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halifaxboyns
Feb 27, 2012, 5:39 AM
Those are great comments from the CEO of Crombie REIT. This will be good news for the merchants at Scotia Square, that really suffer on the weekend. While those 3 apartment buildings have a lot of people (I used to live there), there really needs to be even more to really help support those shops.

When I worked for MTT, it always amazed me how empty that mall was when I was working on a Saturday or Sunday.

RyeJay
Feb 27, 2012, 8:44 AM
Very interesting article tonight in ANS about Scotia Square. As mentioned before, there are a couple of building pads that could accommodate small office developments (40,000 sq. ft. and 100,000 sq. ft.).

A more interesting bit of news was about possible plans for a residential addition to the top of the Trade Mart building. It's been talked about a few times in the past as a good candidate for expansion and residential in that area would be great. Ideally they'd also overhaul the street level of the existing building.

The CEO of Crombie REIT mentioned the importance of residential downtown and he is completely correct. If there were better residential options in that area and more people lived there it would be a more attractive place for office development. Lots of people enjoy the lifestyle of living in an urban neighbourhood with lots of services and being able to walk to work in 10 or 15 minutes. People do not enjoy fighting traffic and parking.

Development around Scotia Square and Brunswick/Cogswell (potentially 5 residential/hotel towers) has good implications for an eventual Cogswell redevelopment as well. Even if Cogswell were torn down right now it would be somewhat unattractive because it is surrounded by a wasteland of concrete and empty lots. If the surroundings were developed a bit more then it would be easy to integrate all the development together.

Very appreciated news! This will strengthen Scotia Square's ability to support its retail. With an addition of one or two new office towers, maybe facade resorations for the existing towers could be done concurrently?... I may just be overly hopeful.

The three moderately sized apartment buildings behind Scotia Square, and connected to it, I wish to see redeveloped.

kph06
Feb 27, 2012, 2:58 PM
The South End Diner is being torn down right now.

halifaxboyns
Feb 27, 2012, 4:06 PM
Very appreciated news! This will strengthen Scotia Square's ability to support its retail. With an addition of one or two new office towers, maybe facade resorations for the existing towers could be done concurrently?... I may just be overly hopeful.

The three moderately sized apartment buildings behind Scotia Square, and connected to it, I wish to see redeveloped.

Could we leave Plaza 1881 alone though? That was always one of my favorites, since I lived there for a few years. :)

someone123
Feb 27, 2012, 7:06 PM
There was also an article last night about streetscaping. Apparently some money will be used for streetscape improvements in "business districts" in the coming year, but a letter was sent out indicating that nothing would happen along Spring Garden Road until 2014 at the earliest because they already have the library project happening.

It seems to me that the best approach would be to time streetscaping with the library to minimize disruption and avoid having to rebuild that sidewalk repeatedly.

Maybe there will be something for Barrington...? Sadly even Hollis Street south of Sackville still has overhead power lines.

Hopefully "business district" doesn't mean Bayers Lake or something like that.

kph06
Feb 27, 2012, 7:41 PM
I had the day off today, so here are a bunch of photo's of the South End Diner coming down. I spoke to a lady who worked there and lived there for a couple decades and she said the fire damage wasn't too bad, but after the fire a few water tanks blew, which took the ceiling of the diner down. It sounded like the owners originally planned to fix the diner up.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7038/6789795898_bf43f061e4_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7067/6789796612_e6a5e4be0c_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7187/6789797016_4304993f71_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7048/6935912477_b784e0eac8_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7181/6935913121_971f235f2a_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7193/6935913523_c3d672930e_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7056/6935914127_c49832a138_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7047/6789799718_4b7d36dcca_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7055/6789800430_3573108859_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7055/6789800430_3573108859_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7184/6789801504_b16c5cac08_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7198/6789803212_e0d86e38c8_b.jpg
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7042/6935910309_67d9cfbcc2_b.jpg

someone123
Feb 27, 2012, 7:53 PM
Isn't that lot one of several on that block that some buyers have been assembling for development?

halifaxboyns
Feb 27, 2012, 8:01 PM
There was an article about that somewhere a while back...can't remember where.

someone123
Feb 27, 2012, 8:03 PM
Yeah, I remember a couple of articles in ANS. I don't remember if there were actual development plans coming along or if this was planned to be something a few years out. It would be unfortunate to have an empty lot here for 5-10 years.

The North End Diner was also torn down after a fire and as far as I know it's still a gravel lot.

macgregor
Feb 27, 2012, 9:11 PM
From Chronicle Herald (http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/66836-rona-downsizes-big-box)

Rona downsizes the big box
February 24, 2012 - 8:01pm BY COLLEEN COSGROVE BUSINESS REPORTER

Retailer will focus on smaller stores

......

Our intention is to have more stores, so instead of one store, we’ll have multiple stores in multiple locations,” Kennedy said, adding that the company is “exploring additional sites all over (Halifax Regional Municipality).”

Meantime, the company has alternative plans for at least one of the five Pierceys hardware stores it purchased in 2010. The Halifax outlet on Robie Street will eventually relocate to a nearby Almon Street site owned by the Bragg Group of Companies and currently occupied by the Used Car Factory.

Blueprints for the construction of a new store are underway and construction is expected to move forward within the year, Kennedy said.

.....

(ccosgrove@herald.ca)

eastcoastal
Feb 27, 2012, 10:05 PM
There was no yellow siding in the rendering :

http://www.dawnsloane.ca/images/gottingen1.JPG

... and the windows are all different. I think that the rendering is from before the street oriented commercial/retail component was axed.

kph06
Feb 27, 2012, 10:33 PM
Yeah, I remember a couple of articles in ANS. I don't remember if there were actual development plans coming along or if this was planned to be something a few years out. It would be unfortunate to have an empty lot here for 5-10 years.

The North End Diner was also torn down after a fire and as far as I know it's still a gravel lot.

I think they own 8 or 9 buildings on that block. It's not a perfect block of properties, there is one on Kent they aren't listed as owners on (had a fire 2 weeks ago) that breaks the group up. They put them out for offers last summer/fall, but didn't get the price they wanted for the block and took them off the market, then the place beside the South end diner had it's fire. I think the plan was to sell to a developer rather than develop the lot themselves.

JET
Feb 28, 2012, 4:37 PM
... and the windows are all different. I think that the rendering is from before the street oriented commercial/retail component was axed.

it is a very different building than originally laid out. On the right hand side where there was to be some contrast is a bank of 12 windows and a yellow wall. On the side street side there was an indent breaking up the wall, and now it is an odd bump out.
The dark brick on the Gottingen main floor is not bad, but if the rest is all yellow hardie, then that is really unfortunate. The original rendering seemed fine, but nothing of that has carried over.

Empire
Feb 28, 2012, 11:08 PM
it is a very different building than originally laid out. On the right hand side where there was to be some contrast is a bank of 12 windows and a yellow wall. On the side street side there was an indent breaking up the wall, and now it is an odd bump out.
The dark brick on the Gottingen main floor is not bad, but if the rest is all yellow hardie, then that is really unfortunate. The original rendering seemed fine, but nothing of that has carried over.

The original rendering was crap!

Jstaleness
Feb 28, 2012, 11:35 PM
I had the day off today, so here are a bunch of photo's of the South End Diner coming down. I spoke to a lady who worked there and lived there for a couple decades and she said the fire damage wasn't too bad, but after the fire a few water tanks blew, which took the ceiling of the diner down. It sounded like the owners originally planned to fix the diner up.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7181/6935913121_971f235f2a_b.jpg
]

Thank You for posting your pictures. I ate a lot of good lunches there. The older couple that ran it up until a year ago or so were some of the nicest people I knew in the restaurant business. Hopefully whatever building replaces this might be able to have a small type restaurant built into it.

Someone said on this forum before about the difficulty of taking a photo without having Fenwick Tower in it somehow. Well....

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7042/6935910309_67d9cfbcc2_b.jpg

planarchy
Feb 28, 2012, 11:36 PM
The original rendering was crap!

No it wasn't. Nothing amazing, but fine infill from a nonprofit on a site that's been vacant for years.

The building currently being built - now that certainly is showing clear signs of being crap.

someone123
Feb 28, 2012, 11:45 PM
No it wasn't. Nothing amazing, but fine infill from a nonprofit on a site that's been vacant for years.

I agree. Like I said, the alternatives in an area like Gottingen are to either get things going with some modest buildings or pass on these opportunities and let sites like this sit idle for an indefinite period of time.

Not every small apartment building needs to be a masterpiece, and I like the simplicity of some of Halifax's older wooden buildings. They can look great, provided they are well-proportioned and kept in good shape. I don't think that original rendering was horrible.

Empire
Feb 29, 2012, 12:58 AM
No it wasn't. Nothing amazing, but fine infill from a nonprofit on a site that's been vacant for years.

The building currently being built - now that certainly is showing clear signs of being crap.

This is my point. When you have a marginal rendering history has shown that the final product is always inferior. A street like Gottingen should have higher commercial appearance then on Creighton or Buddy Day because of the visibility and commercial potential.

Some of the wooden structures in the area add a lot to the feel of the neighbourhood. Crap knock-off structures detract from an otherwise vibrant precinct.


http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0509.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0519.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0521.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0529.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0533.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0539.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0540.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0541.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0542.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0544.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0585.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0700.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0718.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0722.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0726.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0746.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/Halifax%20North%20End/IMG_0775.jpg

Empire
Feb 29, 2012, 1:36 AM
It's about time:

Cranes in short supply:
http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/67780-coping-crane-drain

worldlyhaligonian
Feb 29, 2012, 5:11 AM
I think we are hitting the critical mass, tipping point here people.

This, Dutch Village, and the 2nd Waterton tower really will add a nice flow going southward.

someone123
Feb 29, 2012, 6:59 AM
I think we are hitting the critical mass, tipping point here people.

This, Dutch Village, and the 2nd Waterton tower really will add a nice flow going southward.

Halifax is somewhat unusual for a small city in that most new construction is multi-unit. It's also getting far more urban infill than most other small cities, and that trend is probably going to accelerate. In 10 years I think Halifax will be a much better city than it is now.

It really is time to look at better transit though. Council just put a bunch of developments along the Bedford Highway on hold. If they do not invest in proper infrastructure like rail or at least solid BRT service (with dedicated lanes along corridors like Bayers Road) then the older parts of the city won't be able to handle as much growth and there will be more sprawl in outer suburban areas. We also won't maximize the potential of neighbourhoods like the North End unless they have better transit service.

halifaxboyns
Mar 1, 2012, 8:32 PM
Halifax's building boom: anything goes
HRM By Design can be ignored with impunity.
Posted by Tim Bousquet on Thu, Mar 1, 2012 at 2:36 PM

Development issues have come front and centre at city hall, with so much construction in the works that there’s a reported crane shortage in Halifax. And the much-celebrated ship building contract may or may not result in more and better paying jobs for the bulk of the population, but the building industry is anticipating high rents whether pay increases or not, and so we can expect still more apartment and condo projects in the months and years ahead.
The immediate effect of this upturn in the building industry is two-fold. First, city council is being asked repeatedly to simply ignore HRM By Design, the five-year process that involved over 5,000 citizens and millions of dollars. The HRM By Design consensus was basically that the regulatory process around development be streamlined, so long as new projects fit into a set of design and height restrictions. The “streamlining” part of the consensus has been a huge success; city staffer Andy Filmore told council last week that projects now move through the bureaucracy in 60 days, which stands up as among the fastest approvals in the country.

The design and height part of the consensus, however, apparently has been ditched. Last week council allowed a resurrection of the abandoned Twister Sisters project on Hollis Street to move forward to public consultation. Called “Skye Halifax,” the new proposal is, at 48-storeys, more than double the height limit for the site outlined in HRM By Design. City staff recommended against allowing it to proceed, but council rejected that advice. Judging from comments from councillors, it appears they have no desire to adhere to HRM By Design, begging the question why they adopted it in the first place. Perhaps to increase public cynicism.

With Skye moving forward, there’s no logical regulatory reason for the bureaucracy to oppose the joint YMCA-CBC proposal for the corner of Sackville and South Park Streets, which likewise is double the height limits set out in HRM By Design. In this instance, staff supported the proposal, and council happily agreed. A public hearing will be set to hear what will no doubt be ignored opposition to the project, and that will be that. The flood gates have been opened; HRM By Design can be ignored with impunity.

If you really feel like reading this (why anyone would) the link is here (http://www.thecoast.ca/RealityBites/archives/2012/03/01/halifaxs-building-boom-anything-goes).

someone123
Mar 1, 2012, 9:02 PM
Yeah, it's not much of an article, but I posted a reply.

Basically I had two points:

1) There always has to be room to change plans like HRM by Design because they are never 100% correct. There are already a bunch of examples of areas where HbD rules have had unintended consequences and are being changed.

2) It's wrong to say that HbD is going to 100% collapse if some changes are made for a couple of developments. There's still a strong incentive for developers to go with the quicker basic procedure, and even in cases where they get amendments there are still HbD procedures that must be followed. The design review committee is one example.

someone123
Mar 1, 2012, 11:29 PM
Some great comments have been posted.

I like the Dartmouth Cove story. Public consultations often generate a laundry list of requirements that are impossible to satisfy concurrently, and frequently there is no consensus on important issues. "6 storeys or less" is very small part of the overall picture. People also want things like affordable housing, jobs, low taxes, and good public services. Those aims are all furthered by permitting increased floors for a building like the YMCA. I would argue that the best overall tradeoff is clear when wind and shadow studies are complete and no major downside has been identified.

Empire
Mar 2, 2012, 12:27 AM
I think Mulgrave Park could support three 30 storey towers. A mix of affodable housing and mid-range condos.

Right across the street from the shipyard!!

Mulgrave Park has a tonne of potential:
http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=halifax&hl=en&ll=44.667947,-63.598534&spn=0.000008,0.003519&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=29.481488,57.65625&hnear=Halifax,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia&t=h&z=18&layer=c&cbll=44.667876,-63.598403&panoid=FBpu15xVkkvEU8IDnhVUqg&cbp=12,256.1,,0,0

Mulgrave Park has a tonne of potential:
http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=halifax&hl=en&ll=44.667756,-63.601028&spn=0.001995,0.003519&sll=49.891235,-97.15369&sspn=29.481488,57.65625&hnear=Halifax,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia&t=h&layer=c&cbll=44.667675,-63.60098&panoid=1HfOLyTw0rvHAMaldYR9XA&cbp=12,34.74,,0,0&z=18

worldlyhaligonian
Mar 2, 2012, 4:31 PM
This Bosquet guy needs to be shut down. The anti-development stance is obscene at this point...

Keith P.
Mar 2, 2012, 9:48 PM
This Bosquet guy needs to be shut down. The anti-development stance is obscene at this point...

He's a Marxist. Really. Maybe he can get a one-way ticket to Cuba.

Hali87
Mar 2, 2012, 10:45 PM
A small thing in the article that interested me is that he referred to the "___" (between cogswell and north) as the "lower north end". This is geographically incorrect - by definition the "lower north end" would be the part of the north end closest to the harbour (and thus lower in altitude - consider how "lower canada" and "lower manhattan" got their names) but I think it's time that we decided where each neighbourhood begins and ends, and what they should properly be called. I think this would do a lot to foster a sense of community and identity. Hopefully this will be addressed in RP+5.

DigitalNinja
Mar 2, 2012, 11:15 PM
He's a Marxist. Really. Maybe he can get a one-way ticket to Cuba.

Cuba is too good for him. Send him to North Korea and let him work in a camp for a while and see how it feels.

fenwick16
Mar 3, 2012, 1:56 PM
This story was in the Chronicle Herald - http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/69324-judge-extends-stay-st-patricks-alexandra-case


Judge extends stay in St. Patrick's-Alexandra case
March 2, 2012 - 2:44pm By CHRIS LAMBIE Business Editor


http://thechronicleherald.ca/sites/default/files/imagecache/ch_article_main_image/articles/pp012412metledge_1.jpg
Developer Joe Metledge listens to councillors debate the future of the closed St. Patricks-Alexandra School site at city hall in Halifax in January. In a decision released Friday, a judge has ruled the sale of St. Patrick’s-Alexandra to a developer will remain on hold until a judicial review later this year. (PETER PARSONS / Staff / File)

UPDATED 3:59 p.m. Friday

The sale of St. Patrick’s-Alexandra School to a developer will remain on hold until a judicial review later this year.

A Nova Scotia Supreme Court decision released Friday continues a stay first granted in February that halted Jono Developments Ltd.’s $3-million purchase of the former school property in north-end Halifax. A judicial review of the sale, requested by the North End Community Health Association, the Richard Preston Centre for Excellence Society and the Micmac Native Friendship Society, will go ahead in June.

“The overall balance of convenience favours the applicants and, for this reason, I am prepared to continue the stay until the decision in the judicial review application has been issued,” Justice Michael J. Wood said in his written decision.

The review will look at whether the municipality followed its own rules for disposal of surplus property.
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JET
Mar 5, 2012, 4:13 PM
Cuba is too good for him. Send him to North Korea and let him work in a camp for a while and see how it feels.

if i say that i'm a marxist, can I get a one-way ticket to Cuba? :banana:

DigitalNinja
Mar 5, 2012, 4:19 PM
I'd say I was a marxist if I could go to cuba.

JET
Mar 5, 2012, 4:24 PM
there's something up with one of the dreadful buildings on Gottingen. It's north of the North End Clinic, the second floor has been removed. There have been construction signs on the building for a number of months. could be interesting.

fenwick16
Mar 6, 2012, 2:56 AM
This story was in the Chronicle Herald - http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/70365-work-airport-hotel-set-start-may

Work on airport hotel set to start in May
March 5, 2012 - 7:08pm By REMO ZACCAGNA Business Reporter

Work on a new hotel near the Halifax airport is set to get off the ground in May.

Manga Hotels of Mississauga, Ont., is behind the proposed Courtyard by Marriott, a seven-storey, 120-room hotel that is to include a 5,000-square-foot conference room.

A purchase of four hectares of land from Halifax Regional Municipality that will be used for additional parking for the new hotel is expected to close in the coming weeks.
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cormiermax
Mar 6, 2012, 3:15 AM
Not putting high hopes on this one. Most of these suburban hotels turn out pretty bad.

someone123
Mar 6, 2012, 3:29 AM
The suburban hotels are mostly cookie cutter. Some of the buildings you see in suburban Halifax are basically identical to what you see from highways all over the US and Canada.

Despite the fact that it should look better than average, the Alt hotel at the airport is a standard design too.

fenwick16
Mar 6, 2012, 4:12 AM
Are there renderings for the new Courtyard Marriott proposal?

sdm
Mar 7, 2012, 1:12 AM
Are there renderings for the new Courtyard Marriott proposal?

Due to the Marriott brand requirements it will likely be just like any other courtyard.

JET
Mar 7, 2012, 2:41 PM
there's something up with one of the dreadful buildings on Gottingen. It's north of the North End Clinic, the second floor has been removed. There have been construction signs on the building for a number of months. could be interesting.

a few buildings south, next to the pharmacy, a building that has had dreadful plywood over the main floor windows for a LONG time, now has a new set of storefront windows, a nice change

worldlyhaligonian
Mar 7, 2012, 5:34 PM
He's a Marxist. Really. Maybe he can get a one-way ticket to Cuba.

They aren't anti-development in Cuba, or any communist country for that matter. These folks are out to lunch, their "comrades" would laugh at their interpretation of socialism and development.

SekishikiMeikaiHa
Mar 8, 2012, 12:29 AM
The Pizza Delight on Spring Garden:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7058/6816875636_738a638f79_b.jpg

Jstaleness
Mar 8, 2012, 12:45 AM
:previous: Not bad. One of their nicest looking locations I'm sure.

someone123
Mar 8, 2012, 1:41 AM
I see 8 Pizza Delight signs. Were they going for some sort of record?

MonctonRad
Mar 8, 2012, 2:45 AM
Is that a Turkish Delight sign under the Pizza Delight sign? :haha:

Seriously, I agree, not a bad storefront. :tup:

pblaauw
Mar 8, 2012, 6:14 AM
I see 8 Pizza Delight signs. Were they going for some sort of record?

There's a 9th on the door.

worldlyhaligonian
Mar 8, 2012, 6:56 AM
There's a Pizza Delight? I don't see it guys, I think they need more signage. :)

halifaxboyns
Mar 8, 2012, 7:00 AM
Talk about Signage over kill.

coolmillion
Mar 8, 2012, 7:03 AM
HRM By Design should control overzealous signage. There are at least three other businesses underneath, behind, between and inside the Pizza Delight.

Jstaleness
Mar 8, 2012, 11:11 AM
It's a bit much. Onyx is all but invisible as well under the bright Pizza signage.

eastcoastal
Mar 8, 2012, 11:41 AM
As a consumer, I'd be more likely to identify with the subtle expressions of businesses than the attempts to shove a brand image down my throat through signage alone. I'd prefer the dark materials, slick expression, and simple signage of Onyx over the multitude of Pizza Delight expressions.

Though, not having a large family of hungry tummies to feed, I don't think I'm the target market. I'd more prefer a drink under subdued lighting than cheese and garlic on doughy bread surrounded by crying toddlers.

halifaxboyns
Mar 8, 2012, 3:42 PM
Sign proliferation is a big problem in many cities. If any of you want to take a look at Sign proliferation at it's worst, take a streetview tour of MacLeod Trail S between Mission Road and Heritage Drive, here in Calgary. That's a pretty ugly commercial strip, with way too much signage.

kph06
Mar 8, 2012, 7:12 PM
It's a bit much. Onyx is all but invisible as well under the bright Pizza signage.

I saw a recent ad for Onyx where they poke fun at this. They say something about being hidden behind all that neon.

worldlyhaligonian
Mar 8, 2012, 9:56 PM
I hope this Pizza Delight fails miserably... In that part of town I'm either going to Pizza Corner or something on the south side of downtown like Alexandra's or Papa Mario's.

This location should be a bar, but not a poorly managed operation like Havana Nights.

mcmcclassic
Mar 8, 2012, 10:27 PM
I hope this Pizza Delight fails miserably... In that part of town I'm either going to Pizza Corner or something on the south side of downtown like Alexandra's or Papa Mario's.

This location should be a bar, but not a poorly managed operation like Havana Nights.

According to my gf (who works there), they have already laid off 3/4 of their waiters/waitresses (started with 40, now have 10). She thinks they will fold before the end of the summer - we shall have to see what happens.

someone123
Mar 8, 2012, 10:46 PM
According to my gf (who works there), they have already laid off 3/4 of their waiters/waitresses (started with 40, now have 10). She thinks they will fold before the end of the summer - we shall have to see what happens.

A dine-in family pizza restaurant seems like a poor fit for that location and is sort of a retro concept in general. It reminds me a lot of the old Pizza Hut restaurants like the one they had in Bedford.

If this does close down I'm sure we'll get at least a couple "death knell for Spring Garden Road" articles out of it. :)

Empire
Mar 9, 2012, 1:38 AM
There's a 9th on the door.

I see ten in total.

RyeJay
Mar 9, 2012, 3:07 AM
I hope this Pizza Delight fails miserably... In that part of town I'm either going to Pizza Corner or something on the south side of downtown like Alexandra's or Papa Mario's.

This location should be a bar, but not a poorly managed operation like Havana Nights.

I'm more offended by Chickenburger on Queen Street.

Hali87
Mar 9, 2012, 6:32 AM
To anyone interested, Dal is hosting two free conferences over the next couple days. The Elizabeth May Symposium (http://emaychair.dal.ca/index.php/annual-symposium/2012) (sustainability and environmental) is tomorrow at the SUB from 2-7 and [url=http://planningconference.dal.ca/Home.html]SHIFT 2012[/url (urban planning and related fields) continues tomorrow and Saturday at Pier 21 and Sexton Campus. Went to see tonight's speaker at SHIFT and I was really impressed. The speaker was a woman from the Bronx who talked about the potential for gentrification and infill to provide opportunities for existing communities instead of creating conflict with them and displacing people. I hope all parties involved in the St. Pat's-Alexandra dispute were there - I definitely saw a few councillors, which is a good sign.

SekishikiMeikaiHa
Mar 9, 2012, 6:53 PM
I'm more offended by Chickenburger on Queen Street.

What are you talking about?:haha:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7193/6967430109_5f8fd270de_b.jpg

someone123
Mar 9, 2012, 6:57 PM
That is pretty disappointing and not suited to the location. Parking like that shouldn't even be permitted in that area because it disrupts pedestrian traffic. Soon the far end of that block will have 9-storey condos and major retail spaces and it will be on a block with single-width sidewalks and curb cuts.

Because it's not tall nobody cares. Welcome to Halifax I guess..?

Keith P.
Mar 9, 2012, 8:26 PM
That is pretty disappointing and not suited to the location. Parking like that shouldn't even be permitted in that area because it disrupts pedestrian traffic. Soon the far end of that block will have 9-storey condos and major retail spaces and it will be on a block with single-width sidewalks and curb cuts.

Because it's not tall nobody cares. Welcome to Halifax I guess..?

I cannot understand why they reno'ed that building instead of knocking it down and starting fresh. Cost I suppose. It truly is hideous and inappropriate - looks like something you would see in rural NS or a place like Moncton. :D But one can only hope that a mysterious fire :shrug: destroys the place beyond repair before too long - restaurant kitchens are notorious for fires, after all - and that a more appropriate structure replaces it once the insurance money comes through. :banana:

worldlyhaligonian
Mar 9, 2012, 10:25 PM
A dine-in family pizza restaurant seems like a poor fit for that location and is sort of a retro concept in general. It reminds me a lot of the old Pizza Hut restaurants like the one they had in Bedford.

If this does close down I'm sure we'll get at least a couple "death knell for Spring Garden Road" articles out of it. :)

Great meme idea:

Pizza shop closes.


Downtown Halifax is proclaimed as dying.

Or like with a local politician. Pizza shop closes. Blames developers.

Hali87
Mar 9, 2012, 10:33 PM
I cannot understand why they reno'ed that building instead of knocking it down and starting fresh. Cost I suppose. It truly is hideous and inappropriate - looks like something you would see in rural NS or a place like Moncton. :D But one can only hope that a mysterious fire :shrug: destroys the place beyond repair before too long - restaurant kitchens are notorious for fires, after all - and that a more appropriate structure replaces it once the insurance money comes through. :banana:

I think it looks pretty good personally. My only problem with it is that it's surrounded by parking lots. But the building itself looks pretty nice IMO. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder I suppose.

The only thing pizza delight had going for it is that it's open 24 hours.. I'm sure this will attract a lot of drunk students after 4 am.

spaustin
Mar 10, 2012, 9:53 PM
I actually think the Chickenburger is nicer looking than the Pizza Delight. All that sign pollution and the mash of modern materials makes Pizza Delight look like a piece of the suburbs got dropped on Spring Garden.

someone123
Mar 10, 2012, 10:33 PM
I think it looks pretty good personally. My only problem with it is that it's surrounded by parking lots. But the building itself looks pretty nice IMO. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder I suppose.

The building itself and the signs are kind of interesting looking, but the whole thing looks shabby (the utility poles don't help). It's also an inefficient use of that lot -- the same property could support some office or residential space along with the Chickenburger.

Like I said, it will look weird because this is going to be a high-end shopping district with a little wooden house and parking lot surrounded by modern buildings like the new library and the condos going in on Clyde Street.

worldlyhaligonian
Mar 10, 2012, 11:32 PM
The building itself and the signs are kind of interesting looking, but the whole thing looks shabby (the utility poles don't help). It's also an inefficient use of that lot -- the same property could support some office or residential space along with the Chickenburger.

Like I said, it will look weird because this is going to be a high-end shopping district with a little wooden house and parking lot surrounded by modern buildings like the new library and the condos going in on Clyde Street.

Its a really inefficient use of the site.

fenwick16
Mar 12, 2012, 11:57 PM
A story that was in the Chronicle Herald - http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/72866-apartment-building-booming-halifax

Apartment building booming in Halifax
March 12, 2012 - 8:06pm By ROGER TAYLOR Business Columnist


Halifax is going through an apartment-building construction boom the likes of which the city has not seen since the 1970s.

The apartment buildings now under construction in Halifax have a total of 2,282 units, says Matthew Gilmore, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp.’s senior provincial market analyst.

The national housing agency tracks construction from beginning to end, and Gilmore says this is one of the highest apartment unit totals under construction in Halifax that CMHC has recorded in nearly 50 years.
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fenwick16
Mar 13, 2012, 12:04 AM
Is there a separate thread for this project?

(source: http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/72858-q-lofts-begin-construction-halifax )
Q Lofts begin construction in Halifax
March 12, 2012 - 7:27pm By REMO ZACCAGNA Business Reporter


Demolition of a north-end industrial building to make room for a multimillion-dollar condominium project has begun, with construction expected to start next month.

A fence was put up around the 15,000-square-foot building at 5666 Roberts St., just off James Street, on Friday, with the roof having been removed over the last few days.

The interior was gutted over the last several weeks.

In its place, Polycorp Properties Inc. will build the Q Lofts, a 72-unit condominium building that will be “approximately the height of a six-storey building,” said developer Peter Polley.

It will be that height because each unit will be designed to take up two levels.

Construction of the building, which Polley estimates to cost in the range of $10 million to $20 million and will have a 20,000-square-foot footprint, will begin “relatively soon,” he said.
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.
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FuzzyWuz
Mar 13, 2012, 1:17 AM
Is there a separate thread for this project?

(source: http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/72858-q-lofts-begin-construction-halifax )

Kind of an island of condos in the middle of craptown. (I lived there, I know.)

fenwick16
Mar 13, 2012, 1:31 AM
Here is a Google map link for the new condo location 5666 Roberts Street, Halifax - http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=5666+roberts+street+halifax&ll=44.654428,-63.589983&spn=0.001607,0.004128&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&hnear=5666+Roberts+St,+Halifax,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia+B3K+3W6&gl=ca&t=h&z=19

someone123
Mar 13, 2012, 3:26 AM
I made a thread for Q Lofts: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=198176

halifaxboyns
Mar 13, 2012, 7:01 AM
A story that was in the Chronicle Herald - http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/72866-apartment-building-booming-halifax

Mr. Gilmore's comments are indicative of a problem which I'm hoping the Regional Centre Plan will correct; which is the long time it takes to get through a DA. Particularly when it's located in an area where people are knowingly raising NIMBY issues to stall projects (like the Hydrostone). People seem to think that communities they live in shouldn't grow or what I like to call the snooze you loss principle. I got there first and to hell with everyone else.

If the Regional Centre plan can create a more certain application process (hitting the 90 day timelines) while suburban stuff still takes forever, it further lends support to development happening in the regional centre. It's faster and easier.

Time will tell, but I suspect the 'land rush' has already begun, particularly in areas where the regional centre plan is concentrating growth. I would guess a lot of land purchasing going on around Q condos.

Hali87
Mar 13, 2012, 8:38 PM
Mr. Gilmore's comments are indicative of a problem which I'm hoping the Regional Centre Plan will correct; which is the long time it takes to get through a DA. Particularly when it's located in an area where people are knowingly raising NIMBY issues to stall projects (like the Hydrostone). People seem to think that communities they live in shouldn't grow or what I like to call the snooze you loss principle. I got there first and to hell with everyone else.

I feel like this is a delicate issue, because the NIMBY argument in this case is not entirely without merit. The Hydrostone was a stable/stagnant neighbourhood for decades and a lot of people chose to live there for that specific reason - things were predictable, there were no disruptions due to new construction, etc. All of a sudden this is no longer the case, and some new developments are being plunked down in some pretty random places.

I think a plan similar to the "Toronto Avenues" might help mitigate this a bit, by making sure that moderately-sized infill projects are directed to major mixed-use corridors such as Robie or Young. This would have a major impact on these specific streets, but a very minor one on the surrounding neighbourhoods. The only thing I'm not sure about is how aware people are of how much this would transform the major corridors - imagine Quinpool if every building doubled its height, for example. Maybe not a "bad" thing, but this is arguably a larger scale change than building a couple high-rises downtown - we'd essentially be redeveloping all of our main streets.

worldlyhaligonian
Mar 14, 2012, 1:04 AM
I feel like this is a delicate issue, because the NIMBY argument in this case is not entirely without merit. The Hydrostone was a stable/stagnant neighbourhood for decades and a lot of people chose to live there for that specific reason - things were predictable, there were no disruptions due to new construction, etc. All of a sudden this is no longer the case, and some new developments are being plunked down in some pretty random places.



I don't think there is much validity in any NIMBY argument... its flawed because there is no actual vote from everybody in the neighborhood and the loudest voices are heard. Honestly, private ownership / rights are seemingly out the window in Halifax. You'll eventually need to have a public hearing to mow your lawn. Think of the grass!

Hali87
Mar 14, 2012, 3:21 AM
I don't think there is much validity in any NIMBY argument... its flawed because there is no actual vote from everybody in the neighborhood and the loudest voices are heard. Honestly, private ownership / rights are seemingly out the window in Halifax. You'll eventually need to have a public hearing to mow your lawn. Think of the grass!

You're right, and maybe "merit" was the wrong word. I just meant that it makes sense that some people would be upset by the sudden increase in developments and corresponding change to the landscape, because in some (but not all) cases, people bought houses and settled down in a stagnant area simply because it was stagnant.

scooby074
Mar 14, 2012, 5:34 PM
Maybe Im a greedy capitalist, but i dont think there should be ANY restrictions on development, particularly being forced to keep a set number of units for low income.

If I invest millions in a development, I should have say in what I do with it, not special interests nor council. My goal is to maximize my return and having units tied up by low income and other restrictions makes it that much harder.

I have family who does development in Halifax (some of their units are discussed on these pages), and its something that I've always wanted to get into, but between the special interests, NIMBY's and council, I don't know how anything gets done.

worldlyhaligonian
Mar 14, 2012, 7:54 PM
Maybe Im a greedy capitalist, but i dont think there should be ANY restrictions on development, particularly being forced to keep a set number of units for low income.

If I invest millions in a development, I should have say in what I do with it, not special interests nor council. My goal is to maximize my return and having units tied up by low income and other restrictions makes it that much harder.

I have family who does development in Halifax (some of their units are discussed on these pages), and its something that I've always wanted to get into, but between the special interests, NIMBY's and council, I don't know how anything gets done.

Well, this is part of the problem... the association of point on the political spectrum with rights.

There is nothing specifically "capitalist" about being pro development... centrally planned, left wing, economies are very in favour of high density development. Obviously libertarians believe you can do whatever you want with your land.

This public consultation process has gone way beyond its intention. I don't even think they allow this much, particularly uninformed / loud voices, in the Netherland's polder model.

However, the "anti-development" crowd has somehow pitched themselves as the "morally superior" and that tall buildings are not "left-wing". This is totally b/s. If we aren't going to live in huts, then tall buildings are the most environmentally sound, morally responsible, and "left wing" thing to do. They enable more people to potentially own/rent a place in the city as opposed to the McMansion concept of development.

I want these anti-development people to be called out for what they are. They sure as hell don't truly represent the left or the environment, or even heritage for that matter.

Wishblade
Mar 14, 2012, 9:20 PM
Im pro development and consider myself quite "left wing". One of the most appealing things to me in regards to high density is the positive environmental impact of it. It's why it always perplexes me to see environmentalist types opposing high density and not saying a thing about the sprawling suburbs (unless it has to do with BL I guess). It's almost as if many of them just havn't done their research and can't connect the dots. Or maybe because they think tall buildings have a more "unnatural" look and are therefore worse for the environment? :shrug:

Hali87
Mar 14, 2012, 10:42 PM
Im pro development and consider myself quite "left wing". One of the most appealing things to me in regards to high density is the positive environmental impact of it. It's why it always perplexes me to see environmentalist types opposing high density and not saying a thing about the sprawling suburbs (unless it has to do with BL I guess). It's almost as if many of them just havn't done their research and can't connect the dots. Or maybe because they think tall buildings have a more "unnatural" look and are therefore worse for the environment? :shrug:

Many of the "environmentalist types" are also the "heritage and authenticity types" (read: hipsters) who truly believe that allowing tall buildings will cause Halifax to lose its identity (because they saw it in an article that they skimmed over at Starbucks). Many people think that the obvious solution is just to densify the peninsula without any tall buildings. Unfortunately they don't stop and think about if/how that can actually be done.

Hali87
Mar 14, 2012, 10:45 PM
Maybe Im a greedy capitalist, but i dont think there should be ANY restrictions on development, particularly being forced to keep a set number of units for low income.


So.. if there are no units set aside for low income, and no developer would do that on their own because it doesn't make economic sense, where do low-income people live? The public housing projects haven't exactly been a resounding success..

Empire
Mar 14, 2012, 11:03 PM
So.. if there are no units set aside for low income, and no developer would do that on their own because it doesn't make economic sense, where do low-income people live? The public housing projects haven't exactly been a resounding success..

Why?

planarchy
Mar 14, 2012, 11:15 PM
Public Consultation on the North-South Peninsula Bicycle Corridor
Thursday, March 29, 7:00 - 9:00pm

Bloomfield Centre, 2786 Agricola St.

This session will include an overview of the options for a north-south bicycle corridor on the peninsula. Participants will be invited to provide their perspectives and priorities. This information will be used to inform the final recommendation to Regional Council.

http://halifax.ca/cycling/index.html

planarchy
Mar 14, 2012, 11:21 PM
Also - not sure if this has been mentioned, but the old pool hall on Gottingen is finally seeing a big reno. Main floor to be second Hub location I think. Not sure about upper two floors.

Also - retail space next to Pharasave has been under renovation for the past few weeks and 3 or 4 story small building with ground floor retail under construction here - http://g.co/maps/ed9ca

Hali87
Mar 14, 2012, 11:26 PM
Why?

Well, most of them are more or less cut off from anything that ISN'T public housing - Uniacke Square probably to the least extent, and Greystone definitely the most. This creates communities where the vast majority of residents live below the poverty line. Unemployment is significantly higher than other areas, as are crime rates. Consider that children are growing up in these communities - do you think they would be more likely to fall into the cycle of poverty/crime/unemployment if they were constantly surrounded by it, or if they were dispersed throughout the city and lived in places where there were actually things to do, places to go? Greystone actually has its own elementary/junior high school where almost all of the kids live in public housing. Less than 1 km away is Elizabeth Sutherland, another elementary/junior high that serves the non-public-housing kids.

I guess it's hard to qualify public housing in Halifax specifically as a "failure" but the general trend across North America is to move away from this type of public housing model. See Regent Park in Toronto for example.

scooby074
Mar 15, 2012, 12:17 AM
So.. if there are no units set aside for low income, and no developer would do that on their own because it doesn't make economic sense, where do low-income people live? The public housing projects haven't exactly been a resounding success..

Dont know where they'll live and honestly I dont care. Maybe get a job , off social assistance and a better apartment?

Ive lived in lots of apartments when i was younger that had their share of welfare recipients. Some landlords love it, because the check is always there. An honest assessment of those buildings, that I lived in mind you, would certainly have them as lower class. There is a certain type of individual that calls these places home, and their friends too. These buildings are kept in a certain manner, because the landlord nor the tenants care. One of the best days of my life was when i finally was able to move out and up, away from those places.

If I was a landlord now, having lived the experience, I would not want low incomes in my building. Its just not worth it.

Ill agree that my post smacks of elitism, but i've been there, done that.

DigitalNinja
Mar 15, 2012, 12:31 AM
I remember when I was younger, I lived with my parents my family and I had to rent an apartment for 3 months while our house was being built.
Most landlords in Halifax are SLUM landlords. I'm sorry to say it. But how the hell someone can justify renting out an apartment from the 1970's in 2011 or 2012 and charge $1000 for a two bedroom with the original flooring. (Or some very old reno flooring) Does not make sense to me. Sliding closet doors that are no more than cardboard.
These types of places should not be allowed. A simple renovation could fix much of this but all they want is their money.

Anyway I support density, I support condo's I support rentals. I support apartments that could be lower cost. But I do not support the majority of the owners of these apartments. (Transglobe, and others) that do not do jack shit for the people renting from them.

Empire
Mar 15, 2012, 12:39 AM
Well, most of them are more or less cut off from anything that ISN'T public housing - Uniacke Square probably to the least extent, and Greystone definitely the most. This creates communities where the vast majority of residents live below the poverty line. Unemployment is significantly higher than other areas, as are crime rates. Consider that children are growing up in these communities - do you think they would be more likely to fall into the cycle of poverty/crime/unemployment if they were constantly surrounded by it, or if they were dispersed throughout the city and lived in places where there were actually things to do, places to go? Greystone actually has its own elementary/junior high school where almost all of the kids live in public housing. Less than 1 km away is Elizabeth Sutherland, another elementary/junior high that serves the non-public-housing kids.

I guess it's hard to qualify public housing in Halifax specifically as a "failure" but the general trend across North America is to move away from this type of public housing model. See Regent Park in Toronto for example.

What I am saying is instead of the politically correct assimilation of disadvantaged individuals or groups into small new developments as a way to improve their conditions why not take better developments to them? Perhaps you would call this reverse "gentrification" just as forcing developments to include certain groups could be considered reverse "gentrification".

Hali87
Mar 16, 2012, 12:06 AM
What I am saying is instead of the politically correct assimilation of disadvantaged individuals or groups into small new developments as a way to improve their conditions why not take better developments to them? Perhaps you would call this reverse "gentrification" just as forcing developments to include certain groups could be considered reverse "gentrification".

I think this is another approach to create basically the same conditions. Whether the surrounding community creates more space for lower-income residents seeking upward mobility, or the public housing projects themselves are redeveloped to include more than just low-rent housing, things would improve dramatically. It's not about a politically correct "anyone should be able to live in any new development regardless of income" so much as a recognition that people who live in public housing, who are surrounded by nothing other than more public housing, don't have many opportunities, and that these conditions tend to foster crime and complacency in ways that mixed-use, mixed-income neighbourhoods don't.

someone123
Mar 16, 2012, 12:34 AM
I think this is another approach to create basically the same conditions. Whether the surrounding community creates more space for lower-income residents seeking upward mobility, or the public housing projects themselves are redeveloped to include more than just low-rent housing, things would improve dramatically. It's not about a politically correct "anyone should be able to live in any new development regardless of income" so much as a recognition that people who live in public housing, who are surrounded by nothing other than more public housing, don't have many opportunities, and that these conditions tend to foster crime and complacency in ways that mixed-use, mixed-income neighbourhoods don't.

I agree. Like I said, I think Gottingen's main problem is that it has a high concentration of public housing and not much else. It's hard to run a business in a situation like that. As a result, residents have fewer services and jobs available and fewer opportunities for entrepreneurship. Add in some social problems and it becomes a very difficult situation to deal with.

Unfortunately the sort of dialogue we are seeing with St. Pat's-Alexandra and the supposed gentrification dilemma isn't closely related to the reality of the neighbourhood. It's not a "developers vs. residents" situation or an "HRM vs. Uniacke Square" situation, but some people really wanted to cast it in an adversarial light and turn it into a political issue. That is the kind of stuff that creates a horrible climate for business and really holds neighbourhoods like this back. None of the locals have any money and if outside money is chased away they are stuck with what they've got. They might be able to lobby for more funding for nonprofits or public housing but that will never create a real economy to lift people out of poverty.

Empire
Mar 16, 2012, 1:52 AM
I agree. Like I said, I think Gottingen's main problem is that it has a high concentration of public housing and not much else. It's hard to run a business in a situation like that. As a result, residents have fewer services and jobs available and fewer opportunities for entrepreneurship. Add in some social problems and it becomes a very difficult situation to deal with.


Uniacke Square is the only public housing project that has an immediate effect on the North End. Mulgrave Park is really quite removed from the Gottingen strip. I would like to see more affordable housing incorporated in new developments in the North End and perhaps some retail space reserved for affordable applications. The biggest problem is that the allowable density is too low to be able to have a profitable development with an affordable component. Without the density the building design and quality will take the hit and contribute to the cycle of shoddy buildings.

There have to be more gov. incentives to allow an affordable component and a quality development simultaneously.

someone123
Mar 16, 2012, 2:15 AM
I would like to see more affordable housing incorporated in new developments in the North End and perhaps some retail space reserved for affordable applications. The biggest problem is that the allowable density is too low to be able to have a profitable development with an affordable component.

I remember when the Brickyard development was first proposed. Originally it was going to be a multi-phase midrise loft setup, probably similar to a scaled-up Q Lofts. That was eventually cut down to townhouses. The whole thing was applauded by the usual suspects despite being a bit of a missed opportunity. It turned out okay, but would have been way better with more of a mix of housing and perhaps a commercial component. Allowing a 6 or 8 storey building next to those parking lots on Maitland Street would have had approximately zero impact on anybody, but they were deemed undesirable on an abstract level and that was enough.

The idea of business incubator space is interesting. I'm not sure if such a thing already exists, but it would be interesting to offer cheap space near Uniacke Square and create incentives for hiring locals and for getting people from around the city to volunteer.

someone123
Mar 16, 2012, 2:30 AM
By the way, there was an interesting story tonight in ANS about a craft brewery that will be opening up in an "undisclosed North End Halifax" location. It'll be interesting to see how that turns out.

Maybe there will be another on Gottingen to go along with Propeller.

hoser111
Mar 16, 2012, 3:34 AM
By the way, there was an interesting story tonight in ANS about a craft brewery that will be opening up in an "undisclosed North End Halifax" location. It'll be interesting to see how that turns out.

Maybe there will be another on Gottingen to go along with Propeller.

There's a bit of info on it here: (I presume it's the same...)

http://www.thecoast.ca/RestaurantandBarNews/archives/2012/03/14/another-brewery-for-halifax

kph06
Mar 17, 2012, 4:21 PM
Since the server upgrade the old Halifax threads have reappeared.

The Official Halifax Project Thread (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=1091)
Official Halifax Project Thread 2 (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=128708)

fenwick16
Mar 17, 2012, 5:30 PM
Since the server upgrade the old Halifax threads have reappeared.

The Official Halifax Project Thread (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=1091)
Official Halifax Project Thread 2 (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=128708)

It is interesting to see some of the old posts going back to 2003.

Keith P.
Mar 18, 2012, 1:07 AM
Interesting indeed. It is amazing how much has been accomplished in 9 years and equally discouraging how much was proposed but not done.

The entire Twisted Sisters discussion was quite interesting - the original proposal and the enthusiasm that created; the fight to get it through council; Howard Epstein and the HT trying to derail it and the efforts of many to oppose them; an then the approval to go ahead that resulted in nothing happening. So much energy for so little result...

Interestingly, if you read all the posts about the proposal, there was commentary from 2006 or 2007 that stated a HRM planner wished the towers were taller and narrower, like Skye, because they felt the Twisted Sisters were too wide - the taller, thinner towers were preferable for a variety of reasons. There was also discussion about how much of a market there would be for relatively expensive condos downtown, which Skye apparently tries to address. Fascinating.

someone123
Mar 18, 2012, 2:14 AM
Interestingly, if you read all the posts about the proposal, there was commentary from 2006 or 2007 that stated a HRM planner wished the towers were taller and narrower, like Skye, because they felt the Twisted Sisters were too wide - the taller, thinner towers were preferable for a variety of reasons. There was also discussion about how much of a market there would be for relatively expensive condos downtown, which Skye apparently tries to address. Fascinating.

It is interesting how few people have acknowledged the developer's straightforward explanation that Skye is better suited to the market than a stale proposal from 2004/2005. To my knowledge no journalists have responded to it. Instead we have a kind of "dialogue of the deaf" consisting of various people inventing reasons why Skye should not be permitted. As usual, the "debate" is more about evangelizing than about evaluating the proposal's merits.

Jonovision
Mar 18, 2012, 11:57 AM
Discovered a new tiny crane out near shearwater right before you get to autoport. It's on military land, it looks like its building some sort of infrastructure, but at this point it is still hard to tell.

Also, if anyone has been to Fishermans Cove lately there is a really nice new building there that is a great example of community infill.

kph06
Mar 18, 2012, 6:48 PM
Discovered a new tiny crane out near shearwater right before you get to autoport. It's on military land, it looks like its building some sort of infrastructure, but at this point it is still hard to tell.


If its a yellow one on the water side of the road that is for the expansion of the Eastern Passage waste water treatment plant.

musicman
Mar 19, 2012, 2:25 AM
Noticed that yellow crane there today as well..