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DC83
Aug 21, 2008, 11:47 AM
Mayor wants input on bottled water ban

August 21, 2008
The Hamilton Spectator

Mayor Fred Eisenberger wants city staff to investigate whether Hamilton should follow the lead of London, Ont., in banning bottled water at municipal buildings.

"It's something we've been messaging on for quite some time as a municipality," he said yesterday, noting Hamilton has taken the "education path" so far.

"(I) don't know if we're prepared to do what London did, but it's certainly worth considering."

Toronto Mayor David Miller also said yesterday he'd like his city to join Kitchener, Ottawa and Vancouver in exploring a ban.

"Tap water is safe, clean, high-quality drinking water," said Eisenberger. "There's no reason why people shouldn't use it."

Do you think Hamilton should ban bottled water at its facilities? Comment at hallmarks.thespec.com

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Lets try our hardest to NOT make this a City vs Suburbs debate, pls!!!
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flar
Aug 21, 2008, 11:54 AM
Just ban them. Sadly, people now think that regular tap water is unsafe to drink and pay $1.50 for a tiny bottle of brandname tap water that they could have had for a fraction of a cent.

SteelTown
Aug 21, 2008, 11:59 AM
What's the benefit of banning bottled water?

Aylmer
Aug 21, 2008, 12:00 PM
I think that refillable bottles and fountaines should be more accesible.

In Europe, there are really cool fountains from the 18th-19th century in every park and square...

:)

raisethehammer
Aug 21, 2008, 12:03 PM
your poll question isn't stated too clearly. "personal water bottles" can mean a lot of things.
the real question is whether the city should ban the sale of bottled water in their facilities.

flar
Aug 21, 2008, 12:09 PM
What's the benefit of banning bottled water?

It is a little extreme, and I hate banning things, but all those plastic water bottles are really wasteful. I've always thought everything to do with overpriced bottles of water was stupid.

DC83
Aug 21, 2008, 12:16 PM
What's the benefit of banning bottled water?

They're apparently difficult to recycle, and even though they ARE recyclable, about 35% of water bottles thrown out end up in landfills.

If Hamilton is serious about diverting waste from landfills, this would certainly help.

Sorry rth, maybe a mod can change it to something a lil more clear. I said 'personal water bottles' b/c there are other types of water bottles (ie: Culligan, etc) that people use at home. I was referring to the ones that one picks up at a store, drinks the most expensive 500ml of water they've ever drank, then throw it away.

If they were to ban, the City would need to install safe, clean & accessible water stations ALL throughout the city. We need to bring back our 'Shorty Greens' hahaha

flar
Aug 21, 2008, 12:23 PM
edited to "small disposable water bottles"

FairHamilton
Aug 21, 2008, 12:59 PM
I say eliminate the sale and use of bottled water at all city facilities. Do I use the odd bottle of plastic water, yes, but it's not a regular occurence.

Here's my reasons why.

1. Tap water in Canada is tested and has a high level of safety.
2. Plastic bottles cause unnecessary landfill waste (I use a Laken aluminium bottle), take many resources to produce and there is a transportation cost to the environment (truck fuel/emissions to transport)
3. Plastic bottles take up more space in recycling trucks as compared to their weight meaning more trucks required and more tailpipe emissions to collect less material (by weight).
4. If the water is spring water it's water that is removed from is natural location and transported 100's of km's. Once this water is removed from the ecosystem it's gone forever. Something I think is overlooked.
5. We pay a deposit on our liquor bottles to fund recycling, but water bottlers get off without any additional payments.
6. The guys that complain about $1.25/l gas have no problem dropping $1 on a 500ml bottle of water.
7. Two of the largest bottle water brands are just filtered tap water.............

SteelTown
Aug 21, 2008, 1:02 PM
The bottles are recyclable so I don't see a major problem. Banning bottled water I think is a waste of time. I think banning plastic bags would be more ideal, but Mayor Fred and council blew that chance already.

I'll admit I bought a case of Fiji bottled water, it's damn good water haha.

thistleclub
Aug 21, 2008, 1:05 PM
This is more achievable than the plastic bag ban. The key wording here is "at municipal buildings" -- it's a finite ban and could go into effect immediately if there was political will to do so.

SteelTown
Aug 21, 2008, 1:13 PM
So let kids decide between pop and juices instead at recreational facilities across the city? Lets hope they pick Diet pop eh?

DC83
Aug 21, 2008, 1:14 PM
The bottles are recyclable so I don't see a major problem. Banning bottled water I think is a waste of time. I think banning plastic bags would be more ideal, but Mayor Fred and council blew that chance already.

I'll admit I bought a case of Fiji bottled water, it's damn good water haha.

I'm not gonna lie, if I'm out and about and thirsty as hell I'll buy a small/personal water bottle. Who doesn't? But there are alternatives!
If you like buying bottled water, buy those big jugs instead. I forget how many ml's are in them, but you can keep it in your fridge and fill one of those aluminum containers (or nalgene if you're not too paranoid, I still use them).

This would save on the recycling issue, and of course, reduce waste.

What I do, I buy those big recyclable water bottles for our personal water cooler at home ($3.29/ea. no deposit, from Costco) fill my nalgene b4 going out, and there we go. The bottles usually last a week or a lil less (all we drink is water), and it's the price of two small water bottles!
When it's empty, we step on it to crush it and toss it in the recycling.

SteelTown
Aug 21, 2008, 1:29 PM
Nalgene bottles are cancerous just so you know. If you heat up the water or any liquid the material in the plastic goes into the water. There was a warning about it a few weeks ago.

BrianE
Aug 21, 2008, 1:30 PM
The media and general public keeps using the word BAN!!!!, like somehow you'll be fined if you're caught drinking a bottle of Dasani.

In reality this is just a municipality deciding that they won't sell bottled water in their vending machines or concession stands. Similar to KFC or Taco Bell deciding to sell only Pepsi brand products to their customers. Nobody is under any obligation to sell bottled water, it's just a convienience that is provided to people.

In the near future we're all going to have to take a hard look at everything that we buy and consume. This has happened many times in the past, when times get tough we all have to sacrifice on what we want for what we need.

thistleclub
Aug 21, 2008, 1:33 PM
In reality this is just a municipality deciding that they won't sell bottled water in their vending machines or concession stands.... Nobody is under any obligation to sell bottled water, it's just a convenience that is provided to people.

Exactly. Bring your own if you like.

FairHamilton
Aug 21, 2008, 1:40 PM
The bottles are recyclable so I don't see a major problem.

The problems as I see them are:

1. Most bottles aren't recycled, they are thrown in garbage.
2. Cost ($ and environmental) of collecting plastic water bottles for recycling is much greater than other products (paper, aluminium, etc.)
3. Companies that sell bottled water don't have to invest in the collection/recycling of the bottles (unfortunately, pop and flavoured drink makers don't either).

Model for recycling should be The Beer Store. The Beer Store is close to (if not at) recycling 98% of their packaging. That's a success story others should strive to achieve, and it's not funded by the government. It's funded by consumers that use the product.

Remember to throw your caps into the bottom of the case as they take them for recycling as well.

DC83
Aug 21, 2008, 1:47 PM
Nalgene bottles are cancerous just so you know. If you heat up the water or any liquid the material in the plastic goes into the water. There was a warning about it a few weeks ago.

Oh ya I know. It doesn't bother me. I don't drink out of them every day. Only if I'm going for a long rollerblade where I know there is no access to drinkable water. If I'm at the Bayfront, there are a cpl water fountains so I don't bother bringing one.

And re: Rec Centres, they also have clean, safe, drinkable water fountains set up so an Aquafina vending machine is not really that necessary. Plus that water is free, so choosing it over Diet Pepsi should be an easy decision... esp for their parents ;)

SteelTown
Aug 21, 2008, 1:55 PM
I'm not a snob or anything but I can't drink out of public fountains, I'm a germaphobe.

drpgq
Aug 21, 2008, 2:22 PM
Would a potential ban affect the HECFI facilities as well (ie Copps)?

DC83
Aug 21, 2008, 2:25 PM
I'm not a snob or anything but I can't drink out of public fountains, I'm a germaphobe.

Ah good point. And you're def not the only one.

Alternative: fill your own bottle at this fountain w/o touching the top to the mouthpeice.

I guess Shorty Greens are out of the question for you, eh?

FairHamilton
Aug 21, 2008, 2:26 PM
I'm not a snob or anything but I can't drink out of public fountains, I'm a germaphobe.

Laken, World's finest bottle: http://www.laken.es/

Fill it at home.

FairHamilton
Aug 21, 2008, 2:30 PM
Ironies, of ironies. They are installing vending machines at my office today and a good portion of the beverage one is bottled water.

With the vending machines sitting 8 steps from the free water filtration station we'll see how many bottled waters are sold. I'm willing to bet some people buy the bottled water.........

block43
Aug 21, 2008, 2:33 PM
I think "single use water bottles" is the correct term.

emge
Aug 21, 2008, 3:18 PM
About seven or eight years ago I was working at Wal-Mart during high school, and they had "sport packs" of water and some bottles... me and the other kids working there laughed and laughed at the idea that they'd try to bottle water and sell it to us.

A few years later and no one blinks an eye. When I went to university, on moving-in day I saw one guy bringing about 30 cases of bottled water up to his dorm room.. unbelievable.

Norms can change fast... but the pendulum can swing in the other direction too.

I'm all for the proposed ban, but I know how lazy consumers are.. (pretty much all of us!) Unless there's readily available permanent water bottles, it probably will turn into more pop/other beverages consumed first before it gets better.

There was a comment on a blog talking about providing new vending machines with Hamilton-branded reusable water bottles -- its not such a bad idea! For $8-$20 at local shops the stainless bottles are pretty cheap anyways, and to spin that into bottles that show a positive environmental attitude by the city... that could be something. Even a promotion of the new ban by giving out water bottles like that to city employees could increase visibility and brand it as a positive Hamilton initiative

Millstone
Aug 21, 2008, 4:23 PM
I'll buy whatever I want to, thanks.

FairHamilton
Aug 21, 2008, 4:38 PM
I'll buy whatever I want to, thanks.

As is your right as a member of our society, but soon you just won't be able to buy it on city property.

DC83
Aug 21, 2008, 5:05 PM
There was a comment on a blog talking about providing new vending machines with Hamilton-branded reusable water bottles -- its not such a bad idea! For $8-$20 at local shops the stainless bottles are pretty cheap anyways, and to spin that into bottles that show a positive environmental attitude by the city... that could be something. Even a promotion of the new ban by giving out water bottles like that to city employees could increase visibility and brand it as a positive Hamilton initiative

Fantastic idea!!! You should email that to Council & Mayor Fred. Would be a great innitiative to start at the begininng of next summer: Send out some reps thru Gore Park, Mac, etc giving away these metal bottles with the 'H'-is-for-Hamilton logo with instructions inside as to where one can buy these bottles and how much they are.

Fantastic!

oldcoote
Aug 21, 2008, 5:06 PM
This argument goes beyond the environmental one.

It boils down ('scuse the pun) to a human rights issue. When did water become a commodity? Access to clean drinkable water should be a basic human right.

As for bottled water proponents? Spell EVIAN backwards.

rousseau
Aug 21, 2008, 6:33 PM
I'm not a snob or anything but I can't drink out of public fountains, I'm a germaphobe.
All you need is to remind yourself that teenagers exist in the world and it's summer, and you'll never drink out of a public fountain again.

someone123
Aug 21, 2008, 6:43 PM
Last time I had a bottle of water out in Vancouver and was riding an elevator somebody made a snotty comment.

North American society is becoming disgustingly self-ingratiating. Bottled water is just a target now because it's something people can trivially avoid so they can feel good about themselves. Bitching about smoking and bottled water is for Canadians what bitching about same sex marriage is for southern fundamentalists.

adam
Aug 21, 2008, 7:02 PM
Bottled water is wrong on many levels. Its bringing corporations like Coke and Pepsi that much closer to privatizing our water supply (they've already done it in 3rd world countries). A litre of bottled water costs more than a litre of gas and its no healthier for you than the water coming out of your tap.
I personally don't want to wake up one morning and find out that an American corporation has the rights to all the water in one of our Great Lakes. We are getting closer and closer to this being a reality. Bottled water is helping it along.

hammergirl
Aug 21, 2008, 7:12 PM
I can't remember the last time I bought a bottle of water. I'm cheap.

I fill up my stainless Kleen Kanteen and my BPA-Free Camelbak water bottles daily.

adam
Aug 21, 2008, 7:17 PM
By my calculations I'm saving over $500 a year by using clean, safe tap water.

markbarbera
Aug 21, 2008, 8:08 PM
IMO this whole debate is a little on the silly side. Banning bottled water for sale at public places limits the consumer from making a relatively healthy choice at the vending machine. You are forcing the consumer to make a less healthy beverage choice. How can you reconcile the effort to remove junk food from vending machines while simultaneously limiting beverage choices to unhealthy sodas or fruit-flavoured beverages? And the alternate choice will still contribute to the recycling dilemna.

If you are intersted in improving the recycling rate, then drop a recycling bin next to the vending machine. The more tonnage of recyclable bottles that end up in the bins, recycling facilities for these bottles will become more available and more cost effective. A plastic bottle recycler in southern Ontario recently stopped accepting them because not enough were being diverted to it to make it a cost-efficient endeavor. Modifying human behaviour to recycle is a long and difficult process. Our efforts should be geared to increasing recycling awareness.

Personally, I see the suggestion to ban the water bottle as a quick-and-easy feel-good item that will do little to impact the overall use of water bottles. Education really is the answer. I do think the idea of a deposit/refund policy would be a more effective approach to undertake. But again, such a policy requires initiative at the provincial level, not a piecemeal municipal approach.

FairHamilton
Aug 21, 2008, 8:10 PM
Ironies, of ironies. They are installing vending machines at my office today and a good portion of the beverage one is bottled water.

With the vending machines sitting 8 steps from the free water filtration station we'll see how many bottled waters are sold. I'm willing to bet some people buy the bottled water.........

Less than 5 hours from vending machine stocking for the first bottled water to be purchased. And the person who bought it commented what a schlep he was for "buying water"...........

FairHamilton
Aug 21, 2008, 8:13 PM
If you are intersted in improving the recycling rate, then drop a recycling bin next to the vending machine.

But the one big plus of bottled water is portability. A recycling bin next to the vending machine would be almost entirely empty.

Look at Tim Horton's they have garbage cans at their stores, but the countryside is littered with Tim Horton cups. But, I digress.

FairHamilton
Aug 21, 2008, 8:15 PM
Bottled water is wrong on many levels. Its bringing corporations like Coke and Pepsi that much closer to privatizing our water supply (they've already done it in 3rd world countries). A litre of bottled water costs more than a litre of gas and its no healthier for you than the water coming out of your tap.
I personally don't want to wake up one morning and find out that an American corporation has the rights to all the water in one of our Great Lakes. We are getting closer and closer to this being a reality. Bottled water is helping it along.

Agreed!! Americans already run the Hamilton sewage, so privatizing water treatment plants isn't that big a stretch.

markbarbera
Aug 21, 2008, 8:17 PM
Maybe we should ban coffee cups too...

Modern streetside waste bins have spots for recyclables already. Lets make them more prominent on the streetscape, particularly along high streets.

FairHamilton
Aug 21, 2008, 8:44 PM
Maybe we should ban coffee cups too...

Modern streetside waste bins have spots for recyclables already. Lets make them more prominent on the streetscape, particularly along high streets.

No, but maybe Tim Horton's should pay for the clean-up of garbage created by their customers. The brass at Timmie's know the deal because a few months ago they were running radio ads about putting cups in the garbage. A pre-emptive move to the problem? Perhaps........

Another option is that each cup has a $0.10 cent deposit which is refundable when you bring back the cup in any form factor.

Put bins on the street, make them prominent, but that might not work because some people just don't care unless there's a financial impact to them, hence the deposit solution. And some won't even care then, but at least then they are paying for their non-caring attitude............

SteelTown
Aug 21, 2008, 8:56 PM
I'm pretty sure American Waters no longer run Hamilton's water service, think it's back to publics hand.

MsMe
Aug 21, 2008, 8:56 PM
By my calculations I'm saving over $500 a year by using clean, safe tap water.

And tap water has flouride in it and bottled water doesn`t.

MalcolmTucker
Aug 21, 2008, 9:22 PM
Bottled water is wrong on many levels. Its bringing corporations like Coke and Pepsi that much closer to privatizing our water supply (they've already done it in 3rd world countries). A litre of bottled water costs more than a litre of gas and its no healthier for you than the water coming out of your tap.
I personally don't want to wake up one morning and find out that an American corporation has the rights to all the water in one of our Great Lakes. We are getting closer and closer to this being a reality. Bottled water is helping it along.

Paranoid much? The crown owns all the water, and there is nothing that any corporation can do to take away crown rights. Nothing. Zero. Zilch. Not an option.

Bottled water is an option for those that don't tote large refillable bottles everywhere, and provides an alternative to pop. All Diet Coke is is flavoured artifically sweetend carbonated water. Why should sales of bottle water be stopped but Diet Coke be allowed to continue?

If people are willing to pay for bottled water, why should the state act to restrict that choice?

SteelTown
Aug 21, 2008, 9:26 PM
Diet drinks have crap load of chemicals. Yet they are predicting Diet will overtake regular pop.

MsMe
Aug 21, 2008, 9:49 PM
And don`t forget some of the bottles themselves have a chemical in them that they are saying are unsafe.

go_leafs_go02
Aug 21, 2008, 9:57 PM
As a Londoner..I was like..what the heck?!?! the first time i heard this..especialy because they're keeping pop and sugary drinks in the machines. However, here, they're installing nozzles on drinking fountains that allow you to easily refill a 1 L bottle if need be. I work outside all summer long, in the heat, and sometimes I run out of water. I don't know what I'm going to do, I think they should readily have a container available for purchase (like .50 cents) that is a high quality water bottle, and that you can use that over and over.

I would also like to see Tim Hortons get involved in using a deposit based reusable cup. They have mugs that get washed and reused hundreds of times, I'm sure a plastic cup that insulates coffee well could be a keeper, and heck...have a rewards system...8 cups returned = 1 small coffee, 10 = medium 12 = large, and 14 = extra large. However, the only way this will ever come into effect is if the government comes along.

I can't see how a bottled water ban at municipal buildings is going to work out terribly well, It's gotta be put across the whole province or city before you will reap benefits.

Just like we can't sell spray paint to minors in london. Hello?!?! there are countless stores just outside of the city limit that can.

It's a good start though. And well done. Makes me proud to be a Londoner.!

raisethehammer
Aug 21, 2008, 10:39 PM
Paranoid much? The crown owns all the water, and there is nothing that any corporation can do to take away crown rights. Nothing. Zero. Zilch. Not an option.

Bottled water is an option for those that don't tote large refillable bottles everywhere, and provides an alternative to pop. All Diet Coke is is flavoured artifically sweetend carbonated water. Why should sales of bottle water be stopped but Diet Coke be allowed to continue?

If people are willing to pay for bottled water, why should the state act to restrict that choice?

you need to turn off the TV and read some real news.
The government is working WITH the corporations to privatize OUR water.

raisethehammer
Aug 21, 2008, 10:41 PM
As a Londoner..I was like..what the heck?!?! the first time i heard this..especialy because they're keeping pop and sugary drinks in the machines. However, here, they're installing nozzles on drinking fountains that allow you to easily refill a 1 L bottle if need be. I work outside all summer long, in the heat, and sometimes I run out of water. I don't know what I'm going to do, I think they should readily have a container available for purchase (like .50 cents) that is a high quality water bottle, and that you can use that over and over.

I would also like to see Tim Hortons get involved in using a deposit based reusable cup. They have mugs that get washed and reused hundreds of times, I'm sure a plastic cup that insulates coffee well could be a keeper, and heck...have a rewards system...8 cups returned = 1 small coffee, 10 = medium 12 = large, and 14 = extra large. However, the only way this will ever come into effect is if the government comes along.

I can't see how a bottled water ban at municipal buildings is going to work out terribly well, It's gotta be put across the whole province or city before you will reap benefits.

Just like we can't sell spray paint to minors in london. Hello?!?! there are countless stores just outside of the city limit that can.

It's a good start though. And well done. Makes me proud to be a Londoner.!


you do make a great statement here though - "they are keeping pop and sugary drinks in the machines".
What a joke. Let's get rid of the real health hazard first before we focus on water.

flar
Aug 22, 2008, 1:43 AM
I changed my mind. I would like to see a ban on pop and soft drinks of all kinds. They should also get some kind of deposit/return system going. I have a special hatred for bottled water, but I think pop is one of the greatest contributors to poor health and obesity. I cringe when I see little kids guzzling back Mountain Dew and Pepsi. In fact, I saw a three year old kid in City Centre Mall with Mountain Dew in a baby bottle. His hair was stringy and sparse and he was as pale as a ghost. He looked very sickly and I felt sorry for him. It's amazing (and sad) that people think large quantities of caffeine and sugar drinks are appropriate for children. I'd rather they drank water.

SteelTown
Aug 22, 2008, 1:54 AM
I wouldn't be surprised if either Coke or Pepsi has a contract with the city for recreational centres.

McMaster is all Coke.

MsMe
Aug 22, 2008, 2:03 AM
I'd rather they drank water.


Yes but not out of a plastic container.

go_leafs_go02
Aug 22, 2008, 2:16 AM
I wouldn't be surprised if either Coke or Pepsi has a contract with the city for recreational centres.

McMaster is all Coke.
Dasani (Coke) even offered London to install on their own dime recycling facilities at city centres.

astroblaster
Aug 22, 2008, 2:27 AM
the only reason i might support this is because it will generate some awareness to the overall drive to get rid of disposable crap

raisethehammer
Aug 22, 2008, 2:44 AM
Yes but not out of a plastic container.

Pop is most certainly sold in plastic containers. Go check out a variety store near you.
I'd rather first focus on getting rid of the absolute crap being sold in plastic or metal, and then worry about the water.
I agree with getting rid of all this disposable junk, but pop is one of the worst inventions of all time contributing to an incredible amount of health hazards and problems.
I'd rather see a city-owned vending machine full of only water than one full of only pop.

MsMe
Aug 22, 2008, 3:44 AM
That does go for both issues RTH, the contents and the plastic bottles.

oldcoote
Aug 22, 2008, 3:25 PM
Paranoid much? The crown owns all the water, and there is nothing that any corporation can do to take away crown rights. Nothing. Zero. Zilch. Not an option.

Ummm....if the Crown owns all the water, why is it for sale in every store?

markbarbera
Aug 22, 2008, 5:16 PM
If sovereignty is the driving force here, then municipal politics definitely is not the forum to pursue it.

FairHamilton
Aug 28, 2008, 12:55 PM
Good ole single-use plastic: http://www.thestar.com/News/World/article/486916

There was once at time that beverages came in refillable glass bottles...........

SteelTown
Aug 28, 2008, 1:02 PM
......then it stopped once people got wounds from dropping a glass bottle with the carbon dioxide caused the glass pieces to scatter all over your legs.

SteelTown
Aug 28, 2008, 2:05 PM
Kinda funny actually we banned glass bottles for safety concerns and now we want to ban plastic bottles, well plastic water bottles, for environmental concerns.

FairHamilton
Aug 28, 2008, 8:13 PM
Paranoid much? The crown owns all the water, and there is nothing that any corporation can do to take away crown rights. Nothing. Zero. Zilch. Not an option.

And we can all the trust the crown to do the right thing, right........

Money talks, and BS walks, http://money.canoe.ca/News/TopPhoto/2008/08/27/6591191-cp.html.

Just a think-tank's (most likely a bunch of quacks, or corporate hacks) suggestion, but watch as pressure from all sides starts to rise.

highwater
Aug 28, 2008, 10:14 PM
"Think tank - a place where people are paid to think by the makers of tanks."

- Naomi Klein

BCTed
Aug 28, 2008, 10:58 PM
IMO this whole debate is a little on the silly side. Banning bottled water for sale at public places limits the consumer from making a relatively healthy choice at the vending machine. You are forcing the consumer to make a less healthy beverage choice. How can you reconcile the effort to remove junk food from vending machines while simultaneously limiting beverage choices to unhealthy sodas or fruit-flavoured beverages? And the alternate choice will still contribute to the recycling dilemna.


I agree.

DC83
Aug 29, 2008, 11:59 AM
from Angus Reid


Acting to Substitute Plastic Products

Vast majority is concerned that plastic goods may be toxic; half are already switching to glass and metal products.

Fears that products made of plastic may be toxic are driving more of us away from this popular material, our recent poll has found. In the online survey of a representative national sample of Angus Reid Forum members, two-thirds of you (68%) are worried about the possibility that products made of plastic contain toxic agents—with 23 per cent are extremely concerned. Over two-in-five members (41%) say they are now using less products made of plastic—such as water bottles or food containers—than last year. Half of you (50%) also say you have taken concrete steps to substitute products made of plastic with goods made of other materials such as glass or metal. Of those who have not taken any such steps, one-in-four (26%) say they will try to replace plastic products within the next few months.
Click here to read more (https://www.angusreidforum.com/Admin/mediaserver/3/documents/2008.08.12_Plastic.pdf).
https://www.angusreidforum.com/MediaServer/3/images/plastic_chart.jpg

raisethehammer
Aug 29, 2008, 12:44 PM
we have glass baby bottles.
Much safer and healthier for the babies.

markbarbera
Apr 14, 2010, 4:22 PM
In today's Spec:

No bottled-water ban for Hamilton
City encourages people to use tap water instead

Emma Reilly
The Hamilton Spectator
(Apr 14, 2010)

The city has backed away from a ban on bottled water and will instead encourage Hamiltonians to rely on their taps instead.

Yesterday, council approved a staff recommendation to launch an awareness campaign encouraging residents to drink more municipal water. Staff didn't recommend an all-out ban on bottled water, arguing it would lead residents to choose sugary drinks instead.

Jim Harnum, Hamilton's senior director of environment and sustainable infrastructure, told council yesterday that banning bottled water was "complicated" and wasn't the best solution for Hamilton.

"Whenever you force people to do something, there tends to be a backlash," he said. "We'd rather people chose not to drink bottled water rather than forcing them not to."

The question about whether to ban bottled water stems from 2008, when Mayor Fred Eisenberger called for a staff report on the issue. Eisenberger was absent from yesterday's meeting for personal reasons.

John Challinor, director of corporate affairs for Nestle Waters Canada, attended yesterday's meeting to voice his company's support for council's plan.

"Bans send the wrong message to consumers about the health and wellness attributes of water, bottled and otherwise," he said.

"The fact of the matter is that bottled water is proving to be particularly helpful at a time when the incidents of obesity and diabetes are on a significant increase amongst young Canadians."

Challinor also told council 91 Canadian school boards, municipalities and universities have decided not to ban bottled water over the past two years, while only 17 municipalities, three school boards and two universities have adopted a ban.