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Barrington south
Mar 22, 2009, 9:55 PM
Best of all a little beach and volleyball court wouldn't take up much area and could easilt be incorporated into the Queen's Landing proposal. :)

best of all would be all the femenita beach vollyball players in their Brazilian Bikini's.......:slob:

Dmajackson
Mar 23, 2009, 12:13 AM
best of all would be all the femenita beach vollyball players in their Brazilian Bikini's.......:slob:

Lol ... :haha:

That's one of the reasons I like volleyball :D

Jonovision
Mar 23, 2009, 2:49 PM
From what I know the reason it is like the way it is, is because that stone wall that supports the end of this little inlet is actually part of the original seawall from way back in the day before all the boardwalks.

In one of my urban design classes last year someone actually tackled this tiny spot for the final project. They came up with an awesome concept. They made a sort of step down stairs that went right down into the water and then in the centre was a raised platform that could be used for exhibits of performance. It created a little amphitheatre. But the best part was the interaction with the water. Because of the way the steps went down into the water, depending on the tides. The raised platform in the center would become a little island at high tide. It was an amazing idea. And a great way to get people to interact with the water instead of just stroll along 5 feet above it.

Dmajackson
Mar 23, 2009, 7:46 PM
^Your idea could work too Jonovision. :)

Really I just want some sort of place where people can interact with the water. The city paid millions for a sewage plant but there's only two beaches on the entire peninsula. While it might not be a beach at least some water interaction would happen.

hfx_chris
Mar 23, 2009, 10:08 PM
I just want it to be filled in, it's disgusting... I hate walking by there, and the thought of turning it into anything other than park benches and hot dog vendors is nauseating...

Empire
Mar 23, 2009, 10:57 PM
I just want it to be filled in, it's disgusting... I hate walking by there, and the thought of turning it into anything other than park benches and hot dog vendors is nauseating...

They should widen the bridge and install a fence/cage underneath so that the small inlet is blocked in. Something like a non-corrisive chain link with a gate in the middle. With the inlet blocked in, some native fish could be put in there. Cod, flounder. crabs, sea trout and the big one "SHARK". Around the perimeter would be a boardwalk with a railing. Another bridge could span the middle so fish viewing could be maximized. From the shore side sink a bow of a fishing boat and tie it in so it is water tight. Large glass portholes would allow for underwater viewing from the inner hull. The gate would be lifted once a week and the fish allowed to escape. Local fisherman would be contracted to bring in a new batch of aquarium stock.

Jonovision
Mar 24, 2009, 8:27 PM
I just want to make it clear that what I posted was not my idea, but a classmates of mine.

I kinda like your idea Empire, well at least the concept. It sounds a little tourist trappy though.

Empire
Mar 25, 2009, 12:24 AM
I just want to make it clear that what I posted was not my idea, but a classmates of mine.

I kinda like your idea Empire, well at least the concept. It sounds a little tourist trappy though.

It is tourist trappy....Halifax is one big tourist trap.

Dmajackson
Mar 25, 2009, 7:04 PM
Board saves St. Mary's, closes St. Pat's-Alexandra

By MICHAEL LIGHTSTONE Staff Reporter
Wed. Mar 25 - 1:28 PM

The Halifax regional school board voted Tuesday to close St. Patrick’s-Alexandra School but to keep St. Mary's School open after a review and public meetings on the fate of the peninsular sites.

Members had debated closing the Maitland Street school by September of this year but decided to have a separate vote on the date of the closure, a move that ultimately gave the school some breathing room.

In a separate decision, the school board voted 8-0 to keep Saint Mary’s open.

St. Patrick’s-Alexandra serves pupils in grades Primary to 9. At its meeting Tuesday, the school board initially talked about keeping the school open but that proposal died on the floor.

Then the board debated closing the school this year, and finally discussed delaying the shutdown until 2011. The vote to close the school in 2011 was tied, and board chairman Irvine Carvery broke the deadlock, opting for the later closure.

Board members said they appreciate how important the school is to many families in the community, but the meeting also heard that lots of parents over the years have sent their children to schools out of the district.

St. Patrick’s-Alexandra not only had a declining enrolment to deal with, but "an image problem" as an undesirable school to attend, board members said.

An audience of parents, students and teachers heard that a new school is planned to replace St. Pat’s-Alexandra, but principal Ken Fells wasn’t optimistic it’ll be built any time soon. He told reporters he’s worried about his students having to adjust to new schools.

"None of the (board) members that talked up there talked about transition time, and what the transition’s going to be like for our children to go to other schools," Mr. Fells said. "It’s going to be very hard."

Saint Mary’s, situated on Morris Street, serves students in grades Primary to 6. Board members said the school has much to offer pupils and parents, but a couple of them worried about potential fire hazards inside the building.

According to the Halifax board’s website, Saint Mary’s was built in 1950 and had 110 students in 2008. St. Patrick’s-Alexandra was built in 1971 and had 80 students registered last year, the website says.

Howard Windsor, the retired civil servant who was a one-man school board for almost two years at the request of former education minister Karen Casey, had ruled that both Halifax schools and Alderney School, a Dartmouth elementary, needed to be reviewed for closure.

His decision was a response to the first phase of Imagine Our Schools, a long-term master plan for facilities prepared by Toronto consultants.

The only way to appeal a school closing will be through the courts, Mr. Carvery said this week. Any appeal will have to be based on how board members carried out the process, he said.

Alderney School’s fate will be decided tonight.

( mlightstone@herald.ca)

’None of the (board) members that talked up there talked about transition time, and what the transition’s going to be like for our children to go to other schools. It’s going to be very hard.’

Ken FELLSPrincipal of St. Patrick’s-Alexandra

Dmajackson
Mar 26, 2009, 10:51 AM
Alderney School spared
Board members defeat closure proposal 7-1
By MICHAEL LIGHTSTONE Staff Reporter
Thu. Mar 26 - 5:43 AM

Alderney School in Dartmouth is staying open, the Halifax regional school board decided Wednesday.

In a 7-1 vote, the board decided to keep operating the site despite declining enrolment.

The ruling was greeted by hugs and tears of joy in a gym full of students, parents and Alderney teachers.

The vote to save the school followed a motion to close the facility, but only if two schools scheduled to take Alderney pupils got needed renovations done. The closure proposal was defeated 7-1.

School board members defended Alderney School, saying it’s serving the community well.

"You have a good quality school," board member Sheryl Blumenthal-Harrison told the audience. "Your quality of education here is exceptional."

According to the school board’s website, Alderney School was built in 1953 and had 100 students enrolled last year. Situated on Penhorn Drive, the small hilltop school serves a middle-class community.

Vice-chairman Steve Brine was the sole board member who’d proposed the school be shut down. A retired teacher, Mr. Brine said the board is coping with dwindling enrolment and aging facilities.

"Change can be scary and difficult," he said before his motion was defeated. "But it is sometimes needed."

The vote to keep Alderney open followed a board review of the school, along with two schools in Halifax, and public consultation.

Wednesday’s meeting heard declining enrolment has hit the city’s school board as a whole, but this part of Halifax Regional Municipality could be a growth area if a proposed residential development gets built.

Though Alderney students and staff continue to have a school to study at and work in, the district’s school board member, Gin Yee, acknowledged another closure review could happen. He said the fate of the school has already been reviewed at least twice.

On Tuesday, the board decided to close St. Patrick’s-Alexandra School in Halifax in 2011. It voted to keep operating Saint Mary’s School in the city’s south end.

Dmajackson
Apr 2, 2009, 11:08 AM
Lower Water Street could become one-way

By JEFFREY SIMPSON Staff Reporter
Thu. Apr 2 - 4:46 AM
Lower Water Street might soon be a one-way thoroughfare for traffic in downtown Halifax.

"That’s going to be evaluated this spring," Dave McCusker, of Halifax’s transportation department, said in an interview Wednesday.

City traffic planners will consult with the public before any change takes place, he said.

The harbourside street runs parallel to Hollis Street, which is already restricted to one-way traffic in the southbound direction. So it makes sense to have traffic on Lower Water Street go one way northbound, Mr. McCusker said.

"It’s really a pair with Hollis Street."

Having two lanes in the same direction won’t necessarily improve capacity, but it could make it possible to extend sidewalks, add curbside parking and create bicycle lanes, Mr. McCusker said.

"In a lot of cases where you accommodate traffic going in different directions you don’t really have room for anything else."

Traffic planners have considered changing several downtown streets because some of them switch suddenly into one-way streets at intersections, which is confusing, he said.

Spring Garden Road was under consideration for change, but the city has abandoned the idea.

Coun. Dawn Sloane (Halifax Downtown) said she didn’t have any problem with the plan for Lower Water Street.

"We are trying to make parts of the downtown more pedestrian friendly," she said. "I’m always open to ideas that improve the downtown."

Personally I am all ofr one-waying Lower Water. As the article said Hollis St is just a block up and also not many cars head southbound on the road because of the diffuculty.

hfx_chris
Apr 2, 2009, 11:39 AM
Agreed, it only makes sense, since Hollis is one way the entire length, that LW should be one way the entire length as well. That section where it's two-way always gets backed up.

Spitfire75
Apr 2, 2009, 2:58 PM
It's not big news, but we got a memo from the landlord of the CCL building on Bayers Road the other day:
"...Within a month we expect to start contruction on a new parking structure that will add +/- 550 new parking spaces to our existing 1,200 spaces. We are also redevoloping the existing parking layout for better effiencicy and this addition work has the potential to increase our parking by another 200 spaces. We anticipate these projects taking three months to complete..."

Keith P.
Apr 2, 2009, 11:00 PM
There used to be a parking structure there up to not too many years ago.

Why would they need 1200 spaces anyway?

sdm
Apr 2, 2009, 11:18 PM
There used to be a parking structure there up to not too many years ago.

Why would they need 1200 spaces anyway?

Because they put a 150,000 square foot addition to the 70,000 square foot former zellars space. Therefore based on a minimum 3 parking stalls per 1000 square feet they would be required to have 660 at grade. That is just for the addition, there is at least half that square footage in the existing buildings that requires parking as well.

needless to say, 1,200 is a lot.

macgregor
Apr 3, 2009, 11:08 AM
A co-worker recently showed me the HRM Maps site.
http://www.halifax.ca/giss/index.html
It was new to me so I thought that it was worth sharing on the forum.
By using all the tools, especially the layers, you can bring up civic numbers, viewplanes, height levels (which would likely be updated when HBD is passed) and more.
I think it is great.

Dmajackson
Apr 3, 2009, 11:15 AM
Simpson Hall coming down

Halifax News Net


By Joanne Oostveen – The Weekly News
The demolition of the old nurses residence at the Nova Scotia Hospital has now begun.
Simpson Hall, built in 1964 for students of the hospital’s nurse training program will be taken down to make way for four bungalows for patients who need support to help transition them back into society.
“This is good news,” said Maureen Wheller, senior communications advisor for capital district mental health programs. “Although not much is visible at the present time, as the process involves stripping the interior first, the demolition will be completely finished by the end of August.”
Plans for the demolition began in the fall of 2007 when Capital District Health Authority’s engineering department decided that it was too expensive to upgrade the building’s aging heating system.
“In the meantime, there had been plans to build new community-focused living units at the Nova Scotia Hospital site to replace some of the antiquated and institutional inpatient areas in the Purdy Building,” said Wheller.
“The decommissioning of Simpson Hall provides for an appropriate site, so the Department of Health approved the funds for demolition to make way for these new units.”
The four new buildings, which will open in spring 2011, will look like ordinary houses with space for 10 people in each bungalow. A soft barrier of trees and shrubs will surround the buildings, contributing to a more residential look said Wheller.
Wheller said Simpson Hall has been a landmark building in the Woodside area, surrounded by both residential and commercial properties so it was appropriate to keep the neighbours informed of changes in their community.
“This can only be good for Dartmouth,” she said. “Once the new Community Focused Units are up and the area relandscaped, once the Nova Scotia Community College addition is finished and once the new shopping centre is opened, the whole of the Woodside area will be transformed and revitalized.”

Spitfire75
Apr 3, 2009, 11:17 AM
A co-worker recently showed me the HRM Maps site.
http://www.halifax.ca/giss/index.html
It was new to me so I thought that it was worth sharing on the forum.
By using all the tools, especially the layers, you can bring up civic numbers, viewplanes, height levels (which would likely be updated when HBD is passed) and more.
I think it is great.

That's really cool and useful.

Dmajackson
Apr 3, 2009, 5:58 PM
April 20, 2009 Public Information Meeting - St. Andrew's Centre, 6955 Bayers Road, Halifax - 7:00 p.m.

Case 01252 - Application by 3234098 Nova Scotia Limited to
rezone 6581 and 6589 Chebucto Road, Halifax (PID's 40723363
and 00116525) from R-2 (General Residential) to C-1 (Local
Business) zone. More information... (http://halifax.ca/planning/documents/Case01252FactsheetPIM.pdf)

Jonovision
Apr 3, 2009, 6:22 PM
I learned yesterday that the Dartmouth Sportsplex is finally actually going to expand. I got a look at the new floor plan and they are expanding up into the parking lot directly behind the arena section of the building. They will be adding 3 basketball courts in one large open area similar to the one at the Dalplex.

Dmajackson
Apr 5, 2009, 3:31 PM
City staff want projects ranked

By MICHAEL LIGHTSTONE Staff Reporter
Sun. Apr 5 - 11:08 AM
Municipal staffers want Halifax regional council to set metro’s project priorities so the municipality can tap into federal and provincial funding for capital works, according to a staff report.

The report, to be discussed Tuesday at council’s committee of the whole session, says ranking the capital projects will boost city hall’s chances of getting the government money needed to bankroll infrastructure.

The top 20 projects include expanding Metro Transit’s conventional bus system and its Access-A-Bus program for the disabled, upgrading venues for the 2011 Canada Winter Games, implementing a bikeways master plan and redeveloping the Cogswell interchange in downtown Halifax.

Ranking projects "will allow (Halifax Regional Municipality) to communicate priorities with other levels of government, to help ensure that there are no missed funding opportunities," says the report, prepared by Peter Duncan, the city’s infrastructure planning manager.

The report says politicians "may choose not to endorse the infrastructure list and wait until details of funding programs" from Ottawa are released. But this course of action isn’t recommended.

It says few details of how the federal package will be administered are known at this point. Nova Scotia’s share of two federal programs announced recently is to be $145 million.

"All major infrastructure programs announced by the federal government in recent years either support or favour ‘green’ projects such as transit, water, waste water and community energy," it says. "It is reasonable to expect this trend to continue."

Other priority items are public transit security, a new conventional ferry, a fast-ferry commuter service between Bedford and downtown, expanding metro’s compost facility and launching energy-efficient projects, the staff report says.

Dmajackson
Apr 8, 2009, 11:16 AM
Murphy’s puts $1.6m into remake


Wed. Apr 8 - 4:46 AM
The owners of Murphy’s on the Water are making a $1.6 million investment in the future of tourism on the Halifax waterfront.

That’s the amount Jeff Farwell, general manager of the family-run restaurant and gift shop, said the company is spending to remake the historic Cable Wharf building just down from Halifax ferry terminal.

"It’s a risk for us, no question," he said in an interview Tuesday. "We don’t know how the tourism season is going to be this summer, but we can’t stop because the economy is hitting a bit of a hole in the road. We have to fight for our 250 employees. We don’t want to lose them."

The expansion includes a larger restaurant with bigger windows and more focus on seafood, a $75,000 touch tank where visitors can net their own lobsters, an artisans demonstration area, more local crafts in the gift shop and a year-round ticket outlet that will operate in conjunction with other local businesses.

"This is the culmination of 10 years of planning and discussions," he said. "The building needed a facelift and by proceeding we saw this as an opportunity to raise the bar for tourism in Halifax."

The effort is also the first push to make the waterfront a year round attraction.

"We’re talking to the Waterfront Development Corporation, a couple of the other restaurants and the hotels about the need to bring people to the water year-round," he said. "It might mean adding a winter festival down here, but we believe we can cater to local residents in the winter in the same way we meet the needs of tourist in the summer."

Spitfire75
Apr 8, 2009, 1:40 PM
Waverley Road to get upgrades (http://thechronicleherald.ca/Metro/1115458.html)


Wed. Apr 8 - 5:36 AM Waverley Road residents in Halifax Regional Municipality are going to see a section of the street rebuilt between next week and the end of May, according to a recent release.

Halifax Water installed new sewer and water mains along the street in 2008 and the project’s next phase is the reconstruction of the street from the Irving gas station to Mic Mac Drive.

This work includes concrete curbs on both sides and a new concrete sidewalk on the west side of the road, the release says.

Work on the project is to start April 13.

"During this work there will be times when access to (local properties) will be affected," the release says.

Spitfire75
Apr 8, 2009, 1:41 PM
Roadways will light up with LED (http://thechronicleherald.ca/Metro/1115563.html)

By AMY SMITH Provincial Reporter
Wed. Apr 8 - 6:25 AMLED street lights will soon brighten the roadways of a number of Nova Scotia municipalities.

A pilot project will use the energy-efficient, light-emitting-diode lights rather than the standard versions in several parts of the province, a source told The Chronicle Herald on Tuesday.

Premier Rodney MacDonald and Environment Minister David Morse will be in Amherst today to make a funding announcement of "environmental technology," a government release said.

The province’s ecoNova Scotia for Clean Air and Climate Change fund and Conserve Nova Scotia are supporting LED Roadway Lighting Ltd.’s initiative.
It was described as an "innovative development that will reduce energy use, harmful air emissions, and costs to municipalities," the release added.
The announcement will be held at C-Vision Ltd.

Chuck Cartmill, president of C-Vision and LED Roadway Lighting, would not comment in advance of today’s announcement.

In February the company received a $1-million loan from the provincial Industrial Expansion Fund to allow the firm to double its research and development staff to 20 people.

At the time, Ken Cartmill, human resources manager for C-Vision, said the company would like to replace street lights in Nova Scotia but had yet to develop a pilot project.

"That’s something we are working on," he said.

The company has also received more than $5 million in federal funding for the development of LED roadway lights.

The premier and Senator Fred Dickson are also scheduled to make an announcement at Amherst town hall this morning under the Building Canada Fund’s community component.

Mr. MacDonald and Senator Dickson are slated to make another announcement concerning the fund in Springhill this afternoon at the Dr. Carson and Marion Murray Community Centre.

Barrington south
Apr 8, 2009, 5:58 PM
that $75,000 touch tank sounds cool....I'd like to get me hands on one of those 3 pounders!!.....:slob:

Keith P.
Apr 9, 2009, 1:22 AM
Murphy’s puts $1.6m into remake


Wed. Apr 8 - 4:46 AM
The owners of Murphy’s on the Water are making a $1.6 million investment in the future of tourism on the Halifax waterfront.

That’s the amount Jeff Farwell, general manager of the family-run restaurant and gift shop, said the company is spending to remake the historic Cable Wharf building just down from Halifax ferry terminal.


That's a lot of money for a place that sells vast amounts of HighLiner fish triangles and Valley Farms french fries to unsuspecting tourists. :yuck:

I despise this place. It has the worst food I have ever experienced and really gives the Halifax waterfront a black eye. They are the very definition of a tourist trap.

Dmajackson
Apr 9, 2009, 10:59 AM
New library planned for old Dartmouth movie theatre
By DAVENE JEFFREY Staff Reporter
Thu. Apr 9 - 5:36 AM

Woodlawn residents are about to get a spacious new library.

Renovations are expected to get underway next month at 650 Portland St., the current site of Empire Theatres.

"We’re really pleased with the space. It’s very nice," said Halifax Public Libraries CEO Judith Hare.

One of the benefits of moving into the cinema building is that the library will get a 100-seat theatre, she said. "We’re scrunched into a very small space now."

The branch, located at the Woodlawn Staples Plaza, opened in 1975. According to library statistics, its 4,000 square feet of floor space makes it the smallest urban outlet of Halifax’s public library system while handling the fifth-largest circulation. Last year, it loaned about 400,000 items.

The Woodlawn branch serves 26,301 HRM residents, according to 2006 census numbers.

Construction should be complete by September and the new location should open by November if everything goes as scheduled, Ms. Hare said. But the plan, which includes a 20-year lease, still needs the final approval of council, Ms. Hare said.

Councillors Andrew Younger (East Dartmouth-The Lakes) and Bill Karsten (Portland-East Woodlawn) issued a release supporting the new location. "The new location provides exciting opportunities for growth of the library, and a unique adaptation of an existing commercial space which will prove a benefit to the library user," he said.

The site will include parking, self-checkout machines, areas for children, teens and adults, as well as study areas, computers and a large program room.

What is unclear is when Empire Theatres will close.

Dean Leland, Empire’s vice-president of media and studio relations, said they are in informal discussions with landlord Arcturus Realty Corp.

"We haven’t come to any arrangements. . . . What you may have heard from Woodlawn Library may be a bit premature."

hfx_chris
Apr 9, 2009, 12:26 PM
Yeah, this was announced at the meeting the other night, I forgot to post it here. Great news if you ask me. I know the folks who use Woodlawn on a regular basis will like it, but most importantly are the staff, the working conditions at the current library are poor from a staff-comfort level.
Rumor also is, that the library technical services division currently located on Glendale Avenue is planning to move to the new Woodlawn location as well.

Keith P.
Apr 9, 2009, 12:29 PM
The hegemony of Judith Hare continues... possibly no building is safe from her expansionary aspirations.

Dmajackson
Apr 10, 2009, 3:18 AM
A slightly better article about the Woodlawn expansion.

Movies out, books in
Woodlawn Library moving to Empire Theatre site on Portland Street
Halifax News Net
By Joanne Oostveen – The Weekly News

The Woodlawn Public Library will more than triple its size when it opens in its new location this fall.
“Halifax Public Libraries is very happy to announce the new Woodlawn Library will open in November 2009 where Empire Theatres is currently located at 650 Portland St.,” said Judith Hare, CEO of Halifax Public Libraries.
Hare made the announcement at the current Woodlawn Library in the Woodlawn Staples Plaza this past Monday night to a group of about 85 people from the community. She said she was sorry that it had taken so long to inform the public of this exciting news, but added she was sure the Empire Theatre building was the very best they could have possibly done for the Woodlawn community.
The new 17,700-square-foot space will include a large program room, a 100-seat theatre, seating and study areas, a 600-square-foot space for collection management, two self check out machines, indoor and outdoor book returns, a computer area, a larger materials collection, defined areas for children, teens and adults, free public parking and pedestrian and bus access.
The Woodlawn Library first opened in 1975 and was no longer meeting the needs of a community that has a population of more than 26,000 people, said Hare.
“It definitely justified the existence of a larger building,” she said.
In last year’s budget, HRM council agreed to move ahead with the Woodlawn Library expansion. East Dartmouth - The Lakes Coun. Andrew Younger said the Woodlawn library has the fifth highest circulation numbers of all branches in the system, but is the smallest urban branch at 4,000 square feet.
“In 2008 there were almost 160,000 registered users who borrowed 400,000 items there,” said Younger. “This is in addition to those who attended programs, used the branch for community meetings or simply came in to use the computers.”
He added that the branch is so busy that in September they averaged a loan rate of 500 movies a day and more than 100 babies and toddlers attend day programming each week.
Both Penhorn Mall and Woodlawn Mall were looked at and then discarded as possible new sites. Hare said they could only get about 11,000 square feet of space at the Woodlawn Mall and Penhorn Mall could not make any decision about housing a library there for at least a year.
“So when we heard that the theatre was becoming available it simply blew our minds,” said Hare. “We scored all the sites and the Empire Theatre came out on top as the best possible site. Who knew a theatre could be a natural for a library?”
Senior Janet Stacey has lived in the Woodlawn area for more than 30 years. She said she is happy to see the library moving to a bigger and better location.
“This branch was going to close in 1997 and I rallied behind them then to stay open,” she said. “This is very exciting news.”
Hugh Millward is president of the Portland Estates and Hills Residents Association. He said it was a pleasant surprise to find out the new location of the library.
“I didn’t know the Empire Theatre was even a possibility,” he said. “But this works out perfectly for our community, especially since the completion of the trails nearby. People will now be able to walk to the library.”
Younger said the annual costs to lease the building will be similar to the combined cost of what was being paid at Woodlawn and at the Sackville Technical Library site.
“So taxpayers won’t be faced with increased rental bills as a result,” he said.
Council approval is still required before the 20-year lease of the theatre building is finalized, but Hare said she is hoping that will be done soon.
Construction will start in May and finish in September. And while the move is taking place in October there will be little down time between one library closing and the new one opening in November.
“There was some talk about us keeping the popcorn machines, but we won’t be doing that,” said Hare.

========================================================================================================================

'I’m very serious about protecting the commons’
Public meeting held to discuss future of downtown Dartmouth’s limited green space
Halifax News Net
By Jon Tattrie – The Weekly News

Nearly 100 people gathered at Hawthorn Elementary School Saturday morning to debate the future of the Dartmouth Commons. People raised concerns about the planned bus terminal, expansion to the Dartmouth Sportsplex and how to use the green spaces for dog walkers and others.
Frances and Tom Howard have lived in the area for more than 30 years. Frances spoke up with her fears the open land was being steadily eroded by exceptions to the no-building rule.
“We’ve so little (green space). Places like Shubie are absolutely inundated and worn out now,” she told The Weekly News. “What we have down here is accessible to all sorts of people. The city is nibble, nibble, nibble. It’s a land grab.”
Howard said the commons were not designed for things like schools, libraries and shopping centres. “It was never allowed, but they sold it anyway.”
Coun. Gloria McCluskey said she’s been working on a commons plan for years. “I’m very serious about protecting the commons,” she said. “I remember Leighton Dillman on his hands and knees, building that commons, getting no compensation for it, doing it for the love of the commons.”
McCluskey said the same passion fires her to protect the green side of the commons, but unlike some at the meeting, she doesn’t object to the bus terminal.
“There was no big consultation meeting, and there probably should have been,” she said of the decision to build the terminal on commons ground. “But if you walk up that street, it’s nothing but garbage. Every year, I get more calls about the garbage on that site. The way it is now, it doesn’t do anything for the neighbourhood.”
Another priority for the Dartmouth Centre councillor is an improved sports field for Dartmouth High. She called the current one “useless.”
“Those kids have been deprived for a long time and they should have a decent sports field. What better use for the common land than for the kids to have a place to play sports?”
Holly Richardson of HRM said the city is formulating a master plan for the Dartmouth Commons district. “This is our first public meeting to get ideas, concerns and some understanding from the public about how they want to see future decisions around the common made.”
Saturday’s meeting was the start of a three-month public consultation ahead of city staff placing a recommendation before regional council at the end of June.
“One of the key things we need to look at is: how do we balance public open space on the common with public facilities on the common?” Richardson said.
She encouraged residents to get involved.
“What we hear today and in the coming weeks are going to shape the work we do. The plan will come back to the public in late May-early June with a draft.”

hfx_chris
Apr 10, 2009, 3:43 AM
Nearly 100 people gathered at Hawthorn Elementary School Saturday morning to debate the future of the Dartmouth Commons. People raised concerns about the planned bus terminal, expansion to the Dartmouth Sportsplex and how to use the green spaces for dog walkers and others.
Frances and Tom Howard have lived in the area for more than 30 years. Frances spoke up with her fears the open land was being steadily eroded by exceptions to the no-building rule.
Oh what the hell.. honestly though, the Sportsplex is already built so bitching about that isn't going to do anything, and the green space behind it is so disgusting I don't even like to look into it, let alone walk through it. The section with the ball fields, and the park itself (Leighton Dillman park) are really the only parts of the Dartmouth Common that should be considered as still part of the common. The rest of it is gone, give it a rest. Some people get way too agitated about this stuff.

The hegemony of Judith Hare continues... possibly no building is safe from her expansionary aspirations.
You've clearly never set foot in the Woodlawn library before. In fact, I wonder sometimes if you've ever set foot in any library, but I digress.
The expansion of the Woodlawn library is long in the making, before even Judith Hare - this is a desperately needed expansion, the place really is a joke. My high school library had more to it than Woodlawn. The meeting room is small, the area with the computers is crowded, the stacks themselves are too close together to easily navigate two people through and the combined circulation and reference area is piss poor at best from a staff comfort perspective. You really need to lose your anti-library attitude kp, they serve an important role in the community, and this necessary expansion is long overdue.

Keith P.
Apr 10, 2009, 12:33 PM
My comments on Hare's hegemony had more to do with the denial by Empire Theaters that they are actually leaving. Hare's strategy is always to get way out in front of reality on any site that she wants (see the SGR and Queen megaproject) and this is no exception. I totally agree that the existing Woodlawn strip mall library is a joke and needs to go. I just find it odd that she would make an announcement before the deal is done.

Dmajackson
Apr 10, 2009, 3:31 PM
Second Tim Hortons shuts down

By OUR STAFF
Fri. Apr 10 - 5:14 AM
One of the oldest Tim Hortons shops in Nova Scotia, along with one of the least popular, are fading from the metro retail scene.

The national coffee chain had just boarded up its approximately 20-year-old shop on Ochterloney Street in Dartmouth when a decision was made to close the 5970 Spring Garden Rd. location.

"All staff have been or will soon be relocated to updated and more popular outlets nearby," corporate spokesman David Morelli said Thursday.

The Ochterloney Street location had the distinction of being one of the first 500 opened by Tim Hortons. It was store number 403 until it was closed late last year.

There had been some local speculation that it would be renovated and reopen, however, that is not the case.

Neither shop has enough land to accommodate a drive-thru, said Mr. Morelli.

It seems the fate of the Halifax site was determined after nearby university campuses allowed the chain to open on their premises.

"After a business analysis it was decided to close this location later this spring," said Mr. Morelli.

Tim Hortons has 3,000 stores around the world.

hfx_chris
Apr 10, 2009, 4:34 PM
Funny, the ferry terminal locations don't have drive-thrus, but they seem to be doing just fine.
And you know what? The Ochterloney store was doing pretty damn good too.
But then again, I only visited that location during peak times (morning/afternoon coffee breaks anyone?)...

Dmajackson
Apr 10, 2009, 4:54 PM
I can see why they would shut-down the SGR one. Its not because of the drive-thru though. There are locations at DAL, further down SGR, and countless more in the hospitals nearby. Add that in with the lower pedestrian counts on the west-end of SGR and its enough to close one location I guess.

The other SGR location doesn't have a drive-thru (and one in Bedford too at least) but it appears to be the busiest in Halifax.

someone123
Apr 10, 2009, 10:33 PM
Yeah, for a second I was wondering why they'd close it but I was thinking of the other location. I've never even been inside the Tim Horton's near Robie.

ScovaNotian
Apr 12, 2009, 12:11 AM
The sale of Fenwick seems to either have gone through or be close to going through. http://www.halifaxapartmentrentals.com/details.asp?ID=2215 lists a number of units as available, effective now and June 15.

Wishblade
Apr 12, 2009, 2:12 AM
The sale of Fenwick seems to either have gone through or be close to going through. http://www.halifaxapartmentrentals.com/details.asp?ID=2215 lists a number of units as available, effective now and June 15.

Sounds like its gone through. I did hear a few weeks ago that the renovation was supposed to start this summer.

Dmajackson
Apr 14, 2009, 11:06 AM
'Unique' mosque planned for Halifax
$6-million project next to Maritime Muslim Academy to be completed in about a year
By DAVENE JEFFREY Staff Reporter
Tue. Apr 14 - 5:45 AM

http://thechronicleherald.ca/photos/xlarge/Muslim_Centre_Provincial_04-14-09_TQB7A6A.jpg
An artist’s rendition of the new Muslim community centre and mosque planned for St. Mathias Street in Halifax.

http://thechronicleherald.ca/photos/xlarge/pp041309dome_RGB_04-14-09.jpg
Workers John Hennigar and Paul Wooley put a piece of corrugated steel on the dome portion of a new community centre and mosque. The dome, which will be covered with concrete, is expected to be raised into place on Thursday. (Peter Parsons / Staff)





The Chebucto Road area in Halifax is getting a new landmark.

Construction is underway for a new community centre and mosque next to the Maritime Muslim Academy.

"It’s unique in its architecture," said Hadi Salah, the academy’s principal and chairman of the centre’s building committee.

The new centre’s brick facade will blend in with neighbouring buildings, which include the academy and the Maritime Conservatory of Performing Arts.

However, the structure will also feature windows and domed roofs that will make it instantly identifiable as a mosque.

The $6-million project should be done in 12 to 14 months, Mr. Salah said.

So far, $2 million has been raised and the community is hoping to get government help.

Mr. Salah said he hopes the complex will get some government support because part of the building will be for community use and it is also being designed with the environment in mind.

Local architect Dan Goodspeed designed the project, which will have a geothermal heating system and a grey-water recovery system.

Previously, the Muslim community had used a small bungalow on the property as a prayer hall, but that was torn down to make way for the new mosque.

Until the project is finished, the group is renting space from the conservatory for use as a prayer hall.

The centre’s upper floor will be used as a new prayer hall that will accommodate 800 worshippers.

The family-oriented centre will have a library and a computer lab and will offer youth activities and programming, Mr. Salah said.

The basement level will have a multi-purpose room and a gymnasium. The gym can be used for large-scale events and will have a stage for school performances.

When it is completed, the complex will be open daily from 8 a.m. until midnight.

sdm
Apr 14, 2009, 12:23 PM
News in allnovascotia.com

Khyber building getting a face lift starting May 5th, new windows etc. $70,000

Also news out on a development agreement for that lands known as fairview golf course.

5 mutlifamily buildings, varying in height from 8-12 stories, ground level commercial (37,000) and townhouses.

Public meeting set for April 29th

Dmajackson
Apr 14, 2009, 1:20 PM
Also news out on a development agreement for that lands known as fairview golf course.

5 mutlifamily buildings, varying in height from 8-12 stories, ground level commercial (37,000) and townhouses.

Public meeting set for April 29th

The golf course is now known as Wistee Golf Centre (425 Main Avenue).

Its right across from Mount Royale on the plateau next to Dunbrack Street.

hfx_chris
Apr 14, 2009, 2:59 PM
Fairview golf course?

Edit - Should have looked at the next page before I replied :) - Thanks DJ, wasn't aware that golf course had a name. Not much of a golf course though, I thought it was just mini golf, or a driving range or something.

Dmajackson
Apr 14, 2009, 7:06 PM
Province Invests in Eight New Schools, 41 School Renovations
Department of Education
Published April 14, 2009

Premier Rodney MacDonald and Education Minister Judy Streatch announced a $307-million school construction and renovation program. Eight leading-edge schools will be built and 41 others renovated under the program, part of the province's Building For Growth economic stimulus plan.

The new schools are in Bedford, Dartmouth, Digby/Clementsport, Halifax, New Glasgow, Lunenburg and Truro/Bible Hill. Work on some of the projects will begin this spring

Halifax Regional School Board

New:
Bedford High, $34.2 million, opening 2012
Joseph Howe replacement, Halifax, $15 million, opening 2013
LeMarchant-St. Thomas replacement, Halifax, $13.2 million, opening 2014
Prince Arthur/Southdale-North Woodside replacement, Dartmouth, $24.3 million, opening 2014

Renovations:
Dartmouth High, $11.85 million
Inglis Street, $4.99 million

Empire
Apr 14, 2009, 8:17 PM
Province Invests in Eight New Schools, 41 School Renovations
Department of Education
Published April 14, 2009

Premier Rodney MacDonald and Education Minister Judy Streatch announced a $307-million school construction and renovation program. Eight leading-edge schools will be built and 41 others renovated under the program, part of the province's Building For Growth economic stimulus plan.

The new schools are in Bedford, Dartmouth, Digby/Clementsport, Halifax, New Glasgow, Lunenburg and Truro/Bible Hill. Work on some of the projects will begin this spring

Halifax Regional School Board

New:
Bedford High, $34.2 million, opening 2012
Joseph Howe replacement, Halifax, $15 million, opening 2013
LeMarchant-St. Thomas replacement, Halifax, $13.2 million, opening 2014
Prince Arthur/Southdale-North Woodside replacement, Dartmouth, $24.3 million, opening 2014

Renovations:
Dartmouth High, $11.85 million
Inglis Street, $4.99 million

When is the election?

ZET
Apr 14, 2009, 10:47 PM
My hope is that the renovations go ahead. New schools are often promised and then the waiting takes forever. With renos, hopefully that will just go ahead. ZET

BravoZulu
Apr 15, 2009, 7:18 PM
Ok, I just went by Granite brewery on Barrington. There is a large dumpster at the curb and the inside looks like it is being gutted.

Anybody heard anything?

Keith P.
Apr 16, 2009, 12:37 AM
Ok, I just went by Granite brewery on Barrington. There is a large dumpster at the curb and the inside looks like it is being gutted.

Anybody heard anything?

Kevin Keefe sold the building to Lou Reznick IIRC. Don't know his plans for it.

The brewery operation is relocating to the north end.

Barrington south
Apr 16, 2009, 12:57 AM
Kevin Keefe sold the building to Lou Reznick IIRC. Don't know his plans for it.

The brewery operation is relocating to the north end.

Kevin just delivered his first batch of Granite Ales to us today, so the operation is finally under way...after almost 2 weeks without Granite beers...and many unhappy customers... and this is despite his inital repeated assurances that there would be zero downtime in brewing.

As for the building itself...I have heard indirectly, that Reznick wants to develop the granite building, the old sam the record man's building and the back of the Shoe Shop's building as a single development, not sure how tall he wants to go...probably maximum considering the bazaar height limitations under HRM by design...will try to find out more info though and update Ya'll .....also this would mean an end to the Back Stage at the Shoe Shop and be another major blow to the already beleaguered Victor Syprec...in my opinion this would be a major loss to the Hali scene and I will be sad to see the shue shop downsized or changed in any way

someone123
Apr 16, 2009, 3:15 AM
I was kind of unimpressed with the Shoe Shop last time I was there. The food wasn't great - it was trying to be atypical bar food I guess but ended up being kind of plain anyway - and the place was really dead, although I was probably in there at an awkward time since I was visiting on holiday. It is too bad..

Barrington needs a big, coordinated shakeup. 3-4 decent new retail tenants and some marketing could do wonders to the street. Renovations and new buildings would also help. Projects like what is proposed for the Roy Bldg, Discovery Centre (hopefully residential), and United Gulf would all have a really noticeable impact on the area.

Dmajackson
Apr 16, 2009, 11:00 AM
Rec centre to offer something for all
Construction to start soon on $8.5-million facility
By SHERRI BORDEN COLLEY Staff Reporter
Thu. Apr 16 - 5:39 AM

http://thechronicleherald.ca/photos/xlarge/Hatchett_Lake_Centre_Metro_04-16-09_TQB7GOJ.jpg
An artist’s rendition of the Prospect Road Community Centre. (Contributed)

The spanking new $8.5-million Prospect Road Community Centre will meet the recreational and social needs of area residents, says the chairwoman of centre’s steering committee.

"It’s kind of going to be the focal point to pull all the communities together," Barb Allen said Wednesday. "Other than schools, we don’t have any kind of public facilities, really, so it’s going to be all things to all people, we hope."

Construction for the multi-purpose community recreation centre is slated to begin within the next couple of months with a completion target of summer 2010.

Formed in 2005, the steering committee had done lots of fundraising through community events.

"There’s been an area rate which covers a lot of the capital cost as a community contribution," Ms. Allen said.

"The community is very excited; they know the plot’s there and it’s going to be the gateway onto the Western Commons when they’re established."

Situated between the Hatchet Lake Fire Hall and the Prospect Road Elementary School, the municipality-owned centre, to be run by a volunteer community board, will include a high school-sized gymnasium, meeting rooms, a fitness centre and a kitchen.

"Our hope is to have lots of after-school programs and all kinds of things that will draw in the school community, too," Ms. Allen said.

Next Tuesday, the committee will go before regional council to get approval for the awarding of the tender.

The facility will be designed to meet or exceed LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification and will have geothermal systems.

"It will act as an education piece to the community too, to just see how to do things right," Ms. Allen said.

And a solar skylight will make the centre very inviting, she said.

"Hopefully, there will be community art pieces in there . . . and local artists can show their works, just something for everybody," Ms. Allen said.

Jonovision
Apr 18, 2009, 2:50 PM
Halifax pier gets mild facelift
Construction underway at three locations along waterfront
By IAN FAIRCLOUGH Staff Reporter
Sat. Apr 18 - 5:11 AM

http://thechronicleherald.ca/photos/xlarge/cl041709construction_Metro_04-18-09_8FB8HS1.jpg

Waterfront construction is in full swing Friday near the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Christian Laforce / Staff)


There are broken boards on a Halifax pier, but work’s underway to fix them this year.

Well, some broken boards on the boardwalk, anyway. But there is construction happening at three locations along the waterfront: Cable Wharf, near Bishop’s Landing, and at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic.

The work at Murphy’s on the Water at Cable Wharf is a $1.6-million project the company hopes will boost tourist traffic at the site and increase year-round business.

General manager Jeff Farwell said the work has included gutting the main building and "rebuilding from the bottom up," so it will be open year-round.

The restaurant has been remodelled and "re-themed." New, larger windows will afford a view of the water from anywhere in the restaurant.

The work also includes the installation of a $75,000 lobster tank that will hold 500 kitchen-bound crustaceans, and patrons can use a net to choose their own supper.

There will also be a touch tank with local marine life, so patrons and tourists . . . can get an idea of what the local marine environment is all about, Mr. Farwell said. "We’re going to try to bring an authentic Nova Scotia experience to visitors and locals."

A canopy system around the building will highlight the history and origins of Cable Wharf, and the gift shop will feature more work from local artisans and vendors.

The work at the museum includes removal and reconstruction of the south boat shed, which serves as a summer gift shop, replacement of the wharf’s structural supports and re-decking of the wharfs and boardwalk behind the museum. The work is expected to take five months, and access to the wharfs and boardwalk will be restricted.

Paul MacKinnon, executive director of the Downtown Halifax Business Commission, said the work at the Bishop’s Landing site is boardwalk work, and all the projects are important to bringing more people to the waterfront year-round, especially when the new Waterside Centre development goes ahead.

Mr. MacKinnon said while the waterfront is teeming with people in summer, "retailers find the winter slow. There’s not as much (pedestrian) traffic."

He said work like that at Murphy’s will help dispel the myth that there isn’t much happening on the waterfront during winter. He said more offices mean more people in the downtown, and that means more potential customers for shop owners.

( ifairclough@herald.ca)

hfx_chris
Apr 18, 2009, 8:14 PM
Whenever businesses say they're going to try and bring "an authentic _____ experience" - I shudder. It usually ends up stereotypical and tacky.

Wishblade
Apr 18, 2009, 9:42 PM
I only have one question about these boardwalk upgrades. How are they going to affect the summer festivals, especially Tall Ships?

BravoZulu
Apr 18, 2009, 10:33 PM
I only have one question about these boardwalk upgrades. How are they going to affect the summer festivals, especially Tall Ships?

My understanding, and I believe someone (I just checked, it was Bedford DJ post #188 back on page 10 in this thread) posted it in another thread, is that the work by the maritime museum will pause durring tall ships and the busker festival. (it makes one wonder why they didn't work all winter so it would be done by now)

I believe that the work at the bottom of Salter is supposed to be finished by then (by the looks of things today that shouldn't be a problem)

As for murphy's I don't think it will affect pedestrian traffic in that area except for the wharf itself, however I haven't been down that way in a while.

Jonovision
Apr 19, 2009, 1:11 AM
My understanding, and I believe someone (I just checked, it was Bedford DJ post #188 back on page 10 in this thread) posted it in another thread, is that the work by the maritime museum will pause durring tall ships and the busker festival. (it makes one wonder why they didn't work all winter so it would be done by now)

I believe that the work at the bottom of Salter is supposed to be finished by then (by the looks of things today that shouldn't be a problem)

As for murphy's I don't think it will affect pedestrian traffic in that area except for the wharf itself, however I haven't been down that way in a while.

That's right. And Murphy's is planning on reopenning for May 1st.

Keith P.
Apr 19, 2009, 11:35 AM
That's right. And Murphy's is planning on reopenning for May 1st.

Hopefully, High Liner will have geared up the production run by then to meet their demand for fish triangles. :rolleyes:

hfx_chris
Apr 19, 2009, 7:11 PM
Hopefully, High Liner will have geared up the production run by then to meet their demand for fish triangles. :rolleyes:

That's the authentic Nova Scotia experience they were talking about.

BravoZulu
Apr 21, 2009, 1:07 AM
I was out for a walk on the waterfront tonight and came across the following
http://i723.photobucket.com/albums/ww234/jeff552/murphys1.jpg

http://i723.photobucket.com/albums/ww234/jeff552/murphys2.jpg

http://i723.photobucket.com/albums/ww234/jeff552/murphys3.jpg

http://i723.photobucket.com/albums/ww234/jeff552/murphys4.jpg

http://i723.photobucket.com/albums/ww234/jeff552/murphys5.jpg

It's kind of hard to tell, the quality isn't that great, but the whole dumpster was on fire, if it had been a little closer to the building or the wind had shifted the whole structure might have gone up. Credit to HRFD for getting it under control quickly.

BravoZulu
Apr 21, 2009, 2:41 AM
After the waterfront I headed up the hill and walked down Argyle, they are have started putting in the sidewalk patios....summer is on its way :D

hfx_chris
Apr 21, 2009, 11:54 AM
There's been a lot of dumpster fires around lately...

Barrington south
Apr 22, 2009, 12:18 AM
There's been a lot of dumpster fires around lately...

...probably those damd kids!!!...:ancient:

Dmajackson
Apr 22, 2009, 12:29 AM
There's been a lot of dumpster fires around lately...

I don't think it was a dumpster but I remember seeing a relatively large fire in the Justice Centre parking lot last year.

hfx_chris
Apr 22, 2009, 1:57 AM
...probably those damd kids!!!...:ancient:
Like DJ? :sly:


I kid, I kid...

Dmajackson
Apr 22, 2009, 2:29 AM
Like DJ? :sly:


I kid, I kid...

LOL :haha:

Better watch what you say "Barrington_South" I'm not the only kid on here :P

worldlyhaligonian
Apr 22, 2009, 3:43 AM
Lol

Jonovision
Apr 22, 2009, 9:48 PM
From today's Herald.

Building a creative urban centre important, development expert says

ROGER TAYLOR
Wed. Apr 22 - 5:54 AM




I’M SURE the Halifax regional councillors who were on hand for the Building Our Future luncheon on Tuesday didn’t intend for their exit to be symbolic, but it was.

After listening to a presentation by urban development expert Charles Landry, spectators sat and watched as the councillors got up en masse and prematurely marched out just as the audience was being encouraged to ask questions about the topic: the art of city making.

Mind you, it was an extended luncheon and the councillors probably had to get back to city hall for regular Tuesday meetings. But it looked like the councillors weren’t interested in finding out what it takes to build a creative city.

Besides, they could have waited a couple of minutes longer because most of us passed the councillors on our way out of the venue as they stood and waited for their taxis.

That aside, Landry describes himself as a "critical friend" who will tell decision-makers what they need to know, while at the same time offering inspiring advice that could lead to the city transforming itself for the better.

About 15 years ago, he says, 80 per cent of people surveyed were basing their career choices on a job or a company. Today, a growing number, 64 per cent, are choosing the city where they want to live.

That’s why building a creative and inspiring urban centre has become so important.

Using a series of slides of Halifax and other global centres, Landry showed his audience good and bad examples of urban design.

While there was lots the British-based consultant liked about Halifax, there was also plenty he didn’t approve of.

For example, he doesn’t like the proliferation of buildings in Halifax with reflective glass exteriors. On the other hand, Landry loves Peggys Cove, the Angus L. Macdonald Bridge and parts of Barrington Street, among other spots.

He likes streetscapes that are inviting rather than nondescript buildings that put up barriers to human interaction.

Specifically, he pointed to the Aliant building on Barrington Street, which he says dominates the downtown landscape in a negative way. The cheque-sorting centre on Grafton Street was another example of what he doesn’t like about the city.

Finding a way to attract creative people and employing their ideas, he says, will make Halifax a creative place "for the world" rather than being restricted to simply being a creative city "in the world."

Landry says a modern city generates opportunities for everyone to employ their individual creativity.

There will be mistakes while developing a creative place, he says, but there needs to be allowances, just as long as the mistakes are made in an attempt to make a more livable and invigorating place to live.

Landry, founder of the Comedia consultancy in Europe, has delivered his message to numerous cities in 50 countries. He is best known for three books: The Creative City: A toolkit for Urban Innovators; The Art of City Making; and The Intercultural City, which he co-authored with a colleague.

By viewing big questions with a bit of a twist, cities will be able to find solutions to what he describes on his website ( www.charleslandry.com) as the difficulties of balancing innovation and tradition, wealth creation and social cohesiveness, and local distinctiveness and a global orientation.

Successful cities of the future, he says, will be allowed to change and develop like a living organism, open to new ideas and change.

Whether Halifax politicians appreciate the message Landry delivered Tuesday is still open to question.

( rtaylor@herald.ca)

Dmajackson
Apr 23, 2009, 11:16 AM
Rec centre tender approved


Thu. Apr 23 - 7:19 AM
Eight members of the volunteer board spearheading the construction of the $8.5-million Prospect Road Community Centre left a Halifax Regional Council meeting happy Tuesday night.

Council approved a recommendation to award the tender to Bird Construction Co. for a total tender price of $6,297,788.84.

Eight companies bid for the project.

Construction of the multi-purpose recreation centre is slated to begin within the next couple of months, with a completion target of the summer of 2010.

Located between the Hatchet Lake Fire Hall and the Prospect Road Elementary School, the municipally-owned centre will include a gymnasium, meeting rooms, a fitness centre and a kitchen

kph06
Apr 27, 2009, 10:02 PM
Work has begun at Gerard Hall, the scaffolding was being erected on the south face. Apparently this summer the north and south sides be redone.

Halifax Hillbilly
Apr 27, 2009, 11:44 PM
Specifically, he pointed to the Aliant building on Barrington Street, which he says dominates the downtown landscape in a negative way. The cheque-sorting centre on Grafton Street was another example of what he doesn’t like about the city.

So that's what the building is! :yuck: I've always hated that building.

someone123
Apr 28, 2009, 12:27 AM
Interesting I guess, but these consultants always seem to point out the same obvious flaws in the city. It isn't much of a surprise that they would notice the Maritime Centre as a relatively poorly-designed office tower in terms of street presence and overall appearance.

The insights they bring in from other places are a lot more valuable, although typically I guess nothing is done either way.

Barrington south
Apr 28, 2009, 11:13 PM
I caught the first 15 min of the first episode of that travel show "depapture's" on OLN....first let me comment that I LOVE travelling and have travelled the world for several years like they do on that show...just not filming it...and let me state that I really, REALLY like "pilot guides" and to a lesser extent "don't forget your passport"....however I can not stand the blond haired fellow on "departure's" and my serious dislike for him has turned me of the entire show....I did catch the re-run of the first episode, the first 15 min that is, and I was quiet angered towards his comments made about Halifax (where they started their trip across Canada)...He said...in a condescending tone..."Halifax is....I guess....ALRIGHT"....they then went to peggy's cove and he said "this is a little more of what I was expecting...I guess....it just increases my disdain for this fellow even more and made me realise how attached and proud I have become of this place... Halifax Nova Scotia...:tup:

Dmajackson
Apr 30, 2009, 11:14 AM
Regatta Point expansion on hold
Parking, traffic at issue
By BILL POWER Business Reporter
Thu. Apr 30 - 4:46 AM
A planned 28-unit expansion of the Regatta Point residential complex has hit a snag at Halifax city hall.

Developer Danny Chedrawe said Wednesday he will consult once again with neighbours.

"We’ve consulted extensively with people with all of our projects and this one is no exception," the developer said after the project was stalled.

An easy approval of a plan, that needed amendments to the Municipal Planning Strategy and Land-Use Bylaws, was expected at city hall on Tuesday after the plan received positive staff reviews.

The delay came after Coun. Linda Mosher (Purcell’s Cove-Armdale) said she wanted more information on the project before proceeding with a required public hearing. She said there were issues with parking and traffic safety.

Mr. Chedrawe, who owns Westwood Developments Ltd., said he does not know how long the addition will be delayed.

He wants to put an addition on the western wings of the complex located in Armdale and said the project has received a significant amount of scrutiny from area residents.

There are currently 96 apartment units in the building at 16 Anchor Dr.

A municipal staff report said the project will "effectively complete" the Regatta Point development. Halifax Regional Municipality council and Chebucto Community council will eventually hold a public hearing on the required land use changes, which will involve newspaper advertising and written notices to neighbouring property owners.

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation reported a weak first quarter for residential construction in Halifax in its regular market update, released on Tuesday.

The housing agency said there were only 90 apartment-style rental unit starts in Halifax in the first three months of the year, compared to 124 last year.

According to the agency, there were no apartment-style condominium starts in the city as of March of this year, compared to 38 at this time last year.

Jonovision
Apr 30, 2009, 4:03 PM
I caught the first 15 min of the first episode of that travel show "depapture's" on OLN....first let me comment that I LOVE travelling and have travelled the world for several years like they do on that show...just not filming it...and let me state that I really, REALLY like "pilot guides" and to a lesser extent "don't forget your passport"....however I can not stand the blond haired fellow on "departure's" and my serious dislike for him has turned me of the entire show....I did catch the re-run of the first episode, the first 15 min that is, and I was quiet angered towards his comments made about Halifax (where they started their trip across Canada)...He said...in a condescending tone..."Halifax is....I guess....ALRIGHT"....they then went to peggy's cove and he said "this is a little more of what I was expecting...I guess....it just increases my disdain for this fellow even more and made me realise how attached and proud I have become of this place... Halifax Nova Scotia...:tup:

I've never seen that episode but I do love all those shows. Although I remember watching the episode of Don't Forget Your Passport when they came to NS and the girl was so naive. She remarked while driving down the south shore "I had no idea there were so many trees up here!" And then went on to not even once mention the amazing local music and bar scene we have here in Halifax.

worldlyhaligonian
Apr 30, 2009, 6:27 PM
I've never seen that episode but I do love all those shows. Although I remember watching the episode of Don't Forget Your Passport when they came to NS and the girl was so naive. She remarked while driving down the south shore "I had no idea there were so many trees up here!" And then went on to not even once mention the amazing local music and bar scene we have here in Halifax.

I hate those douches on Departures... they talk more about their emotions and stupid stuff than travel. One episode one of the guys was clearly cheating on his girlfriend and then was crying the rest of the episode about how him and his girlfriend had ended their relationship. A) who cares B) you just cheated on your girl, so why are you crying about it... you are travelling the world... I would hate to travel with these dudes and it isn't suprising that friends end up leaving all the time on the show.

I like that British dude (Ian Wright?) that travels the world (pilot guides)

Dmajackson
Apr 30, 2009, 8:06 PM
Here's a tidbit from a Chronicle Herald article today;

More goodies
$422 million slated for N.S. gateway projects
By DAVID JACKSON Provincial Reporter
Thu. Apr 30 - 4:24 PM

.........

The projects announced include a half dozen gateway projects worth an estimated $172 million. There's cash for improving two terminals at the Port of Halifax, a road connecting highways 102 and 107*, a high-speed highway interchange in Truro**, upgrades to Route 344 to support the proposed Melford container terminal, and money for marketing and business development.

Another $114 million is going to repairs and improvements at universities and community college campuses.

Joan MacArthur Blair, president of the community college, said the $17.5 million for campuses is crucial.

"We open 2.5-million square feet of real estate every morning for Nova Scotians to come and undertake education. It's important that they have buildings that are state of the art to learn in if we expect them to undertake state of the art work in Nova Scotia, and so it's extraordinarily important for us to be able to do this work," she said.

Universities are getting $96.5 million. The province is contributing up to $17 million, and making $30 million available for low-interest loans to the schools, Education Minister Judy Streatch said.

Ottawa and the province are both putting up $18.5 million for paving secondary roads, a new funding plan for Ottawa. Previously, the federal government just cost-shared major highways.

The two levels of government also are contributing more than $7 million each to fix up the Bluenose II, and there's another $4.1 million each for parks and trails.

Mr. MacKay said there's also $14 million each for Cape Breton Regional Municipality and Halifax Regional Municipality for infrastructure projects.

...........

* Highway 107 Extension a.k.a. Burnside Expreeway. See its thread in the transportation thread for more details.
** Highway 102/104 Interchange.

Dmajackson
Apr 30, 2009, 8:17 PM
Value Village to open at former Moirs site next week
Halifax News Net
By Joanie Veitch – The?Weekly News

The aisles at the downtown Value Village are beginning to look bare as more and more inventory is hauled over to the new Dartmouth Gate location.
The popular thrift store is closing its doors on Canal Street to open a bigger outlet at the former Moirs chocolate factory site on April 30.
A spokesperson for the Value Village store network, which represents more than 200 stores throughout the U.S. and Canada, said the new Dartmouth Gate site, located at the intersection of the Circumferential Highway and Pleasant Street, offers a lot more space, easier access and better parking.
“We have finally found a building that is both ideally located and big enough to grow the business to meet the customer demand,” said Kaitlin Goodall.
Despite a grim recession, sales across the Value Village network are up by about five per cent over the past few years. Goodall said she expects that trend will continue as the economy forces people to make drastic budget changes. “More people than ever are turning to thrift stores to maintain their wardrobe at bargain prices and to stretch their dollar. For these savvy shoppers, choosing thrift does not mean sacrificing quality; it means stretching a tight budget further while maintaining style.”
Eight new staff have been hired to help staff the new outlet, in addition to the 47 employees who already work at the Dartmouth store. More staff may be hired once the store officially opens, Goodall added.
Developer Southwest Properties Ltd. began working on the Dartmouth Gate site in March 2008, renovating the former “Pot of Gold” manufacturing facility to create more than 170,000 square feet of floor space. Value Village will take up 30,000 square feet of that space.
Along with Value Village, Dartmouth Gate will also house the Nova Scotia Community College’s Aviation Institute, along with its 180 students. Gordon Laing, president and chief operating officer with Southwest, said “discussions are ongoing” with other retailers for the remaining space.
Two restaurant pads are also in future plans for the site, he added.
Converting the former chocolate factory into prime retail and commercial space meant extensive renovations, but the potential for the site made it a prime opportunity for Southwest, Laing said.
“Like the Moosehead brewery site (which Southwest converted into Windmill Crossing, home to Office Interiors Group), we see opportunities where others maybe don’t,” Laing said.
And the bonus? There’s still a slight whiff of chocolate in the place.

joanie.veitch@gmail.com

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mosque will be new Halifax landmark
Halifax News Net
By Lindsay Jones – The Weekly News

http://www.halifaxnewsnet.com/photos/HalifaxNewsNet/stories/Mosque3.jpg

The construction of a mosque and community centre off Chebucto Road is a new landmark for the region, says the building committee chairman.
“The design and architecture is unique to Eastern Canada,” said Hadi Salah, who is also the principal of the Maritime Muslim Academy. “The windows, the arcs, and the dome — this is what makes this project unique.”
The $6-million project, designed by Halifax-based architect Dan Goodspeed, is expected to opens its doors in about a year.
“We like to have a place that’s basically a hangout for families and youth, not only to come and do prayer, but also for the community centre to be open to other people regardless of faith,” Salah said.
“It’s for everybody to use equally, but the prayer hall is for Muslims.”
He said local Muslims, including the 123 students enrolled at the school, can’t wait for the centre to open.
“We’ve been looking forward to this for over 10 years,” Salah said. “We have built expectation. Everybody’s anxious. Everybody thinks it’s the best thing that could happen to them and to their family and their children. They need to find a place where they can go there and feel they belong among families of similar background.”
The Muslim community had been using a bungalow on the site as a prayer hall, but that was torn down to make way for the project. While construction is ongoing, the group is renting space in the basement of the adjacent Maritime Conservatory of Performing Arts.
Salah said about 500 people attend the weekly Friday prayer session. Students also use the space for their noontime prayer during school hours.
The centre’s upper floor will house a new prayer hall that will accommodate 800 people.
The two-storey centre will have a library, computer lab, youth activity room, seminar rooms and classrooms.
The basement area will have a multi-purpose gymnasium with a basketball court and stage that can be used for community events and school performances.
So far, the local Muslim community has raised $2 million.
Salah is hoping to get funding from the city and province because part of the building is for community use, and has environmentally-friendly design features, including geothermal heating and a wastewater recovery system.
Salah says the Muslim population has multiplied in the city in recent years. In the 1980s, there were only about a dozen families, whereas today he says there are over 20,000 Muslims living in the municipality.

lindsayleejones@gmail.com

Dmajackson
May 1, 2009, 11:15 AM
Halifax piers get bulk of gateway cash
By TOM PETERS Business Reporter
Fri. May 1 - 8:01 AM

More than $100 million has been earmarked for two major Atlantic Gateway projects at the Port of Halifax.

Expansion of the south-end container terminal berth, operated by Halterm Container Terminal Ltd., and extensive work at Richmond Terminals, near the A. Murray MacKay Bridge, were among several projects targeted Thursday for government infrastructure funding.

Defence Minister Peter MacKay, Nova Scotia’s representative in the federal cabinet, and Premier Rodney MacDonald made the announcement at Province House in Halifax.

Other gateway projects getting the nod for shared funding include the Burnside Connector, which will connect highways 107 and 102 to the industrial park and a transshipment facility; improvements at the highway interchange in Truro connecting highways 104 and 102; upgrades to Highway 344 in support of the proposed Melford container terminal; and business development and marketing initiatives to promote gateway ports and facilities.

The Halterm terminal will be extended by less than 100 metres, but "the beauty and significance of this is it will enable the facility to have two post-Panamax vessels alongside simultaneously," Karen Oldfield, Halifax Port Authority president and chief executive officer, said Thursday.

The project has been on the authority’s radar for quite some time, she said, and the gateway funding "enables us to accelerate that and get it done."

Also included in the project is further deepening of the berth at Halterm to 16 metres and improved cargo-handling efficiencies, particularly for truck operations through upgrades of the truck marshalling yard.

That would happen by increasing the terminal area and allowing for a reconfiguration of the approach road and terminal gate complex.

The estimated cost of the total project is $35 million.

At Richmond Terminals, it is estimated that the project will cost $73 million.

"In terms of lands under the administration by the Halifax Port Authority, Richmond Terminals is the last significant block of property" that is underdeveloped and has great potential, Ms. Oldfield said.

"There is so much potential there to go to some of our other lines of business," she said, referring to break-bulk, bulk and occasional cargo business from the offshore exploration industry.

She said the Richmond Terminals project would be to extend the berth and develop an area of just under seven acres of land, "so it is a significant addition at the port."

"This has been on the agenda for a while and we are quite happy with the opportunity to build that out."

The project will also include work to enable roll-on roll-off facility and enhanced heavy-lift capabilities.

There will be rails for cranes installed and possibly, in the future, cranes will be purchased for the site. An area near the terminal known as 9D will be upgraded to provide enhanced pier and marshalling capabilities.

Details on cost-sharing for the Halterm and Richmond projects and when work will begin have not been determined.

"The support of the Province of Nova Scotia and the Government of Canada is important as we move forward competing worldwide for cargo," Ms. Oldfield said in a news release.

"The direct port investments, highway projects and Atlantic Gateway business development funding will support the ongoing efforts of the Port of Halifax supply chain members."

tpeters@herald.ca

sdm
May 1, 2009, 12:03 PM
"Also included in the project is further deepening of the berth at Halterm to 16 metres and improved cargo-handling efficiencies, particularly for truck operations through upgrades of the truck marshalling yard.

That would happen by increasing the terminal area and allowing for a reconfiguration of the approach road and terminal gate complex.

The estimated cost of the total project is $35 million."

Wonder what is planned to accomplish this

Barrington south
May 1, 2009, 5:29 PM
Value Village to open at former Moirs site next week
Halifax News Net
By Joanie Veitch – The?Weekly News

The aisles at the downtown Value Village are beginning to look bare as more and more inventory is hauled over to the new Dartmouth Gate location.
The popular thrift store is closing its doors on Canal Street to open a bigger outlet at the former Moirs chocolate factory site on April 30.
A spokesperson for the Value Village store network, which represents more than 200 stores throughout the U.S. and Canada, said the new Dartmouth Gate site, located at the intersection of the Circumferential Highway and Pleasant Street, offers a lot more space, easier access and better parking.
“We have finally found a building that is both ideally located and big enough to grow the business to meet the customer demand,” said Kaitlin Goodall.
Despite a grim recession, sales across the Value Village network are up by about five per cent over the past few years. Goodall said she expects that trend will continue as the economy forces people to make drastic budget changes. “More people than ever are turning to thrift stores to maintain their wardrobe at bargain prices and to stretch their dollar. For these savvy shoppers, choosing thrift does not mean sacrificing quality; it means stretching a tight budget further while maintaining style.”
Eight new staff have been hired to help staff the new outlet, in addition to the 47 employees who already work at the Dartmouth store. More staff may be hired once the store officially opens, Goodall added.
Developer Southwest Properties Ltd. began working on the Dartmouth Gate site in March 2008, renovating the former “Pot of Gold” manufacturing facility to create more than 170,000 square feet of floor space. Value Village will take up 30,000 square feet of that space.
Along with Value Village, Dartmouth Gate will also house the Nova Scotia Community College’s Aviation Institute, along with its 180 students. Gordon Laing, president and chief operating officer with Southwest, said “discussions are ongoing” with other retailers for the remaining space.
Two restaurant pads are also in future plans for the site, he added.
Converting the former chocolate factory into prime retail and commercial space meant extensive renovations, but the potential for the site made it a prime opportunity for Southwest, Laing said.
“Like the Moosehead brewery site (which Southwest converted into Windmill Crossing, home to Office Interiors Group), we see opportunities where others maybe don’t,” Laing said.
And the bonus? There’s still a slight whiff of chocolate in the place.

joanie.veitch@gmail.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mosque will be new Halifax landmark
Halifax News Net
By Lindsay Jones – The Weekly News

http://www.halifaxnewsnet.com/photos/HalifaxNewsNet/stories/Mosque3.jpg

The construction of a mosque and community centre off Chebucto Road is a new landmark for the region, says the building committee chairman.
“The design and architecture is unique to Eastern Canada,” said Hadi Salah, who is also the principal of the Maritime Muslim Academy. “The windows, the arcs, and the dome — this is what makes this project unique.”
The $6-million project, designed by Halifax-based architect Dan Goodspeed, is expected to opens its doors in about a year.
“We like to have a place that’s basically a hangout for families and youth, not only to come and do prayer, but also for the community centre to be open to other people regardless of faith,” Salah said.
“It’s for everybody to use equally, but the prayer hall is for Muslims.”
He said local Muslims, including the 123 students enrolled at the school, can’t wait for the centre to open.
“We’ve been looking forward to this for over 10 years,” Salah said. “We have built expectation. Everybody’s anxious. Everybody thinks it’s the best thing that could happen to them and to their family and their children. They need to find a place where they can go there and feel they belong among families of similar background.”
The Muslim community had been using a bungalow on the site as a prayer hall, but that was torn down to make way for the project. While construction is ongoing, the group is renting space in the basement of the adjacent Maritime Conservatory of Performing Arts.
Salah said about 500 people attend the weekly Friday prayer session. Students also use the space for their noontime prayer during school hours.
The centre’s upper floor will house a new prayer hall that will accommodate 800 people.
The two-storey centre will have a library, computer lab, youth activity room, seminar rooms and classrooms.
The basement area will have a multi-purpose gymnasium with a basketball court and stage that can be used for community events and school performances.
So far, the local Muslim community has raised $2 million.
Salah is hoping to get funding from the city and province because part of the building is for community use, and has environmentally-friendly design features, including geothermal heating and a wastewater recovery system.
Salah says the Muslim population has multiplied in the city in recent years. In the 1980s, there were only about a dozen families, whereas today he says there are over 20,000 Muslims living in the municipality.

lindsayleejones@gmail.com

I'd love to see the reaction if a Muslim was denied access to a church, based on his faith....no doubt all the white politically correct pansy's would bend over backwards to make sure this outrage was addressed immediately...:koko:

Dmajackson
May 6, 2009, 11:17 AM
Taxpayers on hook for firehall fix

By MICHAEL LIGHTSTONE Staff Reporter
Wed. May 6 - 5:32 AM
It was an offer they could refuse — and did.

About 15 months ago, Halifax regional council received an offer to buy the former Bedford firehall at the full list price of $575,000.

But in February 2008 council declined the proposed deal, to keep the property at 1247 Bedford Hwy. for community use.

A non-profit youth group vacated the building in 2006.

Now, taxpayers are on the hook for $110,000 in repairs needed to maintain the rejected building, which stopped functioning as a fire station 12 years ago. The biggest part of the bill is for a new roof, said a staff report presented Tuesday to regional council.

Staff recommended council issue a request for expressions of interest in the former firehall. The suggestion was contentious as some councillors lamented last year’s lost sale opportunity.

Not only was the recommendation controversial, how it was being discussed was briefly the subject of debate. One councillor wanted the matter deferred so it could be covered behind closed doors, but his proposal was voted down.

Coun. Tim Outhit (Bedford) said Halifax city hall should proceed with the expression-of-interest call to test the waters. He said he knows of two groups that might be interested in it.

Coun. Bill Karsten (Portland-East Woodlawn), who wanted to debate in secret, suggested the old fire station should be demolished and the land redeveloped.

If the worn-out property is sold, it will likely go for less than market value, council heard.

In the end, the plan to issue a request for expressions of interest was approved.

In other business, Halifax Regional Municipality agreed to team up with Soccer Nova Scotia to build a proposed $11.5-million indoor, full-length, artificial turf field that would host soccer games and other sports at a site at the Mainland Common.

The city’s proposed contribution is $900,000, the soccer association would pay $1.9 million and the rest would come from Ottawa and the provincial government, municipal staff said.

Council heard several more of these proposed facilities are needed in the city.

Council also agreed to earmark $1.1 million in advanced capital funding for the 2009 ICF Canoe Sprint World Championships in Dartmouth in August.

Lake Banook will be the host site. Some 90 countries are expected to send athletes and coaches to the event, which is to be televised internationally, the meeting heard.

The city’s draft 2009-10 budget is to be presented next week, but work on the canoeing venue needs to start as soon as possible.

Regarding rural transit, councillors approved a one-year, $300,000, pilot project for the Sambro area. The test run will begin in September and be financed by an impending increase in Metro Transit fares.

Coun. Jerry Blumenthal (Halifax North End) opposed the transit project because he objects to the increase being used for that purpose.

Dmajackson
May 8, 2009, 3:27 PM
Brewdebaker’s set to replace Lone Star in Clayton Park
Halifax News Net
By Lindsay Jones – The Weekly News

A local restaurateur is trading in Tex-Mex for all-American comfort food.
The lone location of the Lone Star Texas Grill in Clayton Park has closed its doors for good.
Now open in its place is a Brewdebaker’s, which is similar to the original flagship brewery and grill in Dartmouth.
Owner Mike Cormier says that after operating the Lone Star for 15 years it was time to part ways. He said people in Clayton Park want more mainstream food.
“The Lone Star was quite specialized. Their menu works better in a big city where there are lots of people,” Cormier said.
“It’s just that it’s a very narrow market and the sales, over time, were just slowly deteriorating. I could just see the writing on the wall. It just wasn’t a concept that I felt we needed to continue on with.”
Like the Dartmouth location, Brewdebaker’s has a mid-scale, Americana-style menu and at least a dozen types of beer on tap, including its own exclusive brews.
“It won’t feel as industrial because it’s not in a brewery,” Cormier said. “There will be something for everyone, from a pizza to a steak, to ribs to nachos.”
Cormier says the goal is to cater to a wider range of customers, including families, ladies out for martinis and appetizers, and those looking for some good comfort food.
The building has had a major facelift.
“We gutted everything,” Cormier said. “The only thing that’s the same as before is the kitchen is the same shell. Other than that, it’s pretty much all new.
“It’s definitely much cosier.”
While Cormier said the economic downturn makes him nervous about opening a new restaurant, the city is impervious to the slump.
“The economy in Halifax is not like most places,” he said. “We’re pretty flat. When the rest of the country is booming, we’re still just flat. So when it goes down real bad I think it stays flat, too.”
Originally from Moncton, Cormier has been working in the restaurant industry in Halifax for 24 years.
At age 15, he was washing dishes at a Bedford restaurant that’s now The Cellar Bar & Grill. He has been a cook at the Middle Deck, and a sous-chef at the Clipper Cay, which is now Salty’s on the Halifax waterfront.
“There’s nothing I haven’t done,” Cormier said.
He says the plan is to open more locations of Brewdebaker’s, possibly in New Brunswick and Ontario.
Cormier is also part owner of SAS Restaurants, which owns The Lower Deck and Brewdebaker’s in Dartmouth.

lindsayleejones@gmail.com

someone123
May 8, 2009, 9:58 PM
“The Lone Star was quite specialized. Their menu works better in a big city where there are lots of people,” Cormier said.

This excuse is pretty funny. A suburban tex-mex type place is too specialized for the city?

I think the reality was just that it was kind of bland and dated, plus there are new restaurants like Montana's in that specific area.

HaliStreaks
May 8, 2009, 10:54 PM
“The Lone Star was quite specialized. Their menu works better in a big city where there are lots of people,” Cormier said.

This excuse is pretty funny. A suburban tex-mex type place is too specialized for the city?

I think the reality was just that it was kind of bland and dated, plus there are new restaurants like Montana's in that specific area.

You took the words right out of my mouth. I had a good laugh at that line as well. lol :haha: That is just their coverup to say they weren't doing so good because of the newer restaurants in the area...

Dmajackson
May 8, 2009, 10:55 PM
Burnside News - May 2009:

• Following in the footsteps of it predecessor, the Red Cross, Canadian Blood Services are also moving to Burnside. The agency has announced plans to build a 53,000 square foot headquarters and production facility in the Park by 2011. The $38 million project would replace the current location on Gottingen Street in Halifax, as well as the current production and distribution facility in New Brunswick. However, the move will also see donor testing services move to Toronto. That means both provinces are facing potential job losses.

• At the same time as Canadian Blood Services is looking to get a new building off the ground, a long expected building project looks like its going to get buried. Construction of a new RCMP headquarters was supposed to start this spring, but none of the proposals put forward by developers met with all the government’s specifications and established budget. That means the entire project is on hold until either new proposals come forward or the specifications are changed.

• Next door in Highfield Park, Rank Inc. is progressing rapidly on the construction of Lockheed Martin’s new HRM home. That home will now have a lot more ‘family’ moving in than originally announced. In addition to the 80 staff already employed, Lockheed plans to add an additional 100 over the next five years to handle expanding opportunities in the naval sector.

Dmajackson
May 9, 2009, 1:01 PM
St. Joseph’s historic church reduced to dust
North-end chapel was rebuilt after Explosion
By Our Staff
Sat. May 9 - 5:17 AM

A church raised from the ashes after it was levelled by the Halifax Explosion is now gone for good.

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Halifax’s north end was knocked down by machines Friday, almost two years after the Halifax diocese decided to shut it down.

About 700 people attended the historic church’s last mass in June 2006. While it was standing-room only on that day, the church had been crippled by declining membership and faced a repair bill of about $665,000.

Church officials combined the parish of the Russell Street church with that of St. Stephen’s Church after the 2004 report on the reorganization of the Halifax diocese.

Later engineering studies showed that St. Stephen’s needed less expensive and less immediate work, so services moved to the Normandy Drive church in the city’s far north end.

The congregation continues to worship there under the name of the Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta Parish.

The former St. Joseph’s site is a short walk to the historic Hydrostone area and a neighbouring Russell Street condominium development called Hydrostone Place.

According to the parish’s website, the St. Joseph’s property was sold in March 2008 to ECL Developments, which requested the development be called St. Joseph’s Square.

While many of the pieces from within the church — the chalices, statues and church records — were brought to the new parish, several items were given away. The stained glass windows dedicated in 1987 to victims of the Halifax Explosion were given to ECL "on the stipulation that they only be used in the development on the (church) property," the parish website states.

The church, which celebrated its 140th anniversary in 2005, was destroyed in the Dec. 6, 1917, blast in Halifax Harbour that devastated the city. Members worshipped in the church’s basement until the new church was completed in 1961.

Just to give an exact location of this it is one block over from 5552 Kaye Street. Also I'll try to remember to get a shot when I'm visting 5552 Kaye today.

Keith P.
May 9, 2009, 4:57 PM
The church, which celebrated its 140th anniversary in 2005, was destroyed in the Dec. 6, 1917, blast in Halifax Harbour that devastated the city. Members worshipped in the church’s basement until the new church was completed in 1961.


I grew up in that area and attended that church as a kid. As students at the adjacent school we would occasionally be herded into the basement for some sort of service. I always found it strange that it seemed to be 2 churches in one -- the newer, glitztier upstairs, and the older, workmanlike one in the basement.

I think it's unfortunate that the developer couldn't find a way to incorporate the structure into the development.

Dmajackson
May 9, 2009, 5:10 PM
Here are some photos from today about the St. Joseph's Church (all taken by me);

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3390/3516086082_97bb3058ef_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3380/3515277331_5393787d27_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3387/3515278249_15c21a190e_b.jpg

someone123
May 9, 2009, 8:24 PM
It does seem like a waste to be tearing down buildings like that. Hopefully the replacement will be nice.

DigitalNinja
May 10, 2009, 2:44 AM
Whats going up in it's place?

gm_scott
May 10, 2009, 1:48 PM
Condos apparently

hfx_chris
May 10, 2009, 2:14 PM
I have to admit, I always hate seeing churches torn down...

planarchy
May 10, 2009, 5:11 PM
From Ekistics website (http://www.ekistics.net/portfolio/environmental/6.html#)

http://www.ekistics.net/images/portfolioEP/ENV6-2.jpg
http://www.ekistics.net/images/portfolioEP/ENV6-1.jpg

DigitalNinja
May 10, 2009, 5:29 PM
Looks nice will go nicely with the one going up on kay street and the hydro stone.

Dmajackson
May 10, 2009, 7:07 PM
Ah WoW! :omg:

I was not expecting anything that impressive!

If this goes through Gottigen will look a lot different! :cool:

dartmouthian
May 11, 2009, 2:36 AM
not bad looking. I hate those fake roofs, but it's certainly better than most of the stuff that's been built in that area recently

Dmajackson
May 11, 2009, 1:56 PM
I think it was in this thread that the area around Murphy's on the Water is being refirbished with new boardwalk right now.

It turns out HRM is also planning to place new boardwalk on Sackville Landing before the Tall Ships festival;

Sackville Landing Boardwalk (http://halifax.ca/council/agendasc/documents/090512ca1113.pdf)

Jonovision
May 11, 2009, 3:03 PM
I think it was in this thread that the area around Murphy's on the Water is being refirbished with new boardwalk right now.

It turns out HRM is also planning to place new boardwalk on Sackville Landing before the Tall Ships festival;

Sackville Landing Boardwalk (http://halifax.ca/council/agendasc/documents/090512ca1113.pdf)

That is the work that has been going on down in front of the museum for the past month I believe. I was down there yesterday and its coming along. They are rebuilding that entire section one piece at a time it seems.

Dmajackson
May 11, 2009, 4:54 PM
That is the work that has been going on down in front of the museum for the past month I believe. I was down there yesterday and its coming along. They are rebuilding that entire section one piece at a time it seems.

Actually if you look at the map provided in the link its the area around the wave. You can actually see the construction fence for the area currently under construction in it.

miesh111
May 11, 2009, 5:16 PM
I believe that it is all part of the plan to have the entire waterfront walk made an actual 'boardwalk', out of wood. We always tout that we have the longest boardwalk in the world, however much of it is gravel or paved. This, in adition to the work just before Bishop's Landing, as well as the revamp at the maratime museum should actually make it continous wood from the Purdy's all the way to the seaport.

Barrington south
May 11, 2009, 7:37 PM
not sure if it has been mentioned before, if it has, my bad....but Frozen Ocean, the surf and surf apparel shop on Barrington is now apearantly out of business....the building is completely empty, and I don't just mean empty shelves and racks....it's basically gutted....so sad...but I guess IF Only took a massive chunk of their business.....IF Only is in every way a superior surf shop, especially for actually surf gear, not just bikini's and Billabong t-shirts....man, as soon as I saw this, I immidietly thought to my self, what Someone123 said is true, Barrington st. is starting to look like the main street of a dying Midwestern city, where all the business has migrated to the boonies....it's very depressing....man, downtown seriously needs many more people living there