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wackypacky
Nov 7, 2011, 5:03 AM
Just a little info about the 10 million project on Portland where the dealerships use to be. A reliable source who is working on the demo says there will be a bank and a shoppers drug mart. Pretty exciting stuff.

Keith P.
Nov 7, 2011, 3:06 PM
just wondering if anyone else can't view the herald web page?

The Herald totally wrecked their website with the change a few weeks ago. No up to date content, nothing easy to find, terrible design and font choices, impossible to read. I imagine traffic must be way down. Apparently they had a big launch event where the top brass was touting it as the best thing since sliced bread. As usual, they were clueless about the reality of the thing. It really is a disaster.

MonctonRad
Nov 7, 2011, 3:09 PM
:previous:

The mobile site for the IPad seems to be working. :tup:

beyeas
Nov 7, 2011, 3:25 PM
:previous:

The mobile site for the IPad seems to be working. :tup:

Yeah the ipad app works, but I also dislike how it is set up now. It is hard to easily sort of what is a new story versus an old one.

kph06
Nov 7, 2011, 3:49 PM
The Herald totally wrecked their website with the change a few weeks ago. No up to date content, nothing easy to find, terrible design and font choices, impossible to read. I imagine traffic must be way down. Apparently they had a big launch event where the top brass was touting it as the best thing since sliced bread. As usual, they were clueless about the reality of the thing. It really is a disaster.

A friend of mine looked into it last week and said that they are about 50% down in traffic, one of the reasons is that you can't find them on Google, besides getting sent to a test page (here) (http://www.halifaxherald.com/) that just says "howdy nurse". So anytime you want to look up a news article from Nova Scotia on Google News, the Herald articles won't show up, which is a huge blunder for a website that relies on hits to generate ad revenue.

Empire
Nov 9, 2011, 2:27 PM
You saying something is a fact does not make it so. You are merely expressing your opinion.

What's not an opinion: higher education, in the demands of today's job market, is not optional. Either study, in order to compete with everyone else out there that has a degree, or be satisfied forever with a low-paying job. In Canada, you cannot independently live on a low-paying job. You used to.

While other countries invest in their labour force and fund their achievement of a higher education, Canada is expecting the highly educated but has no GI program in place for a college level education. We have socialism in our funding of junior high, yes (unlike much of the developing world), high school, yes (unlike most of the developing world), but college, no: unlike most of the industrialised world.

In Canada, either be rich enough to afford to over-priced, required schooling...or go in debt.

Canada is on parity with the USA in our manufacturing industry, our increased poverty, declining middle-class, low quality of public education, household debt, student debt, corporate welfare, corporate lobbying; we are less screwed, but still screwed nonetheless.

With the baby boomers retiring, I wonder if Canada's economy will be able to service the needed healthcare. Projections are that we will not.

You say the world markets need to be reformed? I say Canada needs to start with Canada.

RyeJay, I think what you are trying to say is outlined in the video below:
http://www.youtube.com/embed/OAOrT0OcHh0?version=3D3&rel=3D1&fs=3D1&showsea=

Jonovision
Nov 9, 2011, 6:24 PM
Public Information Meeting for the CD Plus redevelopment on Barrington Street is to take place November 22, 7-9pm in the old building itself. There is currently a sign in the window with some of the renderings as well.

RyeJay
Nov 9, 2011, 7:17 PM
RyeJay, I think what you are trying to say is outlined in the video below:
http://www.youtube.com/embed/OAOrT0OcHh0?version=3D3&rel=3D1&fs=3D1&showsea=

This video is so warped, it's as though the 1% collectively authored it.
This comes from the perspective of someone moaning that he doesn't have enough money to make his private boat payments because the government taxes too much in order to pay for public services.

If you want to get into the issue of the Western World's non-empathy toward how people less fortunate have it: we should discuss the quality of life of the majority of people in undeveloped countries.

Here are a couple videos I'll throw out there, in response. My videos discuss the issues, unlike your video which attempts to misrepresent who the vast majority of the protestors are. The only sense of entitlement the protestors have is the belief that one has the right to paid employment.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZgZeAOaq4U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAhHPIuTQ5k

Keith P.
Nov 9, 2011, 8:31 PM
The only sense of entitlement the protestors have is the belief that one has the right to paid employment.


What? Nobody has the right to a job. This is not the old Soviet Union. You have to earn the ability to have someone want to buy your services. Judging from what I saw today up at Victoria Park, the usual Spriing Garden Road freakshow has just multiplied by a factor of about 10. Nobody is going to hire that bunch.

resetcbu1
Nov 10, 2011, 1:20 AM
90% of these idiots are unemployed by choice. There's help wanted signs all over this city. Heck, if some of them are qualified, I'll hire them. I need people... Ahh but they don't want jobs, they just want to bitch and do drugs... Hardly contributing members of society... If it was the ordinary average working person down there, I'd support there right...but it's not.

RyeJay
Nov 10, 2011, 2:13 AM
What? Nobody has the right to a job. This is not the old Soviet Union. You have to earn the ability to have someone want to buy your services. Judging from what I saw today up at Victoria Park, the usual Spriing Garden Road freakshow has just multiplied by a factor of about 10. Nobody is going to hire that bunch.

I'm getting tired of you taking me out of context. I have in no way said I desire for us to suddenly become some sort of commi state and award everyone a job even if they haven't the skill to complish it. This protest isn't about hand-outs (which are apparently for bankers in the form of bail outs, high income earners in the form of tax credits, and large corporations in the form of subsidies), it is about paid employment.

Keith, I wish everyone was like you: debt-free, with a salary that isn't stagnant.

This protest is NOT anti-capitalistic. This protest is a demand for a smart balance of capitalism and socialism; it is a demand for our democracy to be clean from lobbying and corporate dollars.

And I do believe this is the first time in my life I am more proud of the Americans.

resetcbu1
Nov 10, 2011, 2:39 AM
And I do believe this is the first time in my life I am more proud of the Americans.

Why?

Empire
Nov 10, 2011, 4:42 AM
I'm getting tired of you taking me out of context. I have in no way said I desire for us to suddenly become some sort of commi state and award everyone a job even if they haven't the skill to complish it. This protest isn't about hand-outs (which are apparently for bankers in the form of bail outs, high income earners in the form of tax credits, and large corporations in the form of subsidies), it is about paid employment.
Keith, I wish everyone was like you: debt-free, with a salary that isn't stagnant.

This protest is NOT anti-capitalistic. This protest is a demand for a smart balance of capitalism and socialism; it is a demand for our democracy to be clean from lobbying and corporate dollars.

And I do believe this is the first time in my life I am more proud of the Americans.

What about the $5000.00 hand-out by the Canadian Federation of Labour to the group of wayward campers loosely called "Occupy NS". What was the money for and shouldn't it have been rejected as tainted corporate greed money? The only theme from this protest that is clear is to allow enough capitalism for corporations to make money and then implement enough socialism to give it to uninspired lazy protesters. Once corporations are driven into the ground because of high demands from labour unions an high taxes it is time for protesters to declare there aren't enough jobs because of greedy corporations.

Antigonish
Nov 10, 2011, 5:12 AM
What about the $5000.00 hand-out by the Canadian Federation of Labour to the group of wayward campers loosely called "Occupy NS". What was the money for and shouldn't it have been rejected as tainted corporate greed money? The only theme from this protest that is clear is to allow enough capitalism for corporations to make money and then implement enough socialism to give it to uninspired lazy protesters. Once corporations are driven into the ground because of high demands from labour unions an high taxes it is time for protesters to declare there aren't enough jobs because of greedy corporations.
So I take it your completely satisfied with the way the financial system is working?

I don't understand the point your trying to make man. The system needs accountability and stability and thats the idea of the protests. These protesters are raising awareness, not asking for handouts!

fenwick16
Nov 10, 2011, 9:24 AM
I am shocked that the Canadian Federation of Labour would fund such a demonstration. It certainly seems like a conflict of interest to me.

Empire
Nov 10, 2011, 12:10 PM
So I take it your completely satisfied with the way the financial system is working?

I don't understand the point your trying to make man. The system needs accountability and stability and thats the idea of the protests. These protesters are raising awareness, not asking for handouts!

Why don't the protesters get jobs in the financial sector and change things from the inside instead of banging on a pie plate in 100mm of rain.

Empire
Nov 10, 2011, 12:10 PM
I am shocked that the Canadian Federation of Labour would fund such a demonstration. It certainly seems like a conflict of interest to me.

I think they are trying to keep them away from province house...............

Jstaleness
Nov 10, 2011, 1:30 PM
Could the power be cut at Province House like it has been at Victoria Park? I doubt the protest would move to Province House as the Police would be there within minutes to clear it out.

Keith P.
Nov 10, 2011, 2:41 PM
What about the $5000.00 hand-out by the Canadian Federation of Labour to the group of wayward campers loosely called "Occupy NS". What was the money for and shouldn't it have been rejected as tainted corporate greed money? The only theme from this protest that is clear is to allow enough capitalism for corporations to make money and then implement enough socialism to give it to uninspired lazy protesters. Once corporations are driven into the ground because of high demands from labour unions an high taxes it is time for protesters to declare there aren't enough jobs because of greedy corporations.

While we're talking about handouts, don't forget the free electricity that HRM foolishly provided them with during their time at Parade Square, and the $25,000 cleanup tab we taxpayers are now stuck with, according to the mouth of downtown, Sloane. She sounds like she has turned away from them, which is a telling sign if even she cannot support them any longer.

As for the labour unions secretly supporting this movement, it really is no surprise. Having long ago outlived their usefulness, they now have become a hotbed for left-wing extremists and are using their vast war chests, taken from the paychecks of their members, on useless activities like this. When one sees the likes of Kyle Buott involved, who was one of the Coalition Against Poverty bunch, it becomes clear that these misguided young people are really just being used as pawns by the far left to advance their own ridiculous view of the world.

Keith P.
Nov 10, 2011, 2:48 PM
I'm getting tired of you taking me out of context.

I did not misquote you, I merely repeated what you wrote. How is that out of context?

This protest is NOT anti-capitalistic. This protest is a demand for a smart balance of capitalism and socialism; it is a demand for our democracy to be clean from lobbying and corporate dollars.


We had an election; socialism was largely kicked to the curb by the electorate. In 4 years there is another election where the left can try to make Canada a socialist state once again. Until then I suggest that the election results be respected.

I love the line "clean from lobbying and corporate dollars". It shows quite clearly the naivete involved here. Every time an elector calls their MP or MLA to complain about something the govt has or has not done, that is lobbying. Every time a union gives money to the NDP, that is corporate dollars. Unless we somehow go to a direct democracy system, which I will certainly not live long enough to ever see, thank god, you cannot get away from groups wanting to advance their interests to govt. Just like the Occupy bunch are trying to do.

DigitalNinja
Nov 10, 2011, 4:35 PM
Rye, if this is not anti-capitalist then how come they have post videos on youtube of protestors wanting to abolish capitalism?

I would hope that everyone can agree that these "protests" got taken over by modern day hippies who want to live for free and get high all the time. I walked through the protest the other day and all I could smell was BO and weed.

If governments didn't give hand outs to banks the world would have been a bigger pot of piss than it is now. There are over 288k people who work for Bank of America if that went down all those people would be out of jobs. Would you have liked that? Protesting against the same corporations that offer people jobs while asking for jobs is backwards and makes no sense. Any you say that these people are educated and qualified. Anyone can say they have a degree now. They hand them out to anyone.

These people don't have jobs because they are lazy, stink, probably don't have good work habits, and just want to get money so they can get high. And comparing this to the Middle Eastern protests is a disservice to those people who died in them. This is no where near the same sort of thing.

JET
Nov 10, 2011, 5:25 PM
I would hope that everyone can agree that these "protests" got taken over by modern day hippies who want to live for free and get high all the time. I walked through the protest the other day and all I could smell was BO and weed.

These people don't have jobs because they are lazy, stink, probably don't have good work habits, and just want to get money so they can get high. And comparing this to the Middle Eastern protests is a disservice to those people who died in them. This is no where near the same sort of thing.

and you're hoping that everyone will agree with you? Don't think so.

Empire
Nov 10, 2011, 5:29 PM
This video is so warped, it's as though the 1% collectively authored it.
This comes from the perspective of someone moaning that he doesn't have enough money to make his private boat payments because the government taxes too much in order to pay for public services.

If you want to get into the issue of the Western World's non-empathy toward how people less fortunate have it: we should discuss the quality of life of the majority of people in undeveloped countries.

Here are a couple videos I'll throw out there, in response. My videos discuss the issues, unlike your video which attempts to misrepresent who the vast majority of the protestors are. The only sense of entitlement the protestors have is the belief that one has the right to paid employment.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZgZeAOaq4U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAhHPIuTQ5k

You must understand RyeJay that these smelly protesters have no regard for civic law and order, no respect for fellow citizens, no real appreciation of the corporate world or what makes it tick. Also, they have no appreciation of how they ended up with a North Face tent to stay warm in while smoking pot and protesting. This misunderstanding of their surroundings then allows them to be misguided on a grand scale!

JET
Nov 10, 2011, 8:05 PM
You must understand RyeJay that these smelly protesters have no regard for civic law and order, no respect for fellow citizens, no real appreciation of the corporate world or what makes it tick. Also, they have no appreciation of how they ended up with a North Face tent to stay warm in while smoking pot and protesting. This misunderstanding of their surroundings then allows them to be misguided on a grand scale!

Empire, at first I thought that you were being paternalistic, simplistic and over generalizing; and then I realized that you were just joking; right?

Jstaleness
Nov 10, 2011, 8:15 PM
This protest confuses me. Initially I couldn't choose a side but I'm not getting that clear message of what it is they are against. Usually protests disrupt something or shut something down all together. What have they stopped? They moved for the Remembrance Day Ceremonies without major issues. While there they just sort of camped. That's no different than a cultural fest of something. Doing what you are told by a higher is something that they are supposed to be fighting against. I don't want this protest to end either but c'mon shit or get off the pot. Disrupt something, send a clear message.

One side comment though. Smoking pot does not make you a bum. Many business folk do the same thing. I'm not at all trying to defend it as I quit 5 years ago but over half of Canadians have probably smoked or currently smoke the precious plant.

Keith P.
Nov 10, 2011, 8:39 PM
One side comment though. Smoking pot does not make you a bum. Many business folk do the same thing. I'm not at all trying to defend it as I quit 5 years ago but over half of Canadians have probably smoked or currently smoke the precious plant.

More stark evidence of our national decline. Hopefully Canada's government will pass tough legislation and begin to eliminate this scourge from our society.

someone123
Nov 10, 2011, 8:52 PM
More stark evidence of our national decline. Hopefully Canada's government will pass tough legislation and begin to eliminate this scourge from our society.

I know many brilliant and incredibly productive people who smoke pot. If it were so harmful these people would not exist. It's also worth pointing out that pot genuinely helps some people with medical conditions and it's really cheap to produce.

Marijuana has been used as a political ploy. It's not a real issue. The worst tragedy of it is that for political reasons we have people wasting away in prisons and we have to spend money on policing and corrections. Making pot illegal also puts more money into the hands of people who are willing to break the law -- if it were grown legitimately a big revenue source for organized crime in places like Mexico would evaporate and we would be better off as a result.

ZET
Nov 10, 2011, 9:31 PM
Well Keith, you have definitely stirred the POT this time. ;)
Not that I agree with you, of course.
Can we now get back to the other off-topic topic and leave this off-topic topic.?

Keith P.
Nov 10, 2011, 10:25 PM
I know many brilliant and incredibly productive people who smoke pot. If it were so harmful these people would not exist.

I prefer to think that they would be even more productive and brilliant without it. However, I expect such advocacy coming from the pot capital of Canada.

It's also worth pointing out that pot genuinely helps some people with medical conditions and it's really cheap to produce.

I am aghast at the inability of our pharmaceutical industry to produce the same allegedly beneficial effects from this substance without having to ignite the stuff in a paper cylinder and inhale the products of combustion into the lungs. Smoking of tobacco in such a way has been virtually banned in our society, but this gets a free pass. Bizarre.

Marijuana has been used as a political ploy. It's not a real issue. The worst tragedy of it is that for political reasons we have people wasting away in prisons and we have to spend money on policing and corrections. Making pot illegal also puts more money into the hands of people who are willing to break the law -- if it were grown legitimately a big revenue source for organized crime in places like Mexico would evaporate and we would be better off as a result.

Not at all. It is far from a harmless drug and has many negative effects which the advocates conveniently overlook. It is illegal for a reason and being illegal the laws need to be enforced, just the same way that the law goes after dealers of other types of drugs and, indeed, goes after those who smuggle illegal tobacco and alcohol. As for putting money in the hands of organized crime, the same argument was used in favor of govt-run gambling. That has not worked out so well.

someone123
Nov 10, 2011, 11:43 PM
As for putting money in the hands of organized crime, the same argument was used in favor of govt-run gambling. That has not worked out so well.

That's quite different. If pot were not controlled its price would drop to almost nothing because it is so cheap and easy to produce. I'm not proposing the government get involved -- in fact I am arguing for less government intervention.

FuzzyWuz
Nov 11, 2011, 1:11 AM
... It is illegal for a reason....

Very true, as so eloquently stated by that great sage of government wisdom in the early part of the 20th century,

"There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the US, and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing, result from marijuana usage. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others."http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_J._Anslinger

-- Henry J. Anslinger, First Commissioner of the U.S. Treasury Department's Federal Bureau of Narcotics (FBN)

This is where the war on drugs started in North America, on the front lines of the war to keep the racial status quo.

resetcbu1
Nov 11, 2011, 1:21 AM
She was living in a single room with three other individuals.
One of them was a male and the other two, well, the other two were females.
God only know what they were up to in there.
And furthermore Susan, I wouldn't be the least bit surprised to learn that all four of them
habitually smoke marijuana cigarettes... reefers
-Reefer Madness:haha:
-Sublime

Empire
Nov 11, 2011, 3:18 AM
Empire, at first I thought that you were being paternalistic, simplistic and over generalizing; and then I realized that you were just joking; right?

Wrong, we live in one of the best free countries in the world. In addition to having a corporate system and government that works reasonably well we have mountains, oceans, pristine forests and vibrant urban centers.

Considering the vastness of this country it is a small miracle that we have a system that works at all. So, to have protesters that understand none of this occupying public spaces of great significance in the history of our city and the history of our country is revolting. When you scale a statue of Robert Burns and lash a cardboard sign that says Occupy Nova Scotia to this copper edifice you have somehow skipped a few important life lessons.

pchipman
Nov 11, 2011, 5:30 PM
Just thought I would comment on the discussions, as I read this thread often but am frustrated at obviously misinformed and irrational arguments. I thought I would comment on this particular topic because it highlights my growing frustration with the lack of evidence-based political decision making which seems to be running rampant in Canada at the moment, with the new crime bill proposed by the Conservatives and in their approach to climate change. This problem is also relevant here because it is also employed in the tactics that the Hertigate Trust and other special interest groups use against urban densification.
The argument for intensified criminalization of pot highlights a dogmatic political agenda with little basis in reality.

[QUOTE=Keith P.;5476047]I am aghast at the inability of our pharmaceutical industry to produce the same allegedly beneficial effects from this substance without having to ignite the stuff in a paper cylinder and inhale the products of combustion into the lungs.

Cannabinoids are a well sought pharmaceutical agent. The clinical benefits of THC and it derivatives are well proven. Research into the therapeutic effects of tetrahydrocannabinol analogues are continuously met with restrictive legislation most recently being enforced by conservative ideologies, thus making drug development problematic. The molecule and receptors are known, as is much of its metabolism- the problem is irrational policies promoting non-tolerance. Unfortunately, rather than base decisions on informed science and evidence, many current government decisions are based solely on dogmatic assumptions. It does, however seem that research is being directed towards development of THC analogues which would have therapeutic effects, but lack the controversial cognitive effects.
IMO, given the ease and low cost of growth, the rational option is local, regulated production. The current government seeks to criminalize this solution further.


Smoking of tobacco in such a way has been virtually banned in our society, but this gets a free pass. Bizarre.


You’re kidding right? I suppose that the consumption of marijuana isn’t as villainized as you may think it should be in society, but comparing the stigma associated with cigarette vs marijuana usage in and around Halifax is simply laughable. I suspect this may gradually change in a progressive society, but it’s not currently the case. Is this what you are worried about?

Not at all. It is far from a harmless drug and has many negative effects which the advocates conveniently overlook. It is illegal for a reason and being illegal the laws need to be enforced, just the same way that the law goes after dealers of other types of drugs and, indeed, goes after those who smuggle illegal tobacco and alcohol.

Can you please explain those reasons to me. Blind declaration of a law does not make it just or rational. Look at the negative social and physiological effects of chronic alcohol consumption and compare to chronic marijuana use.

Keith P.
Nov 11, 2011, 8:47 PM
I thought I would comment on this particular topic because it highlights my growing frustration with the lack of evidence-based political decision making which seems to be running rampant in Canada at the moment

Ah yes, "evidence-based", the buzzword of the moment. Someone produces a study and uses its conclusions to propose a social agenda. Of course the validity of the study or its data is seldom questioned by the media or the proponents, despite ample opportunities to do so. What is never taken into account by the evidence-based advocates is the accumulated wisdom of living - what is generally known as "common sense", something most evidence-based advocates seem to lack, in my experience.

Cannabinoids are a well sought pharmaceutical agent. The clinical benefits of THC and it derivatives are well proven. Research into the therapeutic effects of tetrahydrocannabinol analogues are continuously met with restrictive legislation most recently being enforced by conservative ideologies, thus making drug development problematic. The molecule and receptors are known, as is much of its metabolism- the problem is irrational policies promoting non-tolerance. Unfortunately, rather than base decisions on informed science and evidence, many current government decisions are based solely on dogmatic assumptions. It does, however seem that research is being directed towards development of THC analogues which would have therapeutic effects, but lack the controversial cognitive effects.
IMO, given the ease and low cost of growth, the rational option is local, regulated production. The current government seeks to criminalize this solution further.

You seem to confuse the medical aspects of its use with the recreational aspects. This is exactly why any legitimate use of the stuff for medical purposes took so long to occur. The behavior of a typical pothead makes a very good argument against legalization and was a significant reason why medical use took so long to occur. Codeine and cocaine also have beneficial pharmacological effects, but that does not mean they too should be made freely available for recreational use.

You’re kidding right? I suppose that the consumption of marijuana isn’t as villainized as you may think it should be in society, but comparing the stigma associated with cigarette vs marijuana usage in and around Halifax is simply laughable. I suspect this may gradually change in a progressive society, but it’s not currently the case. Is this what you are worried about?

Environmental smoke has been deemed a health hazard serious enough to warrant bans against exposure in virtually any public space, and even in private ones such as vehicles occupied by children. The concept of govt deciding that environmental cannabis smoke is somehow not as harmful is simply ludicrous. The fact the the stuff is generally smoked to obtain the high is a major mark against it in our current public policy environment.

Look at the negative social and physiological effects of chronic alcohol consumption and compare to chronic marijuana use.

The only result of marijuana use is to obtain a high. Alcohol is used in a far different manner and the two cannot be compared.

W.Sobchak
Nov 11, 2011, 10:43 PM
If anyone is going to discuss marijuana and what it does, I recommend you read the Laguardia report, as well as the countless studies and journals by Harvard medical.

The two most outstanding long term effects of extended, and extended is stressed, (5-8 grams a day for 10 years), is slight schizophrenic symptoms, and pulmonary clogging. The former has been proven to dissipate after 3 months of not smoking. While the latter is a side effect of inhaling any carcinogen, which is predominantly the device to smoke it, ie. wood, and rice pulp based papers.


In the 50's they told us it would make you insane, in the 60's you would become a killer, the 70's it made you hate your country, and the 80's said it was the first step to heroin/crack/coke. So why isn't there insane, murderous, anarchists, with needles sticking out of their arms, and joints hanging out of their mouths running around with long as beards?

The reason cannabis is labeled as a gateway drug, is because the local laws have made it an underground drug, so it is found in the same environs as harder drugs. A pot dealer will have access, more often than not, to other more dangerous intoxicants that will always be offered, because a pot dealer is like a car sales man. Why buy the base level model, when for only a few extra buck you can get this, it makes you feel like you are going faster, and indestructable. Education is the key here not stricter rules.

little known factoids

The term "joint" comes from Jazz musicians in the 40's and 50's calling a spliff "pigs feet".

In 2003, a leather basket filled with cannabis leaf fragments and seeds was found next to a 2,500- to 2,800-year-old mummified shaman in the northwestern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. (wikipedia) The first anti-marijuana laws China enacted were as a result from US pressure in the early 80's.

pchipman
Nov 12, 2011, 12:28 AM
[QUOTE=Keith P.;5477153]Ah yes, "evidence-based", the buzzword of the moment. Someone produces a study and uses its conclusions to propose a social agenda.

I think you misunderstood. I am not referring to general public opinion here, but to general scientific consensus. It is easy to dismiss a rigorous scientific study or a whole body of scientific literature, but that is blatantly anti-intellectual (don't get me started on creationism in public schools). Scientists don't generate conclusions to promote a social agenda - and they shouldn't. They generate conclusions to describe a truth as the evidence suggests, regardless (good or bad) of the social implications.

Of course the validity of the study or its data is seldom questioned by the media or the proponents, despite ample opportunities to do so. What is never taken into account by the evidence-based advocates is the accumulated wisdom of living - what is generally known as "common sense", something most evidence-based advocates seem to lack, in my experience.


If you are referring to the dismal quality of scientific journalism, I agree with you. Studies should be questioned and critically assessed, this is the backbone of science. However, superficial and sensational interpretations seem to be more common in mainstream media.

Also, common sense is subjective and only works from a particular perspective. It fails to apply to other in or from different situations to yours. Science - done properly - is objective and is widely applicable.

I don't know who you are referring to when you write 'evidence-based advocates'. I feel this is another example of blind generalization. Do you mean rational people? Those people who disagree with your world-view? Do you support irrationality as a viable means of policy-making?

The only result of marijuana use is to obtain a high. Alcohol is used in a far different manner and the two cannot be compared.

This just confuses me. Do you suggest that the majority of alcohol use is purely for sustenance? Or are you referring to the widely social nature of the drug? And why can't the two be compared? They are widely used drugs throughout the entire world.

Anyway, we are far off topic here.

The Occupy NS camp at Victoria Park has been disassembled by police. Generally I feel this may be a good thing for the movement as the disorganization was starting to sway public opinion against the 'Occupiers'.

Also, the Park is in dire need of some TLC (not directly related to the Occupy protests). Asphalt walkways are a mess of potholes and bumps and the fountain is in a sad state.
It would be nice to see a reworking of the park in conjunction with all the new development happening in the area.

hoser111
Nov 12, 2011, 1:34 AM
All of this has what to do with construction & development?

JHikka
Nov 12, 2011, 1:37 AM
The reason cannabis is labeled as a gateway drug, is because the local laws have made it an underground drug, so it is found in the same environs as harder drugs.

Ding ding. We have ourselves a winner.

I'm also going to echo hoser's question: construction and development, guys?

Keith P.
Nov 12, 2011, 2:20 AM
All of this has what to do with construction & development?

I agree. Let us move back to topic.

Empire
Nov 12, 2011, 3:04 AM
If anyone is going to discuss marijuana and what it does, I recommend you read the Laguardia report, as well as the countless studies and journals by Harvard medical.

The two most outstanding long term effects of extended, and extended is stressed, (5-8 grams a day for 10 years), is slight schizophrenic symptoms, and pulmonary clogging. The former has been proven to dissipate after 3 months of not smoking. While the latter is a side effect of inhaling any carcinogen, which is predominantly the device to smoke it, ie. wood, and rice pulp based papers.


In the 50's they told us it would make you insane, in the 60's you would become a killer, the 70's it made you hate your country, and the 80's said it was the first step to heroin/crack/coke. So why isn't there insane, murderous, anarchists, with needles sticking out of their arms, and joints hanging out of their mouths running around with long as beards?

The reason cannabis is labeled as a gateway drug, is because the local laws have made it an underground drug, so it is found in the same environs as harder drugs. A pot dealer will have access, more often than not, to other more dangerous intoxicants that will always be offered, because a pot dealer is like a car sales man. Why buy the base level model, when for only a few extra buck you can get this, it makes you feel like you are going faster, and indestructable. Education is the key here not stricter rules.

little known factoids

The term "joint" comes from Jazz musicians in the 40's and 50's calling a spliff "pigs feet".

In 2003, a leather basket filled with cannabis leaf fragments and seeds was found next to a 2,500- to 2,800-year-old mummified shaman in the northwestern Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. (wikipedia) The first anti-marijuana laws China enacted were as a result from US pressure in the early 80's.

I don't want to be off topic like everyone else but the reason that marijuana is not leaglized is because "this town is not big enough for the both of us". ie. the gov. probably sees a lot of problems in supporting both alcohol and marijuana.

pblaauw
Nov 12, 2011, 7:11 AM
Shouldn't this topic be in the Politics forum? :shrug:

beyeas
Nov 14, 2011, 1:36 PM
More stark evidence of our national decline. Hopefully Canada's government will pass tough legislation and begin to eliminate this scourge from our society.

Damn straight. After that we can only dream that the government will have the foresight to declare war on other addictive and performance altering drugs such as alcohol and caffeine.

The sooner we rid the world of Cabernet Sauvignon the sooner it will be a safer place. God knows that Bordeaux and tall buildings are directly responsible for the downfall of western society, so cheers to that! :cheers: <--- please note that these mugs are filled with ginger ale.

haligonia
Nov 14, 2011, 2:14 PM
Damn straight. After that we can only dream that the government will have the foresight to declare war on other addictive and performance altering drugs such as alcohol and caffeine.

The sooner we rid the world of Cabernet Sauvignon the sooner it will be a safer place. God knows that Bordeaux and tall buildings are directly responsible for the downfall of western society, so cheers to that! :cheers: <--- please note that these mugs are filled with ginger ale.

:laugh:

BravoZulu
Nov 14, 2011, 5:09 PM
Wasn't exactly sure where to put this but thought you guys might enjoy it as well. Not sure how to attach it as an image.

From the herald online version 14/11/2011

http://thechronicleherald.ca/editorial-cartoon/2011-11-14

bluenoser
Nov 14, 2011, 7:47 PM
I saw this as well, so true and almost funny if it weren't so sad!

(here is the picture)
http://thechronicleherald.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/ch_article_main_image/bm_cartoon/deadderweb-x14.jpg
source: The Chronicle Herald

q12
Nov 14, 2011, 8:10 PM
I saw this as well, so true and almost funny if it weren't so sad!

(here is the picture)
http://thechronicleherald.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/ch_article_main_image/bm_cartoon/deadderweb-x14.jpg
source: The Chronicle Herald

:lmao:

I think that version of the empire state building might still piss off save the view.

RyeJay
Nov 14, 2011, 8:10 PM
I saw this as well, so true and almost funny if it weren't so sad!

(here is the picture)
http://thechronicleherald.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/ch_article_main_image/bm_cartoon/deadderweb-x14.jpg
source: The Chronicle Herald

:) Very cute.

And yes, if much of the world shared Halifax's height restrictions, this is what you'd see.

But you don't. There are super-tall structures all around the world. This illustration, though coveying the significance of height for these pieces of infrastructure (which contributes to their 'greatness'), also shows us that Halifax's height limits....are for Halifax.

Halifax's height limits have influenced the construction of a low-lying scape of towers, which border our Citadel. Our skyline, the downtown, is so unique that it makes Halifax one of the most recognisable cities in Canada.

MonctonRad
Nov 14, 2011, 8:18 PM
:previous:

RyeJay, it almost sounds like you are in favour of height restrictions!! :eek:

RyeJay
Nov 14, 2011, 8:46 PM
:previous:

RyeJay, it almost sounds like you are in favour of height restrictions!! :eek:

:)
I'm not sure whether you're being facetious or not--but yes I do.

Outside of a downtown context, away from the hill... that's entirely different. Build away; reach for the moon!

My support for height limits should not be implicit of being anti-development. I'm not Heritage Trust-crazy. I'm excited about the Nova Centre.

I love downtown Halifax! I've had so much fun there, so many great memories! Yes I've enjoyed the downtown's nightlife, but I've more enjoyed sunny days in Point Pleasant Park or on Citadel Hill doing school work. Halifax's township atmosphere is extremely relaxing. And I love how the up and coming developments will only further emphasise the character of the city's established scape.

planarchy
Nov 14, 2011, 9:54 PM
Greater Halifax Partnership has a new development map - http://www.greaterhalifax.com/en/home/halifax-business-programs/developmentinhalifax.aspx

No big surprises, but one that I don't think has been mentioned here:

5688 Spring Garden Road.

Studio Works International have been engaged as the architect for the project.
L-shaped building to wrap around Spring Garden onto South Park Street.

Estimated to be 6 or 7 storeys with retail space on bottom level.

MonctonRad
Nov 14, 2011, 10:54 PM
:)
I'm not sure whether you're being facetious or not--but yes I do.

I'm mostly pulling your leg. :)

You've seemed to be a very aggressive pro urbanist promoter of development on the peninsula (rather than elsewhere in the HRM or indeed elsewhere in the Maritimes) member of the forums so far, so I was a little surprised by your stance on this issue. ;)

Personally, I strongly support a vibrant downtown in Halifax, with a mix of residential and commercial developments in the core to complement the existing office towers. I appreciate the view from the citadel ramparts, so I sympathize with the viewplanes (but I don't want to be lumped in with the STV or HT wingnuts). Developments in the core should take into account the context of the neighbourhood, which is why I am not in favour of the current Skye Halifax proposal. 48 stories is too tall, but it is desperately important that that particular hole in the ground gets filled. I would be in favour of something in the 30 storey range.

In other words, I think what you would like to see in the core is similar to what I would like to see. :tup:

Keith P.
Nov 14, 2011, 11:29 PM
Greater Halifax Partnership has a new development map - http://www.greaterhalifax.com/en/home/halifax-business-programs/developmentinhalifax.aspx

No big surprises, but one that I don't think has been mentioned here:

5688 Spring Garden Road.

Studio Works International have been engaged as the architect for the project.
L-shaped building to wrap around Spring Garden onto South Park Street.

Estimated to be 6 or 7 storeys with retail space on bottom level.


Hard to tell, but it appears this is the empty lot next to the Eastlink/former DQ corner. Would be good to see something happen there.

someone123
Nov 14, 2011, 11:58 PM
Actually we did discuss the Spring Garden/South Park corner development a while ago. At the time the developer was trying to acquire the DQ building.

The idea of an L-shaped building is interesting. If it's well-done it will have some character. The 6-7 storey scale is good for that site. If they put in some good retail spots on the South Park frontage the new building would also complement the Trillium storefronts.

Like I've said before, Spring Garden is already fairly nice and if it is taken up a notch it will be one of the best and most complete urban neighbourhoods in Canada. It's small but it already has most of the advantages of big city downtown type neighbourhoods and very few cities have the same quality of urban parks, squares, and waterfront space.

By the way, the map also has something about a Windsor Park redevelopment. Conversely it is missing some developments like the building going up next to All Saints.

worldlyhaligonian
Nov 15, 2011, 3:48 AM
Greater Halifax Partnership has a new development map - http://www.greaterhalifax.com/en/home/halifax-business-programs/developmentinhalifax.aspx

No big surprises, but one that I don't think has been mentioned here:

5688 Spring Garden Road.

Studio Works International have been engaged as the architect for the project.
L-shaped building to wrap around Spring Garden onto South Park Street.

Estimated to be 6 or 7 storeys with retail space on bottom level.

Nice find. Although the Eastlink store is a slight improvement over the DQ building, a 6-7 story L-shape would be a perfect step up to the building to the east and the trillium back behind.

RyeJay
Nov 15, 2011, 1:51 PM
Actually we did discuss the Spring Garden/South Park corner development a while ago. At the time the developer was trying to acquire the DQ building.

The idea of an L-shaped building is interesting. If it's well-done it will have some character. The 6-7 storey scale is good for that site. If they put in some good retail spots on the South Park frontage the new building would also complement the Trillium storefronts.

Like I've said before, Spring Garden is already fairly nice and if it is taken up a notch it will be one of the best and most complete urban neighbourhoods in Canada. It's small but it already has most of the advantages of big city downtown type neighbourhoods and very few cities have the same quality of urban parks, squares, and waterfront space.

By the way, the map also has something about a Windsor Park redevelopment. Conversely it is missing some developments like the building going up next to All Saints.

Yes, I recall how painful it was to see the non-demolition of the DQ building.
This proposed L-shape building would connect retail with the building to the left (Mexicali Rosa's), wrap this retail around onto South Park Street, connect to the Trillium's retail--and hopefully give a boost to Park Victoria's retail.

The Trinity restaurant went out of business quite a while ago. I remember there being rumours from Park Vic's tenants (or maybe just hope) of a Tim Hortons possibly going there. It would be the perfect spot for one. Aside from business it could receive from walk-by traffic from people on the street, or internally from residence, it may also service the building's underground parking garage via drive-thru.

kph06
Nov 15, 2011, 2:04 PM
The Trinity restaurant went out of business quite a while ago. I remember there being rumours from Park Vic's tenants (or maybe just hope) of a Tim Hortons possibly going there. It would be the perfect spot for one. Aside from business it could receive from walk-by traffic from people on the street, or internally from residence, it may also service the building's underground parking garage via drive-thru.

A lady who use to work at le Bistro will be re-opening this restraunt in the near future as "le Bistro by [insert her name]". It will have a similar menu as the former le Bistro, which I think was owned by RCR?

ScovaNotian
Nov 15, 2011, 5:35 PM
Wouldn't an L shaped building need to have walls without windows where it borders the lot with the Eastlink store on it?

MonctonRad
Nov 15, 2011, 8:44 PM
A lady who use to work at le Bistro will be re-opening this restraunt in the near future as "le Bistro by [insert her name]". It will have a similar menu as the former le Bistro, which I think was owned by RCR?

That's good news, I used to live in Park Vic (for two years) and remember eating at le Bistro a number of times. It was pretty good! :tup:

halifaxboyns
Nov 15, 2011, 10:52 PM
Halifax’s future depends on downtown

A key to Halifax creating a more vibrant downtown is increased residential density in the central business district.

That is a commonly held view among a variety of planners and real estate experts, but veteran Halifax real estate broker Bob Mussett says the city isn’t aggressive enough about achieving the necessary density and should consider starting an ad campaign:

“Wanted: 10,000 people living downtown — as soon as possible.”

He’s not entirely serious about the campaign, but Mussett insists city hall’s goal of increasing the number of people living in the downtown area by 10,000 in 20 years is not soon enough.

“We’re not going to get office demand and good retail growth downtown until more people live here — pretty simple,” Mussett, the senior Atlantic vice-president at the CBRE Ltd. real estate brokerage, told me Tuesday.

“And if I’m a young professional, you’re going to say, ‘Gee, I can pay a little more rent and live downtown, maybe I can sell my car and simplify things, but I need a way to get from here to Bayers Lake. ..... If I want to go somewhere, I need to know if I can get there.”

The first thing that has to happen is greater residential density downtown, says Mussett, and then other development comes, but the transit issue needs to be on the list of priorities as the city grows.

The future vibrancy of the city and the performance of various regions within metro are all linked together, he says. And as greater population density is added to the downtown, city officials should be thinking about ways to fortify the transit system to meet the city’s growing needs.

That may mean the addition of a light rail link from Bedford or a fast ferry, says Mussett, but rather than talking about it, steps must be taken to address transit issues.

The issue of developing a light rail route in metro has been around for almost 20 years.

A 2008 report filed by city staff suggested that the Halifax region isn’t big enough to get a return on a light rail investment, suggesting a population of one million or more would be necessary to make commuter rail viable.

Last year, a city staff report indicated that startup capital costs for commuter rail would be about $30.9 million, not including any land acquisition, and annual operating costs would be about $6.6 million.

As recently as October, the city’s transportation standing committee considered recommending the city fund a $250,000 consultant’s study on rail commuting. After debate, the idea of funding the study was deferred until later this month.

The controversy holding up the matter is the idea that $50,000 or so would go to CN Rail for its participation in the study.

The rest of the story is here (http://www.thechronicleherald.ca/business/33223-halifax%E2%80%99s-future-depends-downtown).

someone123
Nov 15, 2011, 11:50 PM
A 2008 report filed by city staff suggested that the Halifax region isn’t big enough to get a return on a light rail investment, suggesting a population of one million or more would be necessary to make commuter rail viable.

Arg! Light rail and commuter rail are *not* equivalent! This situation where the city considers one particular outdated proposal once every 5 years is just horrendous. I have very little hope that Halifax is going to have a good transit system anytime soon. Nobody is even talking about the right stuff, let alone implementing it.

The point about downtown residential is of course a good one, although it is already happening to some degree. I wish these articles would be a bit more precise. Really the problem is "CBD" residential -- the old office core needs residents because it will not be getting office towers anytime soon. Nearby areas are already experiencing lots of residential infill.

worldlyhaligonian
Nov 15, 2011, 11:55 PM
Wrong thread.

Pete Crawford
Nov 16, 2011, 7:38 PM
Has anyone seen any images or renderings for the Portland Street commercial development going up on the site of the former Mazda and Subaru dealerships?

They seem to be moving quickly, was just wondering if the new buildings will be at all attractive.

kph06
Nov 17, 2011, 2:40 AM
South end diner is burning.

Jstaleness
Nov 17, 2011, 2:46 AM
I hope it's put out. I love that couple. I have stopped there for lunch quite a few times.

kph06
Nov 17, 2011, 11:29 AM
It appeared to start in the old building attached to it on Barrington, I don't think anyone lived in it, I only saw pigeons coming and going when I would go by. By the end the firefighters were coming and going form both buildings and smashed out most the windows in the upper floors of the diner building. The old couple who use to own the building sold it about a year ago to a few younger guys. The building beside the diner is definitely a write-off, and I can't imagine the diner is salvageable either.

coolmillion
Nov 17, 2011, 12:52 PM
The North End Diner burned down a few years ago and now this? I've actually never eaten at the South End Diner but I like the idea of it. Old school diners are a dying breed in this city.

halifaxboyns
Nov 17, 2011, 4:11 PM
HRM to look at tax holidays on brownfield properties

Tax holidays may spur the redevelopment of brownfield sites in Halifax, says a regional councillor.

“It’s very complicated,” Jennifer Watts (Quinpool-Connaught) said Wednesday in an interview.

Watts has asked staff at Halifax Regional Municipality to investigate the potential of offering tax holidays on old commercial and industrial properties, including former gas stations sites, to encourage their redevelopment. Such locations are called brownfield sites.

“We’re having staff look at the situation,” she said.

There are three former gas station locations in Watts’ riding.

Stations at Quinpool and Harvard streets and at Bayers Road and Oxford Street were demolished years ago and the properties have remained undeveloped.

An Ultramar station on Chebucto Road was torn down earlier this year.

The Chebucto Road property, owned by Ultramar Canada of Montreal, is undergoing an environmental assessment and is slated to be sold sometime next year when that process is completed.

Watts said a tax holiday may encourage developers who may be reluctant to take on environmental remediation costs often associated with brownfield sites such as old gas stations.

“We want to understand the implications,” she said, suggesting that any municipal revenues lost from a tax holiday would be recouped when the properties were redeveloped.

Andy Fillmore, the municipality’s urban design project manager, said tax holidays are a popular tool used in many jurisdictions across Canada and around the world to spur brownfield redevelopment.

“It’s been used broadly,” Fillmore said in an interview.

He called brownfield site development a beautiful opportunity to transform urban communities.

“It’s very affordable, as opposed to a greenfield (site),” since brownfields are already connected to existing municipal infrastructure such as waterlines and sewers, Fillmore said.

Environmental remediation costs associated with old gas station or industrial properties can be expensive, which often results in them lying dormant for years, he said.

“It’s in the municipality’s best interest to put in place incentives that tip the business case to remediate those sites.”

Fillmore said it typically takes five years for municipalities to recoup incentives such as tax holidays on brownfield properties through subsequent redevelopment and new tax revenues.

someone123
Nov 17, 2011, 6:48 PM
Nice to see that get some attention. There are lots of cases where a development is not economical from the perspective of a developer but is economical when you include servicing costs over the lifetime of the building. Remediation is expensive but so is the extension and provisal of services in low-density areas, plus there is the major downside of having empty lots on streets like Quinpool.

I would like to see the city play more of a "facilitator" role when it comes to new development. An good example that already happened was the Clyde Street lots vs. the United Gulf/TexPark sale. The city took a more active role with Clyde Street and I think the results will be much better. The whole process was smoother because it was simpler and there was a clearer vision of what should be built on that land. Similarly the municipality could take an active role with key brownfields by implementing incentives tied to the desired type of development and lobbying property owners.

There's a bit of an issue of fairness when the city goes down the road of subsidizing some developments but from my non-legal perspective at least it seems like it's not so bad when you can articulate a social benefit. I also don't think it's a zero-sum game. If the city helps develop a brownfield lot on Quinpool then the properties nearby will actually become more valuable. It is a very positive type of situation.

halifaxboyns
Nov 22, 2011, 3:45 PM
More news on the Downtown...

Starfish proud of design
Open house tonight to discuss plans for former Tip Top building

IF ALL GOES according to plan, work on redeveloping a Barrington Street building into tip-top shape will begin in the spring.

Starfish Properties has applied for a development permit to build a six-storey retail and office building at 1592 Barrington St., the former Tip Top Tailors building.

As part of that process, the developer will grant public access to the existing building tonight for an open house from 7 to 9 p.m. Comments and suggestions from interested parties are welcomed.

"All of that information, together with our application, goes to the design review committee," said Starfish Properties owner Louis Reznick.

The proposed 22-metre-high, 15,000-square-foot development will feature retail space on the ground floor, with five floors of office space. However, Reznick didn’t rule out the final design including more than one floor of retail space.

"With the activity on Barrington Street, it could all be retail, but most likely it’ll be a couple of floors of retail and a couple of floors of offices," he said.

The building, designed by Lydon Lynch Architects Ltd., will be sandwiched by the Tramway building, at the corner of Sackville Street and Barrington, and the Khyber building.

The facade will feature black anodized aluminum panels between floors, clear anodized aluminum panels, aluminum-framed curtain walls with silicone glazing, light green glass and a small strip on the left side will be red brick.

"It’s very contemporary, but we’ve stolen some details and designs from neighbouring buildings," Reznick aid, adding that the design puts the building in "context with our heritage district and our heritage building neighbours," which is a prerequisite of the municipality’s design review committee.

"We think we’ve done that, we think we’ve done it well and we love it, actually. It’s a great use for that particular lot."

A rooftop terrace will include a green area with tall ornamental grasses and a planter box with hedge.

"We try and build to green standards. Our renovated buildings all have included some green," Reznick said. "Anything we improve, we try to improve to the best standards we can. They’re renovated buildings, so it’s not like building from scratch."

The rest of the story is here (http://www.thechronicleherald.ca/business/35537-starfish-proud-design).

someone123
Nov 22, 2011, 6:52 PM
My only worry is that this might run afoul of Barrington Street historic district/HbD guidelines, but I am not sure what the exact requirements are. Hopefully the regulations focus on important things like street-level interaction but do not demand particular faux heritage styles or building materials.

When it comes to heritage there seems to be an unfortunate trend toward density restrictions and superficial design restrictions for new buildings. The focus should be on the old buildings -- ensuring that their most important assets are kept in top condition and ensuring that they are part of an economically healthy neighbourhood. Barrington's success depends on attracting money and then directing some of it toward restoration efforts.

-Harlington-
Nov 23, 2011, 1:57 AM
The former bay location :



http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6218/6386386637_4e7858231d_z.jpg

cormiermax
Nov 23, 2011, 2:33 AM
That looks HORRIBLE! Is it me or do those windows look like there from 3 decades ago?

RyeJay
Nov 23, 2011, 3:10 AM
That looks HORRIBLE! Is it me or do those windows look like there from 3 decades ago?

I see what you're talking about. I agree.

:D Maybe they're pushing an 80's kind of theme?...

someone123
Nov 23, 2011, 4:43 AM
ANS had an article tonight about Chedrawe's upcoming development of the Spring Garden/Queen/Brunswick block. Looks like we might hear some more details and maybe see some renderings over the next few months. Construction is anticipated for 2013.

The development is being modeled somewhat off of the Hazelton Hotel in Yorkville (Toronto):

http://www.bloor-yorkville.com/img/stores/images/cache/hazelton%20hotel.jpg
Source (http://www.bloor-yorkville.com/Directory/Hotels.aspx?s=2026)

The idea is to put million-dollar condos on the top floors (6 and 7).

It sounds nice but as I've said before my opinion of the development will hinge on how much effort goes into preserving and reusing the buildings that already exist on that block. It would be awful to lose stone bank buildings and brick rowhouses. Even if the plan is to replace those buildings on that block, it would be possible to reuse parts of the buildings elsewhere -- and when we're talking about $1M+ condos the expense is justified.

beyeas
Nov 23, 2011, 1:01 PM
ANS had an article tonight about Chedrawe's upcoming development of the Spring Garden/Queen/Brunswick block. Looks like we might hear some more details and maybe see some renderings over the next few months. Construction is anticipated for 2013.

The development is being modeled somewhat off of the Hazelton Hotel in Yorkville (Toronto):


Source (http://www.bloor-yorkville.com/Directory/Hotels.aspx?s=2026)

The idea is to put million-dollar condos on the top floors (6 and 7).

It sounds nice but as I've said before my opinion of the development will hinge on how much effort goes into preserving and reusing the buildings that already exist on that block. It would be awful to lose stone bank buildings and brick rowhouses. Even if the plan is to replace those buildings on that block, it would be possible to reuse parts of the buildings elsewhere -- and when we're talking about $1M+ condos the expense is justified.

Yeah for me a significant part of whether I will judge this as a success is whether they find a way to keep the BMO facade in particular (in addition to obvious overall street-interface etc). That stone facade is well worth saving, and to me would be a wonderful entrance for the hotel portion.

RyeJay
Nov 23, 2011, 2:45 PM
If they don't keep the stone facade, I won't be pleased either.

sdm
Nov 23, 2011, 3:55 PM
That looks HORRIBLE! Is it me or do those windows look like there from 3 decades ago?

Agreed. Cheap looking.

spaustin
Nov 23, 2011, 11:48 PM
I too won't be thrilled if the BMO building is lost. The stone front on it is definitely worth saving. You just don't get something of that quality anymore. I wouldn't be upset to lose the brick rowhouses further down the block if they were going to make way for an interesting design that adds more density to the block.

Keith P.
Nov 23, 2011, 11:53 PM
This is the last rendering I could find for SGR and Queen. This is from Queen St, looking down Doyle, with the Port of Wines store at the far left:

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll229/keith_p/bmowestwoodrear.jpg

ScovaNotian
Nov 24, 2011, 1:04 AM
Don't throw stones at me, but personally, I like what's in the rendering better than the BMO building.

cormiermax
Nov 24, 2011, 1:29 AM
don't throw stones at me, but personally, i like what's in the rendering better than the bmo building.

+1

resetcbu1
Nov 24, 2011, 3:04 AM
This is the last rendering I could find for SGR and Queen. This is from Queen St, looking down Doyle, with the Port of Wines store at the far left:

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll229/keith_p/bmowestwoodrear.jpg

Is Doyle supossed to be a pedestrian street in this render?

I like this desighn , think it would be great in a million places in this city , but tear down BMO/Planet pool....? I don't know bout that ...... there must be another spot a building of this calliber could be built in this area:shrug:

Empire
Nov 24, 2011, 3:29 AM
I'm 100% against this development as proposed. I think the BMO building needs to be saved, not just the facade.

Also, the two buildings on Spring Gdn. at Brunswick should be saved. Chedrawe's developments are medeocre at best. I would expect the same quality as the Garden Crest towers and that is not good for this site.


BOM Building Queen & Spring Gdn.
http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=halifax&hl=en&ll=44.643395,-63.576078&spn=0.000008,0.003852&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=28.297189,63.105469&vpsrc=6&hnear=Halifax,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia&t=h&z=18&layer=c&cbll=44.643289,-63.575977&panoid=KsMU1upDs7AdHT1LLTssJA&cbp=12,35.45,,0,0

Buildings on Spring Gdn. at Brunswick
http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=halifax&hl=en&ll=44.643575,-63.574877&spn=0.000031,0.015407&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=28.297189,63.105469&vpsrc=6&hnear=Halifax,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia&t=h&z=16&layer=c&cbll=44.643596,-63.574815&panoid=-Zeb9maSsglfzlQb4WZMUQ&cbp=12,315,,0,0

alps
Nov 24, 2011, 5:02 AM
I agree...the proposed development destroys an interesting little block and I personally also find it too uniform and very bland. On another site (i.e. the parking lot beside St. Mary's Basilica) I think it'd be okay, but aside from the additional density I don't think it's a step up from what's currently at the Doyle lots now.

-Harlington-
Nov 24, 2011, 5:13 AM
I hope they dont destroy the building as well, theres not many like it here

and there is to many empty lots in this city and they have to destroy buildings to make development ?

worldlyhaligonian
Nov 24, 2011, 5:28 AM
I'm not usually against development... but this just doesn't make any sense given the number of empty lots. Ugh.

Keith P.
Nov 24, 2011, 11:12 AM
I'm 100% against this development as proposed. I think the BMO building needs to be saved, not just the facade.


The BMO building is apparently in terrible condition and has numerous problems from a tenancy point of view. While I like the facade on the corner I see no reason to keep structures that are obsolete and otherwise suboptimal.

Empire
Nov 24, 2011, 5:05 PM
The BMO building is apparently in terrible condition and has numerous problems from a tenancy point of view. While I like the facade on the corner I see no reason to keep structures that are obsolete and otherwise suboptimal.

This aerial shows that there is a lot of space in the centre of the block. If the intent is to build a boutique hotel then it could be connected to a renovated BMO building or the back half of the BMO building could be removed on a diagonal. Demolishing the BMO building should not be an option.

Lots of room for a mediocre development.
http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=halifax&hl=en&ll=44.643876,-63.575643&spn=0.001683,0.003004&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=50.098287,98.4375&vpsrc=6&hnear=Halifax,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia&t=h&z=19

Northend Guy
Nov 24, 2011, 7:14 PM
Has anyone seen any images or renderings for the Portland Street commercial development going up on the site of the former Mazda and Subaru dealerships?

They seem to be moving quickly, was just wondering if the new buildings will be at all attractive.

Attractive might be a stretch - there will a Shopper's Drug Mart and a CIBC Bank.

Pete Crawford
Nov 25, 2011, 8:10 PM
Attractive might be a stretch - there will a Shopper's Drug Mart and a CIBC Bank.

Well, that's good enough news. The new stand-alone CIBC outlets look quite nice, and Shopper's buildings don't look terrible. The whole thing will look a hundred times better than those old car dealerships!

planarchy
Nov 26, 2011, 3:51 PM
Anyone who wants to get a last look at the old cafe chianti building better run down there now. It's coming down now. Just started, but doesn't look like they will be saving anything.

spaustin
Nov 26, 2011, 5:47 PM
Anyone who wants to get a last look at the old cafe chianti building better run down there now. It's coming down now. Just started, but doesn't look like they will be saving anything.

Thought that might be happening (noticed the excavator parked in behind yesterday). Sad to see them go. I only hope the owner has a plan to do something there sooner rather than later. The neighbourhood is certainly attractive and has seen a lot of activity lately so a project would surely be doable. I just hope the corner doesn't sit empty for the next 10 years, perhaps used as a gravel filled surface parking lot.

someone123
Nov 26, 2011, 6:00 PM
Probably a mistake. Imagine this row being torn down, then the block on Spring Garden Road. Halifax's heritage buildings are one of its best features and they are not being adequately protected.

I think they do have plans to develop quickly but the old buildings have a ton of character that is unlikely to be replaced. I guess if we saw another Vic-style apartment building in the Chianti location it wouldn't be so bad.

pchipman
Nov 26, 2011, 6:09 PM
Anyone who wants to get a last look at the old cafe chianti building better run down there now. It's coming down now. Just started, but doesn't look like they will be saving anything.

This is a terrible loss. Has there been any word from the Heritage Trust on this? I don't understand their priorities.

Empire
Nov 26, 2011, 7:15 PM
This is the biggest loss in decades. That strip of row houses had a real Montreal feel. HRM is entirely powerless to prevent this type of destruction. All the stops should have been pulled to save this group of buildings including massive tax concessions for renovating. I'm thoroughly disgusted with this city's lack of vision.

Unacceptable loss:

http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=halifax&hl=en&ll=44.640185,-63.56904&spn=0.000015,0.007703&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=28.297189,63.105469&vpsrc=6&hnear=Halifax,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia&t=h&z=17&layer=c&cbll=44.640229,-63.569482&panoid=TAHMHyJ1JA5v9gAFxr0bKw&cbp=12,353.31,,0,-21.73

fenwick16
Nov 26, 2011, 8:13 PM
Here is a story about the fire that broke out in this building back on January 12, 2010 - http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2010/01/12/ns-fire-south-street.html . The picture (below) is from the story. Another story indicated that the fire had spread to the second story floor joists - https://groups.google.com/group/hfx.general/browse_thread/thread/ce35c3f792e30221?hl=en.

Based on the story reports, it sounds as though the building would have required a complete rebuild (maybe the bricks could have been saved). Once a historic building is completely rebuilt then it doesn't maintain much of historic significance, it would just be a duplicate of a historic building (in my opinion).

Many old buildings are destroyed by fire because the construction is not up to today's standards. A building like this with multiple units, if built to modern standards, would have kept the fire contained to one unit because of modern fire wall construction that is intented for that purpose.

http://www.cbc.ca/gfx/images/news/photos/2010/01/12/ns-southstreetfire.jpg

kph06
Nov 26, 2011, 8:36 PM
Photos be me:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7014/6406885031_f857b82de3_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7166/6406885807_4989aabba7_b.jpg

Empire
Nov 27, 2011, 12:08 AM
The destruction of these row houses on South St. marks a very bad day for Halifax. All buildings can be renovated and the cost of renovation is not an excuse for demolition. No one would ever argue that Historic Properties was a bad idea. We are losing heritage at an alarming rate and the replacement for that heritage in most cases is the second slap in the face.

Photo of rowhouses by Empire..........................................................Bland ugly Prince George pic by Google
http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/SouthSt.jpg

Here is an example of duplicated heritage on Summer St. This building was 100% demolished and rebuilt exactly as it was..
Not the original but much better than the Prince George cheap replacement.
http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/summerst.jpg

halifaxboyns
Nov 27, 2011, 1:44 AM
I am on the same line as Fenwick on this - once the fire did it's damage; the cost of keeping the building would've been pretty high compared to rebuilding. It's a sad thing that some of the elements aren't being saved though.

I think Empire points out a very good example of a 'rebuild' to similar form of the previous heritage building. Have we not seen or heard about what the project will be? Are there not renderings yet? I don't want to jump to any conclusions on what will replace the previous building until seeing it...