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SteelTown
Apr 29, 2008, 5:43 PM
Made a thread for all events related to HHS.

St. Peter’s Hospital, HHS announce merger

April 29, 2008
By WADE HEMSWORTH
The Hamilton Spectator


St. Peter’s Hospital is amalgamating with Hamilton Health Sciences in an effort to bring better care to Hamilton’s aging population.

The organizations announced their plan in a joint news conference Tuesday,  after their respective boards unanimously approved the merger.

No job losses are anticipated as a result of the amalgamation between St. Peter’s, which operates a 250-bed chronic-care hospital, and HHS, with  nearly 1,000 beds spread throughout sites in the city including McMaster, Chedoke, Henderson and Hamilton general sites.

The move has been planned quietly over the past several months  and is designed to create more seamless care for chronic-care patients — a group composed largely of seniors — whose care is largely shared between the two hospital organizations.

Today, 84 per cent of patients admitted to St. Peter’s from other hospitals come from HHS facilities, while  75 per cent of St. Peter’s patients requiring acute hospital care are treated at HHS facilities.

The goal of merging the two systems is to share knowledge, skills and experience to deliver more effective and efficient care.

The legal formalities of the amalgamation are expected to be complete this summer, and the merger is to take place gradually.

SteelTown
Aug 15, 2008, 11:07 AM
PM's visit to General 'good news' for Hamilton

August 15, 2008
Wade Hemsworth; Fred Eisenberger
The Hamilton Spectator

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is planning to visit Hamilton Tuesday to make a funding announcement.

The Spectator has learned the PM is to make the announcement with Industry Minister Jim Prentice and local MPs at Hamilton General Hospital.

The prime minister's communications staff confirmed Harper would be visiting Hamilton Tuesday, but would not give details of what he will be doing, citing its practice of announcing his schedule only 24 hours in advance.

Several other sources confirmed they are making preparations for the hospital visit at 11 a.m.

Harper is expected to make a swing through southern Ontario early next week, with a stop in Mississauga Monday, before visiting Hamilton, Kitchener and London.

"We're aware that he's coming, and we're delighted that he is," said Mayor Fred Eisenberger. "An announcement in Hamilton should portend some good news for something in Hamilton, as well as potentially nationally."

Details of the funding announcement are not yet available, though the site of the announcement suggests it may be related to Hamilton Health Sciences, which has several major projects under way. They include two construction projects at the General itself: the 100,000 square foot Regional Rehabilitation Centre, and the David Braley Cardiac, Vascular and Stroke Research Institute. That's a $90-million project that is to be home to the Population Health Research Institute and the Fraser Mustard Thrombosis Research Institute.

The mayor said he has not been briefed at all on the substance of the announcement, nor on the amount it might involve.

"That's not untypical for this government," he said. "They keep their cards very close to the vest, and if there's an announcement, they want to be sure they're announcing it and not someone else. I don't blame them for their approach and I appreciate the fact they're coming."

Meanwhile, the mayor himself has a scheduling conflict to resolve before the announcement.

He has already committed himself to attend a service commemorating the 66th anniversary of the raid on Dieppe during the Second World War -- a service that starts at 10:30 Tuesday morning at Dieppe Veterans' Memorial Park on Beach Boulevard.

The service commemorates the participation of 582 soldiers of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry in the raid, of whom 197 were killed and 174 taken prisoner. Of the 211 who returned to England, 109 were wounded.

Eisenberger has asked Harper's team to adjust the time of his visit to the hospital so he can greet the prime minister at the announcement after the service.

thistleclub
Aug 15, 2008, 1:31 PM
PM's visit to General 'good news' for Hamilton

August 15, 2008
Wade Hemsworth; Fred Eisenberger
The Hamilton Spectator

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is planning to visit Hamilton Tuesday to make a funding announcement.

The Spectator has learned the PM is to make the announcement with Industry Minister Jim Prentice and local MPs at Hamilton General Hospital.

Funny that the mayor gets to share the byline on a front-page story. Online, at least. This arms race with Bratina has got to stop.

raisethehammer
Aug 15, 2008, 1:37 PM
Lol....he works for the Spec now.

JoeyColeman
Aug 15, 2008, 11:00 PM
It's good to see the mayor is prioritizing the Dieppe ceremony over a pre-campaign stop by the PM.

The bloody single day of WWII for the Canadians, the PM should be stopping there first.

SteelTown
Aug 18, 2008, 7:18 PM
Prime Minister to attend Dieppe memorial

August 18, 2008
The Hamilton Spectator

Prime Minister Stephen Harper will attend the Dieppe memorial service in Hamilton tomorrow.

The leader’s office called local organizers this morning to confirm Harper will make a special appearance at 11 a.m. at the commemorative service at the Dieppe Veterans’ Memorial Park on Beach Boulevard. He plans to lay a wreath.

“I’m impressed. It’s a great honour,” said organizer Jim Forsyth. “The veterans will be impressed.”

Tomorrow marks the 66th anniversary of the raid on Dieppe during the Second World War.

Harper is in Hamilton tomorrow to make an announcement at the Hamilton General Hospital. Details of the 10 a.m. press conference have not be released.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger asked Harper to rearrange his schedule  in order to attend the Dieppe memorial.

MsMe
Aug 18, 2008, 9:29 PM
Stephan Harper shouldn't have been asked to attend the ceremony. In my opinion he should have chosen to attend the ceremony due to honouring the veterans on his own will.

A friend of my father's ended up in POW when he was taken at Dieppe. He did survive the war but has since passed on from natural causes many years later. He would only ever talk about when the war was over and was down to about 80 pounds when he was taken to England. It was visible to the naked eye that he was missing fingertips more then likely due to frostbite no doubt. Not sure I would want to talk about an experience like that either as I am sure it was total hell. Hence why we should always pay our respects to any veteran that fought in any war.

raisethehammer
Aug 19, 2008, 1:11 AM
I think it's awesome that he's doing this.
Once being informed that he was arriving in town for a press conference at the same time as the memorial service, he decided to re-arrange things.
Good for him and good for Hamilton. Dieppe Memorial Park should make the national news tomorrow night.

bornagainbiking
Aug 19, 2008, 3:13 AM
If you go back for many years this is one of the best PM's we have had for the Forces and vets. I have a picture of him standing next to my best friend in Afghanistan not a week after he was elected. It did not take him or his office long to decide to adjust his schedule after being reminded by our Mayor about the ceremony. Not to be tooooo political but he is in hot water for not flying to China for the games, but he is here at the RHLI & Dieppe momument. Looks like a guy interested in Canada. Remember vote NDP and fight for proper cellphone billing.
MsMe: I am a retired soldier from the Cold war era and my WWII uncle would never talk about the war and what he saw but he took it to an early grave, God bless them all....

MsMe
Aug 19, 2008, 3:31 AM
MsMe: I am a retired soldier from the Cold war era and my WWII uncle would never talk about the war and what he saw but he took it to an early grave, God bless them all....

Amen to that Bornagainbiking.

raisethehammer
Aug 19, 2008, 3:39 AM
yup....I had relatives who would never talk about the war and had a tough time with everything.
I'll third that 'God bless them all'.

SteelTown
Aug 19, 2008, 3:22 PM
Ottawa providing $35M for new cardiovascular research institute in Hamilton

HAMILTON — The federal government will contribute nearly $35 million to a new cardiovascular disease research institute based in Hamilton, Ont.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper says the centre will attract cutting edge researchers to the southern Ontario city and cement Hamilton as a global centre of cardiovascular research.

Harper is making the announcement at Hamilton General Hospital during a three-day visit to Ontario.

The federal funding comes through the Canadian Foundation for Innovation for the institute, which is expected to cost a total of nearly $91 million.

Harper says it will house more than 500 researchers and staff and create 230 new jobs in the area, while also attracting top-shelf researchers from around the world.

Hamilton Health Sciences and other organizations will make up the difference.

SteelTown
Aug 19, 2008, 3:29 PM
http://media.hamiltonspectator.com/images/79/72/8bc1c0c540c89c324fce4a476d78.jpeg

hehehe, it's better than that gay cowboy outfit.

raisethehammer
Aug 19, 2008, 3:43 PM
man, I love that building.
I'd love to see a 10-15 storey version built downtown sometime.

DC83
Aug 19, 2008, 3:56 PM
http://media.hamiltonspectator.com/images/79/72/8bc1c0c540c89c324fce4a476d78.jpeg

hehehe, it's better than that gay cowboy outfit.

Do u mean this...

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b270/DC_83/bareback.jpg

He's so emotionless it's creepy! Look at his ultra-forced smile in that HHS photo-op!

SteelTown
Aug 19, 2008, 4:00 PM
No, this one!

http://www.breadwithcircus.com/harper.jpg

DC83
Aug 19, 2008, 4:02 PM
AAAAHAHAHA omg that's way worse!!

raisethehammer
Aug 19, 2008, 4:29 PM
WOW!! Was that at a gay bar in the Calgary Stampede???
Awesome outfit!

fastcarsfreedom
Aug 19, 2008, 8:12 PM
Excellent news, bad photos aside.

It's amazing to me how the media and the left-wing intelligentsia has invented this supposed infatuation on the part of Harper with GWB -- and the sad thing is that so many of my fellow Canadians buy into it -- it seems the only thing the anti-Conservative forces have that will stick is to play the old anti-Americanism card a la Diefenbaker, Trudeau and Chretien. It amuses/amazes/confounds me that people somehow feel the our PM shouldn't have a close working relationship with our largest trading partner and most strategic global ally.

The man has a family and is a foster-parent to homeless kittens--the "emotionless" label is worn-out and another 'invention'...let's be honest, with Trudeau in everyone's collective memory - anyone would seem emotionless.

SteelTown
Aug 19, 2008, 8:47 PM
PM visits site of new Hamilton Health Sciences facility
19 August 2008
HAMILTON

Prime Minister Stephen Harper today visited the construction site of the new David Braley Cardiac, Vascular and Stroke Research Institute at Hamilton Health Sciences.

“This is a made-in-Hamilton success story,” said the Prime Minister, “Doctors, nurses and other health care professionals in Hamilton saw a need to improve the quality of health care in their community. When this facility is complete, researchers will have the technology, space and support they need to develop new treatments and cures that will end up saving lives.”

When completed, the David Braley Institute will house two of the world’s leading research programs. The Population Health Research Institute will provide cutting edge research into the environmental and social forces that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The Henderson Research Centre will perform clinical trials on drugs and therapies that help fight strokes, blood clots and other vascular diseases.

“When completed, this institute will improve the quality of health care, not just locally, but throughout Canada and around the world,” said the Prime Minister. “Hamilton will become a world leader in finding innovative treatments for some of the world’s leading causes of death.”

The Prime Minister announced that the Government of Canada, through the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, will contribute $34.7 million to the $90.9 million estimated cost of the facility. Most of the funding for the new research centre is being raised by the local community.

“The local community did not wait for someone else to make this happen. Instead they rolled up their sleeves and got to work,” said the Prime Minister. “I want to congratulate David Braley and the Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation for their leadership in making this new facility a reality.”

The new David Braley Cardiac, Vascular and Stroke Research Institute is one of eight major health care research projects being funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation. Details of the other seven health care investments will be released in the near future.

raisethehammer
Aug 19, 2008, 9:57 PM
Excellent news, bad photos aside.

It's amazing to me how the media and the left-wing intelligentsia has invented this supposed infatuation on the part of Harper with GWB -- and the sad thing is that so many of my fellow Canadians buy into it -- it seems the only thing the anti-Conservative forces have that will stick is to play the old anti-Americanism card a la Diefenbaker, Trudeau and Chretien. It amuses/amazes/confounds me that people somehow feel the our PM shouldn't have a close working relationship with our largest trading partner and most strategic global ally.

The man has a family and is a foster-parent to homeless kittens--the "emotionless" label is worn-out and another 'invention'...let's be honest, with Trudeau in everyone's collective memory - anyone would seem emotionless.

having a close relationship with our largest trading partner is one thing.
Letting them call the shots for us is another story.
I get tired of the US using and abusing anyone the call an "allied country".
Hezbollah invades Israel and the US helps them bomb the tar out of them for 2 weeks. Georgia invades Ossieta and the US (and their idiot media clowns) lambastes Russia for defending Ossieta. They're a bunch of hypocrites bent on nothing but their own gain regardless of how many perfectly good cities and families need to be destroyed in the process.
They tell US how to distribute OUR OWN oil. That's not called "a close relationship".
That's called becoming another one of the brain-dead talking heads.

raisethehammer
Aug 19, 2008, 9:58 PM
ps...sorry for the next page of off-topic discussion. Lol.
It's fastcars fault! haha.

fastcarsfreedom
Aug 19, 2008, 11:34 PM
Sure, blame me for defending my political beliefs. I've said my piece...as for the distribution of our oil - when I see this country stop cashing the cheques I will be more open listening to criticism.

MsMe
Aug 20, 2008, 1:04 AM
It's all in fun. How could someone not take a jab at a politician wearing something like that?

adam
Aug 20, 2008, 1:08 AM
Wait until Harper decides we should sell the water from our Great Lakes to the US and then we as the civilians have to buy it back for everyday use from some American corporation...

And about the funny Harper picture, politicians get made fun of on a regular basis. Why is this any different? Because of the particular party? Is it okay to make fun of LIberals but not Conservatives? I don't follow...

raisethehammer
Aug 20, 2008, 2:26 AM
they all suck.

SteelTown
Sep 9, 2008, 9:49 PM
You can see what is happening at McMaster Hospital's renovation.....

http://www.thespec.com/videogallery/432298

With the renovations taking place a lot of ceiling tiles have been coming down and opening up the space for skylights. It's really nice.

SteelTown
Sep 10, 2008, 11:21 AM
http://media.hamiltonspectator.com/images/3b/46/bde8024742a5b8ba999aabcbe651.jpeg

highwater
Sep 10, 2008, 1:33 PM
Here's the vid from the Spec website:

http://www.thespec.com/videogallery/432298

According to the Spec it's at an "undisclosed off-site location for security reasons".

highwater
Sep 10, 2008, 1:35 PM
Oops. Sorry for the duplication. Didn't see your previous post.

drpgq
Sep 10, 2008, 4:22 PM
Here's the vid from the Spec website:

http://www.thespec.com/videogallery/432298

According to the Spec it's at an "undisclosed off-site location for security reasons".

I have to admit I'm now curious as to where this is located.

SteelTown
Nov 12, 2008, 11:10 PM
Hamilton hospitals to cut nearly 500 jobs
HHS must trim $25m by the end of the year

November 12, 2008
Joanna Frketich
The Hamilton Spectator

Hamilton’s hospitals are cutting 485 jobs to avoid multi-million-dollar deficits.

It’s hoped the jobs will be lost through attrition and not filling vacancies but layoffs are possible.

“Unquestionably we’re certainly going to have to look at cutting work hours,” said Kevin Smith, CEO of St. Joseph’s. “I think it’s frankly unrealistic that we wouldn’t have a reduction with that size of a shortfall.”

Nurses say patients will be impacted no matter how the jobs are cut.

“The patients are going to be receiving less hours of nursing care,” said Linda Haslam-Stroud, a Hamilton nurse and president of the Ontario Nurses’ Association.

“Our patients are going to have less contact with the nurse because she’s now spread thinner. That’s going to mean less observation for our patients and less assessment of them.”

Hamilton Health Sciences is cutting 300 of its 10,000 jobs and 10 have already been lost through attrition at St. Peter’s Hospital.

It needs to cut $25 million out of its $1-billion budget by the end of the fiscal year on March 31. It has already cut $500,000 from St. Peter’s $30-million budget.

St. Joseph’s needs to cut 175 jobs to save $12 million. It currently has 4,500 staff and a budget of $500 million.

Both St. Joseph’s and HHS have about 100 vacancies each, which will be targeted first.

Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital in Burlington is short $5.5 million but isn’t saying yet how many jobs will be impacted.

The shortfalls are a result of a gap between provincial funding and inflation. The province is giving hospitals an increase of about 2.1 per cent this fiscal year, but their costs are going up between 4 and 5 per cent.

However, the hospitals blame the ailing economy, and not the province, for the lack of cash.

“This is not me whining about more money, it isn’t there,” St. Joseph's Smith said. “We need to be very upfront and honest and respectful of government.

They can’t produce money that doesn’t exist. Health care can not be divorced from the world’s economy.”

HHS is the city’s largest employer and runs McMaster University Medical Centre, the Juravinski Cancer Centre, Henderson General, Hamilton General, Chedoke, St. Peter’s and McMaster Children’s hospitals.

St. Joseph’s runs an urgent care centre in Stoney Creek, the Centre for Mountain Health Services, as well as its acute care hospital on Charlton Avenue East.

Hospital executives warn patients their finances aren’t expected to get better any time soon.

“We’re assuming that for at least another couple of years we’re going to have significant belt-tightening that has to go on,” said Murray Martin, head of HHS.

SteelTown
Jan 23, 2009, 5:34 PM
Cutting-edge cancer technology comes to Ontario

CTV.ca News Staff
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20090123/breast_cancer_090123/20090123?hub=TopStories

A major worldwide healthcare technology developer has chosen to test out some cutting-edge breast cancer detection technology on patients receiving care at an Ontario hospital.

It was announced Friday morning that GE Healthcare will test various molecular breast imaging probe prototypes at Henderson General Hospital in Hamilton, about 70 kilometres outside of Toronto.

The technology the company will be testing seeks to detect small tumours in women's breasts that are not found as easily through conventional mammography. The goal is to locate such tumours in their very earliest stages, so that treatment can be administered to patients as early as possible.

Early detection is a major factor in surviving breast cancer, with Mayo Clinic research suggesting that as many as 98 per cent of women will live for at least five years after being diagnosed for early-stage, localized breast cancers.

In Ontario alone, 8,500 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year.

Dr. Tom Hudson, president and scientific director of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, said the technology that will be tested in Hamilton holds much promise for cancer patients.

"This technology promises to have a significant impact on care for high-risk patients whose tiny tumours cannot be seen by mammography," Hudson said in a released statement.

"We hope this will lead to earlier detection, better treatment and ultimately save lives."

The company said it chose to test its technologies in Hamilton because of the research facilities and programs available in the area -- including the oncology and nuclear medicine programs in place at McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences.

Health Canada and the hospital's research ethics board will review all of the clinical studies taking place in Hamilton.

The provincial Ministry of Research and Innovation will kick in $450,000 towards the project through its investment in the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research.

According to the official GE Healthcare website, the $17 billion company employs more than 46,000 people in more than 100 countries around the globe. It is a unit of General Electric Company.

MsMe
Mar 23, 2009, 3:51 PM
High school grads to screen blood

March 23, 2009
Joanna Frketich
The Hamilton Spectator
(Mar 23, 2009)
Canadian Blood Services is replacing nurses with high school graduates to screen potential blood donors.

Despite telling Ontario's Standing Committee on Justice Policy three years ago critical functions such as donor eligibility assessment can be done only by nurses, it is now planning on training Grade 12 graduates to do the job.

There will still be at least one nurse to supervise each blood donor clinic and consult about tough calls on donor eligibility.

But the majority of screening will be done by staff who take a course paid for by CBS at Ottawa-based Algonquin College.

The length of the course is still being determined.

Ontario nurses currently train for four years at university.

"The thinking is to really align the roles more closely with the valuable skill sets nurses bring into our organization," said Mark Donnison, executive director of donor and clinic services.

That is a complete turnaround from an oral presentation given in May 2006 by chief operating officer Ian Mumford to Ontario's Standing Committee on Justice Policy regarding Bill 56, which expanded the government's power to respond to emergencies.

"Given the highly regulated nature of our business, many of the critical functions must be performed by doctors, nurses or technologists," said Mumford. "For example, a nurse can only perform eligibility assessment of donors ... we are, therefore, not permitted to substitute other staff or volunteers to perform those duties."

CBS is now planning on submitting a proposal to Health Canada to change the regulations to allow it to substitute other staff to do the job of donor screening.

"Canadians can be confident that whenever Health Canada receives a submission from Canadian Blood Services or Hema-Quebec to change established procedures, sufficient evidence must be provided to show that the change will not compromise the safety to the donor and/or recipient," Health Canada spokesperson Alastair Sinclair said in a statement.

CBS says the change is necessary because of an acute shortage of nurses nationwide. The Canadian Nurses Association predicts the country will be short 78,000 nurses in as little as two years.

"As we're looking at our ability to collect enough blood, we are facing some situations where our clinics are being affected by not having enough staff in them," said Donnison. "It's really prompted us to take a look to see how we can move ahead and deal with this challenge in the future."

The Ontario Nurses' Association says it's dangerous to have less-skilled and unregulated workers screening blood donors.

ONA president Linda Haslam-Stroud argues nurses' medical knowledge, understanding of patient confidentiality and the accountability of being part of a regulatory college are essential to the job.

"When you are doing an assessment, this isn't about ticking off a sheet," she said. "You're asking pretty invasive questions, like your sexual behaviour, and picking up and recognizing a lot of symptoms."

jfrketich@thespec.com

905-526-3349


http://www.thespec.com/News/Local/article/535007



Not so sure I like this idea.

drpgq
Mar 23, 2009, 4:11 PM
I'm ok with it. Seems pretty pointless to take four years of university just to do blood screening.

omro
Mar 23, 2009, 4:18 PM
A lab technician could easily do the job.

SteelTown
Mar 23, 2009, 4:20 PM
^ Who wants to pay for a lab tech with benefits if you can hire a student.

MsMe
Mar 23, 2009, 4:25 PM
And look at the past with the poor screening in the 80s when the AIDS vrus became a problem. And that was properly trained people at the time.

emge
Mar 23, 2009, 4:26 PM
Seriously, the job is not that complicated. It's almost an insult to the nurses' skills to make them do that job.

If not comfortable with high school grads, CERTAINLY lab techs who take blood, get consent forms, and do this daily in the workplace anyway could do it.

bornagainbiking
Mar 23, 2009, 5:08 PM
I am a donor and the majority of the clinic does not need 4 yrs of University. Anyone can ask the questions and do you really think they care after about the first week. if they have concerns refer you to THE nurse or supervisor.
I have had blood taken and most lab techs or medics do better thsn a nurse who doesn't have the venipuncture course or constant practice. If the hospitals are short direct the RNs there.
So RN don't like the shift work as they have families. CDS is mostly 9-5 Mon to Fri
I get insulted with the same old stupid questions if I had sex in Chad even once since 1985. Well there was that one night OK I was drunk but I wore a condom. So much time is wasted with the questionaire, I get asked for ID at least 4 times and I go to the same place and only there, Put a picture on my blood donors card.:yes:

realcity
Mar 23, 2009, 5:49 PM
Considering the Blood Scandal you'd think they'd be careful about cutting any corners. Or is 5 years ago ancient history.

emge
Mar 23, 2009, 6:00 PM
They were probably looking at covering themselves after the blood scandal when they last emphasized that they'd have nurses doing the screening... and now they're probably waking up to the fact that it's not that tough of a job.

There's many more difficult jobs where a nurse can be hired for them, but nurses with their general background aren't as well trained as techs with less, but more specialized training. e.g. any nurse can put on sticky pads and perform an ECG, but very few are trained to read ECGs to the extent that a cardiovascular technologist with 2 years of training JUST in heart pathophysiology and interpreting ECGs is - the same with many other techs that take 2, 3, 4 years of training just in one thing.

When you need something done a few times, a nurse is great. When you need one specific task performed over and over, hire the person with more specialized training in that particular task - whom you need to pay less than a nurse. It's a no-brainer for ECGs.

This one should be another no-brainer. Nurses should be hired for nursing, not questionnaire-taking. It's not invasive, requires administrering no medication... nothing that requires nursing or registration with a college of professionals. Even if they end up plunking Grade 12 graduates through a 2-week or 4-month course or something of the sort, it's still more training on that particular task than any nurse is given, and instead of 70k they can pay them 30k.

SteelTown
May 8, 2010, 4:22 PM
You guys should check out the renovations happening at MUMC. Huge difference is happening.

MUMC is like a maze with all twist and turns and has four blocks where it's open for sunlight, think it was done to have a smoking section. But you can't smoke in the area anymore.

So they've sealed in one section with skylights and probably 20 long hanging lamps with hardwood walls. It's a 3 storey artium, it's beautiful. Cost $15 million.

Here's the rendering...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v174/Appster/artium.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v174/Appster/artium1.jpg

bornagainbiking
May 8, 2010, 9:31 PM
Wonder how many nurses got laid off or could be hired for patient care at this price. Health care = service to the patient not taj mahal buildings.
Is it any wonder we are in the situation we are?:koko: :koko: :koko: :koko: :koko:

SteelTown
May 8, 2010, 9:37 PM
$15 million from the Farncombe Family.

SteelTown
Oct 17, 2011, 11:46 PM
They are trying to keep it hush hush but HHS got a huge fine from the Ministry of Labour recently for asbesto at MUMC.

thistleclub
Mar 12, 2012, 12:07 PM
Steve Buist's Critical Condition series in today's Spec casts a shadow on local health care.

Failing Grades On the LHIN Report Card (http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/684253--failing-grades-on-the-lhin-report-card)

"Hamilton's Local Health Integration Network ranks 11th out of Ontario's 14 LHINs, based on the results of a massive health-care report card created by The Hamilton Spectator. Only the province's three northern LHINs fared worse than the Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant LHIN, which has a $2.5-billion budget to co-ordinate health-care services for 1.4 million people from Burlington to Brantford to Simcoe to Fort Erie... The Hamilton-area LHIN finished last in the cancer category, 13th out of 14 in the wait times category and 11th in the long-term care/home care category."

Performance indicators for our LHIN have apparently been trending lower in recent years. (http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/684288--hamilton-lhin-s-results-the-worst-of-a-bad-lot)

"The Hamilton-area Local Health Integration Network failed to meet 10 of 11 targets in its most recent accountability report, the worst result of Ontario’s 14 LHINs. In fact, the local LHIN’s performance actually worsened for three of the indicators compared to the previous year."

Among the Spec's wait-time findings for the HNHB LHIN (http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/684192--critical-condition-the-waiting-is-often-the-worst-of-it):

• It took 41 days for nine out of 10 people to get a CT scan, tied for the longest wait in the province. By contrast, it took just 14 days for nine out of 10 people to get a CT scan in the Central West LHIN, the best in Ontario.

• When all MRI variables were combined, the HNHB LHIN finished last in the province.

• Just over half of the HNHB LHIN’s Priority 2 MRI scans were done within the provincial target time. In the North Simcoe-Muskoka LHIN, by contrast, 94 per cent of priority 2 MRIs were done within the target.

• Only 15 per cent of HNHB LHIN’s Priority 4 MRI scans were done within the target wait time.

• The HNHB LHIN had the fourth-worst wait time for hip replacement surgery. It took 235 days for nine out of 10 patients to have their hips replaced, compared to 93 days in the Erie St. Clair LHIN."

bigguy1231
Mar 12, 2012, 3:54 PM
As someone who has been waiting 10 months for knee surgery, I can attest to the findings.

I recently called the doctors office to try and find out how much longer and the answer I got was soon, with a laugh.

The MRI wait wasn't as long as they have indicated though. I only waited 6 days. But the appointment for the MRI was at 2 am at St. Joes.

A guy I work with lives up in the Orangeville area. He was diagnosed with a shoulder problem requiring surgery in February this year and is having surgery next week. It almost makes me want to move.

Something drastic needs to be done.

thistleclub
Mar 20, 2012, 5:56 PM
McMaster Children’s Hospital building $100m treatment centre beside HGH (http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/690295--mcmaster-children-s-hospital-building-100m-treatment-centre-beside-hgh
) (Hamilton Spectator, Mark McNeil, Mar 20, 2012)

Hamilton’s new $100 million Children’s Treatment Centre will be located near the General Hospital on Wellington Street North, in an area of the city that hospital administrators say is “one of Hamilton’s most vulnerable neighbourhoods.”

McMaster Children’s Hospital officials today made the surprise announcement that the five-storey, state-of-the-art building would not be built at the Chedoke site of Hamilton Health Sciences on the West Mountain, as originally planned.

Dr. Peter Fitzgerald, president of McMaster Children’s Hospital, said after further consideration hospital administrators realized they didn’t necessarily have to construct the facility where the services are currently being offered. They decided to consider a wider range of possibilities.

“We started being introspective,” he said. “We stepped back ... and wondered what is the best location for all of Hamilton and the region.”

He noted the lower city site is surrounded by neighbourhoods identified in The Spectator’s award-winning Code Red series as having high rates of poverty that went hand in hand with poor health.

Colleen Fotheringham, director Autism, Child and Youth Mental Health and Development Pediatrics and Rehabilitation, says she expects the new facility will handle 70,000 visits a year from more than 20,000 patients. She expects numbers will increase slightly because the new location is more accessible by public transportation than the Chedoke site.
Construction is to begin in 2014 with completion anticipated in 2016.

Last summer Laurel Broten, who was then Ontario’s minister of children and youth services, announced that Hamilton Health Sciences would receive full funding for the building that would replace four rundown Chedoke sites that house programs for young people.

The 170,000 square foot treatment centre – which will feature an outdoor track, a therapeutic playground, physiotherapy space and a motion lab – will be built on Wellington just north of Barton Street East on Hamilton Health Sciences owned property that is currently used for parking.

The facility will house outpatient services, and be the base for in-home and community services, for autism spectrum disorders, child and youth mental health, developmental pediatrics and rehabilitation programs, and prosthetics and orthotics.

“I think this is huge for the city,” said Fitzgerald. “This is a $100 million project. It will provide new facilities for a very needy group of patients and families that to date have not received not much investment from a facility point of view.

“This is spectacular for the city...this is great news for us I am sure other communities are quite jealous.”

matt602
Mar 20, 2012, 7:31 PM
That General Hospital site is getting to be huge with all of the expansion they've done in the last 10 years. It has made that area look very different.

Dr Awesomesauce
Mar 21, 2012, 2:52 AM
Great news. It would be nice if the building faced onto Barton ~ maybe the NW corner of Wellington ~ but it sounds like it might go in behind somewhere.

Hope they release some pics soon.

CaptainKirk
Mar 21, 2012, 3:17 AM
Great news. It would be nice if the building faced onto Barton ~ maybe the NW corner of Wellington ~ but it sounds like it might go in behind somewhere.

Hope they release some pics soon.

The old Hamilton BBQ lot? Don't think HHS owns that lot, do they?

It's a repair garage now
http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&rlz=1C1CHNU_enCA353&ix=sea&ion=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&biw=1280&bih=909&q=221+barton+st+e&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x882c9b8a4789eed7:0xe0c432ff16157b66,221+Barton+St+E,+Hamilton,+ON+L8L+2W8&gl=ca&ei=RElpT7WYDM3qgQfBxKmpCQ&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=title&resnum=1&ved=0CB4Q8gEwAA


(Remember the fleet of Hamilton BBQ cars with the flashing chicken on top of the delivery cars?)

LikeHamilton
Mar 21, 2012, 3:31 AM
This why they built the big parking lot across Barton Street!

matt602
Mar 21, 2012, 4:36 AM
They couldn't have fronted the building on Barton since the General Hospital building fronts pretty much the entire stretch of Barton from Victoria to Wellington. I personally would have preferred if they had built the building on one of the lots that they just turned into parking, either the one beside the Mark Preece House on Barton or the ex-brownfield across the street. It's still great to see some more building in that area either way though.

SteelTown
Mar 21, 2012, 2:21 PM
http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll=43.262566,-79.854319&spn=0.004797,0.009667&t=h&z=17

There were also plans to build an Administrative Office at the corner of Victoria and Birge, former Heliport area. Don't know if that's still an option.

It's gonna be kinda odd to have a children therapeutic playground and outdoor track right next to the Barton jail.

markbarbera
Mar 22, 2012, 12:23 AM
Not really, it will be fronting Wellington Street, with Ferguson between it and the jail. But I guess we can get all worked up by sensationalizing the Hollywood-style possibility of escaped convicts taking sick children hostage...

Dr Awesomesauce
Mar 22, 2012, 3:54 AM
^Nobody's suggesting that.

Having lived a stone's throw from the jail a few years back, I can tell you it's a little depressing seeing it everyday. It makes that part of town just a little grimmer than it would otherwise be. It's not about safety, it's about optics.

I just hope that any new buildings at the General are not hidden in behind but are built near Barton where people can see them.

thistleclub
Nov 26, 2012, 9:00 PM
Infrastructure Ontario's just-released Upcoming Projects Update (Nov 2012) (http://www.infrastructureontario.ca/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=2147489552) contains one Hamilton project:

Hamilton Health Sciences' McMaster Children's Treatment Centre
Proposed Model: Design Build Finance
Issue RFQ: Summer 2012
Issue RFP: Spring 2013
Cost: Less than $100M (Construction Cost Only)

Pretty near the front of the line, too -- only three spots behind Waterloo LRT and six behind Ottawa LRT.

thistleclub
Jan 20, 2013, 1:53 AM
R2-D2 look-alike helps clean hospital rooms of superbugs (http://www.thestar.com/living/article/1317043--r2-d2-look-alike-helps-clean-hospital-rooms-of-superbugs)
(Toronto Star, Joseph Hall, January 18, 2013)

The ominous list of acronyms and contractions can spell illness and death for tens of thousands of hospital patients in Canada each year.

Now, in the battle against such superbugs as C. difficile, MRSA and VRE, a robot that emits UV-3 light is entering the fray.

Bearing a passing resemblance to R2-D2 of Star Wars fame, this droid emits short blasts of high-powered ultraviolet light to rid hospital beds, bathrooms and ICUs of the potentially lethal pathogens.

“We’ve seen (in independent studies) reductions of 50 per cent or more in hospital-acquired infection rates,” says Mark Stibich, the inventor of the Xenex Robot System and chief scientific officer of the San Antonio company.

“And it can be used in every area of the hospital 24 hours a day.”

The system, which is being used in about 100 U.S. facilities, will soon begin a pilot run atHamilton Health Sciences hospitals, an HHS spokesperson says.

Wheeled between vacated rooms by cleaning staff, the robot lifts and dips its saucer-like head, pulsing millisecond blasts of UV-3 light, bathing surfaces and fixtures, and penetrating the crevices and dark places where the germs can lurk.

One of three types of ultraviolet radiation — UV-1, and UV-2 being the others — UV-3 has the power to drill into and “gunk up” the bacterial DNA that directs the superbugs to spread.

“At that point the organism can no longer replicate and at that point it’s no longer infectious,” Stibich says.

The light, produced by a xenon gas-fired lamp, can also obliterate the walls of the single-celled organisms for a faster kill, Stibich says.

The device is used in conjunction with traditional bleach cleaning. But with a welder’s arch brightness to its ultraviolet blasts, the robot must be left on its own when used in rooms and other hospital spaces.

At $95,000 plus a $1,500 monthly service charge, the robot isn’t cheap.

But the company argues it’s cost effective, given that superbugs can infect about 10 per cent of Canadian patients annually, adding billions of dollars to the country’s health care costs.

SteelTown
Jun 19, 2013, 11:01 PM
Site plan for the McMaster Children Health Centre

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v174/Appster/ChildrenCentre_zpsdbd76b5d.jpg

Dwils01
Jun 20, 2013, 2:44 AM
I'm pretty sure that's right across from the General Hospital which seems like a great location from it. Do we know the height of the building yet?

lucasmascotto
Jun 20, 2013, 5:25 AM
McMaster Children’s Health Centre

Location: Hamilton

Project Type: DBF - Design Build Finance

Infrastructure Type: Children and Youth Services

Price of Contract: To be announced following Financial Close

Estimated Value for Money : To be announced following Financial Close

About the Project:

The project will involve the construction of a new children’s treatment centre that will be part of Hamilton Health Sciences’ McMaster Children’s Hospital. The new facility will be built on Wellington Street near Barton Street, across from the Regional Rehabilitation Centre.

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services is funding this project to bring together under one roof four programs currently located at Hamilton Health Sciences’ Chedoke campus. The new site will provide:

Autism Spectrum Disorders services
Child and Youth Mental Health Program
Developmental Pediatrics and Rehabilitation services
Prosthetic and Orthotic services

Project Features
This new facility will provide family-focused service and individualized programming, depending on the needs of the child and family.

Highlights of the project will include fully accessible design and construction, an outdoor wheeling track, a therapeutic playground and physiotherapy space.

http://www.infrastructureontario.ca/Templates/Projects.aspx?id=2147489234&langtype=1033

interr0bangr
Jun 16, 2014, 3:19 PM
It looks like there's some construction ramping up in the parking lot west of Hamilton General Hospital at Wellington/Barton. Does anyone know what this is? Is it related to the hospital at all?

cooker
Jun 16, 2014, 5:45 PM
It looks like there's some construction ramping up in the parking lot west of Hamilton General Hospital at Wellington/Barton. Does anyone know what this is? Is it related to the hospital at all?

This is the new McMaster Children's Hospital Outpatient services building. This building will house all of the services currently housed at Chedoke on the west mountain. Autism, Child and You Mental Health, CDRP, Prosthetics and Orthotics ect. The Move is tentatively scheduled to Nov 2015

interr0bangr
Jun 16, 2014, 6:19 PM
Awesome! Thanks for the info. Might take some pictures and start a new thread soon.

CaptainKirk
Jun 16, 2014, 11:23 PM
It looks like there's some construction ramping up in the parking lot west of Hamilton General Hospital at Wellington/Barton. Does anyone know what this is? Is it related to the hospital at all?

Did you miss the few posts right before yours? it's all pretty much explained there, isn't it?

interr0bangr
Jun 17, 2014, 1:03 AM
Did you miss the few posts right before yours? it's all pretty much explained there, isn't it?

Yep, I didn't read the whole thread before I posted. My bad!

interr0bangr
Jul 25, 2014, 2:18 AM
I see the parking lot at the southeast corner of Barton and Victora (kitty corner to Hamilton General) just went up for sale. I wonder why as the lot is almost always full. Any chance of HHS buying up the land since it's a fairly big plot really close to the hospital? It's a hideous looking parking lot so I hope something decent gets developed on it eventually.

palace1
Jul 25, 2014, 2:59 AM
I noticed the For Sale sign indicated "Power of Sale" so the owner must not be making enough money to cover the mortgage?

http://www.loopnet.com/Listing/18761035/290-Barton-St-E-Hamilton-ON/

Price: $1,800,000 CAD
Lot Size: 0.66 AC
Price/AC: $2,727,272.62 CAD
Lot Type: Retail (land)

bornagainbiking
Jul 25, 2014, 10:41 AM
Considering the HUGE newer parking lot on Barton Between the A&W and Tim Hortons and the other between between Wellington and Ferguson on the North side. I doubt it is required.
Maybe consider another use. It is is poor condition and needs new asphalt also not well laid out. Wasn't that an ESSO station not that long ago?
A small park with over-head cover and picnic tables and parking for food trucks.

matt602
Jul 25, 2014, 11:53 AM
I think a medium-rise condo or loft building on that corner would be wonderful if Barton Street starts to take off in the future. Same for the empty lot on the same corner at Barton and Wellington.

interr0bangr
Jul 25, 2014, 12:57 PM
Yeah, a loft-style building would be great there. Really anything half decent (that's not a parking lot) Would be huge for that stretch of Barton's retail revitalization.

thistleclub
Mar 2, 2016, 2:43 PM
Hamilton Health Sciences considers closing a hospital (http://www.thespec.com/news-story/6369812-hamilton-health-sciences-considers-closing-a-hospital/)
(Hamilton Spectator, Joanna Frketich, Mar 1 2016)

Hamilton Health Sciences is considering closing at least one large hospital in the next 10 years.

"We are thinking hard about whether or not our current physical footprint is appropriate and sustainable," CEO Rob MacIsaac told a group of stakeholders at a summit to get feedback on HHS' 20-year vision expected to be finalized in June.

Instead, HHS wants to shift care to smaller clinics in neighbourhoods that need it most. MacIsaac also envisions virtual clinics where Hamiltonians can get care in their own living room. And he wants to partner with community agencies to provide care together.

"There should probably be 100 points of access to the hospital," said MacIsaac. "You shouldn't necessarily have to walk through the doors of a big huge health care institution in order to avail yourself of our expertise, our knowledge and our services."

HHS is currently one of the largest hospital networks in Ontario compromised of seven hospitals on six sites, three centres and one research institute with a budget of more than $1 billion.

"As some of our buildings age and require replacement we would be thinking about whether we could consolidate into fewer sites," MacIsaac told The Spectator, saying he'd like to get the number of large hospitals down to two or three.

"It's a 20-year-plan. I don't see us doing anything hugely significant for a decade in terms of that side of the equation."

But he wants to get started right away on creating smaller clinics in the community that would provide care cheaper and closer to home.


Read it in full here (http://www.thespec.com/news-story/6369812-hamilton-health-sciences-considers-closing-a-hospital/).


These pressures are not exactly a surprise, having been repeatedly flagged by the province's go-to economist over over (https://www.td.com/document/PDF/economics/special/td-economics-special-db0510-health-care.pdf) the (https://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/Benefactors_Lecture_2011.pdf) last (http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/reformcommission/chapters/executive-summary.pdf) few (http://www.queenshealthpolicychange.ca/resources/2014-WhitePaper-Drummond.pdf) years (http://www.queenshealthpolicychange.ca/resources/2015-WhitePaper-Drummond.pdf).

The issue appears to be primarily one of allocating finite resources: In 2014, the Canadian Institute for Health Information's National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2014 (https://www.cihi.ca/en/nhex_2014_report_en.pdf) noted:

The public sector is forecast to be responsible for 70.5% of Canadian health expenditure in 2014. The public sector’s share is expected to be the highest in the territories (ranging from 75.4% in Yukon to 92.3% in Nunavut) and the lowest in Ontario (68.1%). Provincial and territorial governments’ health expenditure per capita is expected to average $3,960 in 2014. The highest per capita spending among the provinces is projected to be in Newfoundland and Labrador ($5,087) and Alberta ($4,699), while the lowest is forecast to be in Quebec ($3,660) and Ontario ($3,768)…. Quebec and Ontario are projected to have the lowest per capita spending on hospitals, at $1,487 and $1,665, respectively….For physician spending, the highest per capita spending among the provinces is projected to be in Alberta ($1,060) and Ontario ($989), while the lowest is forecast to be in Prince Edward Island ($751) and New Brunswick ($791).

thistleclub
Mar 26, 2016, 2:44 PM
Hamilton Health Sciences “not financially sustainable,” says CEO (hamiltonnews.com/news-story/6406676-hamilton-health-sciences-not-financially-sustainable-says-ceo)
(Hamilton Mountain News, Kevin Werner, Mar 25 2016)

Hamilton Health Sciences president and chief executive officer Rob MacIsaac says the healthcare facility will close a campus before it builds a needed urgent care facility on the mountain.

Appearing before Hamilton politicians last week to talk about HHS’s 20-year plan, MacIsaac said HHS needs to invest up to $60 million in capital funding annually to keep its buildings sustainable. Yet, last year HHS invested only about $20 million.

“There is a backlog of deferred maintenance,” said MacIsaac. “I can’t stand by and let the hospital fall apart. It will take some time to say when HHS is sustainable.”

MacIsaac said HHS’s 20-year plan includes possible “consolidation” of its hospitals and campuses. He said some of the facilities over the next couple of decades “will have outlived their usefulness.”

It’s a similar message that he delivered to about 70 health care officials during a “summit” in February at the Hamilton Convention Centre. At that event, MacIsaac said within a decade HHS will have to close a facility.

HHS is one of the largest hospital networks in Ontario, with seven hospitals on six sites, three centres, and one research institution, all with a budget of about $1 billion.


Read it in full here (http://m.hamiltonnews.com/news-story/6406676-hamilton-health-sciences-not-financially-sustainable-says-ceo).

SteelTown
Jun 1, 2016, 1:16 PM
Hamilton Health Sciences plans to open a new hospital, close others

http://www.thespec.com/news-story/6700722-hamilton-health-sciences-plans-to-open-a-new-hospital-close-others/

Hamilton Health Sciences plans to vastly change the face of health care here over the next 20 years.

The wide-ranging vision includes building a new hospital for women and children, concentrating services at Hamilton General and Juravinski and closing at least one big building.

The new hospital would likely be built near Hamilton General and become part of its campus, replacing the current McMaster Children's Hospital.

"The children's hospital is the fastest-growing children's hospital in the province," said Rob MacIsaac, president and CEO of HHS in an interview with The Spectator regarding the long-term vision.

"We will for sure run out of room on the current site."

Hamilton General and Juravinski hospitals will be redeveloped and modernized to become the focus of acute care under the plan that will be finalized and taken to the board in June.

St. Peter's, a chronic care hospital downtown, would likely lose all of its inpatients as more services are concentrated at the two main sites.

The plan calls for at least one or more big buildings to close.

But MacIsaac maintains it's still "to be determined" if St. Peter's and the current site of McMaster Children's Hospital will remain open despite no clear role for them yet in the long-term plan.

"My intuition tells me he was trying to soften and gently prepare our municipality for some dramatic changes down the road," said Coun. Tom Jackson about a presentation MacIsaac made to city council May 24.

"That leads me right away to closures, consolidations and realignments."

The plan also revives redevelopment of West Lincoln Memorial Hospital that was cancelled in 2012 when Dalton McGuinty's Liberal government killed a number of hospital projects in Tory-held ridings. West Lincoln is in the Niagara West-Glanbrook riding of Tim Hudak, who was opposition leader at the time.

"West Lincoln Memorial Hospital is well past its best-before date in terms of infrastructure," said MacIsaac.

"We've been working with the community in West Niagara on a suite of programs that we think meet those community's needs.

"It does involve a 24-7 emergency, it also envisions being a low-risk birth centre and we're looking at an extensive ambulatory surgery suite of operating rooms that could well service the greater region.

"Community medicine is obviously going to be part of that vision and some specialty clinics. There will be a real focus on healthy aging."

However, MacIsaac would not go so far as to call the newly-envisioned West Lincoln an acute-care hospital.

A big part of the plan is having multiple entry points through clinics spread throughout the region in existing health care practices, community organizations, urgent care — or even the virtual sphere through smartphones and devices.

"Fewer large heavy campuses but a lot more community access points," explained MacIsaac.

"Increasingly we need to be partnering with others in the community to think about better ways to serve our patients. We're looking a lot at how we can keep people out of hospital, keep them healthier and better able to manage their conditions in the community."

The adult services in the new hospital would focus on women's reproductive care allowing labour and delivery to remain in the same building as the neonatal intensive care unit. Moving to the Hamilton's General campus would give women access to adult specialists, diagnostic equipment and intensive care.

"Our clinicians are telling us that there would be some benefit to our patients by locating a new hospital closer to the General," said MacIsaac. "We will definitely have to consider that as a serious option."

He said McMaster University taking over the current hospital building is a possibility, but nothing has been decided.

"We've given McMaster a heads-up and they've been involved in our planning," said MacIsaac. "Before we made any decisions around that, we'd want to make sure McMaster was well-engaged and onside."

The plan has left Jackson worried about the reaction of the community — recalling the "angst" when McMaster closed its emergency department to adults and how the Health Services Restructuring Commission "divided this community horribly" when it suggested closing certain sites.

"I'm just a little bit on tenterhooks here wondering what the ultimate decision will be down the road," he said.

But Coun. Sam Merulla says improving health care and making it sustainable for the future is more important than maintaining the status quo.

"We have to take emotions away from the discussion," said Merulla. "As long as it's a gain for the community, it's something we should support wholeheartedly. It shouldn't be looked at based on parochial means."

He urged residents to become involved in the discussion and help shape the HHS vision.

"The vision itself is something that is sound and one that the community needs to become aware of so they can be engaged to participate," said Merulla.

"It's not written in concrete. It's really more of a drawing of where they'd like to go."

eatboots
Jun 1, 2016, 2:22 PM
Not much room for a new hospital near the old hospital, unless they buy/bought the old Studebaker land. Might be a nice transition from residential to industrial and lots of room for parking! Some extensive teardown on Barton wouldn't be a bad idea either. St Peters is in a nice neighbourhood, I'm sure HHS will have no problem selling that property

king10
Jun 1, 2016, 4:01 PM
I see they've talked to McMaster about potentially closing the Mac Hospital and having the University take the site over.

Mac would be all over that as they're nearing capacity at their main campus and the hospital sits on a substantial piece of land.

Dwils01
Jun 1, 2016, 7:20 PM
I lived in Hamilton for 4 years and I never knew about St. Peter's. I past by the area many times on the B-Line bus but never saw it.
Weird how such a big structure could be so well hidden.

SteelTown
Jun 1, 2016, 7:36 PM
I see they've talked to McMaster about potentially closing the Mac Hospital and having the University take the site over.

Mac would be all over that as they're nearing capacity at their main campus and the hospital sits on a substantial piece of land.

Mac has been taking over MUMC for years now. Lately a lot of office space from Mac has been relocated to MUMC, especially Faculty of Health Sciences.

Though it's kind of odd and awkward when unionized Hamilton Health Sciences staff do work for Mac within MUMC. Hamilton Health Sciences staff used to deliever Mac's mail in the past, though that changed. So I could see Mac replacing Hamilton Health Sciences staff eventually.

king10
Jun 1, 2016, 7:45 PM
Mac has been taking over MUMC for years now. Lately a lot of office space from Mac has been relocated to MUMC, especially Faculty of Health Sciences.

Though it's kind of odd and awkward when unionized Hamilton Health Sciences staff do work for Mac within MUMC. Hamilton Health Sciences staff used to deliever Mac's mail in the past, though that changed. So I could see Mac replacing Hamilton Health Sciences staff eventually.

Yes, Mac has used the North portion of the Hospital as long as I cam remember. They have a couple very nice lecture halls as well as the Faculty of Health Sciences (as you mentioned) as well as the faculty of nursing among other things.

Taking over the whole thing would alleviate space constraints on main campus.

SteelTown
Jun 1, 2016, 7:56 PM
I think McMaster has three separate HR offices spread across campus. That's one department that could use more office space and centralized.

ScreamingViking
Jun 2, 2016, 6:20 AM
I lived in Hamilton for 4 years and I never knew about St. Peter's. I past by the area many times on the B-Line bus but never saw it.
Weird how such a big structure could be so well hidden.

It's on Maplewood Ave, a parallel secondary street a block south of Main. So you'd have seen it from the Delaware 5x buses but not the B-Line.

https://goo.gl/maps/3uJPkGbCa322
Street view: https://goo.gl/maps/khtzTsrYXk52

interr0bangr
Jun 2, 2016, 10:45 AM
Not much room for a new hospital near the old hospital, unless they buy/bought the old Studebaker land. Might be a nice transition from residential to industrial and lots of room for parking! Some extensive teardown on Barton wouldn't be a bad idea either. St Peters is in a nice neighbourhood, I'm sure HHS will have no problem selling that property

Between parking lots, empty lots and potential teardowns (The old HHS library building, 293 Wellington St N, etc) there's a fairly huge amount of space in the area they could use.

Studebaker land is already being developed as a light industrial park.

eatboots
Jun 2, 2016, 1:45 PM
That corner with the auto service centre, warehouse(?) would be ideal, from a strictly planning perspective those things are way out of place there.

As far as Studebaker goes, I thought the "industrial park" was just a ploy to be able to knock down the building and pay less tax on the property, because that's definitely what it looks like.

interr0bangr
Jun 2, 2016, 2:28 PM
That corner with the auto service centre, warehouse(?) would be ideal, from a strictly planning perspective those things are way out of place there.

As far as Studebaker goes, I thought the "industrial park" was just a ploy to be able to knock down the building and pay less tax on the property, because that's definitely what it looks like.

They've started preparing the land for the industrial park. it's recently been leveled out, there's trucks there all the time so I assume it's happening. There's a huge empty lot across the street that could maybe be used though.

eatboots
Jun 2, 2016, 5:29 PM
I've driven through there a few times and never noticed anything but fences, that doesn't mean it's not happening though. Unglamorous intensification, but not everything can be King William St!

LikeHamilton
Jun 2, 2016, 6:10 PM
I suspect that HHS will quietly by up properties south and/or east of the hospital, demolish and develop the new lands. Or they will develop their vast parking properties to the west and south west of the hospital. I don't think they will go north of the tracks. They will want to connect the building either above or below the ground.
They may do all of the above.
I imagine there will be private developers starting to pick up lands in the area to hold and sell to HHS to make a profit. The best would be if they start to develop their own project with a higher density projects.
I have been to a few cities and Charleston SC comes to mind with a large hospital and medical research facilities all together in the core area. They are very vibrant areas with lots of housing, shops and restaurants.

SteelTown
Jul 9, 2016, 8:12 PM
HHS to pull out of St. Peter’s and McMaster hospitals
Board approves 20-year plan to move care to General and Juravinski sites

http://www.thespec.com/news-story/6759889-hhs-to-pull-out-of-st-peter-s-and-mcmaster-hospitals/

Hamilton Health Sciences will stop operating St. Peter's Hospital and McMaster University Medical Centre under a 20-year plan approved by its board.

"What we're going to do with those facilities at this particular point in time is uncertain," said Norm Col, chair of the board of directors.

The plan also calls for Hamilton patients to go to an expanded Grimsby hospital for day surgery.

The HHS proposal now going to the Local Health Integration Network and the province suggests MUMC would most likely be given back to McMaster University in the next 10 to 12 years.

"This will permit the current MUMC facility to be transitioned back to the Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, who own the site for future growth in academic and research activities."

St. Peter's would be "repurposed" within 10 years "for other community health related activities and health/wellness partners."

The case for cutting ties with SPH and MUMC is contained in the board report approved June 23, which HHS has not made readily available to the public.

The hospital network stopped posting board agendas and reports on its website a year ago with no explanation. The Spectator was given a copy five days after requesting it.

The report makes it clear that Hamilton General Hospital and Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre will be the only two hospital sites operated by HHS in its vision of the future.

"HHS identified opportunities to reduce the number of large acute care hospital sites it operates in Hamilton by relocating services currently provided at MUMC and SPH to HGH and JHCC."

The two remaining hospitals would be redeveloped along with Grimsby's West Lincoln Memorial Hospital.

A "substantial portion of day surgery" would move out of Hamilton to Grimsby.

"This recommendation will take pressure off the very busy operating rooms in Hamilton with complex, in-patient surgeries, and puts less complex day surgery in a more appropriate ambulatory environment," states the proposal.

Grimsby would also have an emergency department, do low-risk births and have a community medicine program.

A new hospital for women and children would be built near HGH and become part of its campus within the next 10 years.

A big part of the plan is creating community clinics or other ways to access services in neighbourhoods — particularly those that need it most.

Future patients could even connect virtually with HHS.

"HHS anticipates that reducing the number of operating sites would offer significant opportunities for efficiencies," states the report by Kelly Campbell, vice-president of corporate services and capital development, and Aaron Levo, vice-president communications and public affairs.

Some of the efficiencies come from being able to merge services like pharmacy, diagnostics and laboratories. Some result simply from having to provide services in fewer buildings.

Fewer sites also could "improve patient experience through the continuum of care," suggests the report.

MUMC is specifically targeted because the site is owned by McMaster University, with HHS having a space-sharing agreement.

"Given the ownership structure, HHS has limited ability to expand or redevelop the 45- year-old site to meet future needs, particularly additional space for the growing demands of the McMaster Children's Hospital. Additionally, HHS is currently responsible for all maintenance and infrastructure renewal at the MUMC site, with costs recovered from McMaster University according to their respective space utilization of the site," states the report.

In addition, it's difficult for HHS to maintain an intensive care unit for birthing moms at MUMC.

"Moving the Women's Reproductive Health program to a new building at the HGH site would allow the program to utilize the services of the HGH adult Intensive Care Unit, instead of the current model where a small and relatively expensive Women's ICU is required at MUMC."

CEO Rob MacIsaac says HHS will try to find "new opportunities" for the St. Peter's and MUMC sites instead of seeing them close altogether.

"I think it would be wrong to say 100 per cent the vision is that there won't be anything left on either of the sites."

The next steps are to take the plan to the LHIN and the province.

"The best way to think about it is that you start off in a very broad circle and you keep narrowing in until you have your final plan," said MacIsaac. "We'll keep going in concentric circles until we arrive at an answer that is good for us and acceptable to the LHIN and to the province. Where we stand today might not look like exactly where we end up at the end of the process. I think we've got a vision we can be proud of. … But there's still lots of work left."