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Biff
Dec 19, 2007, 7:11 PM
Maybe we can start posting issues relating to Winnipeg in here instead of filling up the construction threads with non construction news.

I will start it off with some good population news:

Manitoba News Release
............................................................

December 18, 2007


2007 A RECORD YEAR
FOR MANITOBA: RONDEAU
- - -
Province Shows Strongest Population Growth In Nearly A Quarter Century

Competitiveness, Training and Trade Minister Jim Rondeau welcomed Statistics Canada information released today showing strong population growth for Manitoba and reflected on the impressive year of economic, job and labour-force growth.

"Manitoba had a banner year in 2007 with record growth in many sectors of the economy," said Rondeau. "This is the largest population increase in nearly 25 years, the economy continues to flourish and there are outstanding employment opportunities for young people in the province."

Statistics Canada figures released today show:

- The population of Manitoba rose by nearly 11,471 people from October 2006 to October 2007. Not since 1983 has Manitoba observed such a strong year-over-year rise in population.

- The population increase of one per cent matches growth at the national level and is fourth best among the provinces.

- Net in-migration to Manitoba totalled 2,587 people in the third quarter and is the best showing in at least 35 years.

- The last 12-month period represented the best net inflow ever to Manitoba; 7,571 more individuals came to Manitoba than left. The previous net inflow record was 5,204 in 1982. With this information, Manitoba has now recorded five years of positive net migration out of the last six.

- Manitoba welcomed over 10,800 international immigrants over the last 12 months.


Net interprovincial migration levels have also improved, the minister noted. Manitoba recorded a net outflow of 65 people to other Canadian jurisdictions in the third quarter and had a positive net inflow of 153 people from Alberta, the minister said.

"The province's population growth continues to break records," said Rondeau. "Whether it's over the last quarter or the last 12 months, population growth in Manitoba continues to gain momentum."

Today's information is a further reflection of the healthy Manitoba economy in 2007, the minister added. Other recent economic results show:

- Manitoba's labour force increased by 2.5 per cent and ranked fourth highest in Canada;

- the unemployment rate was at 4.2 per cent, third highest in Canada;

- real GDP was at 2.9 per cent, ahead of Canada's 2.6 per cent growth;

- total exports increased by 12.9 per cent, second highest in the country;

- capital investment was up 11.3 per cent, ahead of Canada's 4.6 per cent;

- construction work increased by 13.7 per cent, well above Canada's 4.7 per cent;

- average weekly earnings increased four per cent, third highest in Canada; and

- labour productivity increased 2.2 per cent, the highest in the country.


Manitoba performance charts are available at www.gov.mb.ca/mbs/index.html.

rgalston
Dec 19, 2007, 10:29 PM
This thread is a good idea.

Here is a story that I found while thumbing through the latest issue of The Walrus, the "cities issue".

Just the Thing
Canada Noir: Weaselly... in Winnipeg!
by David Bergen

That spring I took boxing lessons at the Pan Am on McDermot from Trevor, a preacher’s son who had forearms like thick ropes. After an hour of sparring and skipping and all-out thuggery, we’d go over to the King’s Head for a beer and then back to my one-room apartment for sex. In a small planter on my windowsill, I was growing primroses, and Trevor liked to bend toward a flower and smell deeply. Sometimes, before we went out, he’d shave his legs, put on a red dress, a blond wig, and high heels, and then we’d crawl over to a club on Main. He had a stunning body, and it was difficult to keep my hands off his throat. Going home later, full of liquor and lust, I’d ask him to walk ahead of me.

During the heat wave in June, the city fell apart. A man was knifed in the parking lot next to the Bate, and in the morning there were the remains of a chalk outline and a pool of water where someone had washed away the blood. Cyclists were attacked by police. An arsonist burned down the central library; it went up in a huge ball of red, and the sky for miles was lit by pink smoke and fluttering half-burned pages. If it hadn’t been so sad, it would have been just the thing. I picked up a charred book from the gutter. It was by someone called Bolaño, and one sentence stuck with me: “Tomorrow we’ll leave, tomorrow we’ll go back to Mexico City, thinks B joyfully.” Unfortunately, the ending was missing.

One night Trevor was involved in a brawl with fourteen men. After, he made his way along the paths near Waterfront Drive, through the city’s smoky haze to my place. I bathed his bloody hands. I was tender with him that night, bandaging his cuts, washing gravel from his knee, working my way over his naked body. I told him the story of Gauguin, who left his family and ran off to Tahiti. The sunsets, the burnished skin, the ardour. I told him that I loved him and that I would be willing to pack up and go somewhere else. He sat there for a long time, holding a cigarette, looking out at the blue night. Sirens sounded. Someone cried out.

He began to avoid me. He stopped coming to the boxing club. I’d call him and he’d say that he was occupied, as if he were a toilet on an airplane. I saw him with a large girl, both of them swinging down Main. He was wearing jeans and a white T-shirt, she had her big head on his shoulder, and he appeared to be very fond of her breasts. I followed them down Bannatyne to the river, and then they disappeared into a fog that never ever occurs in Winnipeg, but it did that night.

Time passed. I spent evenings at the boxing club, building my repertoire, and then ascended to the streets where I picked fights with lawyers, recovered alcoholics, and groups of brutish young men who were overwhelmed by my rage. I never lost. I was honing myself for some future battle.

One Saturday evening, wandering down Smith Street, I passed by the Meeting Place, a church frequented by those with big emotions. Trevor stepped out with a blond. She had cleavage and she had legs. She was tanned, too tanned, almost leathery. I said Trevor’s name and he turned, showing no surprise. I motioned at the girl.

“Say hi to Trish,” he said.

“My name’s not Trish,” she said.

“You friends with Jesus again?” I asked, reaching for Trevor’s arm, that great cord of muscle.

Trevor wasn’t interested. I could see his nostrils, two little dark holes like targets. I didn’t stand a chance and, knowing this, I wanted him. I had this grand notion that in humiliating me, he would also pity me.I stood eye to eye with him, aware of his long neck.

“Aww,” he said, and swung. I leaned back, and his fist blew past me in a rush of air.

Someone cried out, “Please. Please. Will you please stop this.”

Trevor showed me his beautiful teeth. I jabbed at them, missed, and caught his right ear. He looked surprised and in pain, as if he’d suddenly realized that I could hate him.

“In my room. I’d like to show you,” I said. “I’ve got this flower.”

Tomorrow we’ll leave, tomorrow we’ll go somewhere else, I thought joyfully.

And then the fight began.

1ajs
Dec 19, 2007, 10:59 PM
a lybrary burnt to the ground this summer?

newflyer
Dec 20, 2007, 2:13 AM
I guess using Sask formers logic Manitoba is the greatest place on earth. :rolleyes:

With the economy humming along.. and taxes declining I am happy to see things picking up. Confidence is Manitoba is gaining steam... and Winnipeg gains from Manitoba's growth.

While Manitoba gains from Winnipeg's growing economy... its all good.

trueviking
Dec 20, 2007, 5:49 AM
with a provincial population growth of almost 12 000 this year, you have to figure that winnipeg will grow by 8 or 9 thousand.

that means we are back over the 700 000 mark after losing 15 000 in the 2006 census....should be enough to keep us ahead of hamilton who were 4000 behind us and also catch up a bit on quebec who were 18 000 ahead...both grow between 5 and 6 000 per year.

trueviking
Dec 20, 2007, 6:06 AM
a lybrary burnt to the ground this summer?

ironyc

1ajs
Dec 20, 2007, 7:29 AM
lol

wags_in_the_peg
Dec 20, 2007, 1:58 PM
East-side power line supported in new report
Province risks international uproar over boreal forest
Thu Dec 20 2007

By Mary Agnes Welch

THERE are good reasons to build a massive new power line down the east side of Manitoba instead of the west side but the province risks turning the boreal forest into an international "cause celebre" if it does, according to a new report released Wednesday night.

The NDP government and the Tory opposition faced off again yesterday evening at a Crown corporations committee meeting -- normally mundane gatherings that have taken on new life thanks to the power-line debate.

On the table between the cabinet ministers, opposition critics and MLAs was a new study done by CMC Consultants that recapped many of the east-versus-west arguments that have dominated the legislature for the last several months.

The NDP government has decreed that a third power line connecting northern dams to southern customers should be built down the west side of Lake Manitoba rather than the east side of Lake Winnipeg. That's despite the fact that the west-side route is "the longest, most expensive and least useful in an emergency operation," according to the consultants.

The NDP favours the western route because it wants to preserve the boreal forest on the east side. The government is making a bid to turn that forest into a UNESCO world heritage site.

The consultants' report, which makes no firm recommendations, said building a power line down the east side wouldn't necessarily kill the province's bid for a UNESCO site. And it highlighted some similar environmental issues on the west side that no one has studied properly yet, like a forest reserve near the Saskatchewan River.

It also noted that First Nations opposition to a line down the east side may be wavering -- something the Tories have been arguing for months.

Premier Gary Doer has said repeatedly that his 2004 consultations with the dozen-or-so bands on the east side revealed deep opposition to the line. But the consultants said that view is far from unanimous and they noted that some First Nations appear willing to discuss a line if it comes with economic opportunities.

Also at issue is the lobbying heft of international environmental groups and whether they would make the preservation of the forest the focus of a well-funded global campaign. That's Doer's fear, and the consultants said it's a genuine possibility, especially if First Nations are unanimous and are allied with environmental groups.

But Tory Leader Hugh McFadyen said he's not convinced a global outcry is a foregone conclusion, especially if the pros and cons on each option are laid out clearly for the public. And he said he listens more to people who live in the boreal forest, like aboriginal groups, than he does to Cape Cod environmentalists, a shot at activist Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who has demanded the forest's preservation.

maryagnes.welch@freepress.mb.ca

Biff
Dec 20, 2007, 3:04 PM
with a provincial population growth of almost 12 000 this year, you have to figure that winnipeg will grow by 8 or 9 thousand.

that means we are back over the 700 000 mark after losing 15 000 in the 2006 census....should be enough to keep us ahead of hamilton who were 4000 behind us and also catch up a bit on quebec who were 18 000 ahead...both grow between 5 and 6 000 per year.


I thought i read that Winnipeg grew by approx 7,900 (Oct 06 to Oct 07). I will try to find this stat somewhere. It was connected to the new Stats Can data.

Biff
Dec 20, 2007, 3:14 PM
Manitoba's population increase largest in years
Thu Dec 20 2007

By Marie-Jo Proulx

FEWER people are deserting Manitoba, according to a Statistics Canada report released Wednesday.

In the last year, a total of 7,571 more people were added to Manitoba's population, the largest increase since 1982.

Wilf Falk, of the Manitoba Bureau of Statistics, credited the trend to the high cost of living in Alberta, still the first destination for those who do leave Manitoba.

Falk pointed to the strong economy in Manitoba as a reason many workers may decide to stay or to return. Housing, manufacturing and exports are all up from last year and the province's workforce is growing. Manitoba has improved its labour productivity by 2.2 per cent, or double the national average increase.

Bob Dolyniuk, general manager of the Manitoba Trucking Association, said he would not be surprised to see an influx of workers from Ontario. "With the downturn in the auto industry, I think there's a likelihood people will come back."

The trend may have already started, as 184 people came to Manitoba from Ontario in the last year.

Retired theatre manager Gord Jackson is one of them. Having lived and worked in Hamilton most of his life, he moved to Winnipeg in the fall to enjoy his retirement. "I love the winter here," he said, noting he also appreciates the lower levels of air pollution.

In line with historical trends, Quebec continues to contribute more residents to Manitoba than it welcomes. A total of 230 made that trip west last year.

Isaac Gelin and Diergeline Desjardins left their French-speaking province in search of a place where they could make daily use of their native tongue. They moved to Winnipeg in September.

"The city is not very modern, and it's quite smaller," Gelin said, "but people are a lot friendlier than in Montreal."

He and his wife hope to remain here after they finish their studies. Gelin is in medical school at the University of Manitoba. Desjardins, who was a nurse in Montreal, is now completing equivalencies at the Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface so she can work as a nurse here.

marie-jo.proulx@freepress.mb.ca


The breakdown


Manitoba population and economic figures for the last year:


* Total population increase: 11,471

* Net inter-provincial inflow: 7,571

* Last net inter-provincial inflow: 1,378 (1983)

* Labour productivity increase: 2.2 per cent (first in Canada)

* Total exports: 12.9 per cent increase (second in Canada)

* Unemployment rate: 4.2 per cent

* Corporate bankruptcies: 33 per cent decrease

harls
Dec 20, 2007, 4:28 PM
"The city is not very modern, and it's quite smaller," Gelin said, "but people are a lot friendlier than in Montreal."


Hilarious.. I'm showing this to my wife (a montrealer who has visited Winnipeg a few times now). I think she was impressed with the indoor plumbing and cable tv at my brother's place in St-Vital.. maybe M. Gelin hasn't got his electricity hooked up yet.



He and his wife hope to remain here after they finish their studies. Gelin is in medical school at the University of Manitoba. Desjardins, who was a nurse in Montreal, is now completing equivalencies at the Collège universitaire de Saint-Boniface so she can work as a nurse here.



That's bull.. my wife's a nurse in Quebec and they said all she has to do is pass an exam in order to work in Manitoba, you just need to show your diploma and write the CRNE (Cdn Registered Nurses Exam). Only in Ontario do you require a bachelor's degree. Unless 'completing equivalencies' means 'writing an exam', she's gettting screwed.

Andy6
Dec 21, 2007, 12:47 AM
Hilarious.. I'm showing this to my wife (a montrealer who has visited Winnipeg a few times now). I think she was impressed with the indoor plumbing and cable tv at my brother's place in St-Vital.. .

Really? Which part of St. Vital got indoor plumbing? Was it one of those federal programs?

1ajs
Dec 21, 2007, 11:07 PM
aqua books is moving to garry st

http://www.aquabooks.ca/images/274.jpg


Aqua Books Announces New Location for Expanded Store and Bistro


The wait is over.
As the Winnipeg Free Press reported on December 5, 2007, Aqua Books has a new location.
And here it is:
After a search of many months, we are pleased to announce that Aqua Books has a deal finalized on our new location. Beginning in March 2008, Aqua Books will be located at 274 Garry Street between Portage and Graham, just a few blocks from our current space. (We will be open here until then.) This 8400 square foot, two-storey building is an undeclared gem in the heart of downtown, currently occupied by Kam Kong Restaurant (which has been in abatement for some time). Aqua Books will be joined by (what will certainly be) Downtown Winnipeg's hottest new eatery, (the aptly named) EAT! bistro. Chef Candace Hughes will use her varied experience from Fusion Grill, Bergmann's on Lombard, and De Luca's Cooking School to create some of the most inspired food in town. (More details on EAT! in the coming weeks. I can't spill everything at once, can I?)
In addition to the addition of EAT! bistro, Aqua Books will be doubling its shelf space to accommodate up to 40,000 books (more than McNally has in their lame-duck Portage Place store, and more than the 25,000 that Morley Walker stated in the Freep). The bookstore and the bistro will be located on the exciting (and of course, wheelchair-accessible) main floor. What's on the second floor Kelly? Glad you asked. The 4200 square foot second floor will contain a 1200 square foot events room (almost the size of our entire store on Princess). ideaExchange, Free Your Mind, and the Stone Soup Storytellers will be joined by several new series, including the Aqua Books Lansdowne Prize for Poetry Reading Series. (Say that five times fast. Make it rhyme too and you're a slam poet.) We have already hired an events coordinator to organize all the exciting events that will be happening at this happening venue. (The use for the rest of the second floor will be announced later.)
274 Garry Street is within 300 metres of MTS Centre, the Radisson, the Post Office, the Millennium Library, CityPlace, Winnipeg Square, the Walker Theatre, the Fairmont Hotel, and Winnipeg's Financial Core, Portage and Main. (Don't dismay that we've moved a little closer to the Financial Core. In order to keep your books affordable, we're going to have to put the screws to some Suits for their lunch money.) We're just outside of The Exchange, but still only four blocks from Old Market Square.
Indeed, there is something for everyone here. Location is central, and surrounding surface parking is abundant. For people that can't figure out downtown parking, we have five parking spots. For people that hate cars, there will be a proper bike rack. For people that hate books, there will be food. For people that hate food, there will be coffee. For people that hate me....well, they can bloody well stay home.
The People wanted us to stay downtown, and we, as always, listened to The People. With McNally Robinson's retreat from the downtown happening at the beginning of April, Aqua/EAT! will be uniquely situated to fill that void (and then some, if I may say so). The last time we moved, the bill was about $10,000. This time, the price tag will be pushing half a million dollars after renos. This time, I decided to put my (bank's) money where my mouth is. My goal is to turn Aqua Books into Winnipeg's Cultural City Hall. (And I'm Mayor McCheese.) Or think of us as the P-trap for the Brain Drain.
So, stay tuned to AquaBooks.ca and This Week at Aqua Books for further developments, including the menu for EAT!, our new hours, details on our Writer-in-Residence program, and the Renovation Vidlog (http://www.aquabooks.ca/video.php). (The Renovation Vidlog will be weekly video of me yelling at contractors, tearing out walls, buying drywall screws at Pollock Hardware, and nearly being crushed by Civic Bureaucracy, only to rise triumphant in the end. Gripping stuff.)

j.online
Dec 21, 2007, 11:42 PM
aqua books is moving to garry st

Congrats to Aqua! This'll be great for downtown. Plus, how can anyone hate a project that takes a shot at Nygard like Kelly did in the rendering

1ajs
Dec 21, 2007, 11:58 PM
Congrats to Aqua! This'll be great for downtown. Plus, how can anyone hate a project that takes a shot at Nygard like Kelly did in the rendering
lol they are moving from princess st btw

The Jabroni
Dec 22, 2007, 8:51 AM
^I love that pic lol! Very enthusiastic! :tup:

dennis
Dec 22, 2007, 4:52 PM
What store will be replacing McNally Robinson at Portage Place? A spokesperson from PP said that it was to be another bookstore (on Global news). Any news?

newflyer
Dec 22, 2007, 8:44 PM
with a provincial population growth of almost 12 000 this year, you have to figure that winnipeg will grow by 8 or 9 thousand.

that means we are back over the 700 000 mark after losing 15 000 in the 2006 census....should be enough to keep us ahead of hamilton who were 4000 behind us and also catch up a bit on quebec who were 18 000 ahead...both grow between 5 and 6 000 per year.


Q2 (as of June) Stats Canada lists Winnipeg(CMA) at 706,700.

Winnipeg Capital Region is over 750,000.

I am not as fluient with the other cities you mention, but I am feeling pretty good about Winnipeg's growth these days.

spiritedenergy
Dec 22, 2007, 10:06 PM
aqua books is moving to garry st

http://www.aquabooks.ca/images/274.jpg


Aqua Books Announces New Location for Expanded Store and Bistro


The wait is over.
As the Winnipeg Free Press reported on December 5, 2007, Aqua Books has a new location.
And here it is:
After a search of many months, we are pleased to announce that Aqua Books has a deal finalized on our new location. Beginning in March 2008, Aqua Books will be located at 274 Garry Street between Portage and Graham, just a few blocks from our current space. (We will be open here until then.) This 8400 square foot, two-storey building is an undeclared gem in the heart of downtown, currently occupied by Kam Kong Restaurant (which has been in abatement for some time). Aqua Books will be joined by (what will certainly be) Downtown Winnipeg's hottest new eatery, (the aptly named) EAT! bistro. Chef Candace Hughes will use her varied experience from Fusion Grill, Bergmann's on Lombard, and De Luca's Cooking School to create some of the most inspired food in town. (More details on EAT! in the coming weeks. I can't spill everything at once, can I?)
In addition to the addition of EAT! bistro, Aqua Books will be doubling its shelf space to accommodate up to 40,000 books (more than McNally has in their lame-duck Portage Place store, and more than the 25,000 that Morley Walker stated in the Freep). The bookstore and the bistro will be located on the exciting (and of course, wheelchair-accessible) main floor. What's on the second floor Kelly? Glad you asked. The 4200 square foot second floor will contain a 1200 square foot events room (almost the size of our entire store on Princess). ideaExchange, Free Your Mind, and the Stone Soup Storytellers will be joined by several new series, including the Aqua Books Lansdowne Prize for Poetry Reading Series. (Say that five times fast. Make it rhyme too and you're a slam poet.) We have already hired an events coordinator to organize all the exciting events that will be happening at this happening venue. (The use for the rest of the second floor will be announced later.)
274 Garry Street is within 300 metres of MTS Centre, the Radisson, the Post Office, the Millennium Library, CityPlace, Winnipeg Square, the Walker Theatre, the Fairmont Hotel, and Winnipeg's Financial Core, Portage and Main. (Don't dismay that we've moved a little closer to the Financial Core. In order to keep your books affordable, we're going to have to put the screws to some Suits for their lunch money.) We're just outside of The Exchange, but still only four blocks from Old Market Square.
Indeed, there is something for everyone here. Location is central, and surrounding surface parking is abundant. For people that can't figure out downtown parking, we have five parking spots. For people that hate cars, there will be a proper bike rack. For people that hate books, there will be food. For people that hate food, there will be coffee. For people that hate me....well, they can bloody well stay home.
The People wanted us to stay downtown, and we, as always, listened to The People. With McNally Robinson's retreat from the downtown happening at the beginning of April, Aqua/EAT! will be uniquely situated to fill that void (and then some, if I may say so). The last time we moved, the bill was about $10,000. This time, the price tag will be pushing half a million dollars after renos. This time, I decided to put my (bank's) money where my mouth is. My goal is to turn Aqua Books into Winnipeg's Cultural City Hall. (And I'm Mayor McCheese.) Or think of us as the P-trap for the Brain Drain.
So, stay tuned to AquaBooks.ca and This Week at Aqua Books for further developments, including the menu for EAT!, our new hours, details on our Writer-in-Residence program, and the Renovation Vidlog (http://www.aquabooks.ca/video.php). (The Renovation Vidlog will be weekly video of me yelling at contractors, tearing out walls, buying drywall screws at Pollock Hardware, and nearly being crushed by Civic Bureaucracy, only to rise triumphant in the end. Gripping stuff.)

hahahha funny guy. The building is not a gem btw, it's an eyesore IMHO.

dennis
Dec 23, 2007, 12:11 AM
I disagree with you that it is an eyesore. It isn't a gem in my opinion, but just the brick, the simple limestone work, large windows and the building footing the sidewalk give a little added beauty to the area. This store will only add to an already bleak area. At least that is what I see.

1ajs
Dec 23, 2007, 12:17 AM
hahahha funny guy. The building is not a gem btw, it's an eyesore IMHO.

not an eye sore anymore since its going to be ocupided

1ajs
Dec 23, 2007, 1:10 AM
destination winnipeg has sent a request to dan harper for 60 images (newflyer i know you will like this)

www.danharperphotography.com (http://www.danharperphotography.com)
http://www.danharperphotography.com/photos/why/hasselblad_review/images/A%202214.jpg

1ajs
Dec 23, 2007, 2:27 AM
anyone know what building in the exchange this was in? some time in the 70s from the trubne colection...
http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f196/bubbermiley/OldMarketSquareIncludingTownsite6.jpg

Andy6
Dec 23, 2007, 3:34 AM
Is it the inside of Townsite, which was a sort of mall that was located in the Travellers Building for a couple of years? I don't think I was ever there but it was sort of an early version of the Forks. I'm not sure, though.

trueviking
Dec 23, 2007, 3:42 AM
Q2 (as of June) Stats Canada lists Winnipeg(CMA) at 706,700.


wow...that means winnipeg grew by 11 000 in one year....considering we grew by only 18 000 in the 5 years previous combined, that could be considered substantial.

spiritedenergy (ironic handle)...you and lee haber are like twin brother cranky pants....

1ajs
Dec 23, 2007, 3:58 AM
Is it the inside of Townsite, which was a sort of mall that was located in the Travellers Building for a couple of years? I don't think I was ever there but it was sort of an early version of the Forks. I'm not sure, though.
no idea some one on newwinnipeg was asking about it lol

biguc
Dec 23, 2007, 5:14 AM
wow...that means winnipeg grew by 11 000 in one year....considering we grew by only 18 000 in the 5 years previous combined, that could be considered substantial.

spiritedenergy (ironic handle)...you and lee haber are like twin brother cranky pants....

Something like this happened a few years ago. Winnipeg apparently grew by something like 12000 in one year. Turns out it was just stats can correcting for an undercount in the census. This might be something similar.

trueviking
Dec 23, 2007, 6:34 AM
it does seem a bit much, but with the actual census happening only a year ago and with all the supporting evidence that has been presented, including the inter-provincial migration numbers and the immigration totals it could be plausible....if manitoba grew by 12 000, you would expect 8-9 000 would be to winnipeg and another couple of thousand could come from birth rate and migration from within manitoba.

either way it is good news that we are finally growing more than the customary .01% of a decade ago.

1ajs
Dec 29, 2007, 12:04 AM
lol
kb2nY_jedNU

LilZebra
Dec 29, 2007, 3:43 AM
I guess using Sask formers logic Manitoba is the greatest place on earth. :rolleyes:

With the economy humming along.. and taxes declining I am happy to see things picking up. Confidence is Manitoba is gaining steam... and Winnipeg gains from Manitoba's growth.

While Manitoba gains from Winnipeg's growing economy... its all good.

Maybe the Gouge & Screw Tax is going down a percentage come Jan. 1, 2008, but my CPP Premium and the Minimum Wage will take what savings I had. :koko:

newflyer
Dec 29, 2007, 5:54 AM
destination winnipeg has sent a request to dan harper for 60 images (newflyer i know you will like this)

www.danharperphotography.com (http://www.danharperphotography.com)
http://www.danharperphotography.com/photos/why/hasselblad_review/images/A%202214.jpg

Oh yeah .. he is an amazing photographer!! :tup:

Lets hope Destination Winnipeg website gets a big upgrade.

Donovanf
Jan 2, 2008, 1:36 PM
'I think this city is moving forward'

Wed Jan 2 2008

by Chris Webb and Tania Kohut

Zach Regiec, Red River College student

I'm always optimistic about our city because without hope there is not really much else. Hope keeps you focused. Things are improving. I just wish the politicians, thinkers, academics, and the well-to-do's could get their acts together and help out the less fortunate at a way quicker pace.

I drove down Main Street by Higgins the other day and realized I have been making that drive for over 20 years and the cycle of poverty there is still atrocious.

Roland Landry, Lorette grain farmer

2007 was not really a great year, and our yields were really low because of rains early in the season. The grain prices are pretty great right now but, with input costs like fuel and chemicals going up, it's becoming more difficult.

Farmers are optimistic for 2008 because the demand for ethanol fuel is also pushing up the demand for grain. For all the talk of grain prices being so high, the most a Canadian farmer can make is $6 per bushel for wheat, so people shouldn't be blaming farmers for rising food prices because it's not their fault.

Sean Garrity, Winnipeg filmmaker

I'm optimistic that with the rising dollar that offshore production might let off a little here in Winnipeg and business and government will start investing in their own indigenous filmmakers.

On the city side, I'm pretty pessimistic about what Sam Katz is doing at city hall. I think his policies are reactionary and serve his upper middle class constituents in their fat SUVs, which is very unfortunate given that the previous administration had fairly progressive policies.

Coun. Jenny Gerbasi, Fort Rouge

I'm optimistic that Winnipeg has great potential as a city. I'm also pessimistic because this potential could be more actively cultivated, but mostly I'm realistic that we need to keep working hard to make this city better in 2008.

Ron Paley, jazz musician

I was born in Winnipeg in 1950, and I think this city is moving forward very positively and progressively. Jazz is definitely growing here in Winnipeg and it's thanks to a lot of people. Steve Kirby at the University of Manitoba deserves a lot of thanks, and at the high school level there are a lot of kids getting involved, and that spreads throughout the city and it inspires other kids to play.

David Jacks, U of W Students'Association president

The biggest thing that's going to affect students happens on Jan. 1, and that's transit fees going up by 25 cents. To students who rely on transit to get to school it's a big deal.

One other thing that I noticed in 2007 is the focus on downtown development has taken money away from the North End and West End. When young people come to Winnipeg, they say that it's cold and there's poverty, and that needs to change. Maybe the city should stop focusing on business tax cuts and then it wouldn't have to raise transit fees.

Jim Sanders, documentary filmmaker

In 2007 I have been working on a documentary film about aboriginal housing issues that showed me how profound social and economic inequalities and injustices are the foundation of our city. Unfortunately, the powers that be that run our city, have too much self-interest in maintaining their status and monopoly over resources and wealth.

The good news is that this is all coming to an end. One thing that I have learned from the various indigenous elders that I work with here in Manitoba, as well as in the Amazon, is that we are entering period where consciousness is shifting towards one of harmony and balance. This is all part of the known cycles of nature and the cosmos that many indigenous people are very aware of. So we are in the final years in which those driven by ego and greed will lose what was never theirs to begin with, and those that have remained humble and heart-driven will inherit a renewed Earth.
Why this is special for Winnipeg, is that our hometown just happens to be the site of the world's most ancient sacred gathering site and a place where many indigenous people prophesy will become the location for the renewal of a new global civilization built around peace.

Rachel Gotthilf, U of M student and former UMSU vice-president

I'm really disappointed in the way the city was run in 2007 and I'm even more worried about the direction it's heading in 2008. What Winnipeg really needs for students and residents is affordable transit system, and I really hope rapid transit is put back on the table in 2008. And if this city wants to keep students and young people around it really needs to invest in entertainment and the arts.

David Northcott, executive director, Winnipeg Harvest

2007 has been a difficult year for us and we see the economic difficulties that people face every day such as child poverty levels still being very high, but we have a sense of optimism for the new year.
Personally, I think we need to be on a municipal couch and examine our city's problems. We're a city of great promise with heroes who are never seen nor their stories ever told, we need to get over our sense of inferiority and embrace our city. It's a fascinating place with a lively arts community and it has great potential, so I think Winnipeggers should absolutely look at their city favourably in 2008. It's still fairly affordable to live and it's a great place to keep in touch with friends and family.

Jerry Shore, concert and event promoter

From the point of view of someone who deals in American dollars, the exchange rate has made it very favourable for us, anyone involved in the entertainment business in Canada.

With that soft American dollar, from the point of view of Canadians, 2008's going to be pretty good.

Mike Law, president, Manitoba Bar Association

I'm optimistic that the government will properly fund legal aid in 2008. What legal aid pays in Manitoba is the lowest in all of the country, it's just pathetic how little they pay and that is why so few lawyers take legal aid cases, that's why there's a big crisis. I'm hopeful the government will properly fund it so it's no longer an issue.

David Trach, lead singer, Mr. Boom

It's going to be a great year. Winnipeg's local scene is one of the best in Canada. Go support live local music, we have a lot a lot of original bands that are going to hit the big time soon. See them while you can, before they make it big.

Joanne Loughery, president, A Port in the Storm Inc.

This is going to be a very big year for us. We're heading into a provincial capital fundraising campaign. We are very excited about the generosity and volunteerism of Manitoba people for important causes such as ours. I guess I'm feeling very optimistic that 2008 will be a very successful and exciting year.

Only The Lonely..
Jan 2, 2008, 8:39 PM
:previous:

So did they talk to every Pinko in the city?

rgalston
Jan 2, 2008, 9:08 PM
:previous:

So did they talk to every Pinko in the city?

Yearh really.


Winnipeggers' sunny side up
They're upbeat about city's future and their own finances, poll finds
Wed Jan 2 2008

By Larry Kusch


Winnipeg Free Press Photo
The city's superheated housing market could explain a lot of the optimism.
NEARLY 80 per cent of Winnipeggers are optimistic about the economic future of their city, and 85 per cent of Manitobans feel they're doing as well or better financially than they were a year ago, according to a Free Press/Jory Capital year-end poll.

Despite the prospect of a 2008 recession in the United States, which might have spillover effects for Canada, Manitobans believe they will be better off -- rather than worse off -- this time next year, the survey by Probe Research Inc. shows.
Patrick Cooney, chairman and CEO of Jory Capital Inc., said rising real estate prices are likely a big factor behind Winnipeggers' optimism.

"That's got to be 90 per cent of it," he said in an interview Monday.

Seventy-nine per cent of Winnipeggers surveyed late last year expressed optimism about the future of the city's economy, including 34 per cent who said they were "very optimistic."

That's up seven percentage points from March, when 72 per cent of city residents said they were optimistic about the city's economic future.
Jory and Probe have tracked these numbers quarterly for more than a decade, and they've seldom been higher. In December 2004, 82 per cent of city residents said they were optimistic about the city's future.

Scott MacKay, Probe's president, said that along with the buoyant housing market, last year's run-up of the Canadian dollar may also have been a factor in Winnipeggers' high confidence levels.

He noted that optimism among city residents rose steadily throughout the year as the loonie climbed to unprecedented heights against the U.S. greenback.

Thirty-five per cent of Manitobans surveyed late last year said they were better off than they were a year earlier, while 50 per cent said their financial position hadn't changed and 14 per cent said they were worse off.

"That's very consistent with the story on the optimism about the city's future," MacKay said, adding that rising home values are likely driving this result as well.

Dave Angus, president of the Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce, said he's not surprised by the level of optimism Winnipeggers are feeling these days, which he ties to strong employment and a stable economy.

"We're seeing some substantial growth in different segments of our economy, so I think the overall perception locally is that we're on a very positive track."

Retail sales growth is also a benchmark of consumer confidence, Angus said, and "we've seen stellar retail growth over the last number of years, actually."

Manitobans, and particularly Winnipeggers, see the good economic times continuing over the next 12 months.
Thirty-seven per cent of Manitobans -- including 41 per cent of Winnipeggers -- said they thought they would be better off a year from now, while nine per cent felt they would be worse off and 50 per cent thought their household financial situation would remain the same as now.

Optimism about household finances over the next year was particularly high for Manitobans aged 18-34 (53 per cent), those with children in the home (47 per cent) and households earning $60,000 or more (44 per cent).

"Interestingly, core-area residents (55 per cent) were more likely than residents of other areas of Winnipeg to expect their households' finances to improve over the next 12 months," Jory and Probe said in a commentary accompanying the poll results.

larry.kusch@freepress.mb.ca

newflyer
Jan 3, 2008, 2:12 AM
Rachel Gotthilf, U of M student and former UMSU vice-president

I'm really disappointed in the way the city was run in 2007 and I'm even more worried about the direction it's heading in 2008. What Winnipeg really needs for students and residents is affordable transit system, and I really hope rapid transit is put back on the table in 2008. And if this city wants to keep students and young people around it really needs to invest in entertainment and the arts.

Notice no mention of building an economy which offers excellent employment oportunities. I guess Beavis plans to live in his mom's basement for life. :sly:


.. and as a welfare collector he plans on using his free bus pass.

newflyer
Jan 3, 2008, 2:24 AM
Sean Garrity, Winnipeg filmmaker

I'm optimistic that with the rising dollar that offshore production might let off a little here in Winnipeg and business and government will start investing in their own indigenous filmmakers.

On the city side, I'm pretty pessimistic about what Sam Katz is doing at city hall. I think his policies are reactionary and serve his upper middle class constituents in their fat SUVs, which is very unfortunate given that the previous administration had fairly progressive policies.

Sounds alot like a guy who has lived off government grants to make his films...

Its really pathetic such mindless drivel gets any such attention. Since nearly 80 percent of citizens are feeling positive about the city and its direction .. it is obvious that this unknowlegable government dependant is in the tiny minority... with the city's rapidly declining union loving anti-business community... Murray, Gerbasi and Vandal was your champions I'm sure.

Please follow the other uninspired losers out of town... there is no place for you in today's modern Winnipeg. The economy is picking up... and he hates seeing the masses pass him by like the dirt on the sidelines of life. :haha:

Only The Lonely..
Jan 3, 2008, 2:31 AM
For all the talk of Winnipeg's prosperity the city really doesn't seem all that different to me than it did in the 90's.

Lots of government funded projects be it the Airport, Hydro or the CMHR and little in the way of significant private investment / construction happening right now.

However, I am encouraged to see a few entrepreneur's out there with the balls to invest in North Main and put their money where everyone else has their mouth.

newflyer
Jan 3, 2008, 2:35 AM
For all the talk of Winnipeg's prosperity the city really doesn't seem all that different to me than it did in the 90's.

Lots of government funded projects be it the Airport, Hydro or the CMHR and little in the way of significant private investment / construction happening right now.

However, I am encouraged to see a few entrepreneur's out there with the balls to invest in North Main and put their money where everyone else has their mouth.

FYI .. new airport terminal and possible new airport hotel and airport business centre is 100% private money. No government funds.

In my optinion this is the greatest project happening in Winnipeg as we speak .. and if the new hotel and business centre come to pass it will be even greater.

Winnipeg's economy is definately picking up speed and things haven't looked this promising for a very long time. Yes there are still government projects masking the reality, but in this case the reality is a growing economy with growing business investment.

Only The Lonely..
Jan 3, 2008, 2:50 AM
FYI .. new airport terminal and possible new airport hotel and airport business centre is 100% private money. No government funds.

Ok fine, but nobody would ever confuse Winnipeg's prosperity for Calgary's.

Now this on the other hand is prosperity..


By 1870, 150 people were living in the neighbourhood of present day Portage and Main in about thirty houses; by 1880 a little over 4000 souls lived in the village that had already declared itself a city.

...

Attracted by the feverish real estate speculation attending the coming of the railroad , 13,000 people had crowded into the city by 1882.

...

[By 1912] the population tripled growing from 42,340 in 1901 to 136,035 in 1911. The city claimed the correct figure was actually 166,533, and this latter number is likely closer to the real population if the total includes the seasonal workers who lived in Winnipeg only in the winter and the residents of crowded tenements who were missed by the census takers.



The Winnipeg of 1912 was an overwhelmingly commercial city that extended its influence over the whole prairie region, becoming for a time the metropolis of the west. Commerce employed 15,000 people the single largest category reported in the census.

...

The sumptuous, new, western headquarters buildings built by the eastern banks were impressive proof of the importance of Winnipeg to these institutions.

...

One eastern bank, the Union bank, even moved its headquarters to Winnipeg from Quebec.

newflyer
Jan 3, 2008, 4:42 AM
I agree nothing compares to how Winnipeg was in the early 1900's. Calgary is no where close to that reality... even with its oil wealth.

I have read Winnipeg 1912 .. absolutely incredible how wealthy the city of Winnipeg was and how much respect it recieved as a city of importance.


Today we are still working at building the economy from decades of mismanagement.. but we are starting to see signs of economic confidence and growth, not seen for decades.

An economy can't be built over night, but over time momentum will grow, and as such we will see more significant levels of private investment increase.

fengshui
Jan 3, 2008, 5:32 PM
2008 will bring some major retail developments in several locations, including something long awaited... announcement late first quarter or second quarter

drew
Jan 3, 2008, 6:59 PM
^ oh please god no. Not another IKEA rumour...:yuck:

wags_in_the_peg
Jan 3, 2008, 7:39 PM
^ c'mon man, you know it's going to be more giant tigers

flatlander
Jan 3, 2008, 7:47 PM
^ oh please god no. Not another IKEA rumour...:yuck:

i'll do anything for discount hotdogs and swedish meatballs.

drew
Jan 3, 2008, 7:48 PM
^ and the $1 dollar breakfast that tastes like it's actually worth $1.

1ajs
Jan 3, 2008, 7:53 PM
2008 will bring some major retail developments in several locations, including something long awaited... announcement late first quarter or second quarter


what a future shop downtown?
or you mean something to do with cabelas?

Only The Lonely..
Jan 3, 2008, 11:38 PM
2008 will bring some major retail developments in several locations, including something long awaited... announcement late first quarter or second quarter

I'm guessing a supermarket (Sobeys?) downtown?

1ajs
Jan 4, 2008, 2:22 AM
I'm guessing a supermarket (Sobeys?) downtown?
but we already have one inless hes refering to this?
http://www.pointdouglas.com/plugins/p17_image_gallery/images/913.jpg

The Jabroni
Jan 4, 2008, 4:51 AM
My money is on the farmer's market. ;)

flatlander
Jan 4, 2008, 5:35 AM
that one aint' gonna happen, at least not in that location.

1ajs
Jan 4, 2008, 5:57 AM
that one aint' gonna happen, at least not in that location.
could always take the vulcan iron works building put a new roof on it with skylights and insulate it and put a market inside it...

theres even room on site for a parkade... for parking... and truck loading points.....


GOD DAMIT I WISH I HAD SOME MONEY :(

... loads up google earth and gimp.......
guna take this idea to the residents comity next week....

1ajs
Jan 4, 2008, 6:46 AM
http://www.pointdouglas.com/plugins/p17_image_gallery/images/1007.jpg

1ajs
Jan 4, 2008, 8:53 AM
http://img259.imageshack.us/img259/3986/portageandmain1963hw4.jpg
http://img259.imageshack.us/img259/8417/portageandmain1950sae1.jpg

http://img167.imageshack.us/img167/5648/buildingcollapsec064630ke2.jpg

main st underpas
http://img167.imageshack.us/img167/6071/cprhigginssubway1904c06qi8.jpg
http://img167.imageshack.us/img167/446/cprhigginssubway1904c06hv5.jpg
http://img167.imageshack.us/img167/6526/cprhigginssubway1904c06ul5.jpg
cpr foundation
http://img107.imageshack.us/img107/9774/cprstationbuilding1904cci6.jpg

1ajs
Jan 7, 2008, 10:25 AM
Final nail not yet in coffin
Customers hope to turn hardware store into co-op

By Avi Saper
Canstar News

Jan. 3, 2008



There’s new hope that a North End institution for 85 years may not need to close its doors.

A group of concerned residents and regular customers are looking into the possibility of turning Pollock Hardware into a co-operative, using a model similar to Red River Co-op gas stations.

The Main Street store has been for sale for more than a year, and is in the process of selling off its remaining inventory in a final clearance.

John Loxley, an economics professor at the University of Manitoba, is spearheading the effort to keep the store open. He said he has sat down and looked at the books with the owners, Lois and Wayne Cash, and is satisfied that the business is still viable.

The next step is to come up with a business plan. The likely plan would involve a fee for members that would give them the right to shop in the store. If the business is a success, members could receive profit-sharing payments.

“There’s quite a bit of interest from people. Now we need to figure out what we need to ask people to contribute,” said Loxley, who lives near the store and feels it’s an important institution in the community.

Several longtime customers said the personal and knowledgeable service of Pollock’s staff has kept them coming back for decades. Lois Cash said customers have told her the relatively small size of the store makes it much easier to get in and get out than big-box stores.

Louise Thiessen, another resident involved in the co-op effort, said it’s important to keep small businesses thriving in the area.

“The last thing we need is another business shuttered on Main Street,” she said.

Loxley has met with various financial institutions, financing agencies and economic development groups to determine how much the co-op might be able to borrow to pay for the business. The group is also looking into any tax credits it may be eligible for.

“We hope to very shortly call a meeting of people who might be interested once we know what the business plan might look like,” said Loxley.

“We need to know by January whether this thing is likely to come together.”

rgalston
Jan 7, 2008, 2:30 PM
I'm skeptical that they will be able to pull it off and save Pollock's, but if they do, I would be so happily sign up for membership.

Only The Lonely..
Jan 7, 2008, 11:26 PM
More Synchronized Traffic Lights
JAN 07 2008 02:10 PM


The city is moving forward this year on its plan to synchronize more traffic lights.

The Manager of Transportation-Engineering and Public Works Brad Sacher tells CJOB, it won't be long before we see more improvements to traffic flows:


Some of the other routes that will likely see attention are Bishop Grandin, Lagimodiere, Main Street North of Higgins, Mcphillips, and Pembina Highway.

CJOB News

Only The Lonely..
Jan 7, 2008, 11:27 PM
Empire for sale, owner ponders future
Updated at 5:03 PM

By Aldo Santin | Winnipeg Free Press

The owner of the troubled Empire Cabaret has put the Main Street club up for sale and is reconsidering plans to open another Main Street bar.

Sidney Soronow, lawyer for Sabino Tummillo, said the club owner has been unfairly blamed for the violence that struck the Empire Cabaret in October and November, adding the community’s unwillingness to deal with the growing violence downtown is the reason he’s getting out of the entertainment business.
“Sabino is re-evaluating the club situation until there is a greater commitment from the city of Winnipeg and the Winnipeg Police Service to apply a little more energy to the problems in (the downtown) area,” Soronow said today.

Tummillo has turned down media requests since the stabbing death of Jeff Engen at the Empire Cabaret Nov. 18. Tummillo closed the club after the stabbing and it has not re-opened. Last week, Tummillo surrendered the club’s liquor license ahead of a planned hearing today by the Manitoba Liquor Control Commission.

The Empire was also the scene of an early-morning shooting Oct. 21, when a gunman, allegedly embroiled in a gang dispute, shot four innocent people. Winnipeg Police charged a man with that incident last week.

Soronow said Tummillo had been entertaining offers to sell the Empire Cabaret before the October and November events but added the outburst of violence coupled with an indifferent attitude from police and some community leaders to deal with the violence have convinced him to get out of the bar business.
Tummillo spent $1.5 million converting the former bank building into an upscale bar. It opened in early August 2001 and two weeks later he brought TV star and film actor Vincent Pastore — who played Big Pussy on The Sopranos — to mingle with bar guests.


Before opening the Empire Cabaret, Tummillo used to own the Chalet Hotel in St. Boniface and the Sabino’s Two for One pizza chain. Most recently, he bought the former Roca Jack’s Coffee House on Corydon Avenue and another former bank building on the other side of Main Street opposite the Empire, which he was planning to turn into another nightclub.

Soronow said that Tummillo increased security measures at the Empire club following the October shooting, adding that both the Winnipeg Police and the MLCC blame Tummillo for the stabbing death that occurred in November. Soronow said an MLCC inspection report said that Tummillo knew that gang members frequented the club and suggested that he was unwilling to deal with the appropriate security concerns.

Soronow said that Tummillo had repeatedly asked the Winnipeg Police Service for help in combating the gang problem, adding requests for police to identify known gang members and to let him hire uniformed off-duty officers as security were both rejected by police.

Soronow said the MLCC had issued a report to the Doer government Dec. 21 which acknowledged the problem caused by gang violence but concluded that dealing with the issue can’t be the sole responsibility of bar operators. Soronow said that within days of the MLCC stating the police have to work with bar operators, both the police and the MLCC blamed Tummillo for the violence that struck the Empire Cabaret.

Soronow said that Tummillo circulated a copy of a letter sent to the MLCC last week when he returned his liquor license. The letter, written by Soronow, states that Tummillo had been a leader in trying to prevent violence in the downtown club scene for several years and that he now finds himself being blamed for not doing enough to control the situation.

“It is tempting, but not realistic or fair, to make one operator or one establishment the ‘fall guy’ for a complex problem,” Soronow stated in his letter to the MLCC. “It is all the more unfair, when that operator is a person who has been consistently endeavouring to raise an increased awareness of the problems and who at the same time, has sought the involvement of other stakeholders in addressing the issue.” Soronow said he doesn’t believe that the MLCC would have taken Tummillo’s liquor license back even if the hearing, planned for today, had gone ahead.

aldo.santin@freepress.mb.ca

Only The Lonely..
Jan 7, 2008, 11:35 PM
Winnipeg considers public surveillance cameras
Last Updated: Monday, January 7, 2008 | 10:59 AM CT
CBC News

City officials in Winnipeg are examining the idea of installing surveillance cameras on public streets to help curb crime.

The city's administration is putting together a report on the potential use of public surveillance cameras, which are already in use in Canadian communities ranging from Toronto to the small town of Virden, Man.

While Winnipeggers have expressed resistance to such surveillance in the past, the public seems to have warmed to the idea, Coun. Gord Steeves, who chairs the city's protection and community services committee, told CBC News Monday.

"It may have been one of those things where a critical mass has been reached in this city," he said. "There's more cameras around. People are getting more used to the idea. Society at large might be a little more tolerant to the idea, so maybe its time has come."

One challenge to the plan could be deciding where cameras should be located, Steeves said.

"Winnipeg is a difficult city because it's quite spread out to kind of put your finger on specific spots where cameras would be most useful," he said. "I'd have to be shown that there are specific spots in this city where cameras would genuinely help [stop] repetitive crime."


North End a possibility: residents group

The William Whyte Residents Association thinks its neighbourhood would be a good place to start. The area has become notorious for criminal activity in recent years, including especially a four-block stretch of Magnus Avenue, which has seen nine homicides and 12 shooting injuries over the last seven years.

Association president Denise Greyeyes believes cameras might help deter criminal activity.

"It would be nice on corners on some of the problem areas," she said Monday. "It would probably make people think about what they are doing, maybe identify some of the traffic going on there, what the problem is."

The continuous nature of camera monitoring might help where other initiatives have failed, she said.

"With other programs, it's just when people are out there and noticing. A lot of times, these crimes are happening during hours when people are usually home sleeping."

Winnipeg police have stepped up the force's presence in the neighbourhood in response to the shooting death of Joanne Hoeppner, a 28-year-old pregnant woman, on Magnus Avenue last week.

The city's administration expects to have its report on using security cameras ready for politicians to examine by February at the earliest.

Only The Lonely..
Jan 8, 2008, 3:40 PM
Although not about Winnipeg, the Free Press ran this article last Sunday which I found to be 'Of Interest'.

Most of us have probably travelled down this roadway before in our travels to Minnesota. Coming back from Duluth I would have never guessed its existence was foretold in scripture.


I-35 is road to salvation, say some Christians
Sun Jan 6 2008

By Chao Xiong | Minneapolis Star Tribune

MINNEAPOLIS -- For many drivers it's an efficient route to the cabin up north or the Iowa homestead down south. But for a number of Christians across denominations, Interstate 35 is a holy stretch of asphalt leading not to the site of Buddy Holly's last gig, but to divine salvation.

Some believe I-35 might be shorthand that links the interstate to Isaiah 35:8 of the Bible: "And a highway shall be there, and it shall be called the Holy Way; the unclean shall not pass over it, and fools shall not err therein."

While some believe the interstate is literally a road to enlightenment and a detour from sin, others say the link is, at best, a wildly skewed interpretation of scripture and at worst, "ridiculous."

What proponents of the idea call "The Highway of Holiness" cuts a swath straight through the heartland from Duluth, Minn., to Laredo, Texas, bisecting the country and kissing the Mexican border. The road's prominence through the country's midsection lends more apple-pie credence to the belief.

Worshippers in churches across the United States and abroad prayed nonstop for 35 days from late October to early December as part of the "Light the Highway" movement lead by a Texas ministry.

The goal, believers said, was to pray for the overall betterment of the country, forgiveness of personal and collective sins and closeness with God.

"I believe it began a shift in the spiritual realm over the city of Duluth and especially over I-35," said Shannon Stone, a participant whose husband is pastor of Jesus is Life Ministries in Duluth. "I think we'll see a change in the things that are happening, people's desire to live more righteously."

Not everyone buys it, however.

"These long days of prayer, they try to whip everybody into a frenzy in hopes that God will come and do miracles that he wouldn't do otherwise," said critic Bob DeWaay, pastor at the Evangelical Twin City Fellowship in St. Louis Park, Minn. "God isn't going to determine how he works based on the highway system."

Three years ago self-described prophet and God Channel regular Cindy Jacobs was preaching in a Texas church when she said she made the first public connection between the interstate and Bible verse.

"It's amazing that there's a scripture that talks about the highway of holiness and there's an actual one," said Jacobs, who co-founded Generals International ministry in Red Oak, Texas, which lead the Light the Highway movement.

She referenced a number of incidents along the interstate as a sign of its biblical ties: the I-35 bridge collapse, the 1963 assassination of John Kennedy in Dallas and a spate of kidnappings and murders in Laredo.

"Isaiah 35 talks about a highway of holiness and so we were reading this and felt that in our hearts, just like any Christian would, that it pertained to us," Jacobs said.

The interstate isn't currently holier than any other roadway, she said, but will become so through continued prayer. Churches in 17 cities along the interstate participated in the movement, praying along with a guide that outlined specific "sins" to address, including poverty, racism, abortion and homosexuality.

Jacobs and some participants said it's too soon to expect benefits of the mass prayer, but she predicted that crime will decrease and that government and religious corruption will be exposed.

Coon Rapids resident Tom Gibson is a believer. In the summer of 2005, he and his wife drove the entire stretch of I-35 in 14 days, stopping at churches along the way.

"I felt it wasn't a coincidence," Gibson said. "It is a cry. There has been a lot of repentance."

Critics say that atop of misapplying scripture, such prophecies can scare away people on the fringe of Christianity.

DeWaay has long published articles debunking "grandiose claims" made by self-described modern-day prophets. He's criticized prophecies that the Hoover Dam was going to crumble and that Los Angeles was going to break away and sink into the ocean.

"Every so many years these pronouncements come out and people forget that the last one didn't come to pass," he said. "It's hurting people who are sincere Christians who want to do the right thing."

"It's ridiculous," said David Mathis, executive pastoral assistant at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis. "I'm sure there are good impulses, but I think the overall mission is misguided."

The application of scripture to current events, objects or people isn't new. The practice is "very much in line with fundamentalist Protestant culture," said Penny Edgell, a sociology professor at the University of Minnesota who specializes in religion in American life.

"It takes these mundane everyday aspects of life and makes it sacred," she said. It's about mobilizing the faithful and energizing the faithful."

Making an everyday object sacred crosses religious boundaries. Edgell noted that neo-pagans casting a spell to bless their home is no different from Christians praying for salvation along an interstate.

"There's a tendency to treat these groups as a wacky fringe," Edgell said. "But I think it's also important to recognize that while that may be true, they tap into deep cultural currents that are really common and important in American society to see the sacred in everyday life. Lots of people want that."

-- Minneapolis Star Tribune

Only The Lonely..
Jan 8, 2008, 3:46 PM
And yet another crazy highway conspiracy..this time from the Sun.


Nafta highway conspiracy

Tue, January 8, 2008 | By ED FEUER - Winnipeg Sun

Who would have thought a speech from the throne in Manitoba would become fuel for American conspiracy aficionados?

The issue is the proposed Mid-Continent Trade Corridor, an international transportation route, which Premier Gary Doer hopes will boost Manitoba's economy.

The conspiracists, however, see the road as part of a nefarious scheme by sinister forces to produce a merger of the United States, Canada and Mexico.

Plot devotees include Ron Paul, the libertarian Republican presidential candidate, who was quoted in a Dec. 10 Newsweek story headed "Highway to Hell?"

Said Paul: "The ultimate goal is not simply a superhighway, but an integrated North American Union -- complete with a currency, a cross-national bureaucracy, and virtually borderless travel within the Union."

The Newsweek story went on to refute the claim with facts. But Paul's Internet supporters on the far right of the U.S. political spectrum loudly disagree. Their big proof comes from ... Manitoba.

Just Google the words: Harvard "NAFTA superhighway."

On a number of sites such as New World Order Truth, the headline declares: "Canada openly proclaims NAFTA superhighway."

The "Canada" is largely a Nov. 20 throne speech delivered by Lt.-Gov. John Harvard in which he said: Manitoba is "taking a major role in the development of a Mid-Continent Trade Corridor, connecting ... Churchill with trade markets throughout the central United States and Mexico. To advance the concept, an alliance has been built with business leaders and state and city governments spanning the entire length of the Corridor ... The trade route will incorporate an "inland port" in Winnipeg with pre-clearance for international shipping."

And may it happen with spirited energy. Obviously, the U.S. conspiracists aren't aware that the platitudes of a provincial throne speech don't quite constitute Canadian foreign policy.

This might be amusing in itself but what is not so funny are the strange bedfellows orbiting this issue. In Canada we see the Council of Canadians on the left edge of our politics agreeing with folks on the right down south. Maude Barlow would heartily support Ron Paul's sentiments about the dangers to national sovereignty on the "highway to hell."

1ajs
Jan 12, 2008, 3:56 AM
Mega By-Law In The Works
JAN 11 2008 06:00 PM
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The City is rolling 17 existing by-laws into one Mega By-Law. It will take effect next November.The Neighbourhood Liveability By-law will replace existing by-laws covering everything from smoking to pigeons and refrigerators and freezers. A city report claims the stream-lined approach to enforcing the rules will be more user-friendly. The report also calls for 375-thousand dollars in start up costs for a new city unit to enforce the Mega By-Law. The unit will include specialists and possibly public health inspectors.
The report claims the new set-up will provide more accountability for a more timely and effective reporting process.
CJOB's Colleen Bready reporting.

1ajs
Jan 12, 2008, 3:58 AM
Grace Management Transferred to WRHA
JAN 11 2008 01:00 PM
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The Salvation Army is transferring the governance and management of the Grace Hospital to the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority effective April 1st. Health Minister Theresa Oswald says the change will improve the delivery of integrated and co-ordinated care.
However the Salvation Army will continue to have a voice in management issues through representation on the WRHA's Board.
CJOB News

1ajs
Jan 12, 2008, 3:59 AM
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ads.write("468x60"); New Plan For Frontline Officers In The Works
JAN 11 2008 10:50 AM
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Winnipeg's new police chief is hinting at changes to the police service in the coming months.Since taking over as chief a month ago, Keith McCaskill says a strategic plan is being developed over the next few months to address how best to use frontline officers. That could include shifting paperwork officers currently need to complete to other police staff, freeing them up to spend more time on the street.
And to address a long queue of calls for service, he says some cases might be handled differently. McCaskill also says he's looking at possibly shifting around some police resources to address certain kinds of crime where more specialized police work is needed.
And without giving specifics at this point, he says that could include test projects to see where police will get "the most bang for their buck."
CJOB's Colleen Bready reporting.

1ajs
Jan 16, 2008, 12:29 AM
Jazz under the Rooftop (http://www.wag.mb.ca/)
Saturday, January 19, 8pm.
Heat up your Saturday night with the George Reznik Trio featuring Bob Jackson and Bill McMahon.
Tickets $17 WAG members | $19 adults | $18 seniors and students | Available at the WAG or through Ticketmaster | Includes admission to all Gallery exhibitions

more upcoming events here
http://login.greatbignews.com/UserFiles/184/DowntownMingle-Jan15.htm

Only The Lonely..
Jan 20, 2008, 6:49 AM
I thought this was kinda amusing..

Newspaper pulls ad
JAN 18 2008 02:30 PM

Winnipeg police are responding to a controversial ad from a major car company that appears in today's edition of a local newspaper.

A full-page ad from Ford Canada in the Winnipeg Free Press prominently features the slogan, quote, "Drive it Like You Stole It."

A second slogan underneath reads, quote, "Built for Life in Manitoba."

Constable Jeff Norman says police don't believe there was any intention by Ford to imply that auto theft and dangerous driving are acceptable, but say the ad could be interpreted that way.

While police have said numbers were down last year, Winnipeg had the highest rate of auto theft of all major Canadian cities according to the most recent Statistics Canada data.

The newspaper now says Ford Canada has pulled the ad.

CJOB's Colleen Bready reporting.

Only The Lonely..
Jan 25, 2008, 1:42 AM
It's a good thing there aren't any real problems in Manitoba for the NDP to talk about..:rolleyes:

NDP To Contemplate Resolutions
JAN 24 2008 02:30 PM


Some controversial resolutions could pop up at the NDP convention in Winnipeg that's just over a week away.
There is a resolution to restrict all criminal cases to two remands to cut down on the court's backlog. One proposal would make it at offense to use your cell phone while driving. Another resolution would restrict large trucks and semis from traveling 110 kilometers per hour on highways where the speed limits are raised. The sex trade would be decriminalized by a delegation who is urging the government to set up safe zones for prostitutes.

On a lighter note, there is also a resolution, among the 200 in total, to create a new Manitoba flag by holding a public contest.

CJOB's Jeff Keele reporting.

vid
Jan 25, 2008, 1:46 AM
A new Manitoba flag!! They're improving the situation tenfold!! :banana:

Only The Lonely..
Jan 25, 2008, 2:56 AM
A new Manitoba flag!! They're improving the situation tenfold!! :banana:

Quite you! You might have to pledge allegiance to this thing one day when you join us.

JayM
Jan 25, 2008, 4:01 AM
Quite you! You might have to pledge allegiance to this thing one day when you join us.

ha, im pretty sure in most peoples minds Northwestern Ontario is Manitoba for the most part anyways.

1ajs
Jan 25, 2008, 4:31 AM
new flag? wth whats wrong with our curent one?

JayM
Jan 25, 2008, 4:39 AM
im sure they'll have some outside source make it up, and then sell it off as being what Manitoba is all about, and realize wtf, i don't even now what this represents. must be part of the "Manitoba doesn't know itself" campaign

vid
Jan 25, 2008, 4:41 AM
It looks too much like Ontario's I guess? It entirely leaves out the French heritage and agricultural background of the province.

Doing something like Yukon or NWT with the Canadian Pale and the Coat of Arms in the centre would be nice, or you could go with this:

http://www.mts.net/~hajones/portfol/images/flag2.gif (http://www.mts.net/~hajones/portfol/flag.htm#flag)

Personally, I think the background should be reversed. :/

JayM
Jan 25, 2008, 4:50 AM
could be worse... could be as plain as saskatchewans just the provincial borders, straight up and down.

Andy6
Jan 25, 2008, 5:03 AM
It looks too much like Ontario's I guess? It entirely leaves out the French heritage and agricultural background of the province.

Doing something like Yukon or NWT with the Canadian Pale and the Coat of Arms in the centre would be nice, or you could go with this:

http://www.mts.net/~hajones/portfol/images/flag2.gif (http://www.mts.net/~hajones/portfol/flag.htm#flag)

Personally, I think the background should be reversed. :/

The current flag is just fine. We don't need any of this nonsense.

JayM
Jan 25, 2008, 5:15 AM
The current flag is just fine. We don't need any of this nonsense.

if its anything like spirited energy, u know its gonna be great! ha. a bison a beer bottle, and some wheat, with the mlcc in the bg:koko:

wags_in_the_peg
Jan 25, 2008, 4:14 PM
Manitoba leads affordable homes list - Remains fraction of prices elsewhere

By Murray McNeill

If Manitobans are feeling shell shocked over the spiralling cost of home ownership, they'll be blown away by what's going in British Columbia.

An RBC Economics report released Thursday says housing affordability reached a new low late last year on the West Coast when the cost of owning a standard two-storey home -- including mortgage payments, property taxes and utilities -- was devouring 70.8 per cent of the pre-tax household income of a homeowner earning $122,134.

In Vancouver it was worse, with home ownership costs gobbling up 75.2 per cent of the pre-tax household income of someone with household earnings of $138,309.

"The least affordable housing market in the country entered uncharted waters last year, as affordability deteriorated to the highest level on record (we started tracking conditions in 1985)," the bank said.

Even though Manitoba has long had a reputation for being one of the most affordable housing markets in the country, the chasm with the most expensive has never been greater, according to the RBC report.

The numbers show that after five consecutive years of double-digit house price increases, the cost of owning a home here is still only a fraction of what it is in high-priced British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario.

Commercial real estate agent Darcy Payne discovered that firsthand when he and his family moved to Winnipeg last year from Calgary.

The general manager of the new Winnipeg office of Bentall Real Estate Services said he and his wife, Jennifer, discovered a house that would have cost them $500,000 in their middle-class neighbourhood in Calgary costs only about $300,000 to $350,000 in a similar neighbourhood (Whyte Ridge) in Winnipeg.

Payne said they'd heard tales about how much cheaper homes were in Winnipeg, so they were expecting prices here to be even lower than they were. But still, they weren't complaining.

"Generally, we were happy with what happened," he said.

The RBC report says new records were set late last year for the amount of household income going towards home ownership costs in a number of Canadian markets, including British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan.

Manitoba, meanwhile, remained the most affordable market for most types of homes. The only exception was with bungalows, where Atlantic Canada narrowly edged out Manitoba as the most affordable market for that type of home.

There, owning a bungalow ate up 31.6 per cent of the pre-tax household income of someone with a qualifying income of $45,951, compared to 33.9 per cent for someone in Manitoba with a qualifying income of $55,719, the bank's figures show.

But with the other three major types of homes -- standard two-storeys, standard townhouses and standard condominiums -- Manitoba was still the most affordable market. The housing affordability index for a standard two-storey home was 35.6 per cent of pre-tax household income, for a townhouse it was 20.4 per cent, and for a townhouse it was 18.9 per cent.

And the good news is that homeownership here, and in most other parts of the country, should become even more affordable this year because of falling mortgage rates and moderating house prices, the bank said.

Derek Holt, the bank's assistant chief economist, said Manitobans should be looking at an average selling price increase of about eight per cent this year compared with 11 or 12 per cent in 2007 and nearly 20 per cent in 2006.

And short-term and variable-rate mortgage rates should be down a full percentage point by the end of the year, while long-term rates should be a half to three quarters of a percentage point lower.

Holt said almost every housing class in every province, including Manitoba, saw affordability deteriorate in 2008. And the main culprit was a long string of house-price gains that outstripped income increases in most markets.

But even in the once red-hot B.C., Alberta and Saskatchewan markets and the still-hot Manitoba market should see more modest price gains this year, he said.

murray.mcneill@freepress.mb.ca

1ajs
Jan 26, 2008, 11:34 AM
.... sitting here watching NZ one tv and theres a film on that was shot etirely in winnipeg.... Seven Times Lucky is the name of the film rather interesting lol

Andy6
Jan 26, 2008, 4:40 PM
.... sitting here watching NZ one tv and theres a film on that was shot etirely in winnipeg.... Seven Times Lucky is the name of the film rather interesting lol

How is NZ? How long are you there for?

flatlander
Jan 27, 2008, 6:51 PM
Nice article in the Free Press today Rob.

rgalston
Jan 27, 2008, 6:57 PM
Thanks, flatlander.

Seven Times Lucky--isn't that the one that starred Kevin Pollack?

1ajs
Jan 27, 2008, 9:15 PM
How is NZ? How long are you there for?

its sweet :D

coming back to soon...

newflyer
Jan 28, 2008, 12:21 AM
Here is a rarity for January....

http://img239.imageshack.us/img239/3219/jan2708az5.jpg


Winnipeg and Regina are the national hotspots. :banana:

newflyer
Jan 28, 2008, 1:26 AM
:previous:

What did Saskatoon do to be so much colder than Regina?

Ouch... I wonder what Davidson is like.

vid
Jan 28, 2008, 1:27 AM
A few years ago, Thunder Bay went up to 9 degrees in January, and was the hottest place in Canada for a good 24 hours. It was weird.

And before you celebrate, Adrian, Toronto is -1 and Vancouver is 3. :P And for you, Newflyer, Saskatoon is not on that map! You're looking at Edmonton! ;)

newflyer
Jan 28, 2008, 1:50 AM
A few years ago, Thunder Bay went up to 9 degrees in January, and was the hottest place in Canada for a good 24 hours. It was weird.

And before you celebrate, Adrian, Toronto is -1 and Vancouver is 3. :P And for you, Newflyer, Saskatoon is not on that map! You're looking at Edmonton! ;)

Oh.. you are right... where the hell is Saskatoon on that map?

vid
Jan 28, 2008, 1:56 AM
It isn't on that map. Neither is Victoria, or London, or Kitchener/Waterloo. They're too close to other cities. :P Thunder Bay is only one there because without us it would have a big gap in the middle!

newflyer
Jan 28, 2008, 2:37 AM
It isn't on that map. Neither is Victoria, or London, or Kitchener/Waterloo. They're too close to other cities. :P Thunder Bay is only one there because without us it would have a big gap in the middle!

Perhaps .. but there seems to be cities in close proximity in eastern Canada.


Hmmmmm..... :hmmm:

JayM
Jan 28, 2008, 3:07 AM
It isn't on that map. Neither is Victoria, or London, or Kitchener/Waterloo. They're too close to other cities. :P Thunder Bay is only one there because without us it would have a big gap in the middle!

if ontario didnt have northwestern ontario, they wouldnt get all that money and then keep to themselves and then not share with the northwestern ontario communities like it so does right now. so yeah they need it.

JayM
Jan 28, 2008, 3:08 AM
theyd far sooner list churchill then those places. haha

BrannyMuffin
Jan 28, 2008, 4:14 AM
:previous:

What did Saskatoon do to be so much colder than Regina?

Ouch... I wonder what Davidson is like.

It got up to +1 in Regina today (and no wind! I can't remember the last time there was no wind...) The high in Saskatoon was -8 and the high in Davidson was -6 (although that was around 7am...go figure.) For most of the day, I think it was a little colder in Davidson than it was in Saskatoon.

Look how cold it was in Alberta compared to everywhere else (well, except way up north).

newflyer
Jan 28, 2008, 4:16 AM
It got up to +1 in Regina today (and no wind! I can't remember the last time there was no wind...) The high in Saskatoon was -8 and the high in Davidson was -6 (although that was around 7am...go figure.) For most of the day, I think it was a little colder in Davidson than it was in Saskatoon.

Look how cold it was in Alberta compared to everywhere else (well, except way up north).

I know... I am freezing my butt off... and there a strong wind too.

1ajs
Jan 28, 2008, 10:18 AM
A few years ago, Thunder Bay went up to 9 degrees in January, and was the hottest place in Canada for a good 24 hours. It was weird.

And before you celebrate, Adrian, Toronto is -1 and Vancouver is 3. :P And for you, Newflyer, Saskatoon is not on that map! You're looking at Edmonton! ;)

i in whangerei new zealand vid a long ways away from the winter of canada... where it was 26 today :D

http://img352.imageshack.us/img352/290/aronhr9.jpg

rgalston
Jan 29, 2008, 2:30 PM
Hey Adrian, look what happens when you go away... It's quite a zoo down there. The fire is on the west side of the street.


Two fires battled on Austin Street
Updated at 8:24 AM

By Meghan Hurley

Lois Greyeyes heard the loud crackling coming from outside her Point Douglas home and knew instantly something was wrong.

Greyeyes took a quick glance through her window and immediately saw the orange glow -- confirming her fears that a neighbouring home was on fire.
"I saw the fire and immediately picked up the phone," Greyeyes said this morning.

At 8 a.m., fire crews were continuing to wage war against a huge blaze that started in a home in the 2000 block of Austin Street and quickly spread to a home right beside it.

The initial call came in around 5:38 a.m.

Greyeyes lives directly across the street.
"I could see the light (from the fire) shone right through my window," she said. "There was no one else aware of it. There was no one outside."

Luckily, no one was hurt in the blaze, a fire official said.

The residents of the affected homes managed to escape, while firefighters rescued a dog.

Crews from no fewer than six fire trucks are still spraying water on the two homes on Austin between Lorne and Lisgar streets.

"The fire in the original home has spread through the roof," said Platoon Chief Garry Rasmussen. "With the flames through the roof, that's good for us because we can get at them."

But Greyeyes fears both homes are damaged beyond repair.

"I've been watching the troops go back and forth, and it looks like they just can't save them," she said. "...two houses, just gone like that."

Austin is shut down for several blocks from Euclid to the north.

Euclid Avenue had been closed from Main Street to Austin but has since reopened.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/ips_rich_content/757-austin_fire.JPG

vid
Jan 29, 2008, 5:31 PM
Lots of house fires here lately, too. Weird. A big house in the suburbs burnt down last week, it was barely a year old. I guess that's what they get for living in McSnootyville.

So uh, how's the weather up there? ;)

Only The Lonely..
Jan 29, 2008, 10:26 PM
Lots of house fires here lately, too. Weird. A big house in the suburbs burnt down last week, it was barely a year old. I guess that's what they get for living in McSnootyville.

So uh, how's the weather up there? ;)

Brrrr...

1ajs
Jan 30, 2008, 8:06 PM
Hey Adrian, look what happens when you go away... It's quite a zoo down there. The fire is on the west side of the street.


Two fires battled on Austin Street
Updated at 8:24 AM

By Meghan Hurley

Lois Greyeyes heard the loud crackling coming from outside her Point Douglas home and knew instantly something was wrong.

Greyeyes took a quick glance through her window and immediately saw the orange glow -- confirming her fears that a neighbouring home was on fire.
"I saw the fire and immediately picked up the phone," Greyeyes said this morning.

At 8 a.m., fire crews were continuing to wage war against a huge blaze that started in a home in the 2000 block of Austin Street and quickly spread to a home right beside it.

The initial call came in around 5:38 a.m.

Greyeyes lives directly across the street.
"I could see the light (from the fire) shone right through my window," she said. "There was no one else aware of it. There was no one outside."

Luckily, no one was hurt in the blaze, a fire official said.

The residents of the affected homes managed to escape, while firefighters rescued a dog.

Crews from no fewer than six fire trucks are still spraying water on the two homes on Austin between Lorne and Lisgar streets.

"The fire in the original home has spread through the roof," said Platoon Chief Garry Rasmussen. "With the flames through the roof, that's good for us because we can get at them."

But Greyeyes fears both homes are damaged beyond repair.

"I've been watching the troops go back and forth, and it looks like they just can't save them," she said. "...two houses, just gone like that."

Austin is shut down for several blocks from Euclid to the north.

Euclid Avenue had been closed from Main Street to Austin but has since reopened.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/ips_rich_content/757-austin_fire.JPG

:O HOLY CRAP!

so its two 1920's homes and one 2story house that looked like it was leaning to the one side?

vid
Jan 30, 2008, 8:11 PM
-51°F in Tundra Bay with the windchill. (That's -46°C) But at least it's sunny!!! :rolleyes:

I assume Winnipeg is seeing much of the same? :P We're living up to our stereotypes today.

rgalston
Jan 30, 2008, 9:24 PM
:O HOLY CRAP!

so its two 1920's homes and one 2story house that looked like it was leaning to the one side?

The leaning green house, that's the one where the fire started. The '20s bungalow next door also looks damaged.

1ajs
Jan 30, 2008, 9:34 PM
The leaning green house, that's the one where the fire started. The '20s bungalow next door also looks damaged.
owtch that going to leave a masive hole on austin :( maybe we can go after a developer to buy the land and do some sorta cool infill project :P

Only The Lonely..
Feb 2, 2008, 10:03 PM
Merv sees his shadow
FEB 02 2008 11:40 AM

According to Manitoba Merv spring is still about six weeks away.

The groundhog came out Saturday morning to make his forecast.

Jacques Bourgeois of Oak Hammock Marsh says there was a break in the clouds and Merv saw his shadow.

If a groundhog sees his shadow it suggests six more weeks of winter. If no shadow is seen, legend says spring will come early.

Ken Klassen (CJOB) reporting.