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JET
Feb 3, 2010, 5:32 PM
"Urchin is interested in putting up a large residential/commercial complex on the corner of Queen Street behind the historic Sterns building"

I'm confused. Sterns is at the corner of Alderney and Portland, and behind it is where 19 Portland is being built ( not a large complex). Not sure what the Queen St reference is. Perhaps the reporter got it confused. JET

someone123
Feb 3, 2010, 9:03 PM
I'm guessing they mean one of the parking lots on Queen Street? It's sort of "behind" the Stearns Building in the sense of being behind it on the same block.

Queen between King and Alderney is a great spot for some apartments or condos.

Halifax Hillbilly
Feb 3, 2010, 9:31 PM
Across the street, the upper floors of the Green Lantern building, housing the Pogue Fado, have been unoccupied since Hurri cane Juan damaged it. It’s being converted to office and residential space.

That's great to hear. I found the article confusing though. Is the Green Lantern currently being redeveloped or is going to be redeveloped?

someone123
Feb 3, 2010, 9:55 PM
The downtown Halifax article is also a little weird. There's stuff like this:

Another two buildings on Barrington have been restored as well. One is the former National Film Board Theatre, now owned by Costa Elles and Chris Tzanteas, which burned down about 15 years ago.

Isn't it still just sitting there? It was when I was in town a month ago. I get the sense that in most cases the people who write these articles don't even bother personally investigating the situation.

I am optimistic about Barrington's chances but there's a difference between something that is planned and something under construction. United Gulf and the Salter development have been approved for years and nothing has happened. The NFB building has had multiple redevelopment schemes. I'll be happy when we actually see people working at these sites.

Halifax Hillbilly
Feb 4, 2010, 11:24 PM
You're right, talk is cheap. Shovels in the ground and crews on site are what really matter. By the tone of the (admittedly confusing) article we should know come spring - it sounds like some of these projects are ready to go.

spaustin
Feb 5, 2010, 2:00 AM
That's great to hear. I found the article confusing though. Is the Green Lantern currently being redeveloped or is going to be redeveloped?

In a interview a few weeks back Andy Filmore referenced a condo project for the Green Lantern so there seems to be something in the works even if nothing is officially out there in public yet. If something does happen there it would probably be a good thing. The Green Lantern is one of the best on the street in terms of historic and architectural value, but it is also probably the one in the worst shape (NFB doesn't count as it's only a facade!). Would be great to have more people living Downtown too.

Wishblade
Feb 5, 2010, 11:52 AM
I saw in the Moncton thread that 2009 population estimates are available now. I've decided to post the information here:

CMA Estimates

Halifax: (2007 - 388.3) 2009 - 398.0 Growth - 2.49
St. Johns: (2007 - 183.7) 2009 - 187.6 Growth - 2.12
Moncton: (2007 - 130.6) 2009 - 133.9 Growth - 2.52
Saint John: (2007 - 125.3) 2009 - 126.6 Growth - 1.03

Economic Region Estimates

Halifax: (2004 - 380.5) 2009 - 398.0 Growth - 4.59
St. John's: (2004 - 251.2) 2009 - 257.2 Growth - 2.38
Moncton: (2004 - 193.7) 2009 - 201.8 Growth - 4.18
Saint John: (2004 - 172.1) 2009 - 172.5 Growth - 0.23
PEI: (2004 - 137.7) 2009 - 141.0 Growth - 2.40
Fredericton: (2004 - 130.7) 2009 - 135.3 Growth - 3.52

Regards to mmmatt for getting this information for us :tup:


link: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-214-x/2008000/t013-eng.htm
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-214-x/2008000/t075-eng.htm

fenwick16
Feb 5, 2010, 12:37 PM
I saw in the Moncton thread that 2009 population estimates are available now. I've decided to post the information here:

CMA Estimates

Halifax: (2007 - 388.3) 2009 - 398.0 Growth - 2.49
St. Johns: (2007 - 183.7) 2009 - 187.6 Growth - 2.12
Moncton: (2007 - 130.6) 2009 - 133.9 Growth - 2.52
Saint John: (2007 - 125.3) 2009 - 126.6 Growth - 1.03

Economic Region Estimates

Halifax: (2004 - 380.5) 2009 - 398.0 Growth - 4.59
St. John's: (2004 - 251.2) 2009 - 257.2 Growth - 2.38
Moncton: (2004 - 193.7) 2009 - 201.8 Growth - 4.18
Saint John: (2004 - 172.1) 2009 - 172.5 Growth - 0.23
PEI: (2004 - 137.7) 2009 - 141.0 Growth - 2.40
Fredericton: (2004 - 130.7) 2009 - 135.3 Growth - 3.52

Regards to mmmatt for getting this information for us :tup:


link: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-214-x/2008000/t013-eng.htm
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-214-x/2008000/t075-eng.htm

Since this set of data is for July 2009, by now (Feb 2010) the population of the HRM should be about 401,000. By the year 2020 (10 years time) at 1.2 % growth per year, compounded annually, the population would be about 452,000. It really is time for the HRM to start thinking about facilities like a new stadium.

If the province and city does more to promote growth in the HRM it could be much more than this. At 1.5% growth, compounded annually, over 10 years it would be 465,000 (boom cities like Calgary often see 3% growth per year so this isn't far fetched). It should be pointed out that the population of Nova Scotia is no longer shrinking but has started to increase again. A similar trend happened in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Both of these provinces were supposed to be (or continue) shrinking but are now seeing strong growth.

Wishblade
Feb 5, 2010, 6:10 PM
If the province and city does more to promote growth in the HRM it could be much more than this. At 1.5% growth, compounded annually, over 10 years it would be 465,000 (boom cities like Calgary often see 3% growth per year so this isn't far fetched). It should be pointed out that the population of Nova Scotia is no longer shrinking but has started to increase again. A similar trend happened in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Both of these provinces were supposed to be (or continue) shrinking but are now seeing strong growth.

The good news is, if you look at the patterns over the past 5 years, the rate of growth has been increasing tremendously since 2004. I hope it keeps up, but for now were growing nearly as fast as Hamilton, a city almost twice our size.

Empire
Feb 5, 2010, 7:06 PM
Since this set of data is for July 2009, by now (Feb 2010) the population of the HRM should be about 401,000. By the year 2020 (10 years time) at 1.2 % growth per year, compounded annually, the population would be about 452,000. It really is time for the HRM to start thinking about facilities like a new stadium.

If the province and city does more to promote growth in the HRM it could be much more than this. At 1.5% growth, compounded annually, over 10 years it would be 465,000 (boom cities like Calgary often see 3% growth per year so this isn't far fetched). It should be pointed out that the population of Nova Scotia is no longer shrinking but has started to increase again. A similar trend happened in Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Both of these provinces were supposed to be (or continue) shrinking but are now seeing strong growth.

One of the many this this current council is very bad at is promoting the city. They don't understand two basic concepts. One - a population the size of HRM expects things like a stadium, good transit, big concerts and a top notch library in a location like Spring Garden Rd. Two - by creating venues and infrastructure that should already be in place more people and business will be attracted adding to the tax base.

Dmajackson
Feb 5, 2010, 8:18 PM
http://www.halifax.ca/planning/documents/Case15781FactSheetPIM.pdf

Information Sheet for the Dartmouth Oppurtunity Sites List regarding the proposed development of new lands. The PIM is on February 15th at 7:00pm at Dartmouth High School.

On a side note apparently they are renaming Pine St Ext to Irishtown Rd effective later this month (Feb. 15th)

Dmajackson
Feb 5, 2010, 8:35 PM
Next week the HAC will be considering the proposed additions/renovations to the Sam the Record Man and adjacent buildings.

Case H00348 (http://www.halifax.ca/boardscom/hac/documents/Feb11711.pdf)

Dmajackson
Feb 6, 2010, 3:56 AM
I saw in the Moncton thread that 2009 population estimates are available now. I've decided to post the information here:

CMA Estimates

Halifax: (2007 - 388.3) 2009 - 398.0 Growth - 2.49
St. Johns: (2007 - 183.7) 2009 - 187.6 Growth - 2.12
Moncton: (2007 - 130.6) 2009 - 133.9 Growth - 2.52
Saint John: (2007 - 125.3) 2009 - 126.6 Growth - 1.03

Economic Region Estimates

Halifax: (2004 - 380.5) 2009 - 398.0 Growth - 4.59
St. John's: (2004 - 251.2) 2009 - 257.2 Growth - 2.38
Moncton: (2004 - 193.7) 2009 - 201.8 Growth - 4.18
Saint John: (2004 - 172.1) 2009 - 172.5 Growth - 0.23
PEI: (2004 - 137.7) 2009 - 141.0 Growth - 2.40
Fredericton: (2004 - 130.7) 2009 - 135.3 Growth - 3.52

Regards to mmmatt for getting this information for us :tup:


link: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-214-x/2008000/t013-eng.htm
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-214-x/2008000/t075-eng.htm

I was looking at the chart for all the CMA's and within two years HRM is going to take over 12th spot!

St. Catherine's - Niagara is at 402'000 and only growing by 200 a year so if we haven't already HRM will easily take over their place.

Making it into the top ten will be decades down the road though since the next closest is 489'000 (Kitchener and Hamilton) and both are growing at a rate comprable to HRM.

Just to give perspective on how much larger we are recently Victoria is now 40'000 people behind us.

Phalanx
Feb 6, 2010, 4:08 AM
That's all assuming trends remain as they are, though. An Alberta style economic boom (or downturn, for that matter) would have a dramatic effect on population. Granted, I can't see that happening anytime soon outside of some inspired political leadership and following, say, the Ireland model.

The other thing that could improve the growth rate would be the provincial government finally getting its act together on improving immigration, and keeping immigrants here (rather than being a stepping stone as they move on to points west).

Empire
Feb 6, 2010, 12:24 PM
That's all assuming trends remain as they are, though. An Alberta style economic boom (or downturn, for that matter) would have a dramatic effect on population. Granted, I can't see that happening anytime soon outside of some inspired political leadership and following, say, the Ireland model.

The other thing that could improve the growth rate would be the provincial government finally getting its act together on improving immigration, and keeping immigrants here (rather than being a stepping stone as they move on to points west).

The population will increase dramatically if the NDP does not renew the moratorium on drilling on Georges Bank set to expire in 2012.

fenwick16
Feb 6, 2010, 2:24 PM
There is also the potential for onshore gas from abandoned coal mines: (source http://www.gov.ns.ca/energy/oil-gas/onshore/ ). Since coal and oil are both fossil fuels it makes sense that Nova Scotia with its large coal reserves could also have large onshore natural gas reserves. In addition to potential natural resources, Nova Scotia and the Halifax area can tap into its huge educated work force; if the province and city can just keep them from moving to Alberta and Ontario. Many future jobs are seen as being in high-tech jobs and there is no reason, with the internet, that these jobs can't be in Nova Scotia.

Oil & Natural Gas - Onshore Energy
Oil & Gas Onshore

For 40 years, all eyes on petroleum exploration in Nova Scotia have been offshore. Now, the focus has also shifted to what's been right under our noses - or more accurately, our feet.

Some of the same lands that were once mined for their coal are now being mined for their natural gas potential. Coalbed methane and shale gas exploration are making the onshore the new frontier for Nova Scotia's energy industry.

Another legacy from another kind of mining - salt caverns in Colchester County - are being explored as potential storage sites for significant amounts of natural gas.

And Maple Gas is moving closer to establishing the province's first LNG plant in Goldboro, near the pipeline for the Sable Offshore Energy Project, right next to Keltic Petrochemical's proposed operations.

The establishment of the Sable pipeline and other petroleum-related infrastructure and expertise has helped draw attention to new opportunities for exploration opportunities in Nova Scotia.

MonctonRad
Feb 6, 2010, 3:30 PM
:previous:

Yes, it will be interesting to see what is available onshore...........there is a huge natural gas field south of Moncton, purportedly as large as all of the recoverable natural gas reserves in the rest of the country!!!

The key word here however is "recoverable". The gas field in southern NB is located in shale which apparently is much more difficult to recover. Still, this discovery is quite exciting!

You know, Moncton had gas powered streetlights in the 1890's which were supplied by natural gas from the Hillsborough area. It would be great if both NS and NB could benefit from natural gas in the future as well. I have great confidence in the future of our provinces in the 21st century...........our main enemy is demographics. We need more young people NOW and for the future.

fenwick16
Feb 6, 2010, 3:56 PM
:previous: Is this the McCully gas field being mined by Corridor Resources? From what I have read this certainly seems to have a lot of potential.

MonctonRad
Feb 6, 2010, 4:52 PM
:previous: Is this the McCully gas field being mined by Corridor Resources? From what I have read this certainly seems to have a lot of potential.

McCully is part of it. They're producing gas right now from several wells close to the potash mines in Sussex.

The field is much more extensive than this and is centered more in the Elgin area but extends eastwards as far as Hillsborough.

In essence, the area of interest includes all the land south of the Petitcodiac River down as far as the Caledonia Highlands.

spaustin
Feb 6, 2010, 5:37 PM
McCully is part of it. They're producing gas right now from several wells close to the potash mines in Sussex.

The field is much more extensive than this and is centered more in the Elgin area but extends eastwards as far as Hillsborough.

In essence, the area of interest includes all the land south of the Petitcodiac River down as far as the Caledonia Highlands.

On shore gas is exciting since that's something that we can truly reap the rewards. Ottawa can't swoop in and take it!

Dmajackson
Feb 8, 2010, 8:56 PM
We have new information on multiple restoration/renovation projects in the Barrington Street HCD.

http://www.halifax.ca/council/agendasc/documents/100209ca1041.pdf

Detailed in the document are projects for the following buildings in brackets I put the future uses for the buildings;

- Green Lantren Building (1st floor commercial/entertainment. 2nd floor office, 3rd-5th floor apartments (thirteen total)).

- Freemason's Lodge (commercial/office).

- Colwell Building (work done in 2008).

haligonia
Feb 8, 2010, 10:57 PM
There are a series of meetings to be held in regards to a proposed cultural centre to be built with the new Bedford high school.(Something like the Bella Rose at Hfx West) They will be held on February 15, March 3, March 4 and March 8 at the Sackville
lions club, the st margarets centre, the Bedford legion hall and the old fall river fire hall respectively,

someone123
Feb 8, 2010, 11:11 PM
Good to see that the Green Lantern Building will finally see some work. They're doing about $3.5M of renovations.

Another building that could use some work is the white one next to the Freemasons' Hall - I think it's called the Pacific Building or something similar.

macgregor
Feb 9, 2010, 1:54 AM
I see that the Pacific Building / 1541 Barrington St is for sale:

http://www.colliersmn.com/prod/cclod.nsf/publish/A908B9B5B9729A9185257570005A763A/$File/1541+Barrington+Street+Halifax+-+new+price.pdf

I imagine that this and the other buildings on Barrington could be made into / renovated into some awesome residential.

Dmajackson
Feb 10, 2010, 8:11 PM
The Sam the Record Man addition goes before the Design Review Committee tomorrow night so if it gets approved its possible to see construction this year depending on Starfish's priorities.

sdm
Feb 10, 2010, 9:09 PM
I see that the Pacific Building / 1541 Barrington St is for sale:

http://www.colliersmn.com/prod/cclod.nsf/publish/A908B9B5B9729A9185257570005A763A/$File/1541+Barrington+Street+Halifax+-+new+price.pdf

I imagine that this and the other buildings on Barrington could be made into / renovated into some awesome residential.

This building is already residential, albeit needing of signifcant upgrades.

Dmajackson
Feb 11, 2010, 4:46 AM
More development planned for downtown Dartmouth
Halifax News Net
By Joanie Veitch – The Weekly News

A developer wants to build three multi-unit residential buildings, including a high-rise tower, in the Pine Street Extension and Ochterloney Street area.
Darrell Dixon, a construction manager who has overseen several projects for Shannex, first started buying some of the properties five years ago and now wants to develop four parcels of land. As part of the deal, he’s also proposing to partner with the city and the Shubenacadie Canal Commission to finish the parkland area that has been developed on the former Starr site.
“My property is adjacent to that site so it just makes sense for us all to work together to get a site plan that we’re all happy with. I want to make this an historic destination, an address that people will know and identify,” Dixon said.
At last week’s regional council meeting, councillors approved a staff recommendation to begin the process of amending the Municipal Planning Strategy for downtown Dartmouth to designate the area Dixon owns as an opportunity site under the MPS. Specifically, the parcels of land under discussion are on Ochterloney Street, next to the Greenvale building, a second site behind the former school, a third at the now-vacant laundromat, and a fourth on what is currently a parking lot beside Andrea’s Music Studio.
Referring to the site on Ochterloney Street, Dixon said he plans a building “that will be in keeping with the architecture” of the street.
The high-rise building, which he plans for the middle parcel behind the Greenvale development, will be a slender tower. “It won’t just be a square box, “ Dixon said, adding that he intends to live in the finished structure. “I’m planning a building with a lot of curves. It will have some interesting definition.”
People who attended public forums held in downtown Dartmouth as part of HRM By Design said they want more high-density residential buildings in the downtown core, noted Mitch Dickey, a city planner working on the proposed project.
But people are also very concerned with maintaining the character of the area, he added.
“This site is critical. It is behind a heritage building and faces public streets,” said Dickey. “I expect it’s going to be a highly-scrutinized process.”
The opportunity for partnering on “site improvements” on adjacent lands on the former Starr Manufacturing site and Shubenacadie Canal Corridor — both owned by the city — is an interesting component of the proposal, Dickey said. One of the improvements being discussed is the proposed “daylighting” of a section of the canal.
“Whether or not it will happen is still up in the air, but he (Dixon) could definitely help with that,” he said.
Dickey will be leading a public information meeting on the proposed development on Feb. 15 at Dartmouth High School. Dixon will also be there with some of the preliminary designs for the buildings.

jveitch@ns.sympatico.ca

Jstaleness
Feb 11, 2010, 1:01 PM
This is great news. It's amazing how long it took to get these kind of developments in DT Dartmouth. Being only 7min ferry ride to Halifax it only makes sense to have high density living set behind historical downtown.

Halifax Hillbilly
Feb 11, 2010, 9:56 PM
The Sam the Record Man addition goes before the Design Review Committee tomorrow night so if it gets approved its possible to see construction this year depending on Starfish's priorities.

Any word on this?

Ambitious plans for Dartmouth. Even if only some of them get built it will be a big influx of people to the downtown. Good news. :tup:

Jonovision
Feb 12, 2010, 3:26 PM
From todays Herald.

Businesses welcome Agricola project
Mixed residential and commerical project ‘will be good for us’
By CHRIS LAMBIE Business Editor
Fri. Feb 12 - 6:32 AM


Some neighbouring businesses are welcoming an eight- to 10-storey commercial and resi dential development proposed for north-end Halifax.

Ontario developer Rick Tomul ka is planning to build 110 apart ments and about 1,858 square metres of commercial space at the Agricola Street location now occupied by the Nova Scotia Li quor Corp. The project is expect ed to cost between $17 million and $20 million.

“Bring it on," said Dimo Geor gakakos, who co-owns the nearby Gus’ Pub & Grill with his mother, Maria.

“If you bring more people into the neighbourhood, it’s all good." A lot of his current customers are students. “I don’t know if they’ll accommodate students in (the new development), or just, for lack of a better word, yup pies," Georgakakos said.

“But it will be good for us, no matter what, because people will filter out of there and come here." He wants to see more high-den sity development fronted by com mercial space on Agricola.

“When I was a kid, this place was booming," said the 46-year-old. “It was like Spring Garden Road down here."

The owner of Hayes Antiques,

which lies just west of Agricola Street on McCully Street, is also keen on the project.

“I’d rather have anything there . . . than a bunch of bums hanging out at the liquor store trying to get change from you and cursing at you when you don’t give them change," Greg Hayes said.

The new development may in clude a liquor store.

“But it’s going to be set back far enough to control (people beg ging)," he said. “There’s just no control now. I’m hit up every day." The area used to be home to five or six crack houses, but those are gone now, he said.

The addition of Fr e d , a gallery and cafe on Agricola Street helped the neighbourhood lot, Hayes said.

“Now at night time, there’s a lot more women walking around with baby carriages instead of women running up to your car looking for a trick," he said. “The whole area’s changing."

Claudia Pinto, owner of nearby

Cafe Aroma Latino, isn’ t opposed to the project. But she wondered Thursday if it will accommodate low-income tenants.

“If it is only for business, I don’t think that we need another build ing," Pinto said.

The developer wants to attract two anchor stores to the site, ac cording to Richard Kassner, the project’s architect.

Potential tenants include the existing liquor store, a grocery store, a pharmacy and several smaller convenience stores, Kassner said in an email.

Cafes, restaurants, a dryclean er and smaller retail boutiques might also fit the location.

“Design features will include a pedestrian patio area extension on the south-side commercial space tenancies that we expect will become the focal point of community life in the neighbour hood. We have kept the commer cial driveway access from Agri cola Street and the surface park ing on the north side," Kassner said.

“The development will be a sus tainable design, although, as yet, we haven’t determined if it will be a (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) designat ed project or if it will just perform to the same standard.

“Sustainable building materi als and construction systems, ge othermal, solar, natural gas, high-performance mechanical systems and controls, selection of heating and cooling system, se lection of appliances, low-flow plumbing fixtures and the level of individual tenant monitoring of their utility usage will all be con sidered for this project."

It will be the largest residential development within a five-block radius, he said.

Jonovision
Feb 12, 2010, 3:28 PM
From Halifaxnewsnet.ca

Protecting the view
City looks to secure Dartmouth viewplanes from development

http://www.halifaxnewsnet.ca/photos/HalifaxNewsNet/stories/Dart%20Common.jpg


Views of the harbour and Halifax waterfront from the Dartmouth Common are protected.

By Kim Moar – The Weekly News
A new study aims to identify and preserve Dartmouth viewplanes before they’re lost to development.
HRM planner Mitch Dickey said under current Dartmouth planning documents, there are only two protected viewplanes — one from the Dartmouth Common and one from the Brightwood Golf Course.
“The purpose of those is to keep building heights down so that views of the harbour and Halifax can be maintained,” Dickey said.
Dickey said the current viewplane-protection policies were established in the late 1970s, and are imprecise and confusing.
“So the question keeps coming up, ‘Where do those lines in the air over Dartmouth fall?’ We need to address that,” he said.
To help resolve the issue, HRM has issued a request for proposals for a Dartmouth viewplane study to identify shortcomings with the existing designated viewplanes, and make recommendations for new ones.
Dickey said the problem with current policies became clear last year during the approval process for the King’s Wharf development.
“That really brought it to the forefront. There were some tall buildings proposed,” he said.
In the end the King’s Wharf development proposal was approved with the tallest building consisting of 33-storeys being built outside the viewplane.
Dartmouth Centre Coun. Gloria McCluskey said protecting Dartmouth viewplanes is important, even though it has not been as hot a topic in the City of Lakes as it has been in Halifax.
“We haven’t had any tall buildings proposed to this point,” McCluskey said.
She said although downtown Dartmouth is restricted to buildings five storeys high, taller buildings have been built through development agreements.
According to the request for proposals, the proponent is identify a maximum of six new viewplanes that may be worth protecting.
Rather than simply having a single lookoff area for protected views, Dickey said the city is also looking at establishing walking vistas.
“So as people walk the view angle changes a little,” he said. “So rather than sweeping vistas, we might want to designate multiple spots along a path.”
The proponent is also required to recommend measures to protect identified viewplanes, conduct public open houses and meetings, and determine allowable building heights by city block within viewplanes.
Dickey said he hopes to get the public involved in the process in the spring, and then have Harbour East Community Council decide whether or not to change Dartmouth planning policies.
It will likely be fall before any new policies get final approval.

kmoar@hfxnews.ca

Jonovision
Feb 12, 2010, 3:28 PM
And one more from Halifaxnewsnet.ca

More development planned for downtown Dartmouth
Halifax News Net

By Joanie Veitch – The Weekly News
A developer wants to build three multi-unit residential buildings, including a high-rise tower, in the Pine Street Extension and Ochterloney Street area.
Darrell Dixon, a construction manager who has overseen several projects for Shannex, first started buying some of the properties five years ago and now wants to develop four parcels of land. As part of the deal, he’s also proposing to partner with the city and the Shubenacadie Canal Commission to finish the parkland area that has been developed on the former Starr site.
“My property is adjacent to that site so it just makes sense for us all to work together to get a site plan that we’re all happy with. I want to make this an historic destination, an address that people will know and identify,” Dixon said.
At last week’s regional council meeting, councillors approved a staff recommendation to begin the process of amending the Municipal Planning Strategy for downtown Dartmouth to designate the area Dixon owns as an opportunity site under the MPS. Specifically, the parcels of land under discussion are on Ochterloney Street, next to the Greenvale building, a second site behind the former school, a third at the now-vacant laundromat, and a fourth on what is currently a parking lot beside Andrea’s Music Studio.
Referring to the site on Ochterloney Street, Dixon said he plans a building “that will be in keeping with the architecture” of the street.
The high-rise building, which he plans for the middle parcel behind the Greenvale development, will be a slender tower. “It won’t just be a square box, “ Dixon said, adding that he intends to live in the finished structure. “I’m planning a building with a lot of curves. It will have some interesting definition.”
People who attended public forums held in downtown Dartmouth as part of HRM By Design said they want more high-density residential buildings in the downtown core, noted Mitch Dickey, a city planner working on the proposed project.
But people are also very concerned with maintaining the character of the area, he added.
“This site is critical. It is behind a heritage building and faces public streets,” said Dickey. “I expect it’s going to be a highly-scrutinized process.”
The opportunity for partnering on “site improvements” on adjacent lands on the former Starr Manufacturing site and Shubenacadie Canal Corridor — both owned by the city — is an interesting component of the proposal, Dickey said. One of the improvements being discussed is the proposed “daylighting” of a section of the canal.
“Whether or not it will happen is still up in the air, but he (Dixon) could definitely help with that,” he said.
Dickey will be leading a public information meeting on the proposed development on Feb. 15 at Dartmouth High School. Dixon will also be there with some of the preliminary designs for the buildings.
jveitch@ns.sympatico.ca

fenwick16
Feb 12, 2010, 5:17 PM
Do people in Dartmouth really want viewplanes bylaws? I can understand the need to protect heritage properties but limiting development just for the sake of viewplanes seems like a pointless addition of red tape. Such laws mainly benefit the people in the Halifax area with secure jobs (mainly the wealthy). To me the curtailing of development means that more Nova Scotians will need to move to Ontario and Alberta to look for jobs.

I think that it is time for HRM area politicians to think more about creating jobs for Nova Scotians instead of wasting developers time and money with needless bureaucracy. I would really like to see politicians in the Halifax area start thanking developers for the jobs that they create instead of throwing endless miles of red tape at them.

JET
Feb 12, 2010, 5:30 PM
[QUOTE=fenwick16;4696184]Do people in Dartmouth really want viewplanes bylaws? QUOTE]

As a person in Dartmouth, I do support protecting viewplanes. Some of the views are amazing. Makes sense to protect them. JET

Wishblade
Feb 12, 2010, 5:37 PM
[QUOTE=fenwick16;4696184]Do people in Dartmouth really want viewplanes bylaws? QUOTE]

As a person in Dartmouth, I do support protecting viewplanes. Some of the views are amazing. Makes sense to protect them. JET

I think the viewplanes should be restricted to the Dartmouth common and nothing more. They should be removing the brightwood viewplane, not adding more of them. I hope this proposal goes down in flames.

worldlyhaligonian
Feb 12, 2010, 7:24 PM
While we are at it, why don't we tear every building in Halifax/Dartmouth and then we would have even more views of the harbour.

In fact, we should make a policy stating that the only buildings in HRM have to be 2 stories and clad exclusively in vinyl siding (the most attractive building material).

Actually, lets make development completely illegal and revert to a hunter/gatherer society without annoying modern ideas like electricity and sanitation. It will be so great, and the view will make daily life so much more enjoyable. Economic development sounds like scary stuff to me. Buildings taller than 2 stories are the work of evil developers who are bent on nothing but creating a dark, evil city.

While we are at it, why don't we cut down all of the trees, as they are blocking many viewplanes. Also, tall people should all be eliminated, as they block my viewplanes.

Keith P.
Feb 12, 2010, 8:46 PM
While we are at it, why don't we tear every building in Halifax/Dartmouth and then we would have even more views of the harbour.

In fact, we should make a policy stating that the only buildings in HRM have to be 2 stories and clad exclusively in vinyl siding (the most attractive building material).

Actually, lets make development completely illegal and revert to a hunter/gatherer society without annoying modern ideas like electricity and sanitation. It will be so great, and the view will make daily life so much more enjoyable. Economic development sounds like scary stuff to me. Buildings taller than 2 stories are the work of evil developers who are bent on nothing but creating a dark, evil city.

While we are at it, why don't we cut down all of the trees, as they are blocking many viewplanes. Also, tall people should all be eliminated, as they block my viewplanes.


What a ridiculous post. Everybody knows that tall people need only to be banned from movie theaters. :D

Dartmouth viewplanes are a ridiculous subject. Why bother? Just more bureaucratic red tape that serves no practical purpose. Dartmouth should be lobbying for a downtown full of tall buildings, not putting obstacles in the way of that ever happening.

On the Agricola St project referenced: I am very dubious based only on the apparent lack of work done by anyone. No tenants lined up (or, according to my sources, even approached; apparently even the NSLC was caught off guard) and lots of weasel words about the enviro-friendly stuff they are going to "consider". Suuuuure. Nothing about this seems concrete.

sdm
Feb 12, 2010, 9:02 PM
What a ridiculous post. Everybody knows that tall people need only to be banned from movie theaters. :D

Dartmouth viewplanes are a ridiculous subject. Why bother? Just more bureaucratic red tape that serves no practical purpose. Dartmouth should be lobbying for a downtown full of tall buildings, not putting obstacles in the way of that ever happening.

On the Agricola St project referenced: I am very dubious based only on the apparent lack of work done by anyone. No tenants lined up (or, according to my sources, even approached; apparently even the NSLC was caught off guard) and lots of weasel words about the enviro-friendly stuff they are going to "consider". Suuuuure. Nothing about this seems concrete.

i also like the will be built to LEED standards.... there is no such thing. Its either is certified LEED or its not. There is a lot more to a LEED building then some energy efficency devices.

fenwick16
Feb 12, 2010, 9:20 PM
Instead of protecting the viewplanes why not build a 600 foot observation tower near downtown Dartmouth; something tasteful like the Seattle Space Needle. Since it can't be built on the Halifax side, it would really attract people to Dartmouth. What an amazing view it would be; the harbour, the two bridges, Halifax skyline (and Dartmouth), the Dartmouth lakes .... This is a view that very few people in the HRM ever get to see since there isn't a vantage point that is high enough and airplanes normally don't fly over the HRM urban area.

http://www.coryjon.com/images/cory/seattle_space-needle_2007.jpg

(source: http://www.coryjon.com/seattle_space-needle_12-31-07_07.htm )

coolmillion
Feb 12, 2010, 9:28 PM
On the topic of view planes - there's a little paradox here. Arguably the best feature of the views from Dartmouth is the Halifax skyline. Halifax view planes prevent tall buildings in many locations downtown. But if more were allowed, the views from Dartmouth would be enhanced.

View plane legislation is pretty common though, even in cities with lots of high rises. In Vancouver, for example, there are something like 29 protected views. Recently the city opened debate on whether to adjust them to allow more intensified development downtown. But, they are also considering adding new views to the list, not just taking away existing ones.

I think that a really positive feature that can come out of such discussions is the realization that if tall buildings are built in highly visible locations, they should have high quality design and materials. But I agree that the creation of rigid policies could scare away potential developments.

Dr SweetLove
Feb 12, 2010, 9:59 PM
[QUOTE=fenwick16;4696184]Do people in Dartmouth really want viewplanes bylaws? QUOTE]

As a person in Dartmouth, I do support protecting viewplanes. Some of the views are amazing. Makes sense to protect them. JET

as a manly man in the good side of de harbor I wish to protect Jet feeling's


so if it makes him happy plase no tall stuff cus it make Jet SAD :haha:

Empire
Feb 13, 2010, 1:47 AM
[QUOTE=JET;4696221]

as a manly man in the good side of de harbor I wish to protect Jet feeling's


which side of the de harbour are you on SweetLove?

hfx_chris
Feb 13, 2010, 2:03 AM
as a manly man in the good side of de harbor I wish to protect Jet feeling's


so if it makes him happy plase no tall stuff cus it make Jet SAD :haha:
What's up with your obsession with Jet?

DigitalNinja
Feb 13, 2010, 2:41 AM
I don't understand view planes, because eventually development will take over most areas besides parks, then you have say max 4 story buildings everywhere, you can't see anything anyway because your just a person.

alps
Feb 13, 2010, 7:46 AM
I don't think Dartmouth should have additional viewplanes put in place...the downtown is dead enough and at the first sign of major investment and high-density development in the area (King's Wharf) we jump to stifle anything similar to it that may follow?

I may have missed something, but are there any renderings of the NSLC Agricola plans? I saw the layout on Councillor Sloane's website and I wish they would have worked to make the streetwall more uniform along there rather than breaking it up furthur, but it sounds loads better than what's there now.

kph06
Feb 13, 2010, 3:51 PM
If I'm not mistaken this article is the first one I've seen that identifies the planned heights, 14 and 22 stories. Hopefully the renderings are available soon.

Source: The Chronicle Herald (http://thechronicleherald.ca/Business/1167408.html)

Highrises planned in Starr area

By CHRIS LAMBIE Business Editor
Sat. Feb 13 - 4:54 AM

A three-building residential development proposed for downtown Dartmouth that’s estimated to cost as much as $60 million is about to get a public airing.

Darrell Dixon’s plan includes building a seven-storey complex on Ochterloney Street, beside the former Greenvale School, which Dexel Developments is turning into a complex of 36 loft-style apartments.

Dixon, who didn’t return calls Friday, also wants to build a 14-storey tower on the corner of Queen and Pine streets, and a 22-storey building on a vacant lot behind the former school off the Pine Street Extension.

"We want to get as many people living downtown as we can," said Coun. Gloria McCluskey (Dartmouth Centre).

A public information meeting on the project is slated for 7 p.m. Monday at Dartmouth High School.

Sobeys Land Holdings Ltd. owns the chunks of property where Dixon plans to erect the seven-storey and 22-storey buildings.

"They were going to put a grocery store there," McCluskey said. "They only did it because they thought that Atlantic Superstore was going to buy part of the Starr Manufacturing property. And, of course, (the city is) not selling the Starr property, so Sobeys dropped it."

A numbered Nova Scotia company headed by Dixon owns the other nearby property where he wants to build.

"This developer has the Sobeys land under agreement, so he has a purchase-and-sale agreement with them," said Mitch Dickey, a city planner.

Under the current zoning, Dixon could now construct a 24-unit building on each of the four lots. The buildings could be as tall as 21 metres.

But Dixon, a construction manager who does work for Shannex, wants to create about 300 units, Dickey said.

The developer hasn’t told the planner whether they’ll be apartments or condominiums. "That’s something he’ll let the market decide," Dickey said.

Dixon is asking the city for an amendment to the municipal planning strategy that would allow the three buildings he’s proposed.

"What guides us on that is community feedback," Dickey said.

A lot of low-rise buildings have gone up in downtown Dartmouth over the past decade, he said.

"Generally the feedback is not good on how they look or what their quality is like," Dickey said.

Locals who have already commented on Dixon’s plan want to make sure the project is attractive and of good quality, he said.

"He’s proposing very modern buildings. The renderings are attractive," Dickey said.

"He’s proposing a more traditional design for the Ochterloney Street building — something that would complement Greenvale School with a brick finish on it. And then the other two buildings would be more modern and contemporary."

The downtown plan calls for pedestrian-friendly streets. It aims to ensure new development brings people off the sidewalk right into a business, Dickey said.

The plan wants to promote "lively streetscapes . . . with a variety of architecture," he said.

"At the sidewalk level, buildings should really not exceed three storeys in height. They would have to step back for any level above the third floor, and that’s what (Dixon’s) showing for this proposal."

The city will likely require him to have commercial space in the largest building, which abuts the former Starr Manufacturing site.

Besides the former skate factory, levelled a decade ago, the site also borders the Shubenacadie Canal.

As part of his proposal, Dixon is offering to fund improvements to the public space called the Canal Greenway, which runs down Prince Albert Road from Sullivans Pond to Halifax Harbour.

fenwick16
Feb 13, 2010, 5:49 PM
"We want to get as many people living downtown as we can," said Coun. Gloria McCluskey (Dartmouth Centre)."

I like to read quotes like this. Now hopefully they will forget about implementing new viewplanes and just stick with the ones that they already have.

A nicely designed 22 storey apartment in Downtown Dartmouth wouldn't look bad at all.

Empire
Feb 13, 2010, 6:23 PM
The only place in Dartmouth that should have a protected view is from Dart. Common. The view should start at George's Island and end at the mouth of the Harbour. No Halifax view, no mid harbour etc. from Dartmouth common. The Dart Common is not the Citadel, there are not bus loads of tourists snapping pics of Halifax from the summit and the only locals are the very few area residents walking a dog or taking a shortcut. The Citadel is a national historic site so the idea of highrises close by is a non starter. In Dartmouth more density Downtown may pull it out of its dismal Downtown state?

Dmajackson
Feb 13, 2010, 6:47 PM
Since we know have some heights and whatnot I'm thinking of starting the thread for the Dartmouth sites but I can't think of a name for them ... any suggestions?

Jonovision
Feb 13, 2010, 7:53 PM
From todays Herald.

Changes sweep Dartmouth


ROGER TAYLOR
PERHAPS more than any other part of Halifax Re gional Municipality, the face of the former City of Dartmouth is changing the most. Ranging from the huge Dart mouth Crossing development, which has had a domino effect on Dartmouth’s retail sector, to numerous residential devel opments, good old Dartmouth is in transition.

It all seemed to star t with the development of Dartmouth Crossing a couple of years ago, which attracted a number of stores to relocate from other shopping centres.

One was the Canadian Tire store on Tacoma Drive, just off Main Street. After Canadian Tire relocated, Sobeys moved its West phal store to take over the va cancy left by the defection.

As part of the redevelopment plan, the former grocery store was torn down and replaced with a new structure that will soon house a Lawtons Drugs

store, also part of the Sobeys group. The new building has room for offices upstairs, which will have implications for anoth er retail centre.

Meanwhile, Penhorn Mall, owned by ECL Developments Ltd.,

another subsidiary of the Sobey family-controlled Empire Co. Ltd.,

was perhaps the one retail cen tre most affected by Dartmouth Crossing because it lost Walmart as one of its anchors.

After trying to sell the proper ty without success, ECL came up with a redevelopment plan. It started with the tearing down of the former Walmart store and replacing it with a modern So beys. A strip mall, which over looks the Circumferential High way, was built across the parking lot from Sobeys.

On one side of the new Pen horn Sobeys is the familiar Sears store, which is a holdover from the old Penhorn Mall. Un der construction on the other side is a two-storey fitness club, GoodLife Fitness for Women.

The Alberta-based fitness chain GoodLife acquired locally owned Nubody’s in September.

Just down the street from Penhorn is the Staples Wood lawn Plaza, still referred to by locals as the Woodlawn Mall, which has been suffering from defections and closures.

The Woodlawn plaza lost one of its main tenants, Bank of Mon treal ,

to the rival Millstone Square Shopping Centre , built by West wood Developments Ltd. in Russell Lake West. And soon the Wood­lawn branch of the Halifax Re gional Library will be moving to the former Empire Theatres loca tion next to the Portland Street Superstore , which is currently being renovated.

A Sobeys subsidiary owns the building that houses the Law tons store and the Woodlawn

Medical Clinic, but technically that structure is not part of the Woodlawn plaza. Both the Law tons and the 22 doctors in the medical centre will be relocat ing to the new Lawtons in West phal next month.

There’s still no word on what Empire and Sobeys plan to do with the Woodlawn building once it is vacated, but it is ex pected to be redeveloped due to its convenient location and proximity to a largely resi dential part of Dartmouth.

In the meantime, Peter Mac kenzie, leasing agent with real estate brokerage C.B. Richard Ellis Ltd. , told me Friday that client Retrocom Mid-Market REIT

of Toronto owns the majority of Woodlawn plaza.

He said Retrocom isn’t in terested in acquiring the rest of the property from Empire but is pushing forward with plans.

While there are plenty of vacancies in the retail plaza, he said, it will probably take two or three months before an announcement can be make about new tenants.

It is a bit confusing, but change isn’t always an orderly process. The messiness is likely to continue for some time.

(rtaylor@herald.ca)

fenwick16
Feb 13, 2010, 8:52 PM
Does anyone have any pictures of the Penhorn Mall now that it has been re-developed?

Dmajackson
Feb 13, 2010, 11:24 PM
Just the Chebucto Mosque going up on Matthias Lane;

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2750/4354936298_157022d2fb_b.jpg

worldlyhaligonian
Feb 14, 2010, 12:12 AM
Thanks for this DJ!

I've been out in Whistler for the Olympics for about 3 weeks and needed my Hali fix. This mosque is around the corner from my house.

A ton of construction is going on this winter! So much milder than last year.

Jonovision
Feb 14, 2010, 5:01 PM
That mosque looks awesome! Its a shame it is so tucked out of the way. I would love to have seen it in a more prominent location.

JET
Feb 15, 2010, 3:05 PM
www.downtowndartmouth.ca/.../BusinessTalk%20August%20September%202009.pdf -

Some interesting short articles in here on Dartmouth Down Town, including before and after photos of the first completed Facade Improvment Project. JET

fenwick16
Feb 15, 2010, 3:30 PM
www.downtowndartmouth.ca/.../BusinessTalk%20August%20September%202009.pdf -

Some interesting short articles in here on Dartmouth Down Town, including before and after photos of the first completed Facade Improvment Project. JET

When I try to open this link, I get an error message. I am interested in seeing it.

JET
Feb 15, 2010, 3:37 PM
When I try to open this link, I get an error message. I am interested in seeing it.
I wish that I could replicate the article as other posters have done.
I found it by googling "Greenvale estate, dartmouth, ns" and it was the third or fourth item. Might work. JET

-Harlington-
Feb 15, 2010, 4:04 PM
i dont know if there planning on building it but on that link there was information on a year round ice rink, and it looked pretty cool, i hope they do make one.

fenwick16
Feb 15, 2010, 4:48 PM
I wish that I could replicate the article as other posters have done.
I found it by googling "Greenvale estate, dartmouth, ns" and it was the third or fourth item. Might work. JET

Thanks, I found it. ( http://www.downtowndartmouth.ca/images/pdf/BusinessTalk%20August%20September%202009.pdf ).

Dmajackson
Feb 15, 2010, 8:29 PM
When I try to open this link, I get an error message. I am interested in seeing it.

I beat you this time. I got the blue screen of death. :rolleyes:

planarchy
Feb 15, 2010, 10:48 PM
Event tomorrow at the Halifax Club:

A conversation with Andy Fillmore, HRM Urban Design Project Manager
Date: Tue. February 16, 2010
Time: 12:00pm
Adult's Price: 19.95

Andy Fillmore is a city planner and urban designer with degrees in architecture and city planning from Dalhousie University, and in urban design from Harvard University. He has practiced in Vancouver, Boston and Portland Maine, and in 2005, after 15 years away, he returned to Halifax to fill the newly created Manager of Urban Design position at HRM. Andy’s primary role has been managing the recently adopted HRMbyDESIGN Downtown Plan. He is also HRM's lead urban design advisor on the proposed World Trade & Convention Centre and new Central Library projects, and he will be leading the imminent Cogswell Interchange Redesign Masterplan. A lover of cities and city-living, and one who practices what he preaches, Andy and his family live only a short walk from downtown and their car seldom leaves the driveway.

fenwick16
Feb 15, 2010, 11:12 PM
Event tomorrow at the Halifax Club:

A conversation with Andy Fillmore, HRM Urban Design Project Manager
Date: Tue. February 16, 2010
Time: 12:00pm
Adult's Price: 19.95

Andy Fillmore is a city planner and urban designer with degrees in architecture and city planning from Dalhousie University, and in urban design from Harvard University. He has practiced in Vancouver, Boston and Portland Maine, and in 2005, after 15 years away, he returned to Halifax to fill the newly created Manager of Urban Design position at HRM. Andy’s primary role has been managing the recently adopted HRMbyDESIGN Downtown Plan. He is also HRM's lead urban design advisor on the proposed World Trade & Convention Centre and new Central Library projects, and he will be leading the imminent Cogswell Interchange Redesign Masterplan. A lover of cities and city-living, and one who practices what he preaches, Andy and his family live only a short walk from downtown and their car seldom leaves the driveway.

He sounds like a person that can have a positive impact on the city architecture. I wonder if he has an interest in stadiums (stadia).

sdm
Feb 16, 2010, 1:13 AM
[QUOTE=planarchy;4701292] Andy’s primary role has been managing the recently adopted HRMbyDESIGN Downtown Plan. He is also HRM's lead urban design advisor on the proposed World Trade & Convention Centre and new Central Library projects, and he will be leading the imminent Cogswell Interchange Redesign Masterplan. QUOTE]

This makes no sense, why spend money (well HRM loves to spend) to open up land for development when there is NO developments underway on the already approved to proceed developments?

The city should be spending more time on trying to work the province to open the doors for businesses to locate in Halifax. Right now the shift is to move away with all the talk of taxes and increase to this and that. Look at the vacancy rate downtown, its going the other direction and coupled with this there is a negative absorbtion rate, which means NO new companies locating here.

Time to wake up. This is a 'cart before the horse' move.

planarchy
Feb 16, 2010, 2:13 AM
[QUOTE=planarchy;4701292] Andy’s primary role has been managing the recently adopted HRMbyDESIGN Downtown Plan. He is also HRM's lead urban design advisor on the proposed World Trade & Convention Centre and new Central Library projects, and he will be leading the imminent Cogswell Interchange Redesign Masterplan. QUOTE]

This makes no sense, why spend money (well HRM loves to spend) to open up land for development when there is NO developments underway on the already approved to proceed developments?

The city should be spending more time on trying to work the province to open the doors for businesses to locate in Halifax. Right now the shift is to move away with all the talk of taxes and increase to this and that. Look at the vacancy rate downtown, its going the other direction and coupled with this there is a negative absorbtion rate, which means NO new companies locating here.

Time to wake up. This is a 'cart before the horse' move.


This has to be put into perspective though - I don't think this will be coming down anytime soon. The issue is increasing costs to maintain it v. costs of demolition. I think it is good that they are starting to think about the possibilities for the site - because it will no doubt be a lengthy debate and process. But as always, we'll have to wait and see how the city/planning department handles this. Hopefully they're beginning to learn from past mistakes.

sdm
Feb 16, 2010, 3:01 AM
[QUOTE=sdm;4701513]


This has to be put into perspective though - I don't think this will be coming down anytime soon. The issue is increasing costs to maintain it v. costs of demolition. I think it is good that they are starting to think about the possibilities for the site - because it will no doubt be a lengthy debate and process. But as always, we'll have to wait and see how the city/planning department handles this. Hopefully they're beginning to learn from past mistakes.

Its an estimated 20 million to take it down. I for one have no problem justify such to be spent when we know we will see the lands it yields will be quickly sold AND developed.

The long term goal for the lands is capacity related. Opening them up will do nothing for the city in the near future. Again the city and the province need to work to promote Halifax, or it will continue to decline.

Again i am all for it, but it bugs me when i see statements like that. Council needs to find ways to cut or there will be bigger problems as soon as 2010 budget.....

Keith P.
Feb 16, 2010, 2:45 PM
[QUOTE=planarchy;4701292]
This makes no sense, why spend money (well HRM loves to spend) to open up land for development when there is NO developments underway on the already approved to proceed developments?


I can't make it to this session, but if anyone does, I hope someone asks this question, because SDM is correct. Look at the Infirmary Lands and SGR parking lots. Someone's feet need to be put to the fire to get something happening there. We don't need more parking lots.

Keith P.
Feb 16, 2010, 2:46 PM
www.downtowndartmouth.ca/.../BusinessTalk%20August%20September%202009.pdf -

Some interesting short articles in here on Dartmouth Down Town, including before and after photos of the first completed Facade Improvment Project. JET

That hardly looks like an improvement. Seems like a waste of tax dollars.

JET
Feb 16, 2010, 4:13 PM
That hardly looks like an improvement. Seems like a waste of tax dollars.

That's too bad, I heard that there was a plan to move the Halifax Library administrative offices there. :)

Keith P.
Feb 16, 2010, 4:28 PM
That's too bad, I heard that there was a plan to move the Halifax Library administrative offices there. :)


I see no gold plating, so it is unlikely that Judith Hare would ever cross the threshold. :yuck:

alps
Feb 17, 2010, 11:15 PM
I was in the West End Mall the other day and I noticed some hoarding covering up an empty shop branded the mall as "Mumford Professional Centre"...I didn't know they were changing the name but it makes sense I guess seeing as how it is populated mostly by optometrists and Access NS.

The Gordon B. Isnor Manor (http://maps.google.ca/?ie=UTF8&ll=44.650635,-63.582494&spn=0,359.990441&z=17&layer=c&cbll=44.651549,-63.585226&panoid=rnFeO-azwE4XqCzF8AnAEQ&cbp=12,324.96,,0,-20.9) (seniors apartments I think, on Cornwallis St) is being recladded. They did the centre bit in red a couple years ago and are now taking the rest of the concrete off the front.

Jonovision
Feb 18, 2010, 4:54 PM
I thought we had a thread for this, but I guess not. So I will just post this here.

New spin on a golden oldie

Project rises from music store location


By BRUCE ERSKINE

Business Reporter
SAM the Record Man may be little more than a mem ory, but its granite facade on Halifax’s Barrington Street will live on as the anchor of a new retail and office space complex.

“HRM is reviewing the appli cation," said Rob Landry, proper ty manager with building owner

Starfish Properties , in an inter view Wednesday.

Starfish Properties, which is controlled by Toronto-based Louis Reznick, owns the former music store property at 1656 Bar rington, which includes an adja cent brick-faced building at 1652 Bar rington.

Starfish also owns the former Granite Brewery building to the north at 1662 Barrington.

The company plans to combine the three addresses while retain ing their distinctive historic fa cades.

The project also includes the construction of a glass and metal addition above them that will be set back about three metres from the street front.

Starfish submitted its develop ment plan for the buildings, which have been empty for some time, to Halifax municipal plan ners in January.

Under new streamlined Hali fax by Design development ap proval procedures, the munici pality has 60 days to review the plan from the time it was submit ted, said Landry.

“We’re about halfway through," he said.

Landry said Starfish, which owns a number of other proper ties on Barrington Street, wants to move forward with the Bar rington Espace development, as it is known, “as expediently as we can."

But he didn’t disclose any spe cific project timelines or de tailed construction costs.

“It depends," he said.
Halifax architect David Garrett said the project was designed to meet the requirements of the re cently designated Barrington Street Heritage District under Halif ax by Design.

The heritage designation of fers building owners in the downtown area matching finan cial incentives of up to $100,000 and tax breaks of 15 per cent for expenditures above $100,000 to maintain the historic facades of their properties.

Garrett said the glass and met al addition will include a full lev el plus a partial mezzanine that will be open to the new floor be low.

The Barrington Street ground floor will accommodate retail tenants while the upper floors are being designed to meet the of fice space requirements of busi nesses of different sizes, said Landry.

“It’s a flexible plan," he said.

The development will also in clude a corridor that will con nect Barrington and Argyle streets.

Garrett said the existing struc ture of the three buildings is be ing retained along with their fa cades.

(berskine@herald.ca)

http://halifaxchronicle.can.newsmemory.com/newsmemvol1/canada/halifaxchronicle/20100218/ch_pe_02-18-10_c01.pdf.0/img/Image_3.jpg

-Harlington-
Feb 18, 2010, 11:57 PM
they should make it as tall as surrounding building/s, so it looks more level
unless they alredy are then cool. aha

Dmajackson
Feb 20, 2010, 3:29 AM
I noticed two things tonight;

First the old Frenchy's location destroyed by fire last year on Robie Street has been demolished and a construction trailer and chain link fence are in its place right now.

And the CNIB building on Almon St has been fenced off and is being gutted. Does anybody know Westwood's plan for the site?

Dmajackson
Feb 22, 2010, 8:36 PM
MacKay drops $1.6 million for five rec projects
By PAT LEE Staff Reporter
Mon. Feb 22 - 4:54 AM

Ottawa has given the Halifax area $1.6 million to be divided among five recreational projects, including a new indoor soccer pitch at the Mainland Common.

The Clayton Park soccer facility, expected to be open early next year, received $1 million, the largest chunk of the federal funds that Central Nova MP Peter MacKay announced Sunday.

The announcement was made at the Dartmouth Sportsplex, which received $320,000 to put toward a $960,000 upgrade, including new air conditioning and heat-recovery systems, new arena boards and dressing room improvements.

The remainder of the federal funding will go toward upgrading six kilometres of pathways in Portland Hills in Dartmouth ($200,000), building a new four-season multi-purpose room at the Big Cove YMCA Camp ($32,000) and refurbishing the clubhouse at Banook Canoe Club ($26,667).

The funding is through the Recreational Infrastructure Canada Program.

MacKay said the Halifax area has a core group of active residents and the upgrades and new facilities will be well-used.

"Halifax Regional Municipality is and has always been a strong supporter of sports and active (living)," he said Sunday. "It has also produced many world-class athletes and I would say, in large part, this is why sporting announcements, projects and facilities are so very important to our region and our province.

"With 8,000 regional programs, 237 sport courts, 50 recreation centres and 15 walking trails, just to mention a few, there is truly something for everyone at every level in HRM."

MacKay said recreational facilities are particularly crucial to provide young people with healthy options.

"When we give our children the opportunity to become involved in organized sports or activities, whether they be dance, whether they be arts or sporting activities, it truly enhances their lives in ways we can only imagine if they were not there," he said.

Scott Lytle, vice-president of Soccer Nova Scotia, said the plan for a $10-million indoor soccer facility, with a full-size pitch that is the first of its kind in the province, is essentially ready to go now that federal funding has come through.

"This is effectively the last piece of the puzzle. There’s really no barriers at this point."

The facility will join the $42-million Canada Games Centre being built on the same site.

Brad Smith, chairman of the sportsplex’s board, said the money from Ottawa kick-starts a long-term plan to upgrade the 30-year facility, which includes a rink, pool and fitness facilities.

A series of meetings to garner public input will start soon, he said.

Michael LeDuc, the camp’s director, said the Merigomish facility has for many years been open to groups most of the year, except winter.

"This final part of the puzzle will allow us to offer winter programs," he said of the 120-year-old camp, operated by the YMCA of Greater Halifax-Dartmouth.

The Portland Hills trails will be upgraded to become an active transportation route that will eventually connect to the trail system along the Dartmouth waterfront.

Banook Canoe Club in Dartmouth will use its funding for new siding, windows and sills, painting and chimney repairs.

( plee@herald.ca )

Jonovision
Feb 25, 2010, 2:55 PM
I could have sworn there was a thread for the South Bland development.
Anyway, here is a new rendering.

http://inlinethumb36.webshots.com/44259/2681307020096709958S600x600Q85.jpg (http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2681307020096709958ZTrOgQ)

fenwick16
Feb 25, 2010, 3:02 PM
This looks good, too bad they can't move the grain elevators.

Keith P.
Feb 25, 2010, 3:26 PM
This looks good, too bad they can't move the grain elevators.

And the rats. :eek:

planarchy
Feb 25, 2010, 3:47 PM
This looks good, too bad they can't move the grain elevators.

I like the grain elevators. Maybe we can just renovate them. Here is a proposal (maybe under construction by now) to build on top of obsolete silos at the old Stella Artois Brewery in Leuven, Belgium.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1b/Tweewaters.jpg

sdm
Feb 25, 2010, 4:49 PM
I could have sworn there was a thread for the South Bland development.
Anyway, here is a new rendering.

http://inlinethumb36.webshots.com/44259/2681307020096709958S600x600Q85.jpg (http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2681307020096709958ZTrOgQ)

Not bad, could be worse.

Is there some sort of internal garden or is it one big floor plate?

sdm
Feb 25, 2010, 5:12 PM
I like the grain elevators. Maybe we can just renovate them. Here is a proposal (maybe under construction by now) to build on top of obsolete silos at the old Stella Artois Brewery in Leuven, Belgium.



Want to be even more impressed, check this one out

http://www.silopoint.com/flash.html

planarchy
Feb 25, 2010, 6:39 PM
Want to be even more impressed, check this one out

http://www.silopoint.com/flash.html

Nice to see some creativity with these obsolete, yet city-defining sites - and it Baltimore of all places! Makes me think there is still hope for good design in Halifax...

Thanks for sharing

Dmajackson
Feb 25, 2010, 8:30 PM
I could have sworn there was a thread for the South Bland development.
Anyway, here is a new rendering.

http://inlinethumb36.webshots.com/44259/2681307020096709958S600x600Q85.jpg (http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2681307020096709958ZTrOgQ)

There is a thread for that The Terraces II (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=175564)

The rendering looks decent for the area. :)

GLaing
Feb 25, 2010, 8:39 PM
Impressive project - do you know if it is close to a "working port"

Barrington south
Feb 25, 2010, 10:13 PM
don't know if it has been mentioned, but...........CD Plus on Barrington is closing in march....another one bites the dust

sdm
Feb 26, 2010, 2:37 AM
don't know if it has been mentioned, but...........CD Plus on Barrington is closing in march....another one bites the dust

Yup, and expect more downtown retail to close. We needed to react years ago to sustain it, but failed. Most growth is happen in SGR and it will take some very dramatic change to get the true downtown core retail working again.

spaustin
Feb 26, 2010, 3:17 AM
Or what about this one in Oslo, Norway

http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/p/m/1f933e/

Unlike the Baltimore one, the former Oslo silo still has the shape and looks like one. A little less splashy, but I think way more interesting.

sdm
Feb 26, 2010, 3:19 AM
funny i mention it retail dying, but in allnovascotia the wicker empourium and pay a dollar store are closing downtown in Scotia Square.

fenwick16
Feb 26, 2010, 3:20 AM
Yup, and expect more downtown retail to close. We needed to react years ago to sustain it, but failed. Most growth is happen in SGR and it will take some very dramatic change to get the true downtown core retail working again.

The SGR area is surrounded by high density residential and close to universities so there are quite a few shoppers during the evening and daytime. There is some hope for retail downtown but it will take a lot of residential development similar to what is taking place in Toronto and Vancouver. It could take 10 - 20 years to transform the downtown into more of a residential/retail area, if that is really necessary. In an ideal world there would be an equal amount of retail/residential and office development throughout the city and most people would be able to walk to work or use city transit (kind of like Manhattan where few people need cars).

However, one solution would be to convert more historic downtown buildings, that are no longer practical for office use, to residential similar to what is being proposed for the National Film Board building. This would provide more residents in the downtown area and provide a use for deserted downtown buildings.

fenwick16
Feb 26, 2010, 3:23 AM
Or what about this one in Oslo, Norway

http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/p/m/1f933e/

Unlike the Baltimore one, the former Oslo silo still has the shape and looks like one. A little less splashy, but I think way more interesting.

This is a very interesting development. It would look great in Halifax.

beyeas
Feb 26, 2010, 3:13 PM
Thoroughly depressing sometimes to look at the cool architecture going up in other cities in Canada. Not a fan of all of these, but some are very cool. At least other cities can find the balance of building both "new" architecture and adding to heritage buildings. Trillium aside, Halifax has not built anything remotely "cool" by these standards (accepting even the fact that Halifax is also not necessarily suited to some of these architectural styles).

http://homeandgarden.homes-extra.ca/Microgalleries/coolcondos

macgregor
Feb 26, 2010, 10:03 PM
WDCL has announced that they are building some more boardwalk at Cunard Inlet / Cunard Block.

"Construction is underway to complete a 200' wooden boardwalk as part of the Halifax Harbourwalk. Expected completion date: April 30, 2010."

http://www.wdcl.ca/documents/CunardInlet-%20Halifax%20Harbourwalk%20.pdf

http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&cp=rf6gp39q2cd8&scene=43560505&lvl=2&sty=b

Wishblade
Feb 26, 2010, 10:47 PM
N.S. loans Halifax Shipyard $20 million for upgrades to wharves, cranes, offices

HALIFAX, N.S. - The Nova Scotia government is loaning $20 million to the Halifax Shipyard to help modernize and upgrade its wharves, cranes, fabrication areas and offices.

Premier Darrell Dexter said Thursday the loan to the yard, owned by Irving Shipbuilding Inc., will help secure a stronger future for it.

"This is a sound investment in a successful company," he said in a release. "This investment will not only improve infrastructure at the shipyard and create jobs during construction, it will help the shipyard modernize its facility so it will stay competitive and able to bid on more contracts in the future."

Last fall, the shipyard announced a $219-million contract to build nine mid-shore patrol vessels for the Canadian Coast Guard.

The government said the upgrades to the shipyard will make it one of the most modern on the eastern seaboard.

Jim Irving, CEO of Irving Shipbuilding, thanked the province for its commitment to the yard.

"Today's news is about investing for the long term and securing this Nova Scotian centre of excellence for made-in-Canada ships," he said.

http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/canada/article/462494--n-s-loans-halifax-shipyard-20-million-for-upgrades-to-wharves-cranes-offices

-Harlington-
Mar 1, 2010, 11:50 PM
Some small updates:

Waterfront Renovations:
http://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0986.jpg?t=1267486869

http://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0987.jpg?t=1267487046



Maritime Museum of the Atlantic Renovations:
http://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0988.jpg?t=1267487079

http://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0989.jpg?t=1267487265



And just for shits and giggles, our wonderful prosperous harbour:
http://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0992.jpg?t=1267487340

fenwick16
Mar 1, 2010, 11:56 PM
Some small updates:

Maritime Museum of the Atlantic Renovations:
http://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0988.jpg?t=1267487079

Thanks for the update. I didn't even know that this was taking place. It is quite a change.

Hopefully the harbour will be cleaned up again soon. Is the garbage from melting snow (is snow being dumped into the harbour again?)

-Harlington-
Mar 2, 2010, 12:55 AM
yeah, i was quite surprised about the museum renos as well hopeful it will look good.
and as for the harbour, there were a good bit of snowbanks up around the edge of the water before the rain storm last friday so it was probably the debris from that or just halifax harbour being halifax harbour.

Dmajackson
Mar 2, 2010, 3:22 AM
yeah, i was quite surprised about the museum renos as well hopeful it will look good.
and as for the harbour, there were a good bit of snowbanks up around the edge of the water before the rain storm last friday so it was probably the debris from that or just halifax harbour being halifax harbour.

I also didn't even know the museum was under renovations though I did hear plans are in the making to redesign the pirate ship playground (I'll miss it. I loved that thing as a kid).

Since all the sewage plants have at least the screening process working I doubt that garbage is from our sewer system. Most likely the snowbank debris you mentioned above.

Thanks for the photo updates, Harlington. Its good to know someone can take over for me when I move out of town. :cheers:

-Harlington-
Mar 2, 2010, 4:02 AM
no problem,,
and i sure can try, aha

Jonovision
Mar 2, 2010, 4:56 AM
Thanks for the pics! Most of that debris in the harbour is just a result of the storm over the weekend.

alps
Mar 2, 2010, 5:40 AM
Thanks for the photo updates, Harlington. Its good to know someone can take over for me when I move out of town. :cheers:
For school? Where're you moving to?

Dmajackson
Mar 2, 2010, 12:38 PM
For school? Where're you moving to?

Not positive yet since it depends on what Dalhousie says but probably down in the valley for a couple of years.