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Dmajackson
May 16, 2011, 1:54 AM
3150 Barrington Street (photos taken today by DJ):

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5131/5724894170_5a4b9d3469_z.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5173/5724339457_48aac2aea1_z.jpg

Dmajackson
May 16, 2011, 2:00 AM
Gottingen Street demolitions (photos taken on Maitland St):

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5122/5724342241_d9f0aff165_z.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3042/5724903782_d8973b692f_z.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5122/5724907316_429b0a2bd8_z.jpg

Dmajackson
May 16, 2011, 2:41 AM
I just had to go see the new bandstand in the Public Gardens today. I have to say it's up there with the Fish Hatchery one for attractiveness. :)

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2152/5724468111_89c2edc7b6_z.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5053/5724487113_e19c599b9b_z.jpg

And some others I took;

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5263/5725056636_7c9f2b086d_z.jpg

http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5167/5724491577_3be9dffac6_z.jpg

Haliwood
May 16, 2011, 12:21 PM
It's a renovation.

If anything, I think that Starbucks has increased business in the area. The customer niches aren't really the same, and now there are more options available to consumers. I frequent both places, and do so for different reasons.

Starbucks is a coffee shop - and it's hours provide options later in the evening. HumaniTea/Super Natural is a natural food store and cafe with great freshly made food options. Julien's short hours and terrible coffees don't encourage much in the way of lingering (for me anyway), but some of their pastries, and all of their breads are great.

True. Although I look at Humani-T as more of a coffee shop than anything else too. Really good coffee and specialty drinks, plus the upstairs seating is a nice place to study. Free Wi-Fi too.

I think their addition to the North End is really awesome.

Dmajackson
May 19, 2011, 4:11 AM
Coming Soon!
Lotuspoint Living - Dartmouth, NS
Arrives in 2012
The lotus flower is a symbol of liberation, prosperity and purity. It rises out of the mud, high above the water. The lotus represents the evolution to a balanced state of bliss and contentment. It signifies life, creation and rebirth.

Just as the lotus rises beyond its origins, a quality residential condominium development rises in downtown Dartmouth on Ochterloney and Victoria Rd. Lotus Point Arrives in 2012. Watch for exciting details to come

No link or further information regarding this right now but the development logo is viewable at Boris Development's website (http://borisholdings.com/NewDevelopments.htm)

Empire
May 20, 2011, 12:21 AM
Bill Black just doesn't get it. Halterm is expanding, the grain elevator is busier than ever and you will never transform all of that property to low slung residential plus pave the rail cut. Perhaps you could dig the cut deeper and run a light rail/freight service under a street/greenway....but who pays?

New commuter road proposed
Black: Tear up rail tracks to Halifax core
By CLARE MELLOR Staff Reporter
Thu, May 19 - 5:48 PM
Halifax businessman Bill Black wants government to examine the possibility of a new commuter road for those trying to access or leave Halifax’s urban core.

"In a city our size . . . people who live in places like Sackville (shouldn’t be) taking an hour to get to work," Black told those attending a Halifax Club luncheon Wednesday.

He suggested the railway tracks that run from downtown Halifax to Bayers Road should be torn up and the rail cut paved for use by cars or buses, with an adjacent space for bicycle traffic.

"It would handle, at best, one lane each way. . . . The idea is to make very little change to the actual footprint of the real (rail) cut as it is."

The proposal, he said, would cost much less than a combined truck and rail route proposal that was studied in 2009.

The commuter road would not have intersections and would be accessed "at the Rotary and basically the bottom of the Bicentennial Highway," he said.

"This takes a lot of pressure off other routes into town."

Black’s proposal, published on his New Start Nova Scotia website, would involve buying Via Rail property. Just one passenger train and a cargo train use the south-end track each day, he said.

Black suggested that south-end lands associated with the rail yards and container terminal should become part of the downtown core. His plan entails getting rid of the container terminal near Point Pleasant Park by consolidating it with the one at Fairview Cove. "In my view, the prospects for the (Halifax) port, through no fault of the people who are running it, are very modest.

"All the traffic that we have today, in terms of the number of containers, can easily be handled in the Fairview Cove centre." Truck traffic in the downtown would be drastically reduced if the Halterm terminal near the park closes, Black said.

Getting rid of the "unsightly" Halifax grain elevators, also on Halifax Port Authority land, would also free up more valuable land, he said.

"We have this extraordinary valuable resource that is very, very seriously underemployed. . . . The other underemployed resource that we have is the rail cut," he said.

At least one person attending the lunch did not embrace Black’s idea of a commuter road.

"I look at Halifax and I think the last thing we need is another road in," one man said during a discussion that followed the talk.

"It is only going to encourage more people to live in the outskirts and to encourage more cars to be driving and commuting."

Contacted Wednesday, Coun. Sue Uteck (Northwest Arm-South End) said she has not seen Black’s proposal but the necessary expropriation of properties on peninsular Halifax to make way for such a project would make it unfeasible.

Coun. Jennifer Watts (Connaught-Quinpool) also hadn’t seen the proposal but said she also has concerns. "It would have a huge impact on existing homes in that district," she said.

"You need to look at the budget . . . the actual physical reality of being able to do that, and what (is) the impact on the existing housing stock in that area. Is that investment and actually bringing more cars into the downtown the direction that we really want to be putting our investment in?"

( cmellor@herald.ca)

musicman
May 20, 2011, 2:18 AM
This guy is clueless at best.. Does he not realize that the ships of the future will have issues going under the bridges, or that creating new "commuter roads" does not fix the problem, and that it will only create other problems. Let's just bring more cars to the core, where will we put these cars once they are here. It is backwards thinking at best. Besides i have a dream of one day having those "ugly" grain elevators turned into condos.. I seem to remember something about a development in maybe Portland Oregon that re-used an old grain elevator.

worldlyhaligonian
May 20, 2011, 6:15 AM
I don't get why the rail cut just doesn't become a BRT system with half assed stations as we have discussed on this forum several times.

Waye Mason
May 20, 2011, 7:06 PM
I don't get why the rail cut just doesn't become a BRT system with half assed stations as we have discussed on this forum several times.

LRT you mean? Or pave it over and put in BRT?

Phalanx
May 20, 2011, 8:17 PM
I'm assuming something like the Transitway in Ottawa?

worldlyhaligonian
May 20, 2011, 8:31 PM
LRT you mean? Or pave it over and put in BRT?

Well, lrt would be amazing, but I'm moreso talking about paving a section next to the tracks and having an ottawa style system that could act as pilot for lrt.

As someone who has spent some time down on the tracks, there is quite a bit of space down there.

pblaauw
May 20, 2011, 8:44 PM
Well, lrt would be amazing, but I'm moreso talking about paving a section next to the tracks and having an ottawa style system that could act as pilot for lrt.

As someone who has spent some time down on the tracks, there is quite a bit of space down there.

It was discussed/studied a few years ago. The costs of creating some sort of transit/truck thoroughfare kept escalating, so the idea was shelved, or maybe even killed altogether.

worldlyhaligonian
May 21, 2011, 7:54 PM
It was discussed/studied a few years ago. The costs of creating some sort of transit/truck thoroughfare kept escalating, so the idea was shelved, or maybe even killed altogether.

Yeah, its funny because those against this are coming from different angles.

Utek is clearly just representing the wealthy south enders who don't want the noise, whereas Watts is representing the anti-development crowd.

The thing is... public transportation along this route would be the most environmentally/socially sound transportation option possible for Halifax. But hey, what do I know, my councillor voted against the full scale bridge terminal that will improve access for the disabled and improve public transportation. I don't know how any of this stuff is justified by so called "urban planners" "social activists" etc... Have they been to Europe?

I'm sure the Bayer's Road widing will be met with rediculous/nonsense obstructionism... even though it will improve public transportation along that route.

coolmillion
May 21, 2011, 9:36 PM
I was talking to a developer/ real estate friend the other day who recently bought the building next to the Khyber that formerly housed CD Plus. He plans to demolish the building and replace it with a 7 storey office building with ground floor retail. It will follow HRMbydesign guidelines but he anticipates some dissent because it will be a modern design. Hopefully the "streamlined process" will smooth the usual hurdles... Apparently some are already prepared to argue that the existing box should be preserved as an example of cubism!?

beyeas
May 22, 2011, 1:20 PM
IApparently some are already prepared to argue that the existing box should be preserved as an example of cubism!?

omg that is the funniest thing I have heard in weeks.
Well cubism lasted only 15 years surrounding WWI, so I am not even sure this meets their argument (when was it built??).

Of course cubism gave way to surrealism in the '20s... and I was say the "surreal" is a far better way to describe their argument!!! LOL

Empire
May 22, 2011, 2:22 PM
omg that is the funniest thing I have heard in weeks.
Well cubism lasted only 15 years surrounding WWI, so I am not even sure this meets their argument (when was it built??).

Of course cubism gave way to surrealism in the '20s... and I was say the "surreal" is a far better way to describe their argument!!! LOL

It will be hard for the anti development crew to argue that this building should be saved to prevent a 7 storey monolith.

Ugly CD plus building....

http://maps.google.it/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=it&geocode=&q=halifax+ns&aq=&sll=53.72438,-1.861577&sspn=0.197039,0.486145&g=halifax&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Halifax,+Contea+di+Halifax,+Nuova+Scozia,+Canada&ll=44.646086,-63.573493&spn=0,0.007596&t=h&z=17&layer=c&cbll=44.646024,-63.573459&panoid=5GAbUUrI-mb5QWaHI3RzJw&cbp=12,253.33,,0,-20.2

Keith P.
May 22, 2011, 2:27 PM
It would be a real shame if the wrecking ball demolishing the CD Plus building -- assuming it gets past the defenders of "cubism", good god -- were to accidentally knock down the adjacent Khyber Bldg and take out the Heritage Trust offices along with the rest of that ugly gothic spook-mansion artsy-type money-pit. A real shame. Tragic. Just terrible. Really.

:haha: :notacrook: ;) :cheers::jester: :haha:

fenwick16
May 22, 2011, 3:12 PM
I was talking to a developer/ real estate friend the other day who recently bought the building next to the Khyber that formerly housed CD Plus. He plans to demolish the building and replace it with a 7 storey office building with ground floor retail. It will follow HRMbydesign guidelines but he anticipates some dissent because it will be a modern design. Hopefully the "streamlined process" will smooth the usual hurdles... Apparently some are already prepared to argue that the existing box should be preserved as an example of cubism!?

This would certainly be a positive for Barrington Street. The HRM_by_Design height limit for that area is 22 meters so theoretically a 7 storey office building could be built there but the storeys would have to be limited to about 10.3 feet (3.14 m) per storey. If the first floor could be sunken by 5 feet then it would allow more height per floor for the remaining 6 storeys. Is there a requirement for new buildings to have built-in parking, since there isn't much available space?

coolmillion
May 22, 2011, 4:52 PM
I think the CD Plus building was built around 1930. Not sure about the specs but I don't think it would be possible to include underground parking because of the location. Hopefully more information will be available soon! I'll post if I hear any updates...

worldlyhaligonian
May 22, 2011, 5:57 PM
It would be a real shame if the wrecking ball demolishing the CD Plus building -- assuming it gets past the defenders of "cubism", good god -- were to accidentally knock down the adjacent Khyber Bldg and take out the Heritage Trust offices along with the rest of that ugly gothic spook-mansion artsy-type money-pit. A real shame. Tragic. Just terrible. Really.

:haha: :notacrook: ;) :cheers::jester: :haha:

That's a bit rediculous, those buildings have merit.

Why can't anybody agree on a mix of old and new downtown. This paradigm of heritage vs. development is arbitrary.

Keith P.
May 22, 2011, 7:55 PM
That's a bit rediculous, those buildings have merit.

I despise the Khyber building for a bunch of reasons. I dislike the gothic haunted-house style. I dislike that it houses the obstructionist Heritage Trust. I dislike that HRM makes it available virtually free to an arts society that uses it as its private clubhouse. I dislike that my tax dollars go to not only make that possible but are going to fund a multi-million dollar reno to make it an even better private clubhouse. I dislike that it along with its neighbors has held back that entire block from redevelopment and makes that stretch of Barrington look deserted and decrepit.

worldlyhaligonian
May 22, 2011, 10:04 PM
I despise the Khyber building for a bunch of reasons. I dislike the gothic haunted-house style. I dislike that it houses the obstructionist Heritage Trust. I dislike that HRM makes it available virtually free to an arts society that uses it as its private clubhouse. I dislike that my tax dollars go to not only make that possible but are going to fund a multi-million dollar reno to make it an even better private clubhouse. I dislike that it along with its neighbors has held back that entire block from redevelopment and makes that stretch of Barrington look deserted and decrepit.

You are right in some regards. I personally like gothic style, but anyway... I'm sure that the folks in the Khyber think that the Nova Centre will be the "club house" for the "managerial class" or whatever... but they are hugely hypocritical.

I say that a successful downtown should have both arts and business. What disturbs me most is that the obstructionists will never bend, whereas people with other points of view tend to be more flexible.

A new convention centre, library, performing arts centre, and stadium are all critical for Halifax.

Keith, I think you are on the money about some things, but I'm not going to play the same games of either side in development debates. Both the HT/STV/arts community and the business community are so polarized at this point that everybody else in the middle feels somehow less compared to these "morally superior" assholes.

We need both. To say that is incorrect is buying into some bullshit that simply isn't founded in reality.

beyeas
May 25, 2011, 12:05 PM
AllNS is reporting that Sobey's has plans to "re-develop" their Queen Street lands. Apparently they have not been renewing the leases of the other businesses on their property there.

The downside is that it doesn't sound from the tenor of the article that they are going to do a true re-development in terms of integrating it into something with any height and/or residential component. Rather it just sounds like they plan to renew the Sobey's with their new format and add a gas bar.

Hopefully they plan more than that, but based on that article I wouldn't hold my breath. It will be a huge missed opportunity if they just develop it as another 1 level grocery store with a parking lot and a gas bar. That is the utter opposite of the sort of forward thinking development that should go there (especially given the redevelopment of Fenwick is already going to add a nice density of people to the area).

someone123
May 25, 2011, 5:59 PM
They shouldn't be allowed to build a 1 storey Sobeys and gas station in that area. It's no more appropriate than the planned highrises nearby that were quashed.

They can also make way more money by adding residential. If they don't it will be another huge disappointment emblematic of one of many problems in the city.

HRM
May 25, 2011, 6:43 PM
What nearby highrises were "quashed"?

The redevelopment of Fenwick that includes two new 8-10 story buildings was overwhelmingly approved. Grainery Lofts is now underway. Trillium and Vic are nearing completion.

someone123
May 25, 2011, 7:02 PM
19 storey South Street proposal, 27 storey brewery tower. Not permitted because they were deemed too tall.

Few seem to worry about inappropriately low densities even though they certainly also have an effect on neighbouring properties.

TedWilliamsHead
May 25, 2011, 7:27 PM
knock it down and make Sobeys Stadium...... close enough to dal and smu and the downtown core... this is only a joke but a dream

TedWilliamsHead
May 25, 2011, 7:30 PM
sorry I was actually thinking of the atlantic superstore location on barrington

HRM
May 25, 2011, 8:55 PM
19 storey South Street proposal, 27 storey brewery tower. Not permitted because they were deemed too tall.

Few seem to worry about inappropriately low densities even though they certainly also have an effect on neighbouring properties.

Neither of the two were "quashed". SS has been built albeit at a lower height but not "quashed" nonetheless. The Alexander has been approved, admittedly reduced from 27 to 21 stories, but not "quashed" nonetheless. It's a condo project so obviously the numbers aren't lining up for Halkirk.

Twenty-one stories for the Alexander site seems acceptably appropriate for its particular site, given the neighbouring buildings in the area. The scale of the Alexander will make it easier to justify going taller should another tower be built in the area. That is of course if the Alexander is actually ever built.

someone123
May 25, 2011, 9:43 PM
The proposals as they existed were denied. It took many years of modifications for the developers to get approval. I believe 5620 South may even have been proposed around 2000 initially. The original (rejected outright) Brewery proposal was from 2003.

Either way, my point is that sometimes the city intervenes to reduce building heights deemed inappropriate. However, they rarely intervene to prevent inappropriate low density or car-oriented development. We've only seen a bit of this with HbD; Halifax is very far behind cities like Vancouver in this respect.

worldlyhaligonian
May 25, 2011, 9:49 PM
The proposals as they existed were denied. It took many years of modifications for the developers to get approval. I believe 5620 South may even have been proposed around 2000 initially. The original (rejected outright) Brewery proposal was from 2003.

Either way, my point is that sometimes the city intervenes to reduce building heights deemed inappropriate. However, they rarely intervene to prevent inappropriate low density or car-oriented development. We've only seen a bit of this with HbD; Halifax is very far behind cities like Vancouver in this respect.

Yet we hear nothing from the environmentalist crowd about gas stations, odd isn't it? Maybe because they are just anti-height and won't admit it.

Also, shouldn't the HT be on top of stuff like this? They didn't have cars in the 1800's. ;)

fenwick16
May 25, 2011, 10:41 PM
AllNS is reporting that Sobey's has plans to "re-develop" their Queen Street lands. Apparently they have not been renewing the leases of the other businesses on their property there.

The downside is that it doesn't sound from the tenor of the article that they are going to do a true re-development in terms of integrating it into something with any height and/or residential component. Rather it just sounds like they plan to renew the Sobey's with their new format and add a gas bar.

Hopefully they plan more than that, but based on that article I wouldn't hold my breath. It will be a huge missed opportunity if they just develop it as another 1 level grocery store with a parking lot and a gas bar. That is the utter opposite of the sort of forward thinking development that should go there (especially given the redevelopment of Fenwick is already going to add a nice density of people to the area).

It looks like they could build something quite substantial on that site if they decide to. Being right next to Fenwick Towers and a couple of other apartment buildings, it would be a missed opportunity if they only build an expanded grocery store and gas bar. Here is a Google map link (http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=&q=Queen+Street,+halifax,+nova+scotia&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Queen+St,+Halifax,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia&gl=ca&ll=44.637197,-63.573917&spn=0.002878,0.008256&t=h&z=18). It is also outside the HRM_by_Design height limitations (and likely outside any viewplane?)

I wonder if they could build a grocery store with several levels of residential over it?

DigitalNinja
May 26, 2011, 2:02 AM
Sobeys could make a nice development there. With a store on the bottom 1 or 2 floors, then residential for another 10 it is a nice spot and needs some new buildings to force the current crappy rental places to renovate. (South Point, I'm looking at you.)

sk8tr
May 26, 2011, 2:19 AM
Here's a link to a planned Safeway with residential on top on Granville Street in Vancouver.
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?p=5288050

Why wouldn't Sobey's love this idea? As you can see from the thread, in Vancouver, just like here in Halifax, there was some resistance to tall buildings on the part of certain councillors. But for the grocery store, this has to be win-win. They can be landlords (if they wish), and they have a built-in clientele.

I would love to see Sobeys do this, because you just KNOW that if Sobeys does it, then Superstore will have to follow suit (maybe on Quinpool or Barrington?).

fenwick16
May 26, 2011, 2:30 AM
Here's a link to a planned Safeway with residential on top on Granville Street in Vancouver.
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?p=5288050

Why wouldn't Sobey's love this idea? As you can see from the thread, in Vancouver, just like here in Halifax, there was some resistance to tall buildings on the part of certain councillors. But for the grocery store, this has to be win-win. They can be landlords (if they wish), and they have a built-in clientele.

I would love to see Sobeys do this, because you just KNOW that if Sobeys does it, then Superstore will have to follow suit (maybe on Quinpool or Barrington?).

Thanks for the link sk8tr. This Vancouver project would look fantastic in that area. Here is a direct link to the architectural drawings (from sk8tr's post) - Vancouver grocery store + residential (http://vancouver.ca/commsvcs/planning/rezoning/applications/8495granville/documents/RevisedApplication-5.0ArchitecturalDrawingsforWeb.pdf)

someone123
May 26, 2011, 2:59 AM
Sobeys has many urban-format stores in other parts of the country (Toronto, Edmonton).

Mixed-use grocery store buildings with residential above are built more frequently now in Vancouver and its inner suburbs (Dartmouth proper and Clayton Park equivalents) than the standalone style. I live in a suburban area and shop at a grocery store with underground parking and 30-40 storey condos above. Halifax is very far behind the times.

I would love to see the old Sobeys replaced with a new building with underground parking and whatever scale of residential above, whether it's 4 floors or 40 floors. I do think that 6-8 storeys on top is probably more practical in terms of easy approval and construction.

If something like that happens the Queen Street area will become really great. If they build a set back suburban-style store with gas bar the immediate area probably won't improve much for 20-30 years because it won't be a pleasant area for the residents and pedestrian shoppers who make up the majority in that part of the city.

alps
May 26, 2011, 3:07 AM
Sobeys has many urban-format stores in other parts of the country (Toronto, Edmonton).


Here's (http://maps.google.ca/?ie=UTF8&ll=43.706394,-79.389372&spn=0,0.003345&t=h&z=19&layer=c&cbll=43.706394,-79.389372&panoid=LSUW6NDvtHkHX9T1dMUJ6g&cbp=12,268.6,,0,-11.11) one near my aunt's place in Toronto with apartments above. Kind of an ugly piecemeal building but the concept would be perfect for the Queen St location.

Agreed, making the store MORE suburban will be terrible for the area. We really need stronger design guidelines when it comes to gas stations, drive thrus, more surface parking, and other such streetscape-destroying crap that has no place in this area.

halifaxboyns
May 26, 2011, 6:12 AM
Sobeys seems to be rather new to getting into the more 'urban' format stores; as opposed to loblaws. But based on what I've seen of them out here in Calgary - there is still resistance on their parts to go urban format in suburban areas. If I were to guess, it's probably because the only time they want to be landlords is when it's for them only. They don't seem to have a problem with moving into a development once its getting populated and there isn't a store around to serve the area (like the sobeys that ALPS pointed out). But where they seem to have problems (both sobeys and loblaws and I"d guess safeway and Save on foods) is when you get into new mixed use developments.

Face it; they aren't residential or property managers. They run grocerry stores - so they wouldn't have an interest in redeveloping a site to include residential unless they partnered with a developer; sold the land; then leased the location at a reduced rate as a condition of sale. This is an example of a situation they would be inclined to probably get in on. OR they would move into a new mixed use development if the market in the area was good (but they didn't have the building built nor would they run it).

If I were to guess it would redevelop pretty much as is, just a bigger and better layout and no residential. If you wanted to see Queen Street or even the Superstore on Young or Joe Howe redevelop - the developer would have to buy the land off them; incorporate the store (temporary close; tear down and build a footprint into the new development) and then add residential.

A lot of stores in the US are getting on board the mixed use bandwagon; but they too don't want to be property managers. I had the privilage to deal with the developer who built this (http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=Whole+foods+market+Seattle&aq=&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=35.282731,67.412109&ie=UTF8&hq=Whole+foods+market&hnear=Seattle,+King,+Washington,+United+States&ll=47.618408,-122.336422&spn=0,0.012317&z=17&layer=c&cbll=47.618533,-122.338659&panoid=heiTDKZ0GQMWXyRmiExAJg&cbp=12,138.21,,0,-10.56) development in Seattle and I asked him about Wholefood moving in. He was telling me that Wholefoods only moves into a mixed use development when it's built for them - they never build something themselves. I suspect its the same way here in Canada.

eastcoastal
May 26, 2011, 10:54 AM
As much as I would like to see an urban format store on Queen St., and as much as I'd like to be an optimist, Sobeys is not going that direction any time soon.

Regardless of whether or not they have urban format stores elsewhere in the country, they would have to be convinced the same would work here. My guess is that the organization is structures such that those who make decisions about how and where new stores are built out west are not the same as those who do the same out here. Another guess, is that the perception of the market in Halifax is such that a mixed use development is risky here.

We're not talking about an innovative developer, whose marketing strategy is to position themselves on the leading edge. This is Sobeys.

fenwick16
May 26, 2011, 12:00 PM
This story (below) was in the metronews. I am not convinced that these groups are against urban sprawl. Some of the people involved have helped to limit growth on the peninsula and they now seem to be targeting the suburbs. In my opinion, they are just against growth.

I understand the need to limit urban sprawl but that term should be defined. If people want to own detached homes near the city core then this is not urban sprawl, in my opinion. There isn't enough land on the peninsula for a sufficient number of detached homes, and people with detached homes shouldn't be telling people without detached homes that they must live in condos and apartment buildings. On the other hand, people in the suburbs should pay their fair share for services possibly through increased development fees in the suburbs.

Does Jennifer Watts really want more dense development in her district? Does anyone know of an example of that desire by Jennifer Watts? Could it just be that she and her friends see the population growth occurring in the municipality and are looking for ways to halt it?

There is the other fact - if the municipality wants more industrial jobs then these plants will have to be built outside of the city core in the industrial parks; shouldn't homes be built close to these parks so that workers won't have to travel as far?

Does anyone know of this "alliance's" definition of urban sprawl; what is considered to be their boundary of urban growth? One question with an urban greenbelt - if the HRM sees phenomenal growth and prosperity then can a greenbelt be opened up in the future for growth. After all, people need jobs to survive and Nova Scotians would probably prefer to see to see growth and prosperity locally instead of in Alberta and Ontario (there are exceptions, some people really would prefer to see growth happen in these other locations)

(source: http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/local/article/871460--an-alliance-against-sprawl )
An alliance against sprawl
Alliance looking for more community groups to join Green belt plan for HRM already underway Health, environment, conservation, trails groups among the members

JENNIFER TAPLIN
METRO HALIFAX
Published: May 26, 2011 2:02 a.m.
Last modified: May 26, 2011 2:07 a.m.

An alliance of community do-gooders has risen to battle sprawl.

Seventeen community groups from all over HRM have joined forces under the banner Our HRM Alliance to push for sustainable growth as council gears up to review the Regional Municipal Panning Strategy later this year.

They even have a theme song: Joel Plaskett’s Love This Town.

Representatives publicly announced the alliance and launched a website during a press conference in Halifax yesterday.

“We really hope the alliance will play a key role in making change,” said Mark Butler with the Ecology Action Centre. “It goes beyond a group hug for downtown.”

Walter Regan with the Sackville Rivers Association, said the mega-developments eating up thousands of acres are subsidized by taxpayers. He said developers should have to pay for additional services.

“We have to take control over our destiny,” he said. “People aren’t getting what they want, they’re taking what they’re given.”

Paul MacKinnon with the Downtown Halifax Business Commission said first the residential market seeped away from downtown, and then it was retail. Now office space is high-tailing out of downtown for cheaper rents in business parks.

“It’s an alarm bell,” he said.

Touching on the health impacts of driving cars instead of walking, Menna MacIsaac with the Heart and Stroke Foundation said sprawl is costly.

Inactivity in HRM costs the provincial health care system about $16 million a year, she said.

“There is an obvious link between lifestyle and health, and that link also exists between one’s health and their built-in environment,” she said.

cormiermax
May 26, 2011, 1:06 PM
Would the council be able to stop such a suburban location to be built in an urban area? This would be horrible for the area and in no way should it be built, It would totally ruin the area and would be even worse than parking lots because it would take far longer to develop.

Northend Guy
May 26, 2011, 1:07 PM
As much as I would like to see an urban format store on Queen St., and as much as I'd like to be an optimist, Sobeys is not going that direction any time soon.

We're not talking about an innovative developer, whose marketing strategy is to position themselves on the leading edge. This is Sobeys.

I have to agree. I think that in all likelihood Sobey's will stick to what they know. Not to say that I think that the urban grocery is a bad idea.

I was just thinking that we will have an example of an urban grocery of sorts once CCA is built. (Pete's) My understanding is that City Center is basically leasing the roof of it's building to Dexel for something like 50 years (don't quote that) to do whatever they want with it. Thus the apartments. Basically, as I understand it, City Center bears little responsibility as a landlord, as far as general maintenance, etc. are concerned. I suppose if Sobeys were to have such a relationship with a developer, that would be a good way to mitigate landlord responsibility. Put the infrastructure in place to put something above the store, and then find a developer to make use of the space.

coolmillion
May 26, 2011, 1:29 PM
This story (below) was in the metronews. I am not convinced that these groups are against urban sprawl. Some of the people involved have helped to limit growth on the peninsula and they now seem to be targeting the suburbs. In my opinion, they are just against growth.


Does Jennifer Watts really want more dense development in her district?

There is the other fact - if the municipality wants more industrial jobs then these plants will have to be built outside of the city core in the industrial parks; shouldn't homes be built close to these parks so that workers won't have to travel as far?

Does anyone know of this "alliance's" definition of urban sprawl; what is considered to be their boundary of urban growth? One question with an urban greenbelt - if the HRM sees phenomenal growth and prosperity then can a greenbelt be opened up in the future for growth.



Jennifer Watts isn't mentioned here, although I imagine she would support this effort. I don't think she would be adverse to small-scale infill development on commercial streets in her district but I'm unaware of any specific examples.

It appears that the Alliance formed in order to participate in the review of the regional planning strategy. Because it draws on wide interests (business, environment and health, including groups based in the suburbs), I think it is unfair to say that this effort is about preventing growth. It is more about fostering sustainable growth, both in the urban core and the periphery. There is a website with more information: www.ourhrmalliance.ca

Urban growth boundaries or greenbelts can very effective and they are generally not static but may be moved and altered if the need arises. Portland Oregon's boundary was created in the late 70s, mandated by state law, and has been changed many times to meet new needs.

fenwick16
May 26, 2011, 1:45 PM
Jennifer Watts isn't mentioned here, although I imagine she would support this effort. I don't think she would be adverse to small-scale infill development on commercial streets in her district but I'm unaware of any specific examples.

It appears that the Alliance formed in order to participate in the review of the regional planning strategy. Because it draws on wide interests (business, environment and health, including groups based in the suburbs), I think it is unfair to say that this effort is about preventing growth. It is more about fostering sustainable growth, both in the urban core and the periphery. There is a website with more information: www.ourhrmalliance.ca

Urban growth boundaries or greenbelts can very effective and they are generally not static but may be moved and altered if the need arises. Portland Oregon's boundary was created in the late 70s, mandated by state law, and has been changed many times to meet new needs.

Thanks for the information - this is more informative than the story that I posted. Jennifer Watts was shown in a picture in the full story and a quote was provided by her that I didn't include - http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/local/article/871460--an-alliance-against-sprawl

halifaxboyns
May 26, 2011, 2:42 PM
New group to lobby against urban sprawl

By PAT LEE Staff Reporter
Thu, May 26 - 4:55 AM
A new alliance has been formed to try to rein in urban sprawl in Halifax Regional Municipality.

The various organizations, with ties to business, the environment or health, have joined forces as the region’s 25-year planning strategy comes up for a mandated five-year review.

Mark Butler of the Ecology Action Centre, which is spearheading the lobbying effort, said the groups that have signed on are concerned about dying downtowns, threatened natural environments and the health of a citizenry tied to driving.

"They love this town and think it could be better, and think we could do better," Butler said of the groups. "That’s the big impetus for creating the alliance. I think things have deteriorated to the point where it’s pretty obvious that something needs to change or happen to counteract the prevailing trend."

The alliance plans to insert itself into the municipality’s review plans, which have not yet been laid out, he said.

"We really hope the alliance is going to take a key role in affecting change."

So far, 17 groups have joined the alliance. Representatives from six of those organizations will form a steering committee to guide their efforts. They are the Ecology Action Centre, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia, the St. Margaret’s Bay Stewardship Association, the Sackville Rivers Association, the Downtown Halifax Business Commission and Five Bridges Wilderness Heritage Trust.

Members of Our HRM Alliance said they will press the municipality to create a greenbelt around the city, foster a series of vibrant business centres to counteract the proliferation of industrial parks and provide a more robust public transit system.

Paul MacKinnon of the business commission said the alliance is not opposed to development or pitting the downtown against the suburbs.

But MacKinnon said the groups want to ensure municipal growth is sustainable far into the future and meets the needs of individual communities.

"What we’re talking about is new growth. We’re not talking about bulldozing Dartmouth Crossing or taking away existing suburban development. What we’re talking about is the growth we know is going to occur over the next 10, 20 or 30 years."

Geoff Le Boutillier, founder of the St. Margarets Bay-area association, said rampant development is ruining the ecosystem in his community and elsewhere.

"The environment has changed so radically and a lot of that has been caused by the huge sprawl that we see in Tantallon," Le Boutillier said.

"The model that we’re following is crazy and we have to find something to control that."

He said the alliance will actively review the long-range regional plan, "tweaking it and fixing it and making sure that the principles that that plan was built upon will actually be realized in the next 20 years."

Walter Regan, the longtime president of the Sackville Rivers Association, said it is time to off-load more of the costs of building the infrastructure for urban growth from taxpayers to developers.

"Development is not paying its way. We’re subsidizing these new developments and we shouldn’t."

johnny_boy
May 26, 2011, 3:06 PM
The Sobey's locations in downtown Toronto are very upscale, urban and trendy. They're located near very high income condos usually. Sobey's in Toronto definitely does not have the same brand perception as it does in Nova Scotia. The stores have a lot of dark colours and organic produce (think more along the lines of Pete's). I can't find any pics of the ones in Toronto, but here is one that opened in Edmonton (http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2296/2507047689_868faa50ed.jpg) which gives you a good idea of the downtown feel they go for in other markets. They could easily build it in Halifax, however I think it's clear that despite being the same brand, the image of Sobey's in Halifax is not the image of Sobey's elsewhere.

Wishblade
May 26, 2011, 3:17 PM
Sobeys has many urban-format stores in other parts of the country (Toronto, Edmonton).

Mixed-use grocery store buildings with residential above are built more frequently now in Vancouver and its inner suburbs (Dartmouth proper and Clayton Park equivalents) than the standalone style. I live in a suburban area and shop at a grocery store with underground parking and 30-40 storey condos above. Halifax is very far behind the times.

I would love to see the old Sobeys replaced with a new building with underground parking and whatever scale of residential above, whether it's 4 floors or 40 floors. I do think that 6-8 storeys on top is probably more practical in terms of easy approval and construction.

If something like that happens the Queen Street area will become really great. If they build a set back suburban-style store with gas bar the immediate area probably won't improve much for 20-30 years because it won't be a pleasant area for the residents and pedestrian shoppers who make up the majority in that part of the city.

Sometimes I think we're comparing ourselves to cities that are too large to make an accurate comparison. If you compare Halifax to cities more its size such as Victoria and London, we really don't seem that far behind at all, and are actually progressive in many ways. When I visited London last, I certainly didnt see any 30-40 story towers atop grocery stores :P.

Empire
May 26, 2011, 4:09 PM
New group to lobby against urban sprawl

By PAT LEE Staff Reporter
Thu, May 26 - 4:55 AM
A new alliance has been formed to try to rein in urban sprawl in Halifax Regional Municipality.

The various organizations, with ties to business, the environment or health, have joined forces as the region’s 25-year planning strategy comes up for a mandated five-year review.

Mark Butler of the Ecology Action Centre, which is spearheading the lobbying effort, said the groups that have signed on are concerned about dying downtowns, threatened natural environments and the health of a citizenry tied to driving.

"They love this town and think it could be better, and think we could do better," Butler said of the groups. "That’s the big impetus for creating the alliance. I think things have deteriorated to the point where it’s pretty obvious that something needs to change or happen to counteract the prevailing trend."

The alliance plans to insert itself into the municipality’s review plans, which have not yet been laid out, he said.

"We really hope the alliance is going to take a key role in affecting change."

So far, 17 groups have joined the alliance. Representatives from six of those organizations will form a steering committee to guide their efforts. They are the Ecology Action Centre, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia, the St. Margaret’s Bay Stewardship Association, the Sackville Rivers Association, the Downtown Halifax Business Commission and Five Bridges Wilderness Heritage Trust.

Members of Our HRM Alliance said they will press the municipality to create a greenbelt around the city, foster a series of vibrant business centres to counteract the proliferation of industrial parks and provide a more robust public transit system.

Paul MacKinnon of the business commission said the alliance is not opposed to development or pitting the downtown against the suburbs.

But MacKinnon said the groups want to ensure municipal growth is sustainable far into the future and meets the needs of individual communities.

"What we’re talking about is new growth. We’re not talking about bulldozing Dartmouth Crossing or taking away existing suburban development. What we’re talking about is the growth we know is going to occur over the next 10, 20 or 30 years."

Geoff Le Boutillier, founder of the St. Margarets Bay-area association, said rampant development is ruining the ecosystem in his community and elsewhere.

"The environment has changed so radically and a lot of that has been caused by the huge sprawl that we see in Tantallon," Le Boutillier said.

"The model that we’re following is crazy and we have to find something to control that."

He said the alliance will actively review the long-range regional plan, "tweaking it and fixing it and making sure that the principles that that plan was built upon will actually be realized in the next 20 years."

Walter Regan, the longtime president of the Sackville Rivers Association, said it is time to off-load more of the costs of building the infrastructure for urban growth from taxpayers to developers.

"Development is not paying its way. We’re subsidizing these new developments and we shouldn’t."


These groups are not anti sprawl, they are anti development period. I think you will see them call for a moratorium on surburban development.

They have no plan to intensify the core as it is just a smoke screen to halt all development.

planarchy
May 26, 2011, 5:00 PM
Neighbours upset about proposed Fairview development
Site of the old Halifax West High School.
POSTED BY CHRIS BENJAMIN ON THU, MAY 26, 2011 AT 9:58 AM / THE COAST

http://www.thecoast.ca/imager/artists-rendering-of-the-proposed-fairview-development/b/original/2540798/77b4/Fairview.jpg


A proposed United Gulf development at the old Halifax West High School site on Dutch Village Road has sparked controversy. The plan includes a mixed residential and commercial complex, featuring two seven-storey towers of 100 multi-family condos set above a commercial/retail ground floor, a six-storey 60,0000 square-foot commercial building with ground floor retail, a three-storey 27,000 square-foot commercial building, a one-storey retail building, 450 parking spaces (375 of them underground) and 72,000 square feet of public parkland.

Tamara Lorincz, a resident and member of the Fairview/Clayton Park Community Action Network, says that the community has long needed a community centre, and that the Halifax West site is the ideal location.

Lorincz adds that the community has not been adequately consulted with. “Residents on streets bordering and near the site didn’t receive notice for an October 2009 public meeting,” she says. She adds that United Gulf is being given a sweetheart deal for prime real estate. “UG is paying $1.2 million for all that land. It’s reportedly worth at least twice that.”

The councillor for the area, Russell Walker, accuses Lorincz of spreading misinformation. “A hundred notices were sent to homes and businesses around the site,” he says. “About 50 residents attended the 2009 meeting. They didn’t like the duplexes so the duplexes came out; they didn’t like it as one big building so they got two smaller buildings.

“We’ve had 15 different proposals and the community didn’t like any of them,” continues Walker. “A community centre could add $200 on people’s tax bill for 10 years; I don’t think the people of Fairview can afford that.”

City planning staff is preparing a report, due to the Chebucto Community Council by end of May. If the report favours the development, it will likely reach Regional Council by summer’s end.

halifaxboyns
May 26, 2011, 5:20 PM
These groups are not anti sprawl, they are anti development period. I think you will see them call for a moratorium on surburban development.

They have no plan to intensify the core as it is just a smoke screen to halt all development.

The better question to ask about them is: Where were they when the regional plan was being formulated?

I don't recall many of these groups being involved or even participating in any great detail. The RP is approved - the direction is mainly set, I don't see council wanting to make any serious changes from the RP's direction at this point other than maybe considering an alternate tax strategy for downtown to make it competative with suburban areas.

halifaxboyns
May 26, 2011, 5:23 PM
http://www.thecoast.ca/imager/artists-rendering-of-the-proposed-fairview-development/b/original/2540798/77b4/Fairview.jpg[/IMG]


Garbage - this community rep is spouting garbage and we all know it. Just another nimby trying to stop progress.

As a former resident of Fairview, I can tell you in my university years I saw this neighbourhood start to go down hill. But; there are lots of people that are seeing possibility in the area. Think about it: most of the lots are 50' and you could reno the old bungalows or even tear down and build a bigger home for a fraction of what a new home on a smaller lot would cost. I think that makes Fairview a very interesting area of growth...which staff should look at. Although why the city downzoned most of it to R-1; when it was originally built out at R-2 density (when it was still in the county) is beyond me. Because most of the homes don't have records for their basement apts so getting authorization for them is killer - trust me, when mom sold her house, it was very difficult, but we got the authorization as a duplex.

I also agree with wishblade - I haven't been to London, but a coworker is from there. From the pictures I've seen; we're pretty much on par with London and way ahead of Victoria (I don't think they've broken the 20 storey barrier yet).

As to this particular development - do we not have a thread for it? Perhaps someone should create one if we don't?
Here (http://www.halifax.ca/planning/Case01254Details.html) is the case details from the HRM website.

-Harlington-
May 26, 2011, 5:39 PM
Halifax West

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=167306&page=2

halifaxboyns
May 26, 2011, 5:46 PM
Halifax West

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=167306&page=2

Perfect - I didn't have time to search for it.

I was thinking about the comment someone made earlier about Councillor Watts and density. Something tells me that if you could show that density could be done in a way that makes an area better and improved, I wonder if she'd be more inclined to support it?

For example: IF someone were to do a whole bunch of 15 to 20 storey mixed use buildings along Agricola? If it was done well, with street improvements and turned the area into a vibrant really awesome place to live - would that change her thinking?

For me; I know that sometimes I find some ideas hard to grasp on paper and can't really vision it even in drawings - but if I saw an example of something for real, I understand it better? Just a thought...

someone123
May 26, 2011, 6:07 PM
Sometimes I think we're comparing ourselves to cities that are too large to make an accurate comparison. If you compare Halifax to cities more its size such as Victoria and London, we really don't seem that far behind at all, and are actually progressive in many ways. When I visited London last, I certainly didnt see any 30-40 story towers atop grocery stores :P.

Vancouver is a good city to emulate in some ways. London, Ontario is not.

I don't expect Halifax to have the same level of commercial development as Vancouver but I think we should expect more than a suburban-style box. I also believe that a mixed-use development is feasible and practical. If the city demanded higher quality development from Sobeys in an intelligent way they would get it.

The "we can't have this in little old Halifax" attitude is for the most part just plain old Atlantic defeatism. Some things are infeasible but a grocery store downtown with residential on top isn't one of them. In fact, we already have one...

haligonia
May 26, 2011, 7:45 PM
Some things are infeasible but a grocery store downtown with residential on top isn't one of them. In fact, we already have one...

Pete's is a fantastic example. It's urban, not too big, and extremely popular. I've had high-profile friends visit from Toronto, and they say that Pete's is the best grocery store they've ever been to.

someone123
May 26, 2011, 8:00 PM
I agree that Pete's stacks up well against high-end grocery stores in Vancouver or Toronto (places like Whole Foods or Capers).

I should point out that I don't expect the Queen Street Sobeys to go high-end like Pete's, I just expect the development to be better than a suburban box with gas bar. Many average or discount grocery stores in the suburbs here (Safeway, Save On Foods) have parking below and residential above.

Even a modest apartment building in Halifax would presumably more than offset the cost of non-surface parking (on the roof, underground, or ground level with elevated store) and escalators or ramps. And you know what? Even if it doesn't, the city should require the extra investment because surface parking and giant setbacks are bad for the area.

The suburban style development isn't the optimal development, it's just the easy way out that requires little creativity and planning -- those are pushed off to the city, which has to somehow find a way to service these poor developments.

someone123
May 26, 2011, 8:02 PM
In fact, we already have one...

Actually now that I think of it we have at least two. There is also the one on Quinpool Road.

So it was economically feasible in the 1970s in the West End but it's not feasible in 2011 in the South End? I don't buy it!

fenwick16
May 26, 2011, 9:45 PM
These groups are not anti sprawl, they are anti development period. I think you will see them call for a moratorium on surburban development.

They have no plan to intensify the core as it is just a smoke screen to halt all development.

I have to agree with Empire's comment. If you read some of what this Alliance is stating then it seems evident that they are more anti-development than anti-sprawl. The following comment from the story bothers me:

New group to lobby against urban sprawl

By PAT LEE Staff Reporter
Thu, May 26 - 4:55 AM
A new alliance has been formed to try to rein in urban sprawl in Halifax Regional Municipality.

The various organizations, with ties to business, the environment or health, have joined forces as the region’s 25-year planning strategy comes up for a mandated five-year review.

Mark Butler of the Ecology Action Centre, which is spearheading the lobbying effort, said the groups that have signed on are concerned about dying downtowns, threatened natural environments and the health of a citizenry tied to driving.

"They love this town and think it could be better, and think we could do better," Butler said of the groups. "That’s the big impetus for creating the alliance. I think things have deteriorated to the point where it’s pretty obvious that something needs to change or happen to counteract the prevailing trend."

The alliance plans to insert itself into the municipality’s review plans, which have not yet been laid out, he said.

"We really hope the alliance is going to take a key role in affecting change."

So far, 17 groups have joined the alliance. Representatives from six of those organizations will form a steering committee to guide their efforts. They are the Ecology Action Centre, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia, the St. Margaret’s Bay Stewardship Association, the Sackville Rivers Association, the Downtown Halifax Business Commission and Five Bridges Wilderness Heritage Trust.

Members of Our HRM Alliance said they will press the municipality to create a greenbelt around the city, foster a series of vibrant business centres to counteract the proliferation of industrial parks and provide a more robust public transit system.

Trying to counteract industrial parks is synonymous with stopping job growth. Industrial jobs will not locate in the downtown core or the peninsula. These are manufacturing type jobs that the HRM needs.

It is also a concern when looking at the group spearheading the Alliance - The Ecology Action Centre which is concerned about "threatened natural environments". It seems like some of these groups have forgotten that they live in an urban area that is the economic engine for all of Nova Scotia.

bluenoser
May 26, 2011, 9:55 PM
Chronicle Herald article from today about incorporating art and general esthetics into the Armdale and future roundabouts:

Report: Halifax roundabout should be thing of beauty (http://thechronicleherald.ca/Metro/1245370.html)

Any art that would be displayed at the roundabout, it said, would go outside the centre island due to safety concerns and the underground infrastructure under the circle.


I would have thought the inner circle would be the most obvious and safe place to put something in terms of not blocking the view of other vehicles? Oh well.

spaustin
May 26, 2011, 10:07 PM
I read that in today's Herald too. Sad. Staff missed the whole point of roundabout art. Roundabout's create a centre that calls out for some kind of beautification. Sticking art out on the side misses the whole point. Surely something could be incorporated that addresses whatever safety concerns staff might have. If HRM staff were around in 1808, they would have no doubt condemned the Arc de Triomphe as a dangerous safety hazard!

Empire
May 27, 2011, 12:15 AM
Chronicle Herald article from today about incorporating art and general esthetics into the Armdale and future roundabouts:

Report: Halifax roundabout should be thing of beauty (http://thechronicleherald.ca/Metro/1245370.html)



I would have thought the inner circle would be the most obvious and safe place to put something in terms of not blocking the view of other vehicles? Oh well.

I think there should be a monument in the green space of the roundabout that reflects the connection Halifax has with the ocean and both world wars.

Something like the War Memorial in Ottawa or a tribute to the Titanic should go in the wasted green space at the roundabout.

Empire
May 27, 2011, 12:25 AM
Perfect - I didn't have time to search for it.

I was thinking about the comment someone made earlier about Councillor Watts and density. Something tells me that if you could show that density could be done in a way that makes an area better and improved, I wonder if she'd be more inclined to support it?

For example: IF someone were to do a whole bunch of 15 to 20 storey mixed use buildings along Agricola? If it was done well, with street improvements and turned the area into a vibrant really awesome place to live - would that change her thinking?

For me; I know that sometimes I find some ideas hard to grasp on paper and can't really vision it even in drawings - but if I saw an example of something for real, I understand it better? Just a thought...

Make no mistake about it...................Watts is a Pacey apprentice! Watts wants green space, bikeways, sustainable housing, affordable housing, heritage protection, view protection etc. etc. and no realistic way to deliver it. You will never see Watts approve of any building over 10 storeys.

someone123
May 27, 2011, 12:57 AM
The traffic circle could be a place to showcase artwork that reflects any one or all of "four distinct communities" of Halifax Regional Municipality converging there

:rolleyes:

So they're going to put some bullet holes in the fake lighthouses weirdly positioned around the outside...?

Empire
May 27, 2011, 1:45 AM
When HRM planners say it isn't safe or it isn't feasible to put anything in the centre of our famous roundabout I REALLY belive them!


ROME: Piazza dei Re Roma

Note the clearly marked crosswalk leading to a usable greenspace in the centre of the roundabout. Halifax has no marked crosswalks.

http://maps.google.ca/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=rome&aq=&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=29.481488,67.236328&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Rome,+Lazio,+Italy&ll=41.881368,12.513578&spn=0,0.016415&t=h&z=16&layer=c&cbll=41.881318,12.513669&panoid=u7sHdGwkHnQa1MchfoH_6A&cbp=12,91.38,,0,0

ROME: Piazza Della Repubblica
http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&q=piazza+della+repubblica+rome&ie=UTF8&hq=piazza+della+repubblica+rome&ll=41.902804,12.496498&spn=0,0.016415&t=h&z=16&layer=c&cbll=41.902889,12.49644&panoid=8H_kXzmrIxN6q4MMlL_nMg&cbp=12,190.63,,0,0

PARIS: Arc de Triomphe

http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&q=arc+de+triomphe+paris&ie=UTF8&hq=arc+de+triomphe+paris&ll=48.873833,2.294126&spn=0,0.016415&t=h&z=16&layer=c&cbll=48.873961,2.294151&panoid=2xCtOWEZG2f4VqMlMkgafA&cbp=12,102.78,,0,0

spaustin
May 27, 2011, 3:47 AM
Empire: All your examples have shown is what beautiful spaces roundabouts can be if there is the will to make it happen. Safety can be managed through design. We could wall the centre so that pedestrians aren't tempted to cross traffic to get to it, we could put in underground tunnels (like at the Arc de Triomphe) or we could redesign to slow traffic so that pedestrians have some good crosswalks to use. It's never going to be 100% safe, but nothing in life is. Putting art out on the edge, seems to me, fairly pointless. Even if we end up not doing anything with Armdale because of safety concerns, I hope HRM will at least consider using the centre space in smaller more neighbourhood type roundabouts.


Just for fun, check out this "sculputure" from the centre of a major roundabout in Cardiff, UK.
http://flickriver.com/photos/richardandgill/159272903/
http://www.photoeverywhere.co.uk/britain/cardiff/slides/magic_roundabout_cardiff_jpg_orig.htm
Something simple from Shanghai that might work well at Armdale as the landscapping isn't too high to block sightlines and it's pretty, but not the kind of thing that would tempt pedestrian out to the middle if HRM wanted to keep them out of the centre. Note also the low wall that further discourages pedestrians from wandering out there without being ugly.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/martell/4825553936/in/pool-roundaboutart
Another one with a bit of road humour, the traffic light tree from Canary Wharf in London.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/squirmelia/2451382877/
Here's something simple that still allows visibility and doesn't tempt pedestrians. Again, checkout the use of materials to discourage anyone who might think to wander out there.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/20923094@N04/3657388063/in/pool-roundaboutart
Even something as small as a tree with the right materials can be beautiful as in this roundabout outside of Perth.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/martybugs/2052823536/in/pool-roundaboutart

Why is Halifax always the place that can't when the rest of the world seems to have it figured out?

someone123
May 27, 2011, 4:09 AM
Why is Halifax always the place that can't when the rest of the world seems to have it figured out?

It does seem like the "little city that couldn't". It feels sometimes like people just sit around all day thinking up reasons why things can't be done. No rail. No highrises! No public art in roundabouts. No streetscaping for Spring Garden -- somebody might lose their parking spot.

As I've said many times before, I believe it's Halifax's least appealing characteristic by far. It's the one really depressing thing I wouldn't want to deal with if I moved back.

Alternative pedestrian routes around the Armdale Rotary would be genuinely useful. There's also an opportunity for an interesting redesign around the North Park/Cogswell area.

Empire
May 27, 2011, 12:14 PM
Empire: All your examples have shown is what beautiful spaces roundabouts can be if there is the will to make it happen. Safety can be managed through design. We could wall the centre so that pedestrians aren't tempted to cross traffic to get to it, we could put in underground tunnels (like at the Arc de Triomphe) or we could redesign to slow traffic so that pedestrians have some good crosswalks to use. It's never going to be 100% safe, but nothing in life is. Putting art out on the edge, seems to me, fairly pointless. Even if we end up not doing anything with Armdale because of safety concerns, I hope HRM will at least consider using the centre space in smaller more neighbourhood type roundabouts.


Just for fun, check out this "sculputure" from the centre of a major roundabout in Cardiff, UK.
http://flickriver.com/photos/richardandgill/159272903/
http://www.photoeverywhere.co.uk/britain/cardiff/slides/magic_roundabout_cardiff_jpg_orig.htm
Something simple from Shanghai that might work well at Armdale as the landscapping isn't too high to block sightlines and it's pretty, but not the kind of thing that would tempt pedestrian out to the middle if HRM wanted to keep them out of the centre. Note also the low wall that further discourages pedestrians from wandering out there without being ugly.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/martell/4825553936/in/pool-roundaboutart
Another one with a bit of road humour, the traffic light tree from Canary Wharf in London.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/squirmelia/2451382877/
Here's something simple that still allows visibility and doesn't tempt pedestrians. Again, checkout the use of materials to discourage anyone who might think to wander out there.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/20923094@N04/3657388063/in/pool-roundaboutart
Even something as small as a tree with the right materials can be beautiful as in this roundabout outside of Perth.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/martybugs/2052823536/in/pool-roundaboutart

Why is Halifax always the place that can't when the rest of the world seems to have it figured out?

What is really annoying is that HRM/planning is always trying to whitewash the public by giving lame duck stupid reasons why things can't be done.

Either they do this on puropse, they don't know any better, haven't done any research or have never been anywhere. There is no excuse for this shoody leadership.

Bernie Smith was dead wrong to turn down Spring Garden Rd. improvements because it would disrupt businesses and deliveries etc.

Don't forget about the view of the arm while speeding down Joseph Howe Dr. being blocked by a sculpture.

Keith P.
May 27, 2011, 7:02 PM
I seem to recall Coun. Mosher going on at length at a council meeting a while ago that NOTHING should be in the center of the roundabout as it would impede the view of the NW Arm. Seems to me if you are driving you shouldn't be looking at scenic views but instead concentrating on the task at hand. But what do I know?

I think a giant dandelion - preferably in bronze, maybe 18-20 feet high - would be ideal for the center of the roundabout. The leaves could span from curb to curb, while the center spike would be magnificent (but let's hope it's not TOO TALL!!!!). After all, it is now HRM's municipal weed plant.

kph06
Jun 2, 2011, 2:33 AM
I don't think this has been mentioned yet, but allnovascotia reported that a block of houses on Barrington, Green and Kent are for sale as one group. The owners have amassed the block over a number of years. There were around 8 total properties, which included the entire Barrington street front except for the mac store. The properties go up Green and Kent, ending at the square brick buildings.

halifaxboyns
Jun 2, 2011, 4:34 AM
I don't think this has been mentioned yet, but allnovascotia reported that a block of houses on Barrington, Green and Kent are for sale as one group. The owners have amassed the block over a number of years. There were around 8 total properties, which included the entire Barrington street front except for the mac store. The properties go up Green and Kent, ending at the square brick buildings.

What a great location for a multi! Even though the viewplanes would probably cap it around 10 stories; still great location. Across the street (or down the street) from groceries and close to downtown! That's probably what they were planning to do...build multi.

someone123
Jun 2, 2011, 6:16 AM
It is a great spot.

There was also a story about the redevelopment of the St. Mary's lot on the corner of Spring Garden and Grafton. If I recall correctly the height limit is 10 storeys. Could be a huge improvement for that area -- imagine how much better it will look passing by the Nova Centre, a new residential building on the corner, and then the new library.

JET
Jun 2, 2011, 1:12 PM
Don't know where to put this, so I'll put it her
An interesting historical read
http://www.halifaxpubliclibraries.ca/hnmemorial/redev.pdf

kwajo
Jun 2, 2011, 6:09 PM
I don't think this has been mentioned yet, but allnovascotia reported that a block of houses on Barrington, Green and Kent are for sale as one group. The owners have amassed the block over a number of years. There were around 8 total properties, which included the entire Barrington street front except for the mac store. The properties go up Green and Kent, ending at the square brick buildings.
Remind me to tell my girlfriend, she lives in one of those buildings :haha:

halifaxboyns
Jun 2, 2011, 6:15 PM
It is a great spot.

There was also a story about the redevelopment of the St. Mary's lot on the corner of Spring Garden and Grafton. If I recall correctly the height limit is 10 storeys. Could be a huge improvement for that area -- imagine how much better it will look passing by the Nova Centre, a new residential building on the corner, and then the new library.

HbD post bonus height is 28m. So i'm not sure if that's 10 stories or not? I'd assume that the first storey would probably be commercial. If so; they may have to amend the HbD commercial street map - as the 'main commercial street' map indicates that SGR starts at the library block and extends to the edge of the plan area by the Public Gardens. They could not amend that map; I don't think it matters in the end.

someone123
Jun 2, 2011, 7:34 PM
That was in ANS.. I didn't consult the maps directly. However, I would guess that it's roughly correct (i.e. lowrise building permitted in the 4-10 storey range).

They speculated about ground floor commercial. I think retail would be good in that spot. It doesn't make sense for it to be forbidden in that area, though I could see it. To be honest I think the zoning is a little overboard. In particular a lot of the institutional/residential/light commercial distinctions are pointless.

spaustin
Jun 2, 2011, 9:54 PM
I don't think this has been mentioned yet, but allnovascotia reported that a block of houses on Barrington, Green and Kent are for sale as one group. The owners have amassed the block over a number of years. There were around 8 total properties, which included the entire Barrington street front except for the mac store. The properties go up Green and Kent, ending at the square brick buildings.

Wonder if 1130? (Chalet Realty) is included? It's the wooden one that was painted red right next to the Mac Store. It's a great wooden building that has been well kept and it's kind of a unique style, would be a shame to lose it. The rest are unremarkable except for maybe 1114 and I won't miss them. If 1130 is included in the sale, it would be a great candidate for relocation. We don't do enough of that in Halifax. 11th hour offers to the community like what happened at the Trillium and Vic don't really leave enough time for relocation to be realistic. It's understandable though that property owners don't want to let the buildings go until they're ready to demolish because they're collecting rental income from them. The city should really get involved with a mix of incentives and regulations to change that calculation. We could have infilled a lot of our more intact streetscapes on the Peninsula with authentic wooden buildings that happened to be in the wrong spot at the wrong time. Of course the overhead powerlines would pose a complication, but really, NSP should have had everything buried on the Peninsula long ago!

spaustin
Jun 2, 2011, 10:07 PM
That was in ANS.. I didn't consult the maps directly. However, I would guess that it's roughly correct (i.e. lowrise building permitted in the 4-10 storey range).

I actually think it's a spot where some more restrictive height limitations make sense. St. Mary's is such an amazing structure. We shouldn't crowd it. Filling in the parking lot makes sense, but the church steeple should be the tallest point. Height on whatever they build next to it on that side will have a greater impact on the view because it's uphill from the church and is the side that you see from the greatest distance (coming down Spring Garden). It's a great spot though for infill. Commercial on the lower level with a few floors of residential above would be best since residential requires less height per floor.

Jonovision
Jun 3, 2011, 1:45 PM
It would be cool if they could design a building for that parking lot that highlighted the steeple. Something that would be square at the bottom for 2 or three floors and then lean back along SG so the view of the steeple from along the street was not blocked.

planarchy
Jun 3, 2011, 5:26 PM
http://www.allnovascotia.com/story_img/map.JPG

"25550 sq ft on Kent,Barrington and Green Streets in downtown Halifax have recently been put on market for sale."

via Twitter @DTHFXCondos (http://www.twitter.com/DTHFXCondos) Image from AllNS

someone123
Jun 3, 2011, 5:53 PM
A height limit by St. Mary's would have to be pretty low to make it worthwhile. A building even 70% as tall would probably overwhelm the steeple from a vantage point farther up the hill. This is part of why I find "no taller than x" height limits to be strange.

I would be okay with limiting the corner to something like 6 storeys.

halifaxboyns
Jun 4, 2011, 4:09 AM
http://www.allnovascotia.com/story_img/map.JPG

"25550 sq ft on Kent,Barrington and Green Streets in downtown Halifax have recently been put on market for sale."

via Twitter @DTHFXCondos (http://www.twitter.com/DTHFXCondos) Image from AllNS

It's a shame that it doesn't have the house on the corner too - that would make a really good site for a large bulky 10 storey mixed use (commercial on Barrington).

The viewplanes would limit it to about 10 stories.

Dmajackson
Jun 6, 2011, 3:52 AM
I realise this is old but does anyone know about this? Its on Victoria Road near Boland (in the "projects")

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2242/5802509473_f7de7e1b00_z.jpg
Credit: .... Me

Jonovision
Jun 7, 2011, 1:21 PM
Citadel Halifax closing for renovations

Eighty-nine hotel employees will be out of work
Bruce Erskine reports on the expected long-term closure of the Citadel Halifax Hotel as it undergoes a major refit

T HE

CITADEL HALIFAX Hotel is getting a major, long-term make­over, says Scott Travis, president of the Hotel Association of Nova Scotia.

“They are going to undertake an extensive reno­vation and be closed for some time," said Travis, the general manager of Halifax’s Cambridge Suites Hotel , in an interview Monday.

Travis, who started his hostelry career at the Citadel 20 years ago, said he understood the Bruns­wick Street hotel could be closed for as long as two ye a rs.

He said he was told that 89 hotel employees will be looking for work as a result of the renovation.

“The property and the people are a great re­source," he said. “We don’t want any hotels closed."

Sixty Citadel Halifax employees are members of Local 446 of the Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, said David LeBlanc, the local’s business agent.

LeBlanc, who understood the hotel will close in January 2012, said the union has filed a grievance over the mass termination of workers that will result. But he said the union is working with all parties, including government and the hotel’s owners, to assist affected employees in the transi­tion.

“It’s early days," LeBlanc said Monday, suggest­ing that the hotel could be closed for as long as 30 months.

Citadel general manager Stacie Bowdridge re­ferred all questions to Brigitte Dien-Guy, vice­president of sales and marketing with Vancouver­based

SilverBirch Hotels and Resorts , which owns the Halifax hotel.

Dien-Guy wouldn’t comment on what plans the company has for the hotel except to say an announcement would be made later this week.

The Citadel, which has 171 rooms and suites, was built in 1963, according to the hotel’s website.

It was first renovated in 1974 with the addition of a tower. In 1980, three floors were built onto the original section of the hotel.

The Citadel features an indoor pool, a hot tub, a sauna, a children’s wading pool, a patio sun deck, a fitness area, a restaurant, a lounge and more than 8,500 square feet of meeting space.

SilverBirch manages 21 hotels across Canada, including the Best Western Charlottetown and the Travellers Inn in St. John’s, N.L.

(berskine@herald.ca)

halifaxboyns
Jun 8, 2011, 5:00 AM
That hotel desperately needs the renovations!

fenwick16
Jun 8, 2011, 5:04 AM
I am interested in getting more details such as - will it be expanded, will it have new cladding, etc.?

someone123
Jun 8, 2011, 7:05 AM
Never been inside the hotel but it looks pretty rough from the outside. That part of the city is pretty much an unmitigated disaster -- ugly hotel, giant parking lot, ugly police building, dysfunctional interchange, now a new parking lot where the church used to be...

alps
Jun 8, 2011, 7:07 AM
I'd love if they did something with the parking lot.

JET
Jun 8, 2011, 11:38 AM
Mitchell's enviro depot on Gottingen St is now just the front facade; so I guess now it's on par with Waterside. As far as I know there are no proponents to save the facade on Mitchells.

beyeas
Jun 8, 2011, 12:11 PM
Mitchell's enviro depot on Gottingen St is now just the front facade; so I guess now it's on par with Waterside. As far as I know there are no proponents to save the facade on Mitchells.

I heard that there were rats there that had survived the Halifax explosion.

Will be only a matter of time before HT comes out with a press release... "But the rats! Why won't someone think of the rats?!"

Haliguy
Jun 8, 2011, 3:19 PM
Citadel Halifax closing for renovations

Eighty-nine hotel employees will be out of work
Bruce Erskine reports on the expected long-term closure of the Citadel Halifax Hotel as it undergoes a major refit

T HE

CITADEL HALIFAX Hotel is getting a major, long-term make­over, says Scott Travis, president of the Hotel Association of Nova Scotia.

“They are going to undertake an extensive reno­vation and be closed for some time," said Travis, the general manager of Halifax’s Cambridge Suites Hotel , in an interview Monday.

Travis, who started his hostelry career at the Citadel 20 years ago, said he understood the Bruns­wick Street hotel could be closed for as long as two ye a rs.

He said he was told that 89 hotel employees will be looking for work as a result of the renovation.

“The property and the people are a great re­source," he said. “We don’t want any hotels closed."

Sixty Citadel Halifax employees are members of Local 446 of the Bakery, Confectionary, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, said David LeBlanc, the local’s business agent.

LeBlanc, who understood the hotel will close in January 2012, said the union has filed a grievance over the mass termination of workers that will result. But he said the union is working with all parties, including government and the hotel’s owners, to assist affected employees in the transi­tion.

“It’s early days," LeBlanc said Monday, suggest­ing that the hotel could be closed for as long as 30 months.

Citadel general manager Stacie Bowdridge re­ferred all questions to Brigitte Dien-Guy, vice­president of sales and marketing with Vancouver­based

SilverBirch Hotels and Resorts , which owns the Halifax hotel.

Dien-Guy wouldn’t comment on what plans the company has for the hotel except to say an announcement would be made later this week.

The Citadel, which has 171 rooms and suites, was built in 1963, according to the hotel’s website.

It was first renovated in 1974 with the addition of a tower. In 1980, three floors were built onto the original section of the hotel.

The Citadel features an indoor pool, a hot tub, a sauna, a children’s wading pool, a patio sun deck, a fitness area, a restaurant, a lounge and more than 8,500 square feet of meeting space.

SilverBirch manages 21 hotels across Canada, including the Best Western Charlottetown and the Travellers Inn in St. John’s, N.L.

(berskine@herald.ca)

Must be quite an extensive reno if they are closing it down for a few years.

worldlyhaligonian
Jun 8, 2011, 5:45 PM
I heard that there were rats there that had survived the Halifax explosion.

Will be only a matter of time before HT comes out with a press release... "But the rats! Why won't someone think of the rats?!"

The poor rats! But they are vital to the ecosystem of the north end! :notacrook:

JET
Jun 8, 2011, 6:47 PM
The poor rats! But they are vital to the ecosystem of the north end! :notacrook:

also to balance the ecosytem are the rats in the south end; we all know they are there.

Dmajackson
Jun 8, 2011, 9:36 PM
Grabbed this hot on my way in town last night. The 3150 Barrington has gained an extra floor (wasnt this supposed to be 4 floors?);

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3363/5812696023_a24face74e_z.jpg

worldlyhaligonian
Jun 9, 2011, 6:05 AM
This is going to sound pathetic, but we'll take any extra floors we can get in Halifax :oldlady

Jonovision
Jun 9, 2011, 1:19 PM
Company confirms hotel will close for 18 months


By BRUCE ERSKINE

Business Reporter

The Citadel Halifax Hotel needs the multimillion-dollar makeover that will close it for about 18 months, says Steve Giblin, presi­dent and CEO of SilverBirch Hotels and Resorts , which owns the Brunswick Street hotel.

“It’s time to bring it up to speed and give the city what it deserves in that location," he said in an interview from com­pany headquarters in Vancouver on Wednesday.

Giblin confirmed a report in The Chronicle Herald earlier this week that the 171-room hotel, built in 1963, will close in Janu­ary 2012, putting 80 people out of work while it is refitted.

He said the company consid­ered operating the hotel during the renovation but decided against it.

“The extent of the renovation would make it hard," he said. “It would be too disruptive."

SilverBirch and Local 446 of the Bakery, Confectionary, To­bacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union, which rep­resents 60 hotel staff and is filing a grievance about the layoff, are working together, Giblin said.

“We and the union have agreed that our first and foremost pri­ority is to help our people," he said, adding that staff may return once the renovation is complete.

Giblin said assistance to em­ployees could include technical or literacy training.

SilverBirch plans to rebrand the hotel under a licence agree­ment with a major hotel banner

such as Marriott , Hilton or

Sheraton , Giblin said.

(berskine@herald.ca)



I particularly like the line “It’s time to bring it up to speed and give the city what it deserves in that location," Hopfully this means its going to be a big improvement.

beyeas
Jun 9, 2011, 6:12 PM
/sigh/ Not to rub salt in Halifax's wounds lately but this certainly highlights again the contrast between our situation and what potentially happens when you have a mayor who can articulate a vision:

Time is right for events centre
Published Wednesday June 8th, 2011

Public meetings to share opinions on proposed downtown facility will be held June 16 at Moncton City Hall
by alan cochrane
Times & transcript staff

Mayor George LeBlanc made an impassioned pitch yesterday, asking the people of Moncton to share his vision for a $100-million sports, entertainment and community centre that would be busy 360 days a year and become a focal point of downtown development.

"Some may suggest the time is not right, that we have a significant infrastructure deficit and this is a want, not a need. To that I say, a prosperous and vibrant downtown is a need, not a want," LeBlanc said yesterday as he addressed the annual general meeting of Downtown Moncton Centreville Inc.

"There will always be reasons to wait and not do it now, but I say this is the time, the time is now. If not now, then when."

Speaking to about 100 downtown business and property owners, LeBlanc's presentation included an editorial cartoon from the Times & Transcript showing the downtown centre built onto the back of a tortoise. He joked that the turtle could become the mascot of the centre.

He said the downtown centre would be much more than just a sports and entertainment arena. It could be surrounded by apartment buildings, a seniors' centre, an office tower, retail stores, a museum, art gallery, parking garage, a hall of fame and a tribute to Moncton's heritage. He even suggested its architectural design pay tribute to the old Moncton railroad station that stood for many years before it was demolished to make room for the current Via Rail station behind Highfield Square.

LeBlanc said the Moncton Coliseum is 40 years old and inadequate for many of the events coming to the city. It is too expensive to repair and upgrade and building a new one on the same location would do nothing for downtown redevelopment.

He said the new downtown centre would be the key to revitalizing the downtown.

"Moncton is at an apex, and I would say that it is the most successful city in New Brunswick and one of the most successful cities in the entire country," LeBlanc said.

"We have our financial house in order. We've reduced the tax rate three years in a row. Moncton has a 6.5 per cent growth rate, making our region among the top 10 fastest growing urban centres in the country, way above the national average, but in order to keep growing we have to build this city. I can assure you that your city council is treating this very seriously and it is council that must make a decision. But in order for council to make an informed decision, we need to hear from the community."

The mayor announced that a new round of public consultations on the centre will begin with a meeting next Wednesday, June 16, at 6 p.m. at City Hall. He said people will be given a chance to share their opinions on the centre.

The mayor praised Downtown Moncton Centre-Ville Inc. and the hotel association for promising financial contributions of $2.5 million and $7 million (through a hotel levy) over 10 years respectively toward the multi-use facility.

The city has applied for federal funding, is discussing the plan with the provincial government, analyzed potential sites and is now preparing a business plan for council to review, but it will still be a challenge to find a way to pay for the centre with minimal impact on taxpayers.

The topic of a downtown centre was front and centre at yesterday's DMCI meeting. Board president Louis Leger said Moncton has generated a lot of praise for hosting big events in recent years but the city's economy is largely dependent on a vibrant downtown as a place to do business. To this end, Leger said the time is right for the downtown events centre. He also announced that DMCI will form a new economic vibrancy task force that will work toward attracting more business and development to the downtown.

DMCI executive-director Anne Basque said the downtown has made improvements over the last year and will continue to work toward more growth and development. She attended a recent conference for downtown developers in Chicago where a common theme was the need for safety, cleanliness and vibrancy.

And although it falls just outside of the downtown Moncton core, LeBlanc said he will continue to work to find a way to save the historic Moncton High School building. He also wants to address the situation of downtown buildings and storefronts that are sitting unused.

macgregor
Jun 9, 2011, 11:15 PM
A small garage was added to the side of the Waterfront Warehouse this year.
http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af65/macgregor10/IMG_0450.jpg

New Tim Horton's in former Perk's Location
http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af65/macgregor10/IMG_0451.jpg

Baton Rouge setting up
http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af65/macgregor10/IMG_0452.jpg

Nathan Green square almost finished. Looking pretty good.
http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af65/macgregor10/IMG_0455.jpg

A new office on Sackville Wharf for Port Operations.
http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af65/macgregor10/IMG_0456.jpg

All photos by me today.

macgregor
Jun 9, 2011, 11:26 PM
Small fence around property on corner of Hollis/South. Signs indicate Dexel Developments.
http://i994.photobucket.com/albums/af65/macgregor10/IMG_0465.jpg

Photo today by me.

worldlyhaligonian
Jun 9, 2011, 11:48 PM
Are they going to renovate or tear down? If so, what is the proposal?

q12
Jun 9, 2011, 11:56 PM
Citadel Hotel closing, new hotel being built for fall 2013

http://www.news957.com/news/article/238462--citadel-hotel-closing-new-hotel-being-built-for-fall-2013
Amy Arts Jun 09, 2011 12:49:09 PM

http://media.greenradio.topscms.com/images/f0/0b/def416bf446fa2dc4a04aa1960d5.jpeg
http://media.greenradio.topscms.com/images/c8/51/89d1a03e4549a7a17838919fc5b3.jpeg
http://media.greenradio.topscms.com/images/a6/2d/3b1962b34ba4b6dcf4fc9599d975.jpeg
http://media.greenradio.topscms.com/images/75/41/0d36bf894e46941717f9fe142177.png

A long standing hotel in Halifax's downtown core will be closing in the New Year. Owners of the Citadel Hotel confirm to News 95.7 that the Citadel will be shut down in January 2012.

Siverbirch Hotels and Resorts President and CEO Stephen Giblin says the building needs dramatic and extensive renovations.

"To do that and accomplish what we want in the hotel with the renovation, we feel the only way to do it the right way would be to close the hotel," he says. "So, we're saddened to have to close the hotel but we're worried about safety and disruption and dissatisfied guests. So, it's best to close the hotel and re-work the entire site actually."

A new hotel on the same site should be up and running by fall 2013.

"It'll be a whole new hotel," Giblin says. "We want to really make use of all the real estate there so we can give downtown Halifax a beautiful new building." :tup:

Giblin can't confirm yet whether the new hotel will be named the Citadel, but he says talks are underway with Hilton and Marriott for rebranding.

Employees of the Citadel Hotel were informed two weeks ago that they will be losing their jobs in January.

The hotel was built in 1963 as the Citadel Inn.