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someone123
Sep 16, 2009, 12:14 AM
Here's a nice, though now somewhat dated, photo of Halifax that I don't think has yet appeared in this thread:

http://westinnovascotian.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/aerial-qm2-at-pier-21.jpg
Source (http://westinnovascotian.files.wordpress.com/2009/06)

I'd like to see a new, larger aerial photo stitched together from this perspective.

UrbanPlannerr
Sep 16, 2009, 12:28 AM
^ Thats got to be the best skyline shot of Halifax I have ever seen. :drooling:

djcollege
Sep 19, 2009, 7:57 PM
The terrain is cool but the built form of the city is absolutely appalling.



Yes, What do you mean by this?

Dylan Leblanc
Sep 19, 2009, 10:06 PM
This was posted in the Kelowna Construction thread

Just thought I'd post my panorama picture up here showing the progress of the new buildings and the shaping of the skyline. I can't wait for 24. It will have a huge impact on the skyline and feel of Bernard Ave.

If any of you are on skyscrapercity forums then you would have already seen this probably. But anyway...

Taken July 8th, 2009:

http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/8669/downtownpano2.jpg

Stu
Sep 19, 2009, 10:38 PM
^Kelowna is starting to get a fairly impressive little skyline.

dennis
Sep 20, 2009, 4:18 AM
^of gingerbread houses...

dennis
Sep 20, 2009, 4:20 AM
LOL. Its great that Kelowna and the B.C. interior is experiencing such a boom. Its a place I wouldn't mind retiring to.

Cambridgite
Sep 20, 2009, 7:41 PM
Here's a nice, though now somewhat dated, photo of Halifax that I don't think has yet appeared in this thread:

http://westinnovascotian.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/aerial-qm2-at-pier-21.jpg
Source (http://westinnovascotian.files.wordpress.com/2009/06)

I'd like to see a new, larger aerial photo stitched together from this perspective.

Wicked shot. What's that on the little island off the coast?

Cambridgite
Sep 20, 2009, 7:46 PM
I have many different skyline perspectives on Kitchener yesterday, but here's a shot of downtown, looking south from the 7th floor of the new U of Waterloo Pharmacy campus.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/Doors%20Open%202009/Picture302.jpg

Looks big from here, but I think part of it has to do with not being able to see the ground, so it feels like you're higher up in the air than you really are. :P

Metro-One
Sep 20, 2009, 7:51 PM
That skyline shot of Halifax is amazing, I did not realize so many sizable structures existed away from the waterfront.

Also nice pics of Kelowna and Regina/Saskatoon.

koops65
Sep 20, 2009, 9:58 PM
Kitchener Downtown Skyline:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2450/3938227771_2ff5f01fb8_o.jpg
pic taken today by me

Dylan Leblanc
Sep 22, 2009, 1:45 AM
nice

Dmajackson
Sep 22, 2009, 1:56 AM
Wicked shot. What's that on the little island off the coast?

George's Island. McNab's and Devil's are further south. :)

Dmajackson
Sep 22, 2009, 2:12 AM
I'm not sure if I posted these before in this thread but the first one shows most of the high-rises in Halifax around the Commons and the second and third ones are photos of Peninsular Halifax from a tower in the 'burbs (both photos by me);

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3133/3100383059_a1a4f1f85f_b.jpg

http://i27.tinypic.com/j7qcg1.jpg

http://i37.tinypic.com/51pzk6.jpg

aastra
Sep 22, 2009, 4:55 AM
Victoria's Inner Harbour by ryanthejones at Flickr.com:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3390/3574473279_b382300a3a_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanthejones/3574473279/)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ryanthejones/3574473279/

****

Here's a great shot by Vic Fan at Flickr.com:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3458/3889274600_f381d28003_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/vicfan/3889274600/)
http://www.flickr.com/photos/vicfan/3889274600/

c@taract_soulj@h
Sep 23, 2009, 5:11 AM
Well Yellowknife does have a population under 20 000, and Kitchener is nearly double Peterborough. For a 500 000 CMA is is pretty lame. They must have one of the, if not the lowest tower per capita ratio of any greater area over 100 000 in Canada. And don't take this as a negative spin on the whole area, just in the aspect of urban density.

Honestly...my take as to why Kitcheners skyline is so damn dull is cause K-W doesn't know where to focus it's development so they split it between both Kitch. or Waterloo...

c@taract_soulj@h
Sep 23, 2009, 5:19 AM
Since we're doing suburbs, Hamilton's suburbs:

Dundas (25,000) from Dundas Peak:
http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k28/segaert/ancaster_dundas_stone/00098.jpg

Burlington (150,000) as seen from Hamilton Beach:
http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k28/segaert/beach/00060.jpg

Stoney Creek (60,000) as seen from Stoney Creek Mountain:
http://i84.photobucket.com/albums/k28/segaert/stoneycreek/00100.jpg

The Dundas skyline lol...love it! I always used to think the Amica retirement complex was the centerpiece of it too ;) They need one more cool lookin highrise

c@taract_soulj@h
Sep 23, 2009, 5:23 AM
I forgot these for the Halifax suburbs (Aall taken by me);

Bedford (Former Town ~ 20'000)
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2131/2437893182_5203f89531_b.jpg
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3016/2425749061_52b3c3e147_b.jpg

And the only other comparable suburb is Lower Sackville (Former ~ 20'000)
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3158/2997477480_6618c4cff1_b.jpg

And well since I have one heres the Downtown Halifax Skyline at Sunset (Purdy's to Westin):
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3047/3087703691_92a4fa52f2_b.jpg

I know urban sprawl isn't for everyone but I find it in Halifax to be so damn picturesque for some reason. I think it's how it intertwines with the geography and landscape that adds to it which is also why I feel Halifax's population should be larger. If it were just flat as hell like areas in the GTA, it wouldn't be so pretty lol

c@taract_soulj@h
Sep 23, 2009, 5:29 AM
Fort William/Port Arthur/Thunder Bay/Lakehead, 103,000 to 131,000 depending on how and what you count.

http://img91.imageshack.us/img91/1169/downtownrz0.jpg
Port Arthur, 46,000 © rocket1964

http://img383.imageshack.us/img383/3280/fortwilliamhioriginaljx2.jpg
Fort William, 50,000 © rocket1964

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/67/162132507_24ae3a34c5_o.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/geekent/162132507/)
Current River, 4,000 © Geekent (http://www.flickr.com/photos/geekent/)

Academy Heights/Lakehead University and College Heights, neighbourhoods of Port Arthur, also have skylines (2 or more tall buildings near each other) but there are no real vantage points for them so I don't have any pictures.

Kenora, 15,000:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3232/3119783211_ed0664658f_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/27362978@N04/3119783211/)
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3115/3119786739_b9beddc091_b.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/27362978@N04/3119786739/)
Some aerial photos of apartment blocks and downtown © Ricky Wilkinson (http://www.flickr.com/photos/27362978@N04/)

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/41/103901375_7a62ba64c4.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/scienceduck/103901375/)
Best Western Kenora, tallest hotel between Ottawa and Winnipeg. © Scienceduck (http://www.flickr.com/photos/scienceduck/)

Just ONE tall building that stands out, to be built in T-Bay would be all I'd ask for. Hell even a government building but at least something new! The white sucker in the in Fort William (I think) is pretty cool and I like how Kenora is lined up on the water

c@taract_soulj@h
Sep 23, 2009, 5:50 AM
Has anyone seen Brantford on here lately? Or was the last time simply when you watched Silent Hill ;)

Cambridgite
Sep 28, 2009, 10:27 PM
Some pictures I took today from the 10th floor of Kitchener City Hall.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture253-2.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture254-1.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture255-1.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture256-2.jpg

Looking at the new 560 Queen Street South apartment building and St. Mary's Hospital.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture257-2.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture258-2.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture259-3.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture260-3.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture261-3.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture262-3.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture263-3.jpg

Overlooking the Highland Road corridor (strip malls and apartment buildings).

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture264-2.jpg

Looking west to Victoria Hills.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture265-1.jpg

King and Ontario, zoomed in from above.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture266-1.jpg

In the foreground is the warehouse district. In the middle, off in the distance, you can see the Dana Porter library and the crane that's building the nanotechnology campus.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture267-1.jpg

Metro-One
Sep 28, 2009, 10:31 PM
:previous: That TD building would look good if it did not have those funny domes on it.

Cambridgite
Sep 28, 2009, 10:44 PM
Honestly...my take as to why Kitcheners skyline is so damn dull is cause K-W doesn't know where to focus it's development so they split it between both Kitch. or Waterloo...

Yeah, that's one big reason. Uptown Waterloo employs about 2/3rds as many people as downtown Kitchener.

And don't forget Cambridge, which is part of the regional population and has 3 downtowns itself. Even with the downtowns, the buildings are spread all over the place and are mostly commie blocks of a medium height. Add to that, a bunch of suburban apartment clusters, and it looks more like large swaths of Toronto's inner suburbs than any sort of concentrated downtown.

Has anyone seen Brantford on here lately? Or was the last time simply when you watched Silent Hill ;)

If by recently, you mean a couple years ago, then yes. There isn't much of a skyline to speak of though. However, I wouldn't mind seeing some photos of buildings and streetscapes from Brantford.

Cambridgite
Sep 28, 2009, 10:47 PM
:previous: That TD building would look good if it did not have those funny domes on it.

Really? I'm kind of partial to the domes. They look like breasts. :haha:

Though I must say it's one of the more tasteful modern buildings in downtown Kitchener.

koops65
Sep 28, 2009, 11:43 PM
:previous: The nickname I hear most often is the Dolly Parton Building...

c@taract_soulj@h
Oct 3, 2009, 8:22 AM
Yeah, that's one big reason. Uptown Waterloo employs about 2/3rds as many people as downtown Kitchener.

And don't forget Cambridge, which is part of the regional population and has 3 downtowns itself. Even with the downtowns, the buildings are spread all over the place and are mostly commie blocks of a medium height. Add to that, a bunch of suburban apartment clusters, and it looks more like large swaths of Toronto's inner suburbs than any sort of concentrated downtown.



If by recently, you mean a couple years ago, then yes. There isn't much of a skyline to speak of though. However, I wouldn't mind seeing some photos of buildings and streetscapes from Brantford.

As for streetscapes Brantford is black and white, well...when comparing downtown to the rest of some parts of town anyways. If I were to make a move there, I'd more so relocate to the North End off of Wayne Gretzky because I like how spread out it is OR south of the Casino which I just discovered recently as it seems like there are new developments being built.

Cambridgite
Nov 26, 2009, 1:03 AM
New photos taken by me today.

From the pedestrian bridge connecting Victoria St. North with Shirley Ave, over the train tracks. A beautiful sunset.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture283.jpg

These ones from the Ontario and Duke parking garage. These nighttime shots turned out better than I expected. Compared to how it looked in real life, the pictures are still crap (I need a better camera for night photos), but here they are anyways.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture305.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture306.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture307.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture308.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture309.jpg


This set is from on top of the Market Square parking garage.

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture310.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture312.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture313.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture314.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture316.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture317.jpg

http://i206.photobucket.com/albums/bb210/Cambridgite/skylines/Picture318.jpg

-Harlington-
Nov 27, 2009, 11:58 PM
Sydney NShttp://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0090.jpg?t=1259365793
Dartmouthhttp://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0469.jpg?t=1259365929
Halifax from york redoubt historic sitehttp://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0259.jpg?t=1259365997
Further up by the command centrehttp://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0318.jpg?t=1259366118
And from Dartmouthhttp://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0443.jpg?t=1259366231
And againhttp://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0451.jpg?t=1259366277

Cambridgite
Nov 28, 2009, 12:09 AM
Sydney NShttp://i834.photobucket.com/albums/zz269/6sean/102_0090.jpg?t=1259365793


Is that building in the middle a hotel? Delta by any chance? If so, I might have stayed there when I was 9 years old.

-Harlington-
Nov 28, 2009, 1:25 AM
Is that building in the middle a hotel? Delta by any chance? If so, I might have stayed there when I was 9 years old.

yes that is the delta :yes:

Devon
Nov 28, 2009, 2:30 AM
Regina. courtesy Jesse Robson/Leader Post

http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/www.leaderpost.com/life/take-your-best-shot/2228605.bin?size=620x400

Nathan
Nov 28, 2009, 3:12 AM
Regina. courtesy Jesse Robson/Leader Post

http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/www.leaderpost.com/life/take-your-best-shot/2228605.bin?size=620x400

... and by the angle... taken from the West Grandstand of Taylor Field.

Dylan Leblanc
Nov 28, 2009, 4:07 AM
cool! I wish we saw more of Regina on here

Cambridgite
Nov 28, 2009, 4:09 AM
yes that is the delta :yes:

Awesome. Then I have been in it. :yes:

Polelum
Nov 28, 2009, 4:26 AM
forgotten skyline - Saint John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, pop. 181.113 (metro) http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/3854234.jpg
Source (http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/3854234.jpg)

Nathan
Nov 28, 2009, 8:16 AM
cool! I wish we saw more of Regina on here

Here's one I was considering posting before, and I guess I will now. It's from Migs' blog (http://reginainpictures.blogspot.com/2009/11/downtown-regina-skyline-can-be-seen-way.html). Pretty awesome picture of the downtown from a distance.

http://img21.imageshack.us/img21/4649/mtimg0132regina.jpg

Dylan Leblanc
Nov 28, 2009, 10:18 AM
damn that's fine! thanks for posting. Regina looks like a BIG CITY!

Cambridgite
Nov 28, 2009, 7:06 PM
forgotten skyline - Saint John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, pop. 181.113 (metro)

Awesome photo. While it doesn't have much of a skyline per se (more or less what you'd expect for pop. 180,000), it is Canada's hidden gem when it comes to architecture, history, and cool landscapes. Interesting fact - St. John's has the largest number of bars per capita in North America, with most of them being on one downtown side street. I will be heading down there soon! :banana:

Phil McAvity
Nov 28, 2009, 8:14 PM
damn that's fine! thanks for posting. Regina looks like a BIG CITY!

Regina has an amazing skyline for a city of 200,000 people. The skyline makes it look about three times that size.

Polelum, great shot of St. John's! Most shots of it are only the left half of that pic so your picture really shows how big St. John's is (not that it's huge).

boden
Nov 28, 2009, 10:45 PM
Here's another one of my beloved little Belleville.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3440/3378103926_4c20d4c590_o.jpg

JuelzJones
Nov 28, 2009, 11:07 PM
Kitchener has a horrible, horrible, horrible skyline it's pathetic. Our buildings are atrocious especially that Sun Life building. Kitchener is definitely in contention of having the shittiest skyline in North america going by size of the city. Kitchener looks so fucken boring it's not even funny. :sleep:

Cambridgite
Nov 28, 2009, 11:13 PM
Kitchener has a horrible, horrible, horrible skyline it's pathetic. Our buildings are atrocious especially that Sun Life building. Kitchener is definitely in contention of having the shittiest skyline in North america going by size of the city. Kitchener looks so fucken boring it's not even funny. :sleep:

So I take it you're from there? I haven't seen you in the local section.

koops65
Nov 28, 2009, 11:40 PM
Kitchener has a horrible, horrible, horrible skyline it's pathetic. Our buildings are atrocious especially that Sun Life building. Kitchener is definitely in contention of having the shittiest skyline in North america going by size of the city. Kitchener looks so fucken boring it's not even funny. :sleep:

While I agree the Kitchener skyline isn't all that great, it's not THAT bad... and I have certainly seen worse.

Cambridgite
Nov 28, 2009, 11:49 PM
While I agree the Kitchener skyline isn't all that great, it's not THAT bad... and I have certainly seen worse.

Well, it holds its own in this thread if you don't mention the fact that it's the centre of a region of 530,000 people. Rivals...Saskatoon? Saint John? On a per capita basis, I have a hard time thinking of worse. I only post them in this thread because the CMA population numbers are less than the regional population. Otherwise, I'd technically have to post them among the "greats" and obviously they wouldn't fit in very well over there, lol.

I don't really know how to defend it, if that's even possible. But on ground level, it's definitely improved quite a bit this past decade.

Rico Rommheim
Nov 28, 2009, 11:52 PM
Not much of a "skyline" that's for sure. There are many clusters that are bigger and nicer in Toronto and the GTA alone.

Urban_Genius
Nov 29, 2009, 12:19 AM
The TD building is nice.

And the building storefront are nice. Not really bad K-W I'd say.

Phil McAvity
Nov 29, 2009, 1:06 AM
Kitchener has a horrible, horrible, horrible skyline it's pathetic. Our buildings are atrocious especially that Sun Life building. Kitchener is definitely in contention of having the shittiest skyline in North america going by size of the city. Kitchener looks so fucken boring it's not even funny. :sleep:

Kitchener does have a pretty weak skyline but it's more impressive than Portland Maine. Portland's metro population is 620,000 and it doesn't even have a 200 footer.

Cambridgite
Nov 29, 2009, 1:15 AM
Kitchener does have a pretty weak skyline but it's more impressive than Portland Maine. Portland's metro population is 620,000 and it doesn't even have a 200 footer.

Hmm, actually you're right.

Portand, Maine.

http://www.mainehomebuzz.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/portland-maine.gif

http://www.mainehomebuzz.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/portland-maine.gif

It actually looks more like Galt (Cambridge) or Guelph, but with red brick instead of stone.

Anyhow, there are some nice features in Kitchener, but a skyline and attractive mid-to-high-rises are not among them (save for the TD building). Even the individual nice low-rise buildings we have are often separated from each other by the worst kind of 1960s urban renewal, including failed downtown malls, blank walls, and parking garages.

ErickMontreal
Nov 29, 2009, 1:27 AM
I still think Saint John (NB) has a better skyline than Waterloo/Kitchener, considering the size of the city. (125 000)

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3546/3388996499_28e36f0082_b.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3628/3389807948_4e32603007_b.jpg

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sudsmuffincanada/3388996499/in/set-72157606292200811/

Moreover, here's a better photo of Portland Maine.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/0d/PWM2a.JPG/800px-PWM2a.JPG

Cambridgite
Nov 29, 2009, 1:44 AM
[FONT="Arial"]I still think Saint John (NB) has a better skyline than Waterloo/Kitchener, considering the size of the city. (125 000)

Considering the size, yes. I'm not so sure in absolute terms though. SJ has the advantage that its tallest buildings are concentrated in one spot (a main intersection of sorts), which gives it better form. But there aren't that many buildings over 5 storeys to begin with, and of those that are, none of them are very tall. When I compared Kitchener's skyline to SJ's and Saskatoon's, I meant in absolute terms, not per capita.

Devon
Nov 29, 2009, 8:19 AM
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2422/3631789704_262c4866c9.jpg

have to love Saskatchewan skys.

courtesy of brownridge michelle on flickr.

softee
Nov 29, 2009, 12:34 PM
Portland, Maine's central city has a population of only 63,000. Like most American cities, it's "metro" is very expansive and covers a huge area taking in dozens of surrounding towns.

koops65
Nov 29, 2009, 1:40 PM
You also need to consider that although the "metro" Kitchener area is 500 000+, the city itself (and it's Kitcheners skyline we're talking about here) is 220 000, and that Waterloo, and Cambridge have thier own downtowns and skylines that are completely separate from Kitchener.

Cambridgite
Nov 29, 2009, 4:30 PM
You also need to consider that although the "metro" Kitchener area is 500 000+, the city itself (and it's Kitcheners skyline we're talking about here) is 220 000, and that Waterloo, and Cambridge have thier own downtowns and skylines that are completely separate from Kitchener.

And if we're looking at the 220,000 alone, that really would make the comparison to somewhere like Saskatoon a lot more sensible. Regina as well, but Regina's skyline seems to be in league with places like Halifax and London.

Still, I'm not sure the "multiple downtowns" excuse is really saleable when you consider that Hamilton has Burlington, Dundas, and Stoney Creek within its CMA. Yet, Hamilton's skyline seems fully appropriate for a CMA of about 700,000.

JuelzJones
Nov 29, 2009, 4:37 PM
ya i'm from Kitchener, I go to St. Louis adult learning center right behind city hall. Trying to get into Conestoga. I like Kitchener as a city though I think it's nice, but our skyline is horrendous.


I'm usually in Toronto though.

vid
Nov 29, 2009, 5:58 PM
Still, I'm not sure the "multiple downtowns" excuse is really saleable when you consider that Hamilton has Burlington, Dundas, and Stoney Creek within its CMA. Yet, Hamilton's skyline seems fully appropriate for a CMA of about 700,000.

It depends on the size of the main urban area around that downtown. Hamilton is, when you exclude its suburbs, a city of about 400,000. London is 350,000. Ottawa is about 600,000.

Phil McAvity
Nov 29, 2009, 6:32 PM
^the reason metro populations are more important than city populations (Portland Maine's population of a mere 63,000 is a perfect example) is because most of the people that occupy those downtown office towers are people from the suburbs that aren't part of the city population. That means that those people from the suburbs add to the city's vibrance, social scene, traffic and economic activity. I read years ago that the criterion for inclusion of a surrounding suburb, city or municipality was that at least 50 percent of the people must work within the city proper. The reason Kitchener's skyline is so weak is the same reason Thunder Bay's is-because it is more than one city.

vid
Nov 29, 2009, 6:46 PM
Burlington has a large workforce. So does Stoney Creek. Most people in Thunder Bay work in Intercity, not the downtowns.

Cambridgite
Nov 29, 2009, 7:28 PM
^the reason metro populations are more meaningful than city populations (Portland Maine's population of a mere 63,000 is a perfect example) is because most of the people that occupy those downtown office towers are people from the suburbs that aren't part of the city population. I read years ago that the criterion for inclusion of a surrounding suburb, city or municipality was that at least 50 percent of the people must work within the city proper. The problem with Kitchener is the same as Thunder Bay-it is more than one city.

I know the Statscan criterion you're speaking of. It's actually a little misleading because, while the urban core sounds like it means downtown, it actually means the continuously built-up urban area.

For example, in Toronto, it would include places like Oakville to the west (Burlington was included in Hamilton), Newmarket to the north, and Ajax to the east (Whitby is included under Oshawa).

For Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge are also included as part of the urban core. It is the nearby, detached communities and rural areas that need to meet the commuting threshold to be included in the CMA. Woolwich and North Dumfries Townships meet that criteria, for example.

There is also another criterion, every bit as significant as commuting data in determining who gets included into the CMA. If a CA (urban area of <100,000) gets absorbed by the expanding CMA, it is included as part of the urban core. Waterloo and Kitchener have been a continuous urban area for longer than Statscan has been around. Cambridge has joined more recently. I'm not sure why, but maybe it was less than 100,000 by the time they decided there was enough continuity between the Cambridge and KW urban areas. Neither Waterloo or Cambridge have anywhere near 50% of their labour force commuting to Kitchener though. Not even close.

Burlington has a large workforce. So does Stoney Creek. Most people in Thunder Bay work in Intercity, not the downtowns.

True enough. This pattern is even more exaggerated in the K-W-C area. According to my calculations, ~5% of the local labour force works in downtown Kitchener, which is absolutely miniscule. Even if you included all the downtowns together, it's still not a huge % of the labour force working there. In fact, the most desirable area for office space is suburban Waterloo. Some of the office parks up there rival those in the big 6 in terms of their size and style. And that's just office, not to say anything about industrial, institutional, and retail-based employment.

Actually, one of my former profs wrote a journal article about 'the dispersed city'. Conveniently enough, the Kitchener CMA was the perfect case study.

koops65
Nov 30, 2009, 6:26 AM
Here is another point to consider, one that probably gives Regina and Halifax big boost. They are Provincial Capitals, the seat of government offices and all the associated infrastructure that goes along with that. Fredricton and St. John's can also be included in this category. Thousands? (I have no idea of the real numbers) of people work in that sector in those cities, but are completely absent in other cities like Kitchener, London, Saskatoon, etc...

Acajack
Nov 30, 2009, 6:47 PM
In order for Portland, Maine to arrive at metro population of 600,000, it encapsulates several counties with more than 100 miles from one end to the other.

If Toronto's metro were measured the same way, it would encapsulate (westward for example) everything all the way to and including Kitchener-Waterloo. Right now Toronto's metro stops at the border of Halton region and doesn't even include Hamilton. It doesn't include Oshawa on the east side either.

flar
Nov 30, 2009, 7:07 PM
^^ Toronto CMA includes about half of Halton (the Oakville half, a small technicality, I know). The Burlington half is Hamilton CMA. If Statscan didn't draw arbritary lines, everything from Grimsby through Halton would be part of the same continuous urban area as Toronto (nevermind CMA).

Acajack
Nov 30, 2009, 7:17 PM
^^ Toronto CMA includes about half of Halton (the Oakville half, a small technicality, I know). The Burlington half is Hamilton CMA. If Statscan didn't draw arbritary lines, everything from Grimsby through Halton would be part of the same continuous urban area as Toronto (nevermind CMA).

Thanks. It's even crazier than I thought.

flar
Nov 30, 2009, 7:25 PM
It's very crazy. Grimsby is part of Hamilton's CMA and urban area, but is in Niagara Region.

Dmajackson
Nov 30, 2009, 8:28 PM
Here is another point to consider, one that probably gives Regina and Halifax big boost. They are Provincial Capitals, the seat of government offices and all the associated infrastructure that goes along with that. Fredricton and St. John's can also be included in this category. Thousands? (I have no idea of the real numbers) of people work in that sector in those cities, but are completely absent in other cities like Kitchener, London, Saskatoon, etc...

Direct government jobs (ie Province House workers) is the third highest workforce base in Halifax I believe. The number is easily in the thousands.

First place goes to the Armed Forces ( we have a tonne of bases here and not just the navy) which is obvious if one walks through town on a work-day.

Second place is Capital Health (QEII, VG, IWK-Grace, Dartmouth General, ect).

kirjtc2
Nov 30, 2009, 8:34 PM
Just an FYI: Portland's real metro pop is 150-200K at most. It's only slightly larger than Saint John.

The MSA includes way too many self-contained urban areas (Biddeford-Saco, Sanford, Brunswick, Bath, etc) that are functionally seperate from greater Portland (much like Hamilton is from Toronto), not to mention a large area that's really more in Boston's commutershed than Portland.

someone123
Nov 30, 2009, 9:23 PM
Well, the massive Portland metro is even more suspect than the Toronto metro would be since Portland is so much smaller. There's little reason for it to sprawl 50 miles into other parts of Maine, and the actual core built up area is pretty small. It is similar to Saint John in terms of size.

Something else to consider in the case of Portland's skyline not being that great is that it's an older city with a pedestrian scale and mid-sized buildings.

Provincial capitals don't necessarily have big skylines or office towers. Halifax has office towers because it is the business centre for Atlantic Canada. It has the regional bank offices, law firms, etc. The tallest office towers are basically in a little "financial district" that has been there for about 200 years and is where the Royal Bank and Bank of NS were founded.

Cambridgite
Nov 30, 2009, 10:59 PM
In order for Portland, Maine to arrive at metro population of 600,000, it encapsulates several counties with more than 100 miles from one end to the other.

If Toronto's metro were measured the same way, it would encapsulate (westward for example) everything all the way to and including Kitchener-Waterloo. Right now Toronto's metro stops at the border of Halton region and doesn't even include Hamilton. It doesn't include Oshawa on the east side either.

Forgot about that. American MSAs have much more liberal definitions to them. I'm not sure what the rules are because I'm not sure what the American equivalent to Statscan is.

And yeah, that difference is always pointed out the many times that Toronto/Chicago comparisons are brought up.

^^ Toronto CMA includes about half of Halton (the Oakville half, a small technicality, I know). The Burlington half is Hamilton CMA. If Statscan didn't draw arbritary lines, everything from Grimsby through Halton would be part of the same continuous urban area as Toronto (nevermind CMA).

They're not entirely arbitrary. A major rule Statscan goes by is that a CMA cannot absorb another CMA. While I think Statscan should have an equivalent for American CSAs, I don't see them being of much use outside southern Ontario.

Cambridgite
Nov 30, 2009, 11:09 PM
Here is another point to consider, one that probably gives Regina and Halifax big boost. They are Provincial Capitals, the seat of government offices and all the associated infrastructure that goes along with that. Fredricton and St. John's can also be included in this category. Thousands? (I have no idea of the real numbers) of people work in that sector in those cities, but are completely absent in other cities like Kitchener, London, Saskatoon, etc...

Perhaps there is some legitimacy to that argument. Kitchener has government buildings downtown, but they are mainly just to do with city and regional administration. Seems that the remainder is largely insurance/finance and a call centre. Some engineering/consulting as well.

Well, the massive Portland metro is even more suspect than the Toronto metro would be since Portland is so much smaller. There's little reason for it to sprawl 50 miles into other parts of Maine, and the actual core built up area is pretty small. It is similar to Saint John in terms of size.

Something else to consider in the case of Portland's skyline not being that great is that it's an older city with a pedestrian scale and mid-sized buildings.

Provincial capitals don't necessarily have big skylines or office towers. Halifax has office towers because it is the business centre for Atlantic Canada. It has the regional bank offices, law firms, etc. The tallest office towers are basically in a little "financial district" that has been there for about 200 years and is where the Royal Bank and Bank of NS were founded.

City form across North America is very regionalized. The east coast is known for having dense, pedestrian-scale downtowns and inner cities, but the density tapers off into scattered large-lot developments very quickly after that. Ontario is quite different in that regard.

vid
Dec 1, 2009, 2:28 AM
Most of Sudbury's large offices are government buildings. The largest office building in Thunder Bay's downtowns is a government building, and the second largest is owned by the city.

Phil McAvity
Dec 1, 2009, 5:45 AM
Just an FYI: Portland's real metro pop is 150-200K at most. It's only slightly larger than Saint John.

In order for Portland, Maine to arrive at metro population of 600,000, it encapsulates several counties with more than 100 miles from one end to the other.

Portland

Population
62 561 in city and 619 917 in metro

http://www.emporis.com/application/?nav=city&lng=3&id=101732


Here is another point to consider, one that probably gives Regina and Halifax big boost. They are Provincial Capitals, the seat of government offices and all the associated infrastructure that goes along with that. Fredricton and St. John's can also be included in this category. Thousands? (I have no idea of the real numbers) of people work in that sector in those cities, but are completely absent in other cities like Kitchener, London, Saskatoon, etc...

What you're saying makes sense but I'll bet I can find at least as many examples of capital cities that have lousy skylines. Victoria is a great example-our tallest office building is twelve stories! Edmonton's skyline has nothing on Calgary's, either.

Cambridgite
Dec 1, 2009, 7:52 AM
What you're saying makes sense but I'll bet I can find at least as many examples of capital cities that have lousy skylines. Victoria is a great example-our tallest office building is twelve stories! Edmonton's skyline has nothing on Calgary's, either.

Victoria's tallest office building is only 12 storeys? Wow, the downtown looks bigger in the photos, but maybe that's just the density that's greater and the buildings aren't actually that tall.

True about Edmonton. It does not have as much of a corporate base as Calgary. It's still a decent skyline though.

Re: Fredericton: It may be the provincial capital of NB, but Saint John's skyline totally dwarfs the non-existant skyline of Fredericton.

Ottawa is the national capital, but its skyline is squat, as is Washington DC's (though I realize both places have height restrictions).

koops65
Dec 1, 2009, 9:22 AM
All these posts tell me one thing... there is no hard n fast rule for explaining why some cities (in the under 500 000 category) have a great skyline and others dont. Some have awesome density, others are tall (Niagara Falls springs to mind) and some have a classic look to them. On the flip side of that are cities that have a weak skyline for their size, with no easy explanation for it. Maybe it boils down to previous city administrations policies, combined with NIMBYism?

Dylan Leblanc
Dec 1, 2009, 10:34 AM
little ol' Victoria BC

CIBC is that 12 storey office building


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3500/3214538454_4411f77740_b.jpg
Brandon Godfrey on flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/vicfan/3214538454/


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3083/3213691255_4d8d325efc_b.jpg
Brandon Godfrey on flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/vicfan/3213691255/


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3426/3393788035_656eb11319_b.jpg
Brandon Godfrey on flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/vicfan/3393788035/in/set-72157616277820135/


Sketch of downtown from Vicwest by mc_bds. Remarkably accurate.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3039/3040037706_ccb6e16c1e_b.jpg
mc_bds on flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/mc_images/3040037706/

Metro-One
Dec 1, 2009, 11:01 AM
I love the Victoria Skyline. It is the one western city in Canada that looks more as if it belongs in New England.

It also has an amazingly large, dense, and active downtown core for a metro of only 340 000. Although the towers are not tall, they have many many mid rise buildings (around 10 floors) but have also built many 15 to 20 floor condos in the past 5 years.

Downtown is definitely growing.

Victoria is great for pub crawling.

vid
Dec 1, 2009, 10:03 PM
Portland

Population
62 561 in city and 619 917 in metro

http://www.emporis.com/application/?nav=city&lng=3&id=101732

Really? :D You think Emporis is a source regarding city data?! :D Using those stats one would think Duluth is a city of almost 300,000 but in reality, the municipalities around it and with an economic relationship to it makes it barely larger than Thunder Bay.

The smallest unit the US uses for determining metropolitan areas are counties, so the measure is virtually useless and almost always overstated. Look at a map of the municipalities in and around Portland, Maine. Include all municipalities and township covering the urban sprawl, and all rural municipalities and townships bordering that. There is your metro population for Portland Maine. It will be around 250,000 people.

le calmar
Dec 1, 2009, 10:10 PM
^ I was in Portland Maine a couple of weeks ago, and it's definitely not a city of 600,000. If feels more like a city slightly bigger than Sherbrooke QC (pop 200,000), but with taller buidings in the core. Same for Boston, there's no way it's bigger than Toronto! Boston should be slightly bigger than Montreal.

Cambridgite
Dec 1, 2009, 10:25 PM
I love the Victoria Skyline. It is the one western city in Canada that looks more as if it belongs in New England.

It also has an amazingly large, dense, and active downtown core for a metro of only 340 000. Although the towers are not tall, they have many many mid rise buildings (around 10 floors) but have also built many 15 to 20 floor condos in the past 5 years.

Downtown is definitely growing.

Victoria is great for pub crawling.

Do you or does anyone else know whether or not downtown Victoria has height restrictions? It seems like there is a high density of buildings that are of similar heights.

craneSpotter
Dec 2, 2009, 12:10 AM
Do you or does anyone else know whether or not downtown Victoria has height restrictions? It seems like there is a high density of buildings that are of similar heights.

Yes. Downtown Victoria has a building height restriction of 43.5m.

However, council does have discretionary guidelines that allow for approvals of building heights up to 58.7m. They have recently approved buildings over 50m in the downtown Humboldt valley. We are working on a new downtown plan which recommends building heights of up to 72m within certain areas. Wow, eh ;)

Victoria's skyline does not photo all that well from many angles and can look uniform due to varying base elevations - the heights are more varied when on the ground.

As one poster mentioned, Victoria's downtown area is surprisingly large, dense and busy for its population. The pubs downtown are numerous and great too!!! :)

vid
Dec 2, 2009, 7:00 AM
Thunder Bay's height restriction is 45m. :P

(Except in every zone other zone besides RM3, where it is 10m...)

WhereverIRoam
Dec 2, 2009, 7:29 AM
Here's a couple pics of Regina I found while going through its construction thread posts by one_brick_at_a_time. From the Leader Post.

http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/www.leaderpost.com/business/Regina+only+Western+Canadian+city+with+positive+near+term+employment+prospects+report/2278311/2278312.bin

And from about 10 km or so out of town if I recall correctly.

http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/www.leaderpost.com/news/Cash+cities+pulled+Saskatchewan+government/2287774/2290058.bin

sammo
Dec 2, 2009, 1:39 PM
^i like pic1. what's the pop of regina?
city?
metro area?

Ayreonaut
Dec 2, 2009, 1:42 PM
I think it's about 225,000 or so.

vid
Dec 2, 2009, 2:21 PM
206,000.

MolsonExport
Dec 2, 2009, 3:04 PM
^thanks for that! wow! from memory!

Acajack
Dec 2, 2009, 4:17 PM
Portland

Population
62 561 in city and 619 917 in metro

http://www.emporis.com/application/?nav=city&lng=3&id=101732



That’s what I said. Emporis appears to use the generous U.S. Bureau of the Census definition for Portland’s metro, which includes York County near the NH border, Lewiston-Auburn (actually pretty much a separate city or metro) and Androscoggin County. It is 110 miles from the NH border where York County starts to the northern tip of Androscoggin County. And that’s supposed to be “Metro Portland, Maine”.

vid
Dec 3, 2009, 2:49 AM
^thanks for that! wow! from memory!

He asked how many people lived in Regina, I gave him the exact number because Aryeonaut's was too high. I looked it up on Wikipedia, I just didn't mention it. You don't have to get all spazzed out about it.

dennis
Dec 3, 2009, 4:01 AM
Ya right. Youse just gots nothin' better to do...





JK ;)

Devon
Dec 3, 2009, 5:25 AM
Population in 2006 179,246 (city)

Population in 2006 194,971 (cma)

From Stats Can Website.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2152/1582746324_76fa75e973_b.jpg


...and here's an interesting perspective of the city. Oh, and see that train yard? Check back in a few years when there is a stadium and other fine developments in its place.

vid
Dec 3, 2009, 5:59 AM
Looks like a baby Calgary. With a lake.

Distill3d
Dec 3, 2009, 9:33 AM
I love how you drive into Regina on nothing but bald ass prairie, and then BAM! there's trees like you suddenly drove into a forest!

dsim249
Dec 3, 2009, 4:26 PM
I love how you drive into Regina on nothing but bald ass prairie, and then BAM! there's trees like you suddenly drove into a forest!

More than 350,000 hand planted trees, to be precise.

Distill3d
Dec 3, 2009, 4:51 PM
Pardon my ignorance, but is the legislature building in Regina actually right on the Trans Canada Highway? Was that an intentional thing so that politicians in Saskatchewan can get the heck out of Dodge a little faster?

sammo
Dec 3, 2009, 4:59 PM
^:haha:

drm310
Dec 3, 2009, 5:16 PM
I never thought of it that way, but you know, you're right! :haha:

In practice, that part of Highway 1 is Albert Street, which is Regina's main north-south thoroughfare. They would have to get through the traffic jams first before making their escape!

Pardon my ignorance, but is the legislature building in Regina actually right on the Trans Canada Highway? Was that an intentional thing so that politicians in Saskatchewan can get the heck out of Dodge a little faster?

Devon
Dec 3, 2009, 9:05 PM
The Trans Canada runs East-West and vice versa right at the very edge of the city in this photo. The opposite of Albert street. BUT, they could quickly canoe Wascana lake through Wascana creek to Highway 1!

Distill3d
Dec 3, 2009, 10:35 PM
The Trans Canada runs East-West and vice versa right at the very edge of the city in this photo. The opposite of Albert street. BUT, they could quickly canoe Wascana lake through Wascana creek to Highway 1!

Technically, they could take Albert Street south and connect with the Trans Canada as well.

vid
Dec 4, 2009, 3:56 AM
According to my maps, BC's Parliament is on the Trans-Canada. So is Manitoba's. In Regina, Albert Street is marked as part of the Trans-Canada south of Victoria, which is beside the legislature. Province House in PEI is also on the Trans-Canada. These are according to MapArt maps, so naturally they're probably wrong. :) (But, so pretty.)

Nothing in Ontario is on highways because we have so few of them. :(

LeftCoaster
Dec 4, 2009, 5:37 AM
According to my maps, BC's Parliament is on the Trans-Canada. So is Manitoba's. In Regina, Albert Street is marked as part of the Trans-Canada south of Victoria, which is beside the legislature. Province House in PEI is also on the Trans-Canada. These are according to MapArt maps, so naturally they're probably wrong. :) (But, so pretty.)

Nothing in Ontario is on highways because we have so few of them. :(
Not around these parts :D

Oh and The BC Parliament is a block west of Highway 1... and its highway 1 only as a technicality... its not a highway and its only attached to the rest of the transcanada by a ferry.

vid
Dec 4, 2009, 6:27 AM
Downtown Toronto used to have lots of highways, almost every major street was a highway. Now, there are none. And by highway, I mean having the highway designation, not being a freeway or something like that.