A rendering of the Wilshire at La Brea residential and retail complex, looking south on La Brea Avenue. (TCA Architects)
By Roger Vincent
August 5, 2012, 10:35 a.m.
Work is underway on a $105-million apartment and retail development at the crossroads of two major Los Angeles thoroughfares, Wilshire Boulevard and La Brea Avenue.

The six-story complex called Wilshire at La Brea is being erected by San Francisco apartment developer BRE Properties. It will house 480 residential units and fill the block at the southeast corner of the intersection.

“Through careful planning, this project comes to market at the right time and provides much-needed housing in an area already rich with valuable amenities and easy access to mass transit,” BRE Vice President John Selindh said.

The development is one of the first to take advantage of a new city planning policy that allows for replacement of obsolete structures to encourage higher density in urban infill areas, according to architect Thomas Cox, a principal at Los Angeles-based TCA Architects, who designed the project.

Over the objections of some preservationists, BRE razed a building that was completed in 1965 to house a Columbia Savings branch and was used most recently as a church. Its stained-glass ceiling was listed for auction in 2010.

Wilshire at La Brea will have shops and restaurants along both streets, said Steve Pellegren of Bernards, the Los Angeles contractor building the complex. It will include two swimming pools, a fitness center and 997 parking spaces in a subterranean garage.

“This is a very high-density project, directly in the middle of one of the city’s hottest redevelopment areas,” Pellegren said.

I am not trying to get in a city vs. city debate but this would be a standard infill project in most places in DC or the surrounding suburbs. Not every building is going to be prize-winning architecture, especially if it is only 6 stories. This building (although I am sure it could be improved) looks fine.

It lets more people live within walking distiance of a rail station. The construction will create jobs when jobs are desperately needed and the new residents living here will bring the city of Los Angeles more property tax revenue. On the other hand, I do agree that the amount of parking provided is vastly excessive.

colemonkee
Aug 7, 2012, 4:33 PM
^ What you're not seeing in that render are the bent pitched roofs along Wilshire that totally don't fit an already disjointed excuse for a design. This building would be an embarrassment in any city. From a density standpoint, though it is better than what was there. I'm just starting to come around to edluva's position (though not nearly to his extreme) that the city should expect better - much better - than this.

And for the record, this building is well underway. I drove by it months ago and they when they were performing a pretty massive foundation pour. I haven't been by there since then, but they should be at or close to street level by now. The underground parking structure is pretty massive.

pesto
Aug 7, 2012, 5:26 PM
[QUOTE=LosAngelesSportsFan;5789786]Apartment and retail complex at Wilshire and La Brea is underway

http://www.trbimg.com/img-501c5a03/turbine/la-fi-mo-wilshire-apts-underway-20120803-001/600

Very nice. Hopefully the first of a real wave of new buildings in this area.

The corridor from 7th to Beverly, from La Brea to La Cienega is surprisingly dense with multi-story buildings and more are coming along all the time. La Brea and Beverly are rapidly getting retail and foot traffic to match 3rd, Fairfax, Melrose, the Grove, Beverly Center, the LACMA complex and the expanding Park La Brea.

Really a very large urban area considering it's distance from downtown, and eventually it will link to WeHo and BH into a first class urban area. But still needs Purple and Pink (or tail of the Crenshaw).

citywatch
Aug 7, 2012, 5:29 PM
1. It's a horrible mish-mash of bad architecture, which will be made even worse with the inevitable poor quality materials choices that mar the SoCal landscape.

The image doesn't provide enough details for me to know for sure what it will end up looking like....I went by that location several wks ago & there was quite a bit of excavation work underway on it.

in a way your reaction implies just how bad the city must be to lots of ppl, cuz if you take all the ppl who are very picky about the design of new devlpt & combine them with all the ppl who notice the really, really bad newer devlpt like this....

http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn89/Viewpark/perinos.jpg
perinos.net

http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn89/Viewpark/perinos2.jpg
perinos.net

....& combine them with the greater number of ppl who notice how much of the city looks not much better than this....

http://i302.photobucket.com/albums/nn89/Viewpark/city.jpg

....you then realize we're stuck with a really :( situation.

That apt bldg shown above is also on wilshire, just a few miles east of the corner of Wilshire & la brea & was built not too many yrs ago on the location of the old perinos restaurant. It makes the design for the BRE proj look that by comparison it could win a pritzker award.

we in LA are like ppl driving in a car with 2 bald tires, 1 about ready to go flat, another one that's already flat, & we're also having to fuss about the interior being paneled in vinyl instead of velour, much less leather. It's both :haha: & :(

Gram3000
Aug 7, 2012, 6:19 PM
The more I look at the website for this it actually looks like a high quality project yes the rendering provided is not that flattering but remember there will be 6 stories over retail which means that it will be more than just a typical stucco box. Now along the other streets with low-rise floors its questionable what massing will be used. BTW I like how it ties into its surrounding neighborhood with the 3 story type structure facing the S.F.R's just hold your breath folks it may turn out better than expected! Yes the parking ratio is not cool. Also I like the Desmond (per website) mix use project that looks to be 12 stories and really carries out the Streamline theme remarkably. :tup:

LAofAnaheim
Aug 7, 2012, 6:25 PM
Until we fix the parking minimums, we're going to have to live with mega-huge projects as our only hope for infill. We need significant parking reform to make developments more affordable and attractive to a greater number of developers. The amount of parking required in Los Angeles is beyond ridiculous, especially now that our public transit system is expanding and this building is across the future the Wilshire/La Brea Purple Line station opening within the next 7 years.

pesto
Aug 8, 2012, 5:31 PM
The more I look at the website for this it actually looks like a high quality project yes the rendering provided is not that flattering but remember there will be 6 stories over retail which means that it will be more than just a typical stucco box. Now along the other streets with low-rise floors its questionable what massing will be used. BTW I like how it ties into its surrounding neighborhood with the 3 story type structure facing the S.F.R's just hold your breath folks it may turn out better than expected! Yes the parking ratio is not cool. Also I like the Desmond (per website) mix use project that looks to be 12 stories and really carries out the Streamline theme remarkably. :tup:

Yes. This reflects reality much better than some of the previous comments. And the sfh's are being protected from facing directly onto towers, which will keep nice residential neighborhoods intact within easy walking distance of retail, office and transit. Urban ideal: 6-story apartment and retail and 15 story office on the main streets; two story tree-lined sfr's on the side streets; bus and rail convenient.

LosAngelesDreamin
Aug 9, 2012, 6:07 AM
Apartment and retail complex at Wilshire and La Brea is underway

http://www.trbimg.com/img-501c5a03/turbine/la-fi-mo-wilshire-apts-underway-20120803-001/600


I don't think it's stucco... it looks more like its going to be those metal panel thingies.. and about the design.. i actually like it.. thats me though. at least its not just a complete square box.. it has angles and stuff like that.. and a lil pointy top thingy.

BrandonJXN
Aug 9, 2012, 6:10 AM
Nothing improves the quality of a building than metal panel thingies and stuff like that.

:P

colemonkee
Aug 9, 2012, 6:18 AM
You guys must be talking about the "metal panel thingies" on the New Genesis Apartments on Main Street. Which, coincidentally, are made of stucco. I saw them being applied.

This, my friends, will be the same "metal panel thingies." Made of stucco.

BrandonJXN
Aug 9, 2012, 6:20 AM
The rendering looks better than what the building will look like once completed. While not bad, a tower would have been better suited.

blackcat23
Aug 17, 2012, 10:08 PM
Some pictures I took today of the Vermont/Wilshire towers site. Coming along nicely.

http://i.imgur.com/Jzl0U.jpg?1

http://i.imgur.com/lMnkM.jpg?1

Mojeda101
Aug 17, 2012, 10:42 PM
Some pictures I took today of the Vermont/Wilshire towers site. Coming along nicely.



Nice pictures! I still wish it had a live feed camera.

pesto
Aug 18, 2012, 3:16 PM
I notice that Mar Vista has joined Holmby Hills in wanting to leave the city of LA over potholes. I have mentioned the low quality of LA street repairs for some time (easily the worst I've seen in the first world) and I guess this reaffirms it.

I wouldn't be surprised if other districts look to leave, since no part of the city is in good shape and a failure of local services is the sign of a seriously mis-managed city.

blackcat23
Aug 18, 2012, 4:04 PM
I notice that Mar Vista has joined Holmby Hills in wanting to leave the city of LA over potholes. I have mentioned the low quality of LA street repairs for some time (easily the worst I've seen in the first world) and I guess this reaffirms it.

I wouldn't be surprised if other districts look to leave, since no part of the city is in good shape and a failure of local services is the sign of a seriously mis-managed city.


Mar Vista probably has a 0% chance of Culver City taking them on. The irony of course being that Culver City is the main culprit behind the added street traffic and road damage in Mar Vista.

It's not like parts of the city looking to secede is something that's a recent development. The valley talks about doing it every few years.

pesto
Aug 19, 2012, 4:38 PM
Mar Vista probably has a 0% chance of Culver City taking them on. The irony of course being that Culver City is the main culprit behind the added street traffic and road damage in Mar Vista.

It's not like parts of the city looking to secede is something that's a recent development. The valley talks about doing it every few years.

My concern is not about actually seceding: if that were possible, the Valley, Hollywood, the westside, San Pedro and a dozen other communities would be long gone.

The problem is that visitors and current residents see that the city is falling apart while the mayor and city council are doing God knows what. The BASICS aren't even getting done right: schools, roads, sidewalks, business development, etc., are total failures. And these are things that a visitor notices immediately; it's hard to miss potholes, broken sidewalks, for lease signs, etc.

Illithid Dude
Aug 27, 2012, 12:48 AM
Drove down sunset today. The Old Spaghetti Factory tower is definitely under construction. Lots of movement - heavy equipment, piles of dirt, digging. Across the street, Emerson is above street level (though barely), and just down the road, Blvd. 6200 is going strong. Hollywood is looking great.
Also, they recently put up a sign for the bellow building, with the words 'coming soon'. I think this would be L.A.s first office tower in a decade.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3374/3493346144_f27a8f309b_o.jpg

Any any word on the digging at 1000 Santa Monica?

Quixote
Aug 27, 2012, 2:15 AM
^ Where is that?

blackcat23
Aug 27, 2012, 2:36 AM
Also, they recently put up a sign for the bellow building, with the words 'coming soon'. I think this would be L.A.s first office tower in a decade.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3374/3493346144_f27a8f309b_o.jpg

I've seen pictures of this floating around, but never realized that it was being built in West LA.

Kind of monolithic, given the location. 230' is way taller than any other building in the immediate area. Also looks like a five year old scribbled over it with crayons. Still, it would be nice to see a decent sized office building go up, especially one that's adjacent to the Expo line.

Illithid Dude
Aug 27, 2012, 2:38 AM
^ Where is that?

In Culver City, next to the Expo Line.

LosAngelesSportsFan
Aug 27, 2012, 2:44 AM
Drove down sunset today. The Old Spaghetti Factory tower is definitely under construction. Lots of movement - heavy equipment, piles of dirt, digging. Across the street, Emerson is above street level (though barely), and just down the road, Blvd. 6200 is going strong. Hollywood is looking great.
Also, they recently put up a sign for the bellow building, with the words 'coming soon'. I think this would be L.A.s first office tower in a decade.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3374/3493346144_f27a8f309b_o.jpg

Any any word on the digging at 1000 Santa Monica?

nice update Illithid Dude! Ive been meaning to get to Hollywood these last few days to check these projects out.

Any news on the office building on Vine across from the Trader Joes?