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worldlyhaligonian
Sep 25, 2012, 4:32 AM
:previous: What are "progressive" tennis courts? Do they all lean to the left? :D

They are for children to learn on a proportionately sized court and also mean that kids don't take up valuable space on the standard courts.

kph06
Sep 29, 2012, 7:26 PM
New SMU building:
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8318/8036587704_680412598f_b.jpg

Nilan8888
Sep 29, 2012, 7:40 PM
What are "progressive" tennis courts? Do they all lean to the left?

No. These will be Progressive Conservative Tennis Courts.

Unfortunately, Joe Clark will be the only regular player.

someone123
Oct 5, 2012, 3:32 AM
Southwest Properties is soon going to move forward with a proposal to build a 21-storey, 274 unit apartment building at the corner of Sackville and Hollis. The existing Bank of Canada Building will be demolished and that site as well as the corner parking lot will be built on.

One the proposal is submitted to the city we can make a project thread. Hopefully renderings will come out soon.

cormiermax
Oct 5, 2012, 3:49 AM
I assume its this building being talked about?

http://imageshack.us/a/img543/9976/ssdfg.png (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/543/ssdfg.png/)

halifaxboyns
Oct 5, 2012, 4:15 AM
Awesome! I had hoped this block would slowly start being redeveloped. More residential - not quite what I had thought I would put there. Well - I had hoped a hotel would go on this block and then an apartment building on the other side, but I'm happy either way. :)

someone123
Oct 5, 2012, 4:21 AM
Yes, that's the site. I find that to be a very unattractive stretch of Hollis and it is a great spot for a tower. It will tie in nicely with the Nova Centre and give Sackville Street a more complete, built-up feel. Right now the downtown stretch of Sackville has 5 empty lots, but soon that will be down to 2 (Skye and the lower portion of the Bank of Canada block, if it is not included in this development). The Discovery Centre and Roy proposals are also nearby so this could become a very busy area. 1,000-2,000 new residents in these buildings would have a big positive impact on Barrington.

The only bad part of this is that the Bank of Canada Building is being torn down. Halifax doesn't have a lot of buildings in that style. I think we will regret the demolition of 1950s-70s era buildings in a few years.

fenwick16
Oct 5, 2012, 4:38 AM
I can't say that I will miss that building. Here is the Bing Maps Birds Eye View (http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&cp=rf6z109q23vk&lvl=19.25&dir=270.66&sty=b&where1=1583%20Hollis%20St%2C%20Halifax%2C%20NS%2C%20B3J&form=LMLTCC).

Based on the allnovascotia.com story, the portion of the surface parking lot between the 1583 Hollis Street building and Sackville Street is owned by Southwest Properties but I wonder about the area adjacent to Lower Water Street? With 274 units this will be a substantial building.

alps
Oct 5, 2012, 4:56 AM
The only bad part of this is that the Bank of Canada Building is being torn down. Halifax doesn't have a lot of buildings in that style. I think we will regret the demolition of 1950s-70s era buildings in a few years.

Is it? I was hoping they'd build on the parking lots before tearing that down, though I'm not sure who owns what land in that area. I agree that the Bank of Canada building is fairly handsome and definitely unique in the city.

someone123
Oct 5, 2012, 6:23 AM
Is it? I was hoping they'd build on the parking lots before tearing that down, though I'm not sure who owns what land in that area.

I believe that the parking that goes down Sackville and along Lower Water is multiple different lots with different owners. It sounds to me like the plan is that Southwest will build on the BoC building site, the parking deck next door, and the roughly square empty lot at the corner of Sackville and Hollis. I don't think this development will be on the lower part of the block.

I'd really like to find good street level shots of this area from the 1950s-70s period. There used to be 5 storey brick buildings on Sackville Street between Hollis and Lower Water, and there were some more 4 and 5 storey buildings on the west side of Hollis from Sackville to the Maritime Centre lot.

eastcoastal
Oct 5, 2012, 3:12 PM
Yes, that's the site. I find that to be a very unattractive stretch of Hollis and it is a great spot for a tower. It will tie in nicely with the Nova Centre and give Sackville Street a more complete, built-up feel. Right now the downtown stretch of Sackville has 5 empty lots, but soon that will be down to 2 (Skye and the lower portion of the Bank of Canada block, if it is not included in this development). The Discovery Centre and Roy proposals are also nearby so this could become a very busy area. 1,000-2,000 new residents in these buildings would have a big positive impact on Barrington.

The only bad part of this is that the Bank of Canada Building is being torn down. Halifax doesn't have a lot of buildings in that style. I think we will regret the demolition of 1950s-70s era buildings in a few years.

Agreed - this area needs more build-up. Too bad it can't be accommodated on the surface parking lots rather than tearing down buildings like this. I guess the only architecture the heritage trust cares about preserving is the type that is representative of an era that didn't consider women persons.

Halifax Hillbilly
Oct 5, 2012, 4:32 PM
Agreed - this area needs more build-up. Too bad it can't be accommodated on the surface parking lots rather than tearing down buildings like this. I guess the only architecture the heritage trust cares about preserving is the type that is representative of an era that didn't consider women persons.

You could also make the argument that the architecture of the modern movement didn't consider persons to be persons: a lot of modern architecture is a disaster from a livable, vibrant streetscape perspective. The public spaces created by the modernists are by and large failures from the same perspective.

The myopic views of the Heritage Trust, while on the extreme side, are not unique to Halifax. In addition to ignoring anything modern I also find there is too little interest in older working class areas of the city, like the North End.

What would you suggest are modern buildings worthy of preservation? I think the Dal Arts Centre is an obvious one, but beyond that there are not a look of good modern buildings in Halifax. The Law Courts aren't too bad if the lower levels and plaza could be re-worked.

Halifax Hillbilly
Oct 5, 2012, 4:37 PM
Southwest Properties is soon going to move forward with a proposal to build a 21-storey, 274 unit apartment building at the corner of Sackville and Hollis. The existing Bank of Canada Building will be demolished and that site as well as the corner parking lot will be built on.

One the proposal is submitted to the city we can make a project thread. Hopefully renderings will come out soon.

This is also the section of downtown that could most use some residents. Pretty dead at night. Do they have 21 stories as-of-right under HRMbyDesign?

someone123
Oct 5, 2012, 7:43 PM
The public spaces created by the modernists are by and large failures from the same perspective.

This really depends. When they were first built some of the severe, open modernist spaces created an interesting contrast and had a lot of architectural appeal. The problem is that the style worked for isolated, expertly-designed projects, but did not work when sloppily applied to all new construction and combined with car-oriented planning. A city can only handle so many monumental buildings.

This is also the section of downtown that could most use some residents. Pretty dead at night. Do they have 21 stories as-of-right under HRMbyDesign?

Yes, they mentioned quick approval under HRM by Design at that height and that is the HbD height for the Skye site as well. It's possible there was an old development agreement for that site because I heard of the same proposal years ago. In the past development agreements didn't necessarily have expiry dates.

someone123
Oct 6, 2012, 12:56 AM
Here's a little rendering I made that shows what Hollis might look like with the Southwest proposal and Waterside Centre. Hollis is only a few blocks long but it is a fairly impressive street.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8457/8055634696_d4f730cb7c_b.jpg

halifaxboyns
Oct 6, 2012, 3:34 AM
I guess there is some consolation if Skye doesn't go forward - they could do the original approval under HbD and get a quick approval. 66m is the post bonus height - so that's good for this block.

RyeJay
Oct 6, 2012, 8:45 PM
I guess there is some consolation if Skye doesn't go forward - they could do the original approval under HbD and get a quick approval. 66m is the post bonus height - so that's good for this block.

How likely do you think this is?

We still aren't even sure if the company has financial means to continue.

Could they not re-engage their intentions for the Twisted Sisters?

someone123
Oct 6, 2012, 9:05 PM
United Gulf's old DA is set to expire, if it hasn't already. I think it was issued sometime in 2007 with a 5 year limit.

I think a development based on the new HbD rules is as likely as anything at this point.

eastcoastal
Oct 9, 2012, 11:14 AM
You could also make the argument that the architecture of the modern movement didn't consider persons to be persons: a lot of modern architecture is a disaster from a livable, vibrant streetscape perspective. The public spaces created by the modernists are by and large failures from the same perspective...

Absolutely. Doesn't mean that they aren't part of the layered meaning found in a city. If you're going to preserve one built expression of our shitty cultural consciousness, then you need a pretty good reason not to preserve another that marks an equally well-defined moment in cultural self-perception. Modernism sort of coincides with Canada positioning itself on the international stage as an ideal expression of the "New World" free of the cultural baggage that contributed to the two World Wars. So, maybe it was more of a marketing tool... I think it'd be hard to say that we REALLY carried none of the colonial posturing with us... but still, it's a romantic idea.


The myopic views of the Heritage Trust, while on the extreme side, are not unique to Halifax. In addition to ignoring anything modern I also find there is too little interest in older working class areas of the city, like the North End.

Agreed - love the North End as urban form


What would you suggest are modern buildings worthy of preservation? I think the Dal Arts Centre is an obvious one, but beyond that there are not a look of good modern buildings in Halifax. The Law Courts aren't too bad if the lower levels and plaza could be re-worked.

Interesting - the Law Courts are pretty well aligned with the part of the modernist movement where pedestrian and vehicular traffic were separated (here, with the pedestrian bridge, which I think was intended to connect to a whole network of similar bridges spanning the planned waterfront superhighway that was thwarted with the preservation of the Historic Properties), but forgot that streetscapes needed to be animated and human scaled to provide environments where people could feel comfortable living and interacting. Tower in the green = bad.

I'd want to preserve the Canada Permanent Trust Building (where Starbucks and Durty Nelly's are right now)... it'd need some restoration work first, but the original terrazzo floor is still apparent, and I think it was the first curtain wall building in Atlantic Canada.

Dalhousie Killam Library. Unfriendly, I know... but pretty cool.

There's a nursing home with attached round church behind Quinpool and the old St. Patrick's High School that I like... the original brick cladding is covered up on the main building with some panel system (likely a compromised brick cladding that leaked and was falling apart as many from that era are), but the building has nice corner windows, and the church is a nice formal expression of sacred space.... I've always wanted to peek inside.

The Nova Scotia Public Archives Building

The former CNIB building on Almon St. is gone now, but I liked that one...

Halifax Hillbilly
Oct 11, 2012, 1:28 PM
Absolutely. Doesn't mean that they aren't part of the layered meaning found in a city. If you're going to preserve one built expression of our shitty cultural consciousness, then you need a pretty good reason not to preserve another that marks an equally well-defined moment in cultural self-perception. Modernism sort of coincides with Canada positioning itself on the international stage as an ideal expression of the "New World" free of the cultural baggage that contributed to the two World Wars. So, maybe it was more of a marketing tool... I think it'd be hard to say that we REALLY carried none of the colonial posturing with us... but still, it's a romantic idea.

I'm with you, we should preserve part of the modern movement's legacy. I guess the question is do we have to preserve their failed urban design principles that continue to make our streets dull and blocks unappealing? How do we decide between preservation and updating a building for modern needs? I guess I'm only in favour of "museum-piece" preservation for the absolute best buildings. Other buildings may deserve some form of protection but they might be adapted or re-purposed along the way. Also part of the layered meaning and history within a city.

Interesting - the Law Courts are pretty well aligned with the part of the modernist movement where pedestrian and vehicular traffic were separated (here, with the pedestrian bridge, which I think was intended to connect to a whole network of similar bridges spanning the planned waterfront superhighway that was thwarted with the preservation of the Historic Properties), but forgot that streetscapes needed to be animated and human scaled to provide environments where people could feel comfortable living and interacting. Tower in the green = bad.

I'd want to preserve the Canada Permanent Trust Building (where Starbucks and Durty Nelly's are right now)... it'd need some restoration work first, but the original terrazzo floor is still apparent, and I think it was the first curtain wall building in Atlantic Canada.

Dalhousie Killam Library. Unfriendly, I know... but pretty cool.

There's a nursing home with attached round church behind Quinpool and the old St. Patrick's High School that I like... the original brick cladding is covered up on the main building with some panel system (likely a compromised brick cladding that leaked and was falling apart as many from that era are), but the building has nice corner windows, and the church is a nice formal expression of sacred space.... I've always wanted to peek inside.

The Nova Scotia Public Archives Building

The former CNIB building on Almon St. is gone now, but I liked that one...

The church on Windsor is very cool. Not at all context-sensitive but in small doses that's not really a problem. Funny, I've never thought to go inside.

All of the above suggestions for some type of preservation make some sense. A few well chosen buildings from different eras can make an enormous difference in a streetscape or district. The Archives Building should be preserved for no other reason than the cornerstone dedicated to John Buchanan. Nothing like a reminder of how much debt you can pile up during a government building spree.

kwajo
Oct 11, 2012, 2:57 PM
A well designed 21 storey apartment building would be an amazing victory for that block!

Also, if Haligonians are really going to miss the Bank of Canada building that badly, you are always welcome to come to Saint John and visit it's twin:

http://i46.tinypic.com/wj7ww1.png
https://maps.google.ca/maps?q=prince+william+st.+saint+john&hl=en&ll=45.271904,-66.062025&spn=0.009227,0.01399&sll=45.110292,-66.041847&sspn=1.184352,1.790771&t=h&hnear=Prince+William+St,+St+John,+New+Brunswick&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.271996,-66.062064&panoid=Ldsn7UYkRL0DppIyFM8ixQ&cbp=12,310.15,,0,-11.39

Dmajackson
Oct 12, 2012, 12:45 AM
Discharge Agreement for the existing "Bay Store" development agreement;

http://www.halifax.ca/Commcoun/pcc/documents/TheBay.pdf

someone123
Oct 12, 2012, 2:18 AM
The owner of the Mills building on Spring Garden Road has announced that he intends to redevelop it in two phases in four or five years. The plan is to build two 8-10 storey buildings with a total of 200 apartments and retail spaces along Spring Garden Road.

It's a small site for two towers. It will be interesting to see which parts of the block will be redeveloped in each phase.

eastcoastal
Oct 12, 2012, 11:21 AM
I'm with you, we should preserve part of the modern movement's legacy. I guess the question is do we have to preserve their failed urban design principles that continue to make our streets dull and blocks unappealing? How do we decide between preservation and updating a building for modern needs?

The urban design principals are stumbling blocks.... I guess the criteria for preserving a building should be pretty strict - allowing only the best examples to remain. Luckily the building with Durty Nelly's and Starbucks in it has some decent urban design merits... back when it was a banking building, I hear that one could enter the double height main space from either Barrington or Argyle - one of the few buildings that would have used the topography of Halifax's street grid to form a feature, rather than simply trying to mitigate the effect of the slopes.


The church on Windsor is very cool. Not at all context-sensitive but in small doses that's not really a problem. Funny, I've never thought to go inside.

It's terrible... hard to say where the front of that complex is... surrounded by a sea of asphalt.

Too bad the Centennial Pool has already been super compromised... the recent energy efficient renos have cloaked that thing in a horrifying armor of temporary-looking photovoltaic arrays. Could we not have integrated them better? It's a building that I think is indicative of the role of modernism in Canada... following the World Wars, nationalism was more and more frequently expressed through venues other than war... the League of Nations and Olympics became larger movements. Not only does the Centennial Pool mark the centennial of Canada (and serve as a symbol of the break from British colonial architecture), but it was also built for the first Canada Summer Games: a way to increase the country's competitive advantage on the international stage.

someone123
Oct 15, 2012, 2:36 AM
There was an article tonight in ANS about the possible redevelopment of the Queen Street Sobeys. There are no concrete plans yet but residential is being considered.

Hopefully they will move forward with a plan for a mixed-use, urban format development with a grocery store below and apartments above. Apartments on that site combined with the Fenwick project would complement the grocery store perfectly and turn that area into more of a storefront neighbourhood commercial area rather than an out of context cluster of strip malls. I could see a lot more happening along the Queen Street axis. It's one natural extension of the Spring Garden Road area, which has very little vacant land left.

teddifax
Oct 15, 2012, 3:40 AM
There was an article tonight in ANS about the possible redevelopment of the Queen Street Sobeys. There are no concrete plans yet but residential is being considered.

Hopefully they will move forward with a plan for a mixed-use, urban format development with a grocery store below and apartments above. Apartments on that site combined with the Fenwick project would complement the grocery store perfectly and turn that area into more of a storefront neighbourhood commercial area rather than an out of context cluster of strip malls. I could see a lot more happening along the Queen Street axis. It's one natural extension of the Spring Garden Road area, which has very little vacant land left.

That would be great to hear!! Now let Empire build International Place downtown....

RyeJay
Oct 15, 2012, 7:33 AM
There was an article tonight in ANS about the possible redevelopment of the Queen Street Sobeys. There are no concrete plans yet but residential is being considered.

Hopefully they will move forward with a plan for a mixed-use, urban format development with a grocery store below and apartments above. Apartments on that site combined with the Fenwick project would complement the grocery store perfectly and turn that area into more of a storefront neighbourhood commercial area rather than an out of context cluster of strip malls. I could see a lot more happening along the Queen Street axis. It's one natural extension of the Spring Garden Road area, which has very little vacant land left.

If the Queen Street Sobeys is redeveloped, I wonder how many storeys they will be able to get?

halifaxboyns
Oct 16, 2012, 4:59 AM
If the Queen Street Sobeys is redeveloped, I wonder how many storeys they will be able to get?

Well that whole area is covered by viewplanes 9 and 10. My guess would be not very high but wasn't the new building with the fenwick proposal 12 stories? I guess it depends on where the focus the highest portion of the building to be.

I figure if they get 10 stories in the area with a nice mixed use format and a urban format sobeys like someone had suggested, that would fit in very well. The whole south end in that area could redevelop into 8 to 10 storey buildings and that would bulk up the density in that area nicely. Push up the number of people biking and walking to work in the office core nicely.

halifaxboyns
Oct 16, 2012, 5:02 AM
The owner of the Mills building on Spring Garden Road has announced that he intends to redevelop it in two phases in four or five years. The plan is to build two 8-10 storey buildings with a total of 200 apartments and retail spaces along Spring Garden Road.

It's a small site for two towers. It will be interesting to see which parts of the block will be redeveloped in each phase.

It is a small site but I think with the viewplanes, 10 stories will be lucky. What is City Centre Atlantic? Isn't it 9 stories? I'd say that might actually be lucky to get 9 - more likely 8 because VP 9 and 10 do project downward from the hill (if I remember some of the City Centre Diagrams correctly and they were pretty close).

Regardless, if they can get between 8 to 10, that seems to be the right size along that street for me. I don't mind Trillium being taller off the street and maybe an anchor building at the end next to the Lord Nelson (where that horrible eastlink shop is now) - but for most of the street 8 to 10 works fine. Plus with more units on the street, more people and more activity.

halifaxboyns
Oct 16, 2012, 5:10 AM
I was fortunate enough to attend the Canadian Institute of Planners national conference in Banff last week and listen to Andy Fillmore present a couple times on HRM by Design and the Regional Centre Plan. Unfortunately because I'm part of the host council, I didn't have a lot of time to talk to him about the recent Skye recommendation by the design committee. But I digress...

One thing that I had no idea of (I haven't been reading enough I guess) was this whole idea of a walkscore. I went to a presentation on it and found it very interesting, in fact it was brought up by one of the keynote speakers, whose book I purchased. Into the first chapter and so far it's quite good. He gave me this link where you can type in different cities and see the average walkscore of all neighbourhoods in that City (the over all City score) and you can narrow it down by neighbourhoods too.

Here is the link. (http://www.walkscore.com/)
Just to give you an idea of how HRM rates: HRM's overall walkscore is 98, while Hammond's Plains rates 25 (car dependant). I don't think it's quite 100% accurate as Fairview scored a zero, while Clayton Park scored a 63 so for smaller cities it may not be so accurate. But I thought I'd share it...

someone123
Oct 17, 2012, 5:39 PM
Yeah, they are missing some businesses and amenities so some areas have incorrectly low scores.

I thought the new Fenwick buildings were around 8 or 9 storeys. That will probably be the norm for that part of town. St. James Place was originally proposed as a 19 storey building but was eventually cut down to what it is now. Some of the original "public consultation" quotes were amazing for that one. I remember one person complaining about how it would be terrible to permit 1 bedroom units because then people like nurses might be able to afford them. Not a very flattering picture of South Enders' attitudes!

essaysmith
Oct 17, 2012, 9:30 PM
Anyone heard anything more about the city accepting tenders for the demolition of the Cogswell Interchange? The news was out a couple of days ago. Now that would open up some pretty sweet non-viewplane area.

fenwick16
Oct 17, 2012, 10:59 PM
Anyone heard anything more about the city accepting tenders for the demolition of the Cogswell Interchange? The news was out a couple of days ago. Now that would open up some pretty sweet non-viewplane area.

There was a story online by CBC that gave the impression that it was a tender for the demolition of the Interchange. However, it was actually a Request for Proposals for a technical design study. There is more information at this thread - http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?p=5868068#post5868068. Here is a link to the Request For Proposals for the technical design study - http://www.gov.ns.ca/tenders/pt_files/tenders/P12-082.pdf

eastcoastal
Oct 18, 2012, 9:51 AM
There was a story online by CBC that gave the impression that it was a tender for the demolition of the Interchange. However, it was actually a Request for Proposals for a technical design study.

Yeah... I was more excited when I thought is was a tender for the actual demo. Once I understood it was *another* study, I became a little less enthused. Still, it seems like another (baby) step forward? Right? Please?

Halifax Hillbilly
Oct 18, 2012, 2:14 PM
Yeah... I was more excited when I thought is was a tender for the actual demo. Once I understood it was *another* study, I became a little less enthused. Still, it seems like another (baby) step forward? Right? Please?

It seems like the big step forward. It's one thing to say we're going to take it down, it's another to say this is how we'll do it, and this is the end product.

someone123
Oct 18, 2012, 4:41 PM
It seems like the big step forward. It's one thing to say we're going to take it down, it's another to say this is how we'll do it, and this is the end product.

Yeah, this is actually great news. I remember a traffic engineer's report from about a decade ago; it would have basically created a couple of at-grade highways and some awkward land parcels that probably would become something like the backside of the Purdy's Wharf complex. It is actually good that they did not tear Cogswell down ten years ago. The outcome is likely to be much better with HRM by Design rules and the increased level of awareness of the importance of pedestrian-friendly building design, mixed uses, higher densities, etc.

Another advantage of the study is that it can be used to elevate the level of discussion at public consultations and in the media. Many people, including councillors, have unrealistic expectations about Cogswell.

Hopefully in the future we'll get some clear, useful transit studies (done by an outside consultant) as well.

kph06
Oct 24, 2012, 1:12 AM
The crane that recently came down at the Killam built S2 Shaunslieve on the Bedford Highway, is now up at the Eastern Passage Waste Water Treatment Plant, making this a 2-crane project. Little less glamorous than the Citadel Hotel or Nova Centre, but still cool to see.

someone123
Oct 24, 2012, 2:54 AM
Southwest's new Hollis Street project will be unveiled tomorrow at VivaCity. I have high hopes for that project given the great location and given how well Southwest's other projects have turned out.

BravoZulu
Oct 24, 2012, 3:08 AM
Southwest's new Hollis Street project will be unveiled tomorrow at VivaCity. I have high hopes for that project given the great location and given how well Southwest's other projects have turned out.

Not sure I'm familiar with this one, where is it going to be located?

someone123
Oct 24, 2012, 3:16 AM
Not sure I'm familiar with this one, where is it going to be located?

Southeast corner of Hollis and Sackville. It's right next to Skye and the Discovery Centre proposal (may also be built in 2013), and a few blocks down from the Nova Centre. Currently this is a particularly weak part of the downtown core with few residents. A few sizable residential developments around there would have a big positive impact on Barrington.

fenwick16
Oct 24, 2012, 3:18 AM
Not sure I'm familiar with this one, where is it going to be located?

Here is the Bird's Eye View (Bing Maps) - http://www.bing.com/maps/?v=2&cp=rf6z109q23vk&lvl=19.25&dir=270.66&sty=b&where1=1583%20Hollis%20St%2C%20Halifax%2C%20NS%2C%20B3J&form=LMLTCC. The address is 1583 Hollis Street. Apparent the 5 storey 1950's era office building would be demolished.

BravoZulu
Oct 24, 2012, 3:29 AM
Southeast corner of Hollis and Sackville. It's right next to Skye and the Discovery Centre proposal (may also be built in 2013), and a few blocks down from the Nova Centre. Currently this is a particularly weak part of the downtown core with few residents. A few sizable residential developments around there would have a big positive impact on Barrington.

Cool so this is the one involving the bank of Canada building then. Can't wait to see what they have planned. Totally agree that it'll look much better once this corner fills in.

HalifaxRetales
Oct 24, 2012, 10:23 AM
The Construction has begun on the Kempt Rd Harveys

pblaauw
Oct 27, 2012, 2:55 AM
Dartmouth Coast Guard Base Moves Closer to Market (http://http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/155210-dartmouth-coast-guard-base-moves-closer-to-market)

fenwick16
Oct 27, 2012, 4:08 AM
Dartmouth Coast Guard Base Moves Closer to Market (http://http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/155210-dartmouth-coast-guard-base-moves-closer-to-market)

The link didn't work for me. I think this should work - http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/155210-dartmouth-coast-guard-base-moves-closer-to-market

Here is a Google map link - http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=27+Parker+St.,+dartmouth,+ns&ll=44.662266,-63.556573&spn=0.006532,0.016512&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&hnear=27+Parker+St,+Dartmouth,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia+B2Y&gl=ca&t=h&z=17. It looks like there could be the potential of a large residential development since it is so close to King's Wharf.

Dmajackson
Oct 27, 2012, 7:56 PM
The Coast Guard base could be very interesting for a new waterfront community. This is rough but something like this would be great IMO;

BUILDINGS: With little to no infill new mixed-use buildings would line the space between the rail-line and waterfront. There would be varying heights and complimentary designs. None would exceed 20-storeys to maintain the transition to low-rise around Tupper Street and to keep the King's Wharf Tower as the skyline landmark. Commercial would fill each ground-floor on the waterside. In the lanes between the buildings there would be ground-floor townhouses and access to offices on the podium (~2-4 floors).

TRANSPORTATION: A new connector road would link Parker Street to Oceanview Drive. This road would run inland of the rail-line and be constructed in a boulevard style. It would provide access to a central parkade buried into the hillside that would service the new community. The area on the other side of the rail-line would be pedestrian/bicycle only with emergency access across the rails.

Centered in the new community would be a transit terminal that would be designed for ferry and LRT use. Initially peak-hour only this ferry would travel faster than conventional ferries and would run with a smaller boat. Three new bus routes would service the area; The "67" and "69" would run opposite one-way loops servicing Prince Arthur and Graham's Corner communities. The other bus "50" would connect Woodside-Coast Guard-Alderney-Bridge-Highfield and would be labelled a core service.

For active transportation the waterfront would be the focus of the new community. The Dartmouth Harbourfront Trail would be rerouted to this area. Heading north it would run along Waterfront Dr (Mawomi Place) to the sewage plant. Heading down the hill it would wrap around the sewage plant on the waterside and head north along the new community. At the north end of the site water lots would be purchased to allow minor infilling to allow the trail to stay on the waterside to Old Ferry Road.

halifaxboyns
Oct 28, 2012, 4:34 AM
It's a very interesting development, so to speak hehe. The whole area above the base is prime space to redevelop and isn't far from an area already being looked at under the Regional Centre's corridor project. I'm talking about that whole area (it looks to be some old military housing maybe??) between Parker and Tupper. If you combined that with an adaptive low density zoning for the older homes between Tupper and Arthur that would allow some townhousing - you could build up the area quite nicely.

Considering the surrounding buildings, there is an existing building that is 9 stories already, so I don't think something in the 12-15 storey range would be out of the realm of possibility. But I'd like to see the regional pathway along the harbour edge improved as well.

Judging from the article; this might be a great opportunity to get some people together to do a community visioning exercise like Dartmouth cove. Gets more buy in when everyone is working together.

RyeJay
Oct 28, 2012, 1:48 PM
Though I realise it's not likely, I wonder how doable a small, yet charming, pedestrain bridge connecting this development to the edge of King's Wharf would be...

It would give Dartmouth Cove a more enclosed feel, and would create a direct path for shoppers to visit retail spots throughout this new development, after spending time at King's Wharf.

:) Just a random idea.

pblaauw
Oct 28, 2012, 10:33 PM
The link didn't work for me. I think this should work - http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/155210-dartmouth-coast-guard-base-moves-closer-to-market

Here is a Google map link - http://maps.google.ca/maps?q=27+Parker+St.,+dartmouth,+ns&ll=44.662266,-63.556573&spn=0.006532,0.016512&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-a&hnear=27+Parker+St,+Dartmouth,+Halifax+County,+Nova+Scotia+B2Y&gl=ca&t=h&z=17. It looks like there could be the potential of a large residential development since it is so close to King's Wharf.

Thanks for fixing the broken link. :)

teddifax
Nov 2, 2012, 2:45 AM
Excavation is finally beginning on the long-awaited Nova Centre in downtown Halifax.

Dexter Construction is on-site with equipment, ready to get on with the job of preparing the massive property for the start of construction. Developer Joe Ramia of Rank Inc. says the digging will begin on the Argyle Street side but will quickly expand to the rest of the property.

Archeologists who had been going over the site in search of historical artifacts for the past several weeks have finished their work, says Ramia.

The Nova Centre will, most notably, include a new convention centre financed by three levels of government. But Rank is paying for the other parts of the project.

Rank wants the Nova Centre to become a financial services hub, catering to companies that provide administrative support for hedge fund operators.

Rank has been working with EllisDon Corp. in preparing plans for construction. Although nothing has been decided, Ramia says he expects EllisDon will be building the massive project.

It has been estimated that the Nova Centre will have a value of about $500 million when completed.

Prior to the Nova Centre getting the official go-ahead, it had been speculated it would become a catalyst for other downtown developments. That may be true, but the $25-billion contract for Irving Shipbuilding Inc. may have also played a role in getting cranes in the air downtown.

Aside from the Nova Centre, the $62-million redevelopment of the former Citadel Halifax Hotel site on Brunswick Street has been getting a lot of attention. The owner of the property, Silver Birch Hotels and Resorts, is financing the side-by-side construction of a 13-storey Hampton Inn & Suites and 13-storey Homewood Suites by Hilton.

Armour Group’s $25-million RBC Waterside Centre, which combines a historic facade at street level with a nine-storey environmentally conscious internal structure, has been in the construction phase all through the summer.

Construction is expected to begin soon on a $26-million expansion of the TD Centre building on Granville Street. And Crombie REIT has announced plans for a three-storey mixed-use addition to its Scotia Square property.

There is also the proposed $350-million Skye Halifax project, which would be twin 44-storey residential towers. The oversized high-rise is controversial because it flaunts all planning guidelines for the downtown.

Whether that project goes ahead will be one of the first decisions of the newly elected council.

Jim Spatz, CEO of Southwest Properties Ltd., recently unveiled plans for an ambitious redevelopment of the Bank of Canada building on Hollis Street. Spatz expects to build a 21-storey mixed-use project with an estimated 300 apartment units that probably won’t be completed until 2016.

While it has been suggested that the Southwest project is needed because there aren’t apartments available in that part of the city, the statement fails to take into account Ramia’s Barrington Gate building on Barrington Street and his plans to work with the Roman Catholic Church to create residential construction adjacent to St. Mary’s Basilica in the same neighbourhood.

Also, restaurateur and developer Chris Tzaneteas and his business partner, Costa Elles, announced plans in 2011 for a $13-million residential redevelopment of the former National Film Board building, destroyed by fire a number of years ago. If it goes ahead, the apartment building would create another 55 units on Barrington Street.

Toronto-based developer Louis Reznick, who controls Starfish Properties, has numerous properties in the downtown in various states of redevelopment. Work started recently on what the company describes as a “three-year rebuild” of the former Sam the Record Man building on Barrington Street that will become office and commercial space.

Reznick also has plans to tear down the Roy Building, directly across the street from his Sam the Record Man property, and replace it with a 17-storey structure. Work has not started on that project, which is grandfathered under old development rules.

Before that happens, Reznick’s company plans to demolish the former Tip Top Tailors building on Barrington and replace it with a six-storey retail and office building.

There are other projects on the go, including adding height to the old Zellers building on Barrington Street, currently home to the Discovery Centre.

With all the construction going on, besides booking their tenants before they start construction, developers need faith that everything will go as they hope.

(rtaylor@herald.ca)

someone123
Nov 2, 2012, 4:15 AM
That is a pretty good run-down of projects happening downtown. It is an impressive amount of construction. There are a couple of odd points in the article though:

While it has been suggested that the Southwest project is needed because there aren’t apartments available in that part of the city, the statement fails to take into account Ramia’s Barrington Gate building on Barrington Street and his plans to work with the Roman Catholic Church to create residential construction adjacent to St. Mary’s Basilica in the same neighbourhood.

Barrington Gate is a smaller project that most likely has few if any available units. There is a demand for lots of apartments downtown. The goal should be to fill empty lots downtown with thousands of residential units. That is what is required in order to fill all the storefronts downtown with successful businesses and maintain vibrant levels of activity in the district.

More generally, the norm is that cities need a constant supply of new construction and investment. Without that, they slowly decline as the stock of buildings ages and becomes less economically viable. Even heritage buildings need maintenance and, occasionally, modifications. Many people in Halifax, for whatever reason, seem to have a mental model of a "fixed" city and view construction or change as an unusual intrusion. I hope this attitude continues to fade, because it's really unhealthy. Most of the parts of the city that haven't seen much recent construction are in rough shape, are not very desirable, and don't function very well.

There is also the proposed $350-million Skye Halifax project, which would be twin 44-storey residential towers. The oversized high-rise is controversial because it flaunts all planning guidelines for the downtown.

This is just sloppy. Skye violates the HRM by Design height limit, which was put in place after the city sold the lot to the developer and after a taller building was already approved for that site. It also violates the ramparts bylaw. The list of planning guidelines that Skye doesn't violate is too long to enumerate.

Also, restaurateur and developer Chris Tzaneteas and his business partner, Costa Elles, announced plans in 2011 for a $13-million residential redevelopment of the former National Film Board building, destroyed by fire a number of years ago. If it goes ahead, the apartment building would create another 55 units on Barrington Street.

I hope this development moves forward. The NFB Building is a real low point on Barrington Street, but if restored it could be part of an excellent streetscape.

NewBalearic
Nov 2, 2012, 11:39 AM
The Bio Science building on Lower Water Street is finally being demolished...

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8469/8147415364_1be0891e8c_c.jpg

HalifaxRetales
Nov 2, 2012, 12:21 PM
Watch the destruction on Webcam
http://www.novascotiawebcams.com/halifax/museum-wharves.html

someone123
Nov 2, 2012, 4:31 PM
That is nice to see. I wonder how far off Queen's Landing is, and how much plans have changed. All I have seen are rough conceptual renderings.

There was an article not too long ago about building an expansion of the Maritime Museum to permanently house the HMCS Sackville out of water. It sounded like it was dependent on federal funding.

pblaauw
Nov 2, 2012, 10:14 PM
I saw - in the paper, I think - a few months ago, that the housing for HMCS Sackville is currently in the design phase.

Nifta
Nov 3, 2012, 10:32 AM
I still can't believe there's no aquarium on the waterfront or in Halifax at all. Seems like a no-brainer tourist attraction. Has anyone ever heard rumours of one being built?

worldlyhaligonian
Nov 3, 2012, 12:58 PM
I still can't believe there's no aquarium on the waterfront or in Halifax at all. Seems like a no-brainer tourist attraction. Has anyone ever heard rumours of one being built?

Some guy was on this forum awhile back saying 100 percent that one was being built in Shannon Park... didn't happen.

There should be a small scale aquarium for sure. Sharks would be badass.:whip:

fenwick16
Nov 3, 2012, 5:08 PM
I think that Halifax should focus on observing sea animals in their natural environment. This is the case now to some extent; there are whale-watching vessels closeby and even dolphins can sometimes be observed in the harbour.

I think that aquariums are better suited for places far from the ocean such as in Ontario. However, many people are becoming opposed to zoos and aquariums. I am not a conservationist but zoos and aquariums seem to be jails for animals. I wouldn't want to see an aquarium in Halifax to hold sea animals in captivity directly adjacent to their natural environment.

cormiermax
Nov 3, 2012, 5:24 PM
Iv never enjoyed going to zoos, specially not the one in Moncton man that place is depressing. Id say aquariums are different though, I don't think the animals feel jailed or even notice they are outside their natural environment, unlike zoos.

Keith P.
Nov 3, 2012, 5:37 PM
I still can't believe there's no aquarium on the waterfront or in Halifax at all. Seems like a no-brainer tourist attraction. Has anyone ever heard rumours of one being built?

Various folks have talked about one over the years. Nobody has ever made it their mission.

Phalanx
Nov 3, 2012, 5:53 PM
...
I think that aquariums are better suited for places far from the ocean such as in Ontario. However, many people are becoming opposed to zoos and aquariums. I am not a conservationist but zoos and aquariums seem to be jails for animals. I wouldn't want to see an aquarium in Halifax to hold sea animals in captivity directly adjacent to their natural environment.

I don't think there's really been a movement against aquariums except in regards to large marine mammals, which most actual aquariums don't keep (as opposed to aquatic theme parks/animal exhibits like Marineland, or Marine World which have a pretty horrible track record). Good aquariums, by their very nature, have to replicate the natural environment that the animals live in, so tend to be far more humane.

For some good, modern examples, take a look at:
Georgia Aquarium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgia_Aquarium)
or:
The Steinhart Aquarium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Academy_of_Sciences) at the Califorinia Academy of Sciences
or here (http://inhabitat.com/california-academy-of-sciences-unveiled/) for some more pictures.

I don't think we could, or would build anything on that scale of size and expense, but aquariums can be well done, interesting, and humane.

And aquariums exist because it's so difficult to observe most of these animals in their natural environment.

Empire
Nov 3, 2012, 10:16 PM
Halifax should have an aquarium but not a silly Florida style commercialized tourist trap. The Atlantica Aquarium should be at BIO. This facility would be a research centre and educational venue. The fish stock would be mainly native and changed out on a regular basis. The opportunities are endless at the BIO centre. Halifax being Halifax just doesn't realize it!!

someone123
Nov 3, 2012, 11:48 PM
BIO already has aquariums you can go visit. They have some set up for tourists plus a bunch of research-related aquariums you can see if you go on a tour. It's all cold water stuff native to Canada as far as I know. It would be interesting if they set up something to showcase the region's marine life on the downtown waterfront. It's not hard to imagine an attraction like that making a lot of money in the summer months given how busy it is there.

As Phalanx says there's nothing inherently wrong with aquariums. I went to the California Academy of Sciences last year. It was quite impressive. In addition to the aquariums they have a large indoor tropical environment that you can walk around in.

Empire
Nov 10, 2012, 1:24 AM
BIO already has aquariums you can go visit. They have some set up for tourists plus a bunch of research-related aquariums you can see if you go on a tour. It's all cold water stuff native to Canada as far as I know. It would be interesting if they set up something to showcase the region's marine life on the downtown waterfront. It's not hard to imagine an attraction like that making a lot of money in the summer months given how busy it is there.

As Phalanx says there's nothing inherently wrong with aquariums. I went to the California Academy of Sciences last year. It was quite impressive. In addition to the aquariums they have a large indoor tropical environment that you can walk around in.

I went to the open house this fall at BIO and the only fish available for observation were a few dead sharks split wide open on ice in tents and some very lame 30 year old cod fish in a concrete tank with algae infested glass on both ends of the tank. The observation deck was approx. 4ft. wide and this area was packed with people peering into the tank. Could you please post a link for the real aquariums at BIO...thanks.

someone123
Nov 10, 2012, 1:41 AM
I went there a while ago, maybe in 2007 I guess. There was a touch tank outside, a series of smaller tanks in a hallway, and then a room with a variety of tanks. They had a bunch of individual animals (urchins, a giant lobster, etc.) and one big tank with a school of fairly large fish in it. It sounds like things have changed since then.

Empire
Nov 10, 2012, 2:21 AM
I went there a while ago, maybe in 2007 I guess. There was a touch tank outside, a series of smaller tanks in a hallway, and then a room with a variety of tanks. They had a bunch of individual animals (urchins, a giant lobster, etc.) and one big tank with a school of fairly large fish in it. It sounds like things have changed since then.

Is this the aquarium of which you speak? Kids in the background don't seem overly impressed.

Photo by Empire at BIO open house 2012:

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/BIOSharks.jpg

Wishblade
Nov 10, 2012, 2:39 AM
^At their age that would have scared the living hell out of me lol

Empire
Nov 10, 2012, 2:43 AM
^At their age that would have scared the living hell out of me lol

I agree, but HRM sees nothing wrong with it! This is the cheap way to display fish that are present in our waters.....

fenwick16
Nov 10, 2012, 2:53 AM
I wonder if something could be done in conjunction with the new Discovery Centre? Maybe several thousand square feet could be set up as an aquarium with various fish breeds, including tropical species. It would be an added attraction for kids going to the Discovery Centre. Personally, I don't think the more intelligent marine animals such as dolphins should be kept in captivity.

kph06
Nov 10, 2012, 9:09 PM
I think the Blue building further up Kent St. from the old South End Diner site has now been torn down.

fenwick16
Nov 11, 2012, 3:35 PM
I am not sure if this is the right thread for this story, but there are plans to build a Titanic II, with a possible launch date in 2016. The Billionaire behind the plan will be hosting a breakfast and project information session in Halifax on December 7th. The connection to Halifax is that this vessel might make some stops in Halifax once it is launched.

It would be an amazing sight to see a Titanic II coming into Halifax. Here is a link to the general plans for the Titanic II - http://www.bluestarline.com.au/documents/pdf/TitanicII_GA_12%2007%202012%20COLOUR.pdf

(source and full story - http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/167397-billionaire-building-titanic-ii-heads-to-halifax-for-breakfast-pr-event )

Billionaire building Titanic II heads to Halifax for breakfast PR event
November 9, 2012 - 5:24pm By BILL POWER Business Reporter

Vessel scheduled for 2016 maiden voyage


Clive Palmer, the outrageous Australian billionaire who is building a 21st-century version of the Titanic, is bringing his international road show to Halifax.

Word of the visit Thursday from Palmer’s public relations firm in Australia is the first hint a Nova Scotia stop will be on the itinerary when the huge ship goes into service.

“To honour the history of Titanic and recognize Halifax’s very special relationship and role with the grand ship, a Titanic Breakfast will be held at the Lord Nelson Hotel,” said a news release.

The Halifax breakfast event is scheduled for Dec. 7. Palmer is to provide details of the Titanic II project afterwards.
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RyeJay
Nov 11, 2012, 4:11 PM
:previous:

This is exciting news! A visit to Halifax from the Titanic II would elevate the city's profile, as this will be covered by news organisations from around the world.

By 2016, Halifax's core will be more developed and camera-ready :)

Jstaleness
Nov 11, 2012, 5:10 PM
As long as it isn't as awful as the movie Titanic II.

scooby074
Nov 11, 2012, 7:03 PM
It would be pretty amazing to have a regular or semi-regular stop for boarding passengers by the Titanic II in Halifax.

Throw into the mix the possibility of a scheduled Halifax-Boston ferry and there could be good days ahead for the port.

Fenwick, the PDF in your post appears to be password protected.

fenwick16
Nov 11, 2012, 7:10 PM
It would be pretty amazing to have a regular or semi-regular stop for boarding passengers by the Titanic II in Halifax.

That combined with the annual cruse ship traffic will mean good things for the port.

Fenwick, the PDF in your post appears to be password protected.

I got the link from this story - http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/drawings-released-of-clive-palmers-titanic-ii/story-e6frfq80-1226427924480 (actually it appears to be a different link to the same pdf file)

bluenoser
Nov 12, 2012, 7:34 PM
Halifax planners hope to revitalize Argyle Street
Plan hopes to replace fighters with shoppers
CBC News Posted: Nov 12, 2012 7:47 AM AT Last Updated: Nov 12, 2012 10:04 AM AT Read 16 comments16

http://www.cbc.ca/gfx/images/news/photos/2012/11/12/li-ns-argyle-plans.jpg


...a team of community planners is proposing that Argyle Street be transformed into a limited vehicle patio zone from Blowers Street down to Duke Street.

...

The plan envisions curbless sidewalks, new benches and parkettes.

"Speaking with Neptune Theatre they're interested in bringing entertainment out to the street, some theatre, some performance, " Scott said

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/story/2012/11/12/ns-argyle-street-plans.html

Details are a bit vague but I guess it would make sense to plan something like this in conjunction with the final designs of the Nova Centre.

Duff
Nov 12, 2012, 7:40 PM
I don't think there is a thread for this one, but here are some pictures I took of whats going on the corner of Robie and St. Albans.


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8346/8179717099_2c6e71be73_b.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8342/8179716581_aee0bfa598_b.jpg

someone123
Nov 12, 2012, 7:48 PM
I didn't know there was something planned for that site. It's impressive to see all these construction sites popping up around the North End. I like how we have seen a mix of new residential and office buildings (I am thinking of the two little ones on Agricola), and how a lot of them have been smaller buildings that have preserved the fine-grained diversity of buildings in the neighbourhood. I am still holding out a little bit of hope that the McCully Worklofts project is going to be dusted off and built as well.

Details are a bit vague but I guess it would make sense to plan something like this in conjunction with the final designs of the Nova Centre.

Definitely. A big part of the street has to be redone anyway and some parts of the Nova Centre will change the requirements for the area. There will be more pedestrian traffic, and it looks like there's going to be lots of underground parking, so on-street parking will be less important. It also makes sense to do the Spring Garden Road streetscape at the same time as the library. I guess we'll see over the next few months if council starts following through a little more on projects like these.

scooby074
Nov 13, 2012, 5:16 AM
I got the link from this story - http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/drawings-released-of-clive-palmers-titanic-ii/story-e6frfq80-1226427924480 (actually it appears to be a different link to the same pdf file)

Thanks for that.

Read the article and now Im not so sure of the idea.

I mean the casino is for 1st class passengers only? Way to loose money.
Who will buy a 3rd class ticket and travel overseas like a weary popper from 1910 as he envisions? Are they going to barricade the stairwells to keep the rich from the "poor" like they did in Titanic's days? And I'm no naval architect, but the hull design is exactly the same from the turn of the last century, no bulbous bow or other features to increase efficiency and reduce fuel usage other than Azipods..

I dont think that Cunard and the Queen Mary 2 have much to worry about.

Hali87
Nov 13, 2012, 7:21 AM
A nice boost for Western NS, and good for Halifax too - most of Risley's hospitality business is centred downtown.

Family reunion of sorts for White Point staff (http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/170574-family-reunion-of-sorts-for-white-point-staff)

I couldn't find any photos of the new main lodge but the renderings looked pretty good:

http://www.whitepoint.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/entrance.jpg
Source (http://images.google.ca/imgres?q=white+point+new+lodge&hl=en&biw=1280&bih=610&tbm=isch&tbnid=E82oybCebGxm9M:&imgrefurl=http://www.whitepoint.com/blog/2012/02/14/rebuilding-white-point-%25E2%2580%2593-main-lodge-design-released/entrance/&docid=-f7fZsml8jUcCM&imgurl=http://www.whitepoint.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/entrance.jpg&w=720&h=455&ei=ffShUKDrLKaniQLZ2oGYBA&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=369&vpy=219&dur=597&hovh=178&hovw=283&tx=184&ty=109&sig=108910527494856788924&page=2&tbnh=131&tbnw=208&start=15&ndsp=22&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:20,i:137)

http://metronewsca.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/62068f15491e9344aeed21a13c1e.jpg?w=618&h=408&crop=1
Source (http://metronewsca.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/62068f15491e9344aeed21a13c1e.jpg?w=618&h=408&crop=1)

musicman
Nov 14, 2012, 2:22 AM
Was one of the first 10 or 15 guests to check in.. Still some work to be done on the indoor pool and such but they did an amazing job. It is new and different but they did an amazing job.

halifaxboyns
Nov 14, 2012, 3:48 PM
Costs soar as construction boom continues in Halifax
Prices for materials and labour in Halifax have gone through the roof as the region experiences a construction boom not seen in years.

According to Statistics Canada figures released Tuesday, the non-residential building construction price index in Halifax had the highest jump in Canada from the second to third quarter.

The index, which measures selling prices for materials, labour and equipment and provincial sales tax in the commercial, industrial and institutional sectors, is at 144.4 (not seasonally adjusted) in Halifax, a 0.7 per cent increase from the previous quarter. The next highest increase was experienced in Edmonton, which saw a 0.3 per cent jump between quarters.

Overall, construction prices in Halifax went up 2.3 per cent from the same period last year, placing the city in the middle of the seven metropolitan areas that Statistics Canada surveyed.

At 3.6 per cent, Edmonton once again had the largest increase in prices year-to-date.

The rest of the herald story is here (http://www.thechronicleherald.ca/business/172103-costs-soar-as-construction-boom-continues-in-halifax).

fenwick16
Nov 15, 2012, 3:45 AM
(source and full story - http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/major-changes-coming-to-halifax-hospitals-1.1038624 )

Major changes coming to Halifax hospitals

CTV Atlantic
Published Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012 7:02PM AST
Last Updated Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2012 7:09PM AST

CTV News has learned exclusive details about the plans for major changes in Halifax-area hospitals.

New operating theatres and about 200 more beds are planned for the Dartmouth General Hospital, while an expansion will also take place at the Halifax Infirmary to help replace beds and operating rooms at the Victoria General site.

A Halifax company has been awarded a $1-million contract to prepare the preliminary designs and cost estimates. The Capital District Health Authority was given approval by the province to award the contract last week.

The approval comes 11 months after former Health and Wellness Minister Maureen MacDonald announced the Victoria General site of the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre would have to come down and be replaced.

Shauna McMahon, the director of infrastructure at the Capital District Health Authority, gave a general description of the bed tower the health authority wants designed above the emergency department at the Halifax Infirmary.

“That bed tower would see 150 beds and there would be 16 operating rooms,” says McMahon.

The proposed tower is five storeys with a mechanical floor – one for operating rooms and three for patients.
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With files from CTV Atlantic's Rick Grant


It will be interesting to see what occurs over the next few months.

Pete Crawford
Nov 18, 2012, 11:02 AM
Why haven't more people voted for Halifax on the nicest city in thread on the Canada wall by now? I know there's more than nine of us!

RyeJay
Nov 18, 2012, 12:07 PM
Why haven't more people voted for Halifax on the nicest city in thread on the Canada wall by now? I know there's more than nine of us!

Although much of my ego resides in Halifax, I had to be honest with my vote. I voted for Quebec City.

fenwick16
Nov 18, 2012, 1:27 PM
If the thread was for favourite city then Halifax would get my vote. But as far as most beautiful city then I would pick Vancouver. Halifax would be in my top two most beautiful (however, I have only seen the outskirts of Quebec City, I have only seen Calgary from 30,000 feet up in an airplane and I haven't seen Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Regina or Victoria, so my vote would be biased).

Halifax has a lot of beauty for sure - the Citadel, downtown core, Dalhousie University, the harbour, Point Pleasant Park, Public Gardens, the whole south-end, the bridges, the Northwest Arm - and many other points that I am missing. It will be even more beautiful once the Nova Centre, Canada Bank tower, TD expansion, etc, etc proceed. And a 600 foot Seattle Space Needle-type observation tower in the downtown core would top it off. Plus a couple 30 storey office towers downtown or 40 storey residential towers would make the city stand out more.

Hali87
Nov 18, 2012, 2:05 PM
I couldn't decide, so I voted for Oshawa. For me it was a tough call between Vancouver, Victoria, or Ottawa, and I think that's only because I haven't been to Quebec City. Halifax being a close second of course.

Pete Crawford
Nov 18, 2012, 2:27 PM
Harper would call this an Atlantic Canadian culture of defeat :)

I think Halifax's skyline from the Dartmouth waterfront is unbeatable.. and I've lived in Ottawa/Toronto for the last five years.

ILoveHalifax
Nov 18, 2012, 2:29 PM
Yes, Loud and clear, HALIFAX. I have lived in Halifax, Toronto, Vancouver, and travelled to most other cities in Canada and the USA.
No city in Canada has the view of the city that we get as we drive into Halifax, or travel about across the bridges. Vancouver has a mountain but it is hard to see the mountain at the same time you see the city and the water. There really are not a lot of beautiful spots in Vancouver with city and parks and water and accessible waterfront. Quebec City is very charming in old town, but the river does not make up for our harbor and our views.
I used to travel all over the USA for business and most everywhere I went I'd say to myself, this in no way compares to Halifax.
Favorite? HALIFAX, and that has another whole set of reasons.

RyeJay
Nov 18, 2012, 3:43 PM
Harper would call this an Atlantic Canadian culture of defeat :)

I think Halifax's skyline from the Dartmouth waterfront is unbeatable.. and I've lived in Ottawa/Toronto for the last five years.

:haha:

Harper's Atlantic Canadian comments aren't related to this subjective question about municipal beauty.

Nor are Harper's comments related to reality. :rolleyes:

Pete Crawford
Nov 18, 2012, 3:49 PM
:

Nor are Harper's comments related to reality. :rolleyes:

Let's be honest now, he had a point.

Keith P.
Nov 18, 2012, 3:52 PM
Let's be honest now, he had a point.

Absolutely, one sees it every day in these parts.

RyeJay
Nov 18, 2012, 3:54 PM
Yes, Loud and clear, HALIFAX. I have lived in Halifax, Toronto, Vancouver, and travelled to most other cities in Canada and the USA.
No city in Canada has the view of the city that we get as we drive into Halifax, or travel about across the bridges. Vancouver has a mountain but it is hard to see the mountain at the same time you see the city and the water. There really are not a lot of beautiful spots in Vancouver with city and parks and water and accessible waterfront. Quebec City is very charming in old town, but the river does not make up for our harbor and our views.
I used to travel all over the USA for business and most everywhere I went I'd say to myself, this in no way compares to Halifax.
Favorite? HALIFAX, and that has another whole set of reasons.

Given your user name, I would have been shocked otherwise... ;)

But I do agree with you that the views of our downtown are incredible from the bridges: Our gentle appalachian landscape; our massive natural harbour; our bonsai skyline.

I'm glad that Halifax isn't just another typical city.

Dmajackson
Nov 18, 2012, 7:23 PM
For me it was between Halifax, Quebec City and Ottawa so I went for Quebec City because I don't like to vote for my hometown in these polls.

The only problem with my thinking is a lot of people from Calgary think their city should win every poll so they are now beating us even though the city is just a typical inland city along a standard river. The only advantage Calgary has over Edmonton, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, and Regina is its mountain view and that can't be seen from ground level in most of the city.

halifaxboyns
Nov 19, 2012, 10:18 PM
Something of interest for everyone...nothing Halifax related.
Great story on CBC about some of the 'ghost' cities in China. Unbelievable...they built whole cities that could hold thousands (maybe even millions) of people and no one lives there. What a waste of $ and materials...makes you wonder whether the costs of materials going up really has a purpose?

CBC story on ghost cities

fenwick16
Nov 20, 2012, 12:30 AM
Something of interest for everyone...nothing Halifax related.
Great story on CBC about some of the 'ghost' cities in China. Unbelievable...they built whole cities that could hold thousands (maybe even millions) of people and no one lives there. What a waste of $ and materials...makes you wonder whether the costs of materials going up really has a purpose?

CBC story on ghost cities

There is something wrong with your link. Is this the story - http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/11/13/f-arsenault-ordos-china.html

halifaxboyns
Nov 20, 2012, 5:20 PM
There is something wrong with your link. Is this the story - http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/11/13/f-arsenault-ordos-china.html

Weird how it didn't work - but thanks for posting the correct link!
Really amazing story.

beyeas
Nov 20, 2012, 5:26 PM
Something of interest for everyone...nothing Halifax related.
Great story on CBC about some of the 'ghost' cities in China. Unbelievable...they built whole cities that could hold thousands (maybe even millions) of people and no one lives there. What a waste of $ and materials...makes you wonder whether the costs of materials going up really has a purpose?

CBC story on ghost cities

Last fall I was on the train from Beijing to Tianjin and was in awe of these fields of twenty 30-story buildings just sitting in the middle of no where. Absolutely bizarre. Nothing like creating a false manufacturing economy to justify the ruling party's ability to keep everyone working!

Dmajackson
Nov 22, 2012, 4:56 PM
New $18-million facility will replace two aging Dartmouth schools
November 22, 2012 - 4:15am BY CLARE MELLOR STAFF REPORTER

Dartmouth is getting a new Primary-Grade 9 school.

The province announced Wednesday that a modern, $18-million facility will be built to replace two existing schools in the southern part of the community that are almost 60 years old.

“The new school will replace Southdale-North Woodside (School) and Prince Arthur Junior High and bring the students together under one roof,” Labour and Advanced Education Minister Marilyn More said.

...

(cmellor@herald.ca)

Read More: thechronicleherald.ca (http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/186694-new-18-million-facility-will-replace-two-aging-dartmouth-schools)

Should be good for the area. Hopefully a good use is found for the existing schools but considering their proximity to each other and both being surrounded by detached housing I'm not expecting much for the site.

Empire
Nov 23, 2012, 1:57 AM
Halifax November sunset:

All photos by Empire - pls excuse the blur

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/IMG_4640.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/IMG_4638.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/IMG_4636.jpg

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q7/empire1_2007/IMG_4620.jpg