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Wheelingman04
May 9, 2009, 12:46 AM
I know there are a lot of steel mills in the area. Are these steel companies shedding jobs or are they staying in good health?

Is the city revitalizing/gentrifying?

Is the proximity to Toronto/GTA a good or bad thing for Hamilton?


Thanks.:)

crhayes
May 9, 2009, 4:15 AM
I know there are a lot of steel mills in the area. Are these steel companies shedding jobs or are they staying in good health?

Is the city revitalizing/gentrifying?

Is the proximity to Toronto/GTA a good or bad thing for Hamilton?


Thanks.:)

Someone else may be able to give a more detailed answer, but I'll take a shot at it.

As far as I know our economy isn't doing relatively terrible, but the steel mills have taken a big hit. One of our Largest, Stelco, recently shut down until next year (I believe) and 1500 jobs were lost. There have been layoffs in the Health Care industry as well, which is currently our largest (Hamilton Health Sciences being Hamilton's largest employer). HHS is still building massive expansions at three of it's five hospitals though, which is creating a lot of construction jobs.

The city is revitalizing, although it is a slow and painful process. There are a lot of developments that have been proposed/are in the works for 2009. Some of these include:

4 hotel developments
McMaster University Innovation Park (Research Facility)
Major expansions to Henderson/St. Joes/General Hospital
City Hall renovation
Lister Block renovation (heritage building)
Proposed LRT public transportation (to hopefully start by 2013)

James Street North has been revitalizing steadily over the last few years and continues so this year. It seems all of the revitalization has been starting outside of our core downtown, and hopefully in the future will work itself inwards.

I can't comment on gentrification because I am not sure, but certain developments seem to be promising such as the Hamilton Grand boutique Hotel, which will include condominium units starting at $200,000. This could possibly bring some more affluent individuals into the core where a lot of lower income individuals currently reside.

The proximity to Toronto can be seen as both positive and negative depending how you look at it; it's pretty subjective. I think Toronto is a great city and it's nice to be only 40-60 minutes away. Another benefit from being close to Toronto is the proposed improvements to our infrastructure and public transportation via Metrolinx (the corporation that deals with transportation for the Toronto-Hamilton region). It is inevitable that Toronto get's the bulk of the funding, but because of the size of Hamilton and proximity to Toronto we have quite a few projects with high priority as well. By the same token, though, a lot of white collar workers that live in Hamilton commute to Toronto everyday which does not do so much for our local economy.

Hope that gives you some insight into Hamilton! Why are you wondering, if I may ask? Are you interested in moving here or just curious about Hamilton?

SteelTown
May 9, 2009, 12:53 PM
Hamilton's economy hit rock bottom during the late 80's and early 90's, the last recession. Thousands of jobs were eliminated from the manufacturing sector especially the steel sector. That recession did more damage than this current recession. So because Hamilton hit rock bottom is had nowhere to go but up.

Here's an example, Stelco once had well over 10,000 employees but currently there's probably only 1,500 employees at Stelco (US Steel Canada). So if Stelco were to completely to shut down it wouldn't really have a big dramatic effect to Hamilton's economy. We've been kind of lucky to have jobs eliminated over the years than have it hit all at once.

Health care and research is really the main drive in Hamilton's economy sort of like what's happening at Pittsburgh.

The city is currently trying to rezone the land around Hamilton's Airport for businesses (it's mostly all zoned for farming). Once that happens it'll open up a massive piece of greenfield for companies to build on. There's a group of people trying to stop this because they are afraid it’ll expand the urban boundary and lead to sprawl. They are unlikely to stop this from happening but likely to stall it.

Now if we get an NHL team that would to wonders to Hamilton's downtown core. It'll encourage more hotels, retail, stronger public transit for the region, and more white collar jobs, which will create a demand for more residential units in the core.

adam
May 9, 2009, 2:29 PM
Hamilton has several well established residential areas within walking distance to the core. Homes are cheap and are attracting many younger families who cannot afford homes in neighbouring Burlington or Oakville. Right now, these people commute to neighbouring cities for work and shopping along the highway. This should change with all the proposed changes and projects in the works downtown.

Wheelingman04
May 11, 2009, 1:26 AM
I hope Hamilton gets an NHL team. Those sunbelt cities don't support or know anything about hockey anyway.

Millstone
May 11, 2009, 2:49 AM
Hamilton has several well established residential areas within walking distance to the core. Homes are cheap and are attracting many younger families who cannot afford homes in neighbouring Burlington or Oakville. Right now, these people commute to neighbouring cities for work and shopping along the highway. This should change with all the proposed changes and projects in the works downtown.

I agree!

adam
May 11, 2009, 3:41 AM
WHAT?! Pinch me so I can stop dreaming ... Millstone agreed with me on something.. :tup:

highwater
May 11, 2009, 1:20 PM
Right now, these people commute to neighbouring cities for work and shopping along the highway. This should change with all the proposed changes and projects in the works downtown.

Everyone I know in this situation hopes to find work and/or start their own business in Hamilton eventually. They view their commute as a temporary evil. How many of them will achieve their dreams is anyone's guess, but even if it's only a small percentage it will have positive ripple effects for Hamilton. When my hubby lost his job in Oakville 9 years ago, he started his own business here and employs several people.

adam
May 11, 2009, 2:19 PM
If I need something, I try to find a shop downtown that has it instead of going to a power centre in Burlington. However, with the 1 way streets and "No Parking" along the curbside lane for much of the downtown, its almost impossible to navigate with a car. Two-way conversion would make it sooo much easier to navigate the downtown. If you want to find a shop that you know is on King St., but you are too far west, you have to kind of *GUESS* where it is located and travel that guessed distance along Main St. Sometimes you miss it and have to make a loop or two.. Really baffles my mind how 1-way streets have lasted so long. They really hinder the downtown as a destination.

astroblaster
May 11, 2009, 2:23 PM
Everyone I know in this situation hopes to find work and/or start their own business in Hamilton eventually. They view their commute as a temporary evil.

couldn't agree more!

omro
May 11, 2009, 2:36 PM
Everyone I know in this situation hopes to find work and/or start their own business in Hamilton eventually. They view their commute as a temporary evil. How many of them will achieve their dreams is anyone's guess, but even if it's only a small percentage it will have positive ripple effects for Hamilton. When my hubby lost his job in Oakville 9 years ago, he started his own business here and employs several people.

As someone who has recently moved here, finding work locally would be my ideal! That was one of the reasons why I moved to a smaller city. I wanted to be able to live and work and have fun within a smaller area, preferably all within walking distance. I wanted to escape the London Underground morning sardine packed commute and the London Underground must commute to anything social. If I have to commute to Toronto initially for work, then I will, but I'll actively seek local work opportunities.

Short term goals, find job downtown and then move more downtown (though Barton/Wentworth seems quite downtown, I'd like to be a little closer to the core).

Funnily enough, one of my long term goals is to start up a business. This is something that's being considered once I'm more settled and have sold up my property in the UK to use as seed money.

ryan_mcgreal
May 11, 2009, 3:51 PM
Really baffles my mind how 1-way streets have lasted so long. They really hinder the downtown as a destination.

The purpose of the one-way streets is to facilitate traffic flow through the city, not into it. Downtown vitality has been sacrificed so people just passing through can do so a few minutes faster.

adam
May 11, 2009, 6:11 PM
Omro, I think you're just a bit ahead of the curve, but more and more people want the same as time goes on. This is totally contrasting to Richard Florida's prediction that we should have high speed trains as the preferred form of transportation and people will live in Hamilton and working in Windsor, for example.

No matter how fast the train is, I think many people would prefer to walk to work. Most people don't want to sit in traffic or sit "packed like sardines" as you put it... its just so unnatural!

Millstone
May 11, 2009, 9:14 PM
If I need something, I try to find a shop downtown that has it instead of going to a power centre in Burlington. However, with the 1 way streets and "No Parking" along the curbside lane for much of the downtown, its almost impossible to navigate with a car. Two-way conversion would make it sooo much easier to navigate the downtown. If you want to find a shop that you know is on King St., but you are too far west, you have to kind of *GUESS* where it is located and travel that guessed distance along Main St. Sometimes you miss it and have to make a loop or two.. Really baffles my mind how 1-way streets have lasted so long. They really hinder the downtown as a destination.

I agree!

matt602
May 11, 2009, 9:56 PM
Ok. This is getting weird.

adam
May 11, 2009, 11:42 PM
Yep, I'm feeling nauseous (LOL)

omro
May 12, 2009, 11:34 AM
Omro, I think you're just a bit ahead of the curve, but more and more people want the same as time goes on.

I'm behind the curve, people in the UK and Europe have been making such choices for years...

highwater
May 12, 2009, 1:33 PM
I'm behind the curve, people in the UK and Europe have been making such choices for years...

No doubt geography and the cost of petrol (;)) had alot to do with those choices. Is that why you moved to the Hammer? So you could be somewhere so far behind that you're ahead? :D

omro
May 12, 2009, 1:57 PM
No doubt geography and the cost of petrol (;)) had alot to do with those choices. Is that why you moved to the Hammer? So you could be somewhere so far behind that you're ahead? :D

Nope, I moved here because all the signs are that it's an "up and coming" city, ripe for improvement and redevelopment. I want to ride the wave, rather than have missed it!!

I did it before. Walthamstow was dirt cheap and everyone said it was a crap area to be in. Two years after I moved there it suddenly was an "up and coming" area after professional people began to move north, as Islington and Angel got too expensive and the areas of Seven Sisters and Tottenham were still considered too grotty to invest in. Four years later, it was a property hotspot, when people realised the property was underpriced and that the "village" area of Walthamstow was actually quite charming. A decade later, the property I bought is still worth, even after the property price crash, nearly four times what I paid for it originally. That said I never planned to live there so long. A move to another country was always on my "life map" and I've been in "Canadian Limbo" for the last 2 and a half years. Once the recession starts to lift, I can sell up in the UK and establish myself more here.

In many ways I'm much happier with the decision to move to Hamilton rather than Vancouver. The only thing I may miss out on is the lack of a large "community" network, but I'll survive I'm sure.

sofasurfer
May 12, 2009, 3:49 PM
Nope, I moved here because all the signs are that it's an "up and coming" city, ripe for improvement and redevelopment. I want to ride the wave, rather than have missed it!!

Pretty much this for me, too.

Let's get something straight: the cost of petrol/transport is very much relative. Distance, wages, etc. are all very different between here and Canada, and it's way too over-simplistic put an emigration decision in those terms (not to say that some people don't do this!!). My wife and I earned a LOT more in direct headline UKP/CAN$ conversion terms, but rent/petrol/transport/child care was similarly way more expensive. (FWIW, I understand from mates in Australia that it's the same kind of thing - you simply can't just apply a conversion rate and say it's better by a factor of Y. Lots of things to aggregate)

What is *very* apparent, IMO, is that the scope for improvement and development here is massive. It's happened in the UK and Europe in several cities (Sheffield and Nottingham seem the most relevant examples from personal experience, I suspect Lille might be another one but apart from a couple of quick visits I couldn't say for sure) and several things are coming in to place for this to happen in the coming years, in the same way it's happened where Omro and I hail from in the last 10-15 years.

highwater
May 12, 2009, 4:58 PM
Let's get something straight: the cost of petrol/transport is very much relative. Distance, wages, etc. are all very different between here and Canada, and it's way too over-simplistic put an emigration decision in those terms (not to say that some people don't do this!!).

My comment re the cost of petrol referred to Europeans' commuting choices, not their emigration choices. :)

thistleclub
May 12, 2009, 4:59 PM
As far as I know our economy isn't doing relatively terrible, but the steel mills have taken a big hit. One of our Largest, Stelco, recently shut down until next year (I believe) and 1500 jobs were lost. There have been layoffs in the Health Care industry as well, which is currently our largest (Hamilton Health Sciences being Hamilton's largest employer). HHS is still building massive expansions at three of it's five hospitals though, which is creating a lot of construction jobs.

The city is revitalizing, although it is a slow and painful process. There are a lot of developments that have been proposed/are in the works for 2009. Some of these include:

4 hotel developments
McMaster University Innovation Park (Research Facility)
Major expansions to Henderson/St. Joes/General Hospital
City Hall renovation
Lister Block renovation (heritage building)
Proposed LRT public transportation (to hopefully start by 2013)


You've captured the redevelopment rub, though. Not to discount the energy that these projects will bring to the table, but these are almost all driven by public investment, and few add to the tax base. I seem to recall that something like that six of the city's Top 10 employers are public-sector; the other four are metals manufacturing. So there's work to be done, need for progressive private employers and bold private investment, which can breed the sort of confidence needed to spark a genuine turnaround, and often faster than public projects.

drpgq
Jun 24, 2009, 6:14 PM
Some data (http://research.cibcwm.com/economic_public/download/metro_monitor.pdf) comparing recent economic performance for Canadian cities from CIBC (PDF). Unemployment seems a bit high compared to the latest data (7.4%) but I think they use a three month average and don't have the latest data.

bigguy1231
Jun 25, 2009, 7:31 AM
Some data (http://research.cibcwm.com/economic_public/download/metro_monitor.pdf) comparing recent economic performance for Canadian cities from CIBC (PDF). Unemployment seems a bit high compared to the latest data (7.4%) but I think they use a three month average and don't have the latest data.

I don't know where they got those figures either, I haven't seen any numbers even close to that from statscan yet. Supposedly, from an unemployment perspective we are doing pretty good, better than most from what I have heard.

SteelTown
Jul 2, 2009, 3:08 PM
Hamilton – an example of Canada’s changing economy

By Murray T. Martin
http://www.hospitalnews.com/modules/magazines/mag.asp?ID=3&IID=124&AID=1603

During my early childhood growing up in Western Canada, I recall reading in my grade five history textbook about the Canadian Mecca of manufacturing located in Hamilton, Ontario. This was at a time when the Stelco and Dofasco steel mills were roaring in production and Hamilton was home to big-name manufacturing icons such as Otis Elevator, Firestone, Westinghouse and more. However, the world started to change very dramatically in the late 70’s and early 80’s following a major North American recession; Hamilton’s manufacturing base started to close down and move elsewhere.

Hamilton still remains home to two steel mills, now employing only a small fraction of the 20,000 plus people employed during the pinnacle of their production years. Today, both mills have been dramatically impacted by our current recession with Stelco (now U.S. Steel) in total shutdown and Dofasco (now Arcelor-Mittal) in major slow down mode.

There is no doubt, the economic and cultural landscape in Hamilton has changed dramatically. ‘Steel town’ is becoming ‘health town.’ In the year 2009, the health-care sector is quickly becoming the largest employment sector in Hamilton with some 38,000 employees in total. The city’s single largest employer -- with close to 10,000 employees -- is Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS), a multi-site teaching hospital.

As we all know, the business of health care is terrifically employee-intense. It’s a service-based industry that remains on a high-growth trajectory as the population ages and as people continue to live longer.

With annual spending of more than $1 billion on clinical services, Hamilton Health Sciences is a major economic engine in south central Ontario. The fastest growing part of the hospital is not clinical programs, but its research enterprise. During the last fiscal year, Hamilton Health Sciences’ research revenues were $186 million. This is an increase of more than 20 per cent over the previous year and 100 per cent over just five years ago.

In Hamilton, the momentum continues to build. One of the highlights of the past year was a visit from our Prime Minister who announced HHS as one of the few hospitals in Canada to receive a major investment through the Canada Foundation for Innovation research awards to expand our research infrastructure. This investment award has resulted in the construction of a soon-to-be-opened $100 million Cardiac, Vascular & Stroke Research Institute. With this new facility, we’ll be well positioned to grow our world-class research team by a further 50 per cent.

To drive by the north Hamilton location of the new research building, co-located with a brand new, purpose-built Rehabilitation/Acquired Brain Injury Centre and the Hamilton General Hospital, one can clearly see how this once industrial core is going through an unprecedented transformation.

Other major health-care construction projects in Hamilton have stimulated the local economy well in front of any recession-busting strategies. In addition to our new research building and rehab centre, HHS has a major redevelopment underway at the Henderson General Hospital site and a series of smaller projects at the McMaster University Medical Centre site. The total value of all of these projects is in excess of $500 million. At the same time, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton has recently completed a new tower and has recently received approval for another mega project to renew and replace the old Hamilton Psychiatric Hospital facility.

New high-tech buildings, growing research, expanding clinical programs, and a changing workforce -- this is the nature of a modernizing Hamilton.

Hundreds of millions of dollars in capital project investment has dramatically changed today’s skyline view in Hamilton from smokestacks to construction cranes. The more impressive economic change on the landscape relates to the people and the families coming to Hamilton and joining the community.

Knowledge-based employees in health care and biomedical research are often highly educated and highly paid. These employees, their spouses and children are also highly educated and potential high income earners. These families have money to spend -- they eat in the city’s restaurants and shop at the malls. They enjoy the arts and the abundance of leisure activities in the area. For most, Hamilton is a well kept secret to outsiders. (You most likely did not know that Hamilton has more waterfalls than any urban city in North America and sits adjacent to a beautiful escarpment full of trees and parks?) Its economy is energized as it moves away from manufacturing and becomes increasingly based in service and high-tech industries.

In fact, Hamiltonians will say that the best thing about Hamilton is that “it is not Toronto.” And there must be some truth to this since increasingly people are choosing the affordability and lifestyle offered in Hamilton. According to real estate expert Don Campbell, who recently appeared on CBC’s The Hour, Hamilton is the number one place in Canada right now to invest in property. Among other things, including plans for improved commuter access to the Toronto core via light rail transit, proximity to Lake Ontario and other location characteristics and the changing nature of the economy and culture -- not to mention McMaster which has become Canada’s most research intensive university -- makes Hamilton a great choice for people looking for a challenging career in health care mixed with a good balance of family and fun.

Although, I’m not originally from Hamilton and I’ve worked in several other cities across Canada, I’m not surprised to see folks originally from Hamilton returning from elsewhere. And although even Hamiltonians may sometimes need to leave to come back to appreciate all that this city has to offer; when they do, they become the greatest champions of this place that’s “not Toronto.” Now, the only thing left to do is to let the NHL commissioner in on the secret -- Hamilton is also the greatest un-served hockey market in the world.

Murray T. Martin is the President and CEO of Hamilton Health Sciences.

matt602
Jul 3, 2009, 12:19 PM
That was certainly one hell of an article.

thistleclub
Jul 3, 2009, 12:46 PM
$699,331.98 of public sector money buys a lot of civic enthusiasm.

realcity
Aug 25, 2009, 12:58 AM
Why did he have to mention the stupid waterfalls?

:gaah:

SteelTown
Sep 16, 2009, 11:16 PM
Last night I was over at Toronto and learned that Kanetix (Insurance company) is moving a large chunk of their office to Hamilton from Toronto. They'll still keep the Toronto office but most are moving to Hamilton, they cited that it's cheaper to do business in Hamilton.

It'll be up and running in November and they got office space somewhere in Hess Village.

drpgq
Sep 17, 2009, 12:12 AM
Last night I was over at Toronto and learned that Kanetix (Insurance company) is moving a large chunk of their office to Hamilton from Toronto. They'll still keep the Toronto office but most are moving to Hamilton, they cited that it's cheaper to do business in Hamilton.

It'll be up and running in November and they got office space somewhere in Hess Village.

At least there's some good news this week.

urban_planner
Sep 17, 2009, 12:53 AM
Why did he have to mention the stupid waterfalls?

:gaah:

Because they are actually bringing people to Hamilton from other areas. I have met people on several ocassions that have come here from the GTA strictly to look at the falls.

SteelTown
Jan 22, 2010, 12:12 PM
Jobs boom in city's future
Steel, manufacturing out, education, health and science in

January 22, 2010
Steve Arnold
The Hamilton Spectator
http://www.thespec.com/News/Local/article/709804

More than 50,000 jobs will become available in Hamilton in the next six years and the city doesn't have the workforce to fill them.

A study prepared for the Hamilton Training and Adjustment Board concludes much of that employment growth will be due to increased economic activity around Hamilton -- but with the right development strategy the city can grab its own piece of that future.

Economist Tom McCormack, author of the study, said the best of the new jobs won't be the metal-bashing and manufacturing work that made Hamilton famous. They'll also demand a lot more education than in the past.

The new jobs illustrate a shift that has been taking place in Hamilton for decades. Since 1987, the city has lost 26,200 manufacturing positions, but gained more than 40,000 jobs in the professional-scientific-technical, transportation, education and health sectors.

That's a gain of 1.5 positions for every one lost, but in vastly different fields.

That trend clearly means Hamilton will have to focus on developing a more highly educated population than it currently has.

"What has happened to manufacturing here has happened to manufacturing right around the world," McCormack said. "That sector hasn't been creating any underlying jobs forever. No community in Canada is going to see growth in manufacturing jobs. That's just not going to happen."

The study, prepared by the Centre for Spatial Economics, concludes as many as 29,000 new jobs will be created in Hamilton by 2016. On top of that, 21,000 current workers will retire.

McCormack said since 2006, the biggest job growth in Hamilton has been in the clerical and retail-service segment, with the "better" jobs going to areas outside the city.

Turning that trend around is a focus of the economic development strategy being developed by the city -- a strategy targeting growth in advanced manufacturing, clean technology, food production, cultural industries, bioscience and goods movement.

McCormack's study showed a clear link between employment and education -- according to the 2006 census, 75 to 80 per cent of the working age population with a community college diploma or university degree was employed compared to 65 per cent of those who had only finished high school and only 35 per cent of those without high school.

The trouble for Hamilton is that about 210,000 of its population over age 15 have high school or less and that's not a pool of workers that will capture the attention of the kind of employers the city needs in the future.

"Hamilton is not as well educated as the rest of the country, but that is going to change in spades," McCormack said.

Another major problem for Hamilton is that its net "natural" growth in population -- births minus deaths -- isn't keeping up with the demand for new workers.

By 2020, McCormack estimates the city will have to attract as many as 8,500 immigrants to keep up with demand, a need that will change the very complexion of Hamilton.

Initial reaction to the findings was positive -- HTAB executive director Judy Travis said they show "the future is bright for Hamilton," while Neil Everson of the city's economic development department said it shows the pressing need for worker education.

"It means we'd better have a skilled labour force ready or employers are going to look elsewhere," he said. "Without the labour force, we aren't going to get the business."

Richard Koroscil, president of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, said the results clearly show "Hamilton has an opportunity to shape its own future.

"The opportunity is there if we're proactive," he said. "We have a chance to create a different city."

McCormack's study is part of an effort to design a workforce development plan for the city. The paper will now be taken to employers to test its projections.

50,000

New jobs coming to Hamilton over next six years

40,100

New jobs in health, transportation and education since 1987

26,200

Jobs lost in the manufacturing industry since 1987

8,500

Immigrants required by 2020 to keep up with demand

THE GOOD

The five sectors which fared best at job creation in Hamilton, 1987 to 2008

THE BAD

The five sectors which fared worst at job creation in Hamilton, 1987 to 2008

THE FUTURE

The fastest growing occupations in Hamilton*

Registered nurses 50%

Nurse aides, orderlies 50%

Early childhood educators, assistants 44%

Receptionists switchboard 41%

1987 2008 Change

Health care 29,200 48,200 19,000

Professional,scientific, technical 8,100 22,100 14,000

Construction 16,000 27,400 11,400

Education 20,100 30,800 10,700

Transportation, warehouse 8,100 17,100 9,000

1987 2008 Change

Manufacturing 80,000 53,800 -26,200

Public administration 13,800 13,200 -600

Utilities 2,500 2,100 -400

Agriculture, other primary 4,500 4,300 -200

Real estate rental and leasing 6,700 6,900 +200

flar
Jan 22, 2010, 1:47 PM
I certainly hope 50,000 jobs become available in Hamilton, but I'm still not a believer in the service economy. To me, the service economy is a whole lot of low paying jobs like retail, which is just what we've been seeing. The rest of the economy is hospital and education workers, who will presumably overeducate future generations in preparation for underemployment. So we have a bunch of moderately paid public sector (health and education workers being paid with tax dollars) supporting nine Walmarts, where everyone else works. Sounds unsustainable to me.

omro
Jan 22, 2010, 5:10 PM
It was just pointed out to me that this 21,000 of the "new" jobs are simply replacements for people who are retiring, so really only 29,000 new jobs are being created. Also the article implies the jobs will only be in the area, not within Hamilton itself, but in the "area".

drpgq
Jan 22, 2010, 7:15 PM
That's a good summary. One thing is with the colossal provincial deficit, there just won't be money for more hospital and education spending. You're already seeing it with HHS laying off people, so I can't see this being a source of growth for Hamilton over the next five years, where it has been previously.

I certainly hope 50,000 jobs become available in Hamilton, but I'm still not a believer in the service economy. To me, the service economy is a whole lot of low paying jobs like retail, which is just what we've been seeing. The rest of the economy is hospital and education workers, who will presumably overeducate future generations in preparation for underemployment. So we have a bunch of moderately paid public sector (health and education workers being paid with tax dollars) supporting nine Walmarts, where everyone else works. Sounds unsustainable to me.

SteelTown
Jan 22, 2010, 7:20 PM
The only people that got laid off were the mail service department, that's about 30 people. HHS outsourced them, yea I know I never heard of outsourcing mail service before either. The rest will be pushed somewhere else.

drpgq
Jan 23, 2010, 12:52 AM
The only people that got laid off were the mail service department, that's about 30 people. HHS outsourced them, yea I know I never heard of outsourcing mail service before either. The rest will be pushed somewhere else.

In the context of my comment, that's still 30 Hamilton jobs lost, whatever they are.

SteelTown
Jan 28, 2010, 12:14 PM
Hamilton economy on upswing in 2010
Manufacturing upturn fuels growth for first time in 3 years

January 28, 2010
Steve Arnold
The Hamilton Spectator
http://www.thespec.com/News/Business/article/713281

Hamilton's economy will grow in 2010 for the first time in three years, a new study by the Conference Board of Canada concludes.

Driving a major part of that growth will be the first upturn to manufacturing output since 2003.

"All of the signs point to a good year for Hamilton," said Jane McIntyre, one of the authors of the Conference Board's quarterly Metropolitan Outlook report. "It's all part of the general world economic recovery."

McIntyre said recovery in the battered manufacturing sector -- which saw output shrink by 31 per cent from 2003 to 2009 and employment in Hamilton fall by almost 18,000 jobs, will be an especially good news story.

Manufacturing output is "finally starting to show some signs of life," she said. "That's going to drive improvements in the service industries and other areas."

The signs McIntyre reads include real gross domestic product, employment, unemployment rate, personal income per person, population, retail sales and housing starts. All of them, except employment, are forecast to increase this year over last and to continue rising through 2014.

The drop in jobs, and matching rise in unemployment, will be smaller than in the past three years, and the situation is expected to get better after this year.

Driving the key recovery in manufacturing will be improved demand in the U.S. for Canadian exports and the recovery in the steel-consuming auto industry.

Specifically, the Conference Board predicts demand for autos and parts this year will increase by more than 10 per cent, contributing to a growth in manufacturing output of 3 per cent.

Ruth Liebersbach, president of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, said the Conference Board outlook matches the chamber's reading of the economic tea leaves.

"It mirrors what we see as a fragile recovery," she said, attributing the fragility to continued slow growth in employment.

"As long as employment is down, people are going to remain cautious, but that increase in housing starts shows that people are starting to open their pocketbooks again," she said.

The uptick in manufacturing activity will be matched by a rise in construction across the city, especially in the housing market.

Last year, housing starts dropped to about half their 2008 level.

This year, the Conference Board said they're expected to spike to almost 2,500 from 1,857.

Starts of single-family homes began to bounce back in the third quarter of '09 and are predicted to surge 56.2 per cent this year.

Starts of multiple units -- apartments and townhouses -- will rise this year partly in response to provincial and federal government funding of social housing projects.

Together, housing starts are forecast to rise 34.4 per cent.

Construction activity outside housing will continue to boom because of road and sewer projects, work on the Hamilton cardiac care centre, $290 million in hospital renovations and construction of the CANMET Materials Technology Lab at the McMaster Innovation Park.

The improvement could be even greater, McIntyre added, if construction of the proposed light rail transit system goes ahead.

An improved outlook in manufacturing and construction will also drive an upsurge in the service sector where growth is expected to run between 2.6 and 3.1 per cent.

All of that activity will help boost the city's real estate sector, added Joe Ferrante, president of the Realtors' Association of Hamilton-Burlington.

"I think we're positioned in a good spot now," he said. "Any overall improvement in the economy is going to be good for real estate."

SteelTown
Mar 9, 2010, 12:10 PM
Last year's big projects diversify city tax base

March 09, 2010
Meredith Macleod
The Hamilton Spectator
http://www.thespec.com/News/Local/article/734617

Hamilton made big strides in boosting its non-residential tax base in 2009, with huge gains on the crucial industrial and commercial fronts.

While building permit values were down 15 per cent overall, industrial building permits grew in value by 113 per cent in 2009 over the previous year, and commercial permits increased by 37 per cent.

The industrial permits were valued at $115 million last year and commercial permits valued at close to $195 million.

Director of economic development Neil Everson said the numbers, all contained in a series of economic performance reports to councillors, are a good indicator of current economic activity and job creation. He said other area municipalities did not achieve such growth.

Some of the big projects include the Tim Hortons coffee roasting plant, $30 million; the CANMET materials lab, $60 million; and Mountain Plaza Mall, $55 million.

Others are the Red Hill Toyota dealership, the new Ancaster Fairgrounds, upgrades at ArcelorMittal Dofasco, and the Centre on Barton (the former Centre Mall).

City number-crunchers have long been concerned about Hamilton's heavy reliance on the residential taxpayer and a lack of assessment growth in the commercial and industrial areas.

But last year, both sectors soundly beat the four-year average, by 77 per cent on the industrial side and 72 per cent on the commercial.

Residential building was hard hit by the recession last year, falling 32 per cent in value over 2008.

The city issued $282 million in residential building permits, sharply down from the four-year average of $398 million.

The institutional sector was also off by 57 per cent over 2008, but much of that sector, which includes hospitals and schools, doesn't generate tax revenue for the city.

So far, 2010 is proving to be a strong year, with building permits up 108 per cent over January and February of last year.

The big coup is Canada Bread, which announced last month a $100-million, 375,000-square-foot bakery, which will make it the first tenant in the newly renamed Red Hill Business Park.

That will encourage other businesses to follow, Everson said.

"I call it the lemming effect," he added.

Council members praised Everson and his department for producing such positive results while the city was in the grip of the recession.

"I'm sensing that Hamilton is finally economically gaining at other municipalities' expense where for so many years the reverse was true," said Councillor Tom Jackson.

"We are seeing some spectacular growth," said Mayor Fred Eisenberger. He said performance measures across a broad range of indicators show the city's $1.5-million increase to the economic development budget last year paid off.

Overall assessment growth came in at 1.3 per cent. While that was short of the city's target of 1.5 per cent a year, Everson said it was a good result given the economy last year.

Close to half of the growth came from the industrial and commercial sectors, which had accounted for about a quarter of the growth in the previous two years.

Economic development staff also focused on a business retention program called Hamilton Calling, which surveyed 354 business owners last year.

"The Hamilton Calling program has really ramped up and that to me is the star of the show," said Councillor Brian McHattie.

"Keeping in touch with people who are already here is where our growth is going to be."

Everson said his department will be focused on completing a four-year economic development strategy, expected to be presented to council in June. He said major catalysts will include the Pan Am Games and light-rail transit.

The city is also throwing its efforts into marketing through social media and has been recognized for its success.


IN OTHER MEASURES OF 2009:

* Hamilton's unemployment rate was below the provincial average and two full percentage points below any other manufacturing centre in southern Ontario;

* The city lost 200 businesses in 2009. City council has set a target of increasing the number of businesses yearly by 5 per cent;

* The direct economic impact of film shoots dropped to $6.1 million in 2009 from $6.6 million in 2008;

* The downtown office vacancy rate dropped 25 per cent from 2008 to 2009;

* Only three residential units were added downtown, well short of the target of 150 a year;

* Ancaster Industrial Business Park sold out a 35-acre phase in 10 months;

* The economic development office achieved a 95 per cent approval rating from clients in 2009, breaking a city target of 90 per cent;

* 69 per cent of 354 companies surveyed in the city's Hamilton Calling program said they intend to expand in the next three years;

* The city sold $4.2 million in non-core assets and purchased about $20.5 million in property and capital projects.

SteelTown
Mar 9, 2010, 12:10 PM
http://media.hamiltonspectator.topscms.com/images/ce/0e/db194f3747e4a2f2cd3cebc23209.jpeg

realcity
Mar 9, 2010, 2:46 PM
Mountain Plaza Mall
Centre Mall Power Centre
A toyota dealership


commercial and industrial beat out residential because residential fell 32%. Kinda like losing private industrial jobs, by default education and healthcare rise to the top.

SteelTown
Mar 9, 2010, 3:33 PM
We've increased our tax base, that's the important part for me.

realcity
Mar 11, 2010, 5:38 PM
Siemans is closing its Sanford plant. 500 jobs gone.... good paying jobs

LikeHamilton
Mar 11, 2010, 6:11 PM
Siemens Hamilton cuts 550 jobs

TheSpec.com Lisa Grace Marr

Moving gas turbine division to North Carolina

Siemens Fossil Power Generation division in Hamilton announced today that it is moving its Hamilton gas turbine manufacturing arm to Charlotte, North Carolina, affecting 550 jobs.

The division will shut down Hamilton operations by July 2011.

Brian Maragno, operations manager at the Hamilton plant, said the decision was in no way a reflection of the quality of its employees.

“We have a long history in Hamilton - more than 100 years - I can say that I hold the employees here in the highest regard.”

Maragno said Siemens made the decision to move the gas turbine division to Charlotte to be closer to its customer base.

The 200 service-related positions at the Milton Avenue plant will remain.

The affected employees may be offered positions in Charlotte or in Siemens’ Canadian operations, said Maragno.

The Hamilton plant was responsible for the manufacture of large efficient gas turbines for the new Halton Hills Generating Station - expected to be ready for commercial operation this year.

http://www.thespec.com/News/BreakingNews/article/735564

bigguy1231
Mar 11, 2010, 8:16 PM
Another one bites the dust.

I have to laugh when these companies say they are moving to be closer to their customer base. They are moving to North Carolina in this case because it is one of the many states in the US that is a right to work state or as I like to call them a slave state. These are states where workers have no rights and no ability to organize. They can pay them minimum wages and no benefits. US Steel did the same when they moved production from here to Alabama and closed the former Stelco plants. This is what Free Trade got us, minimum wage service industry jobs.

realcity
Mar 12, 2010, 8:03 AM
/\

That's why Charlotte is thriving and Hamilton is sinking? Charlotte also is a hub in finance but I guess that has lots to do with not be able to organize labour.

I hardly doubt the Siemens workers will be paid $7.25/hr with no benefits.

"The move is expected to create 825 engineering and manufacturing jobs in Charlotte within five years, paying an average wage of almost $64,000 a year. Production in the expanded plant is scheduled to start in the fall of 2011, the company said."

realcity
Mar 12, 2010, 8:05 AM
Charlotte Bank of America Tower
http://pics4.city-data.com/cpic/ufiles1086.jpg

now add 500 well paying (former Hamilton) factory jobs to their economy

This is what a slave state looks like
http://www.7mainstreet.com/domains/7mainstreet/images/cities/charlotte.jpg

http://images.businessweek.com/ss/08/07/0723_subprime_stadiums/image/08-bank-of-america-stad_5b2.jpg

highwater
Mar 12, 2010, 2:36 PM
Another one bites the dust.

I have to laugh when these companies say they are moving to be closer to their customer base.

Yep. Laughable. Haven't these guys heard of a little thing called 'Globalization'? Or maybe they think our education system is as bad as the American one and we haven't heard of globalization.

bigguy1231
Mar 13, 2010, 2:08 AM
/\

That's why Charlotte is thriving and Hamilton is sinking? Charlotte also is a hub in finance but I guess that has lots to do with not be able to organize labour.

I hardly doubt the Siemens workers will be paid $7.25/hr with no benefits.

"The move is expected to create 825 engineering and manufacturing jobs in Charlotte within five years, paying an average wage of almost $64,000 a year. Production in the expanded plant is scheduled to start in the fall of 2011, the company said."

It's been a financial hub for a long time and the financial industry never has been a bastion of organized labour. I don't know if you have ever been to Charlotte but outside of the very compact, smaller than Hamilton's downtown, the city is a dump. Anyone with money lives either 40 miles to the North or South of the city. Lake Norman to the North or Rock Hill to the South.

realcity
Mar 13, 2010, 5:08 PM
ridiculous

thistleclub
Mar 14, 2010, 1:20 PM
New jobs better replace those lost (http://www.thespec.com/News/Business/article/736657)
Siemens looking at Ontario for renewable energy plant

Lisa Grace Marr
The Hamilton Spectator
(Mar 13, 2010)

Hamilton officials will make it a top priority to discuss ways to replace the 550 jobs the city has lost to the United States when they meet with Siemens executives in a few days.

"They have a large wind turbine division. We have highly skilled workers. It's at the top of the list," said Neil Everson, director of economic development for Hamilton.

"We'd like them to stay in the community."

Siemens announced Thursday it will be moving its gas-turbine manufacturing division from its Milton Avenue plant, near Sanford and Barton streets, to Charlotte, N.C., by July 2011.

Brian Maragno, the plant's operations manager, indicated some jobs may be relocated.

At issue is the ability of provincial and federal governments to attract and retain jobs in the critical manufacturing sector as global competition mounts, and in the Siemens case, countries are working to steal those jobs away.

Yesterday Dave Christopherson, MP for Hamilton Centre, raised the point in the House during question period.

"While this government is slashing corporate taxes, corporations are slashing jobs," said Christopherson. "What is this government going to do to keep those jobs in Hamilton?"

Industry Minister Tony Clement responded that he helped open the David Braley cardiac care centre Thursday in Hamilton, which promises 200 new health-care jobs.

Maragno said Siemens' move isn't a reflection of the quality of its workers but a strategic one because most of its customer base is in the United States.

But there were other reasons, millions of them. The state government offered enticements of up to $22.75 million US in tax breaks and grants.

County and city governments promised millions more and a county agency can offer up to $120 million in low-interest loans.

In return, the Munich-based conglomerate plans to invest $135 million and create more than 1,000 new jobs in Charlotte over five years, bringing its employment levels in that city to 1,800.

CAW Local 504, which represents about 325 of the affected workers, and opposition politicians reacted angrily to the news at a press conference yesterday organized by Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath, who is the MPP for Hamilton Centre.

"It's just devastating," said Randy Smith, president of the CAW local. "Siemens owes something to these workers -- I know they only bought it (from Westinghouse) in 1998, but we built this place and we made them billions and billions of dollars over the years.

"And this is what we get for it? We want these jobs and if we can't have these jobs, we want jobs in this plant.

"They've talked about jobs coming into Ontario from Siemens. They better be coming to this plant."

Siemens Canada is exploring the idea of opening a plant to support its renewable energy division somewhere in Ontario, said company spokesperson DL Leslie.

"It's too early to say yet," said Leslie. "Whether it will be in Hamilton, I don't know. I don't want to give any false hope."

Horwath said the provincial government must create policies that link jobs to any government-funded infrastructure or green energy program.

She spoke specifically of the NDP's call for a 50 per cent Buy Ontario policy that would apply to government infrastructure or "green energy" projects.

"We believe quite strongly in all the infrastructure money, the stimulus packages -- a portion of those need to be putting our people back to work."

The provincial government has some initiatives: wind projects must have 25 per cent Ontario content, which will increase to 50 per cent by January 2012. Large solar projects are now set at 50 per cent, increasing to 60 per cent by January 2011, while small solar moves from 40 per cent domestic content to 60 by January 2011.

But David Butters, president of the Association of Power Producers of Ontario, said a 50 per cent Buy Ontario policy is unrealistic because some parts for power plants are not even available domestically.

"The reality is that the taxpayer should have their power plants built with the most cost-effective parts."

The CAW Local 504 is organizing a large rally on Thursday at noon to protest the move.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Love that our Industry Minister holds up 200 new healthcare jobs in response to the loss of 550 private sector jobs.

markbarbera
Mar 14, 2010, 6:02 PM
Hamilton area loses 1,600 jobs last month; mixed reviews on recovery

Carmela Fragomeni
The Hamilton Spectator

(Mar 13, 2010)
While national and local unemployment rates edged down, the Hamilton region still lost 1,600 jobs in February.

The news from Statistics Canada yesterday comes on the heels of Thursday's announcement from Siemens Canada that it is moving its gas turbine manufacturing and 550 Hamilton jobs to North Carolina. In January, the Hamilton area lost 1,900 jobs.

Hamilton's February unemployment rate decreased slightly to 8.7 per cent from 8.9 in January, according to Statistics Canada's national labour force survey released yesterday. Canada's unemployment rate was 8.2 per and Ontario's was 9.1.

However, Hamilton's labour force shrank. Both the number of employed and of unemployed went down.

"Those are negative trends," said Erin Weir, economist for the United Steelworkers. "Just the fact that fewer people are employed is a bad thing for the community."

He points out Toronto's employment went up 1 per cent while it decreased 1.6 per cent in Hamilton.

"It's an indication Hamilton is lagging behind in the labour market recovery, if it's recovering."

Danielle Zietsma at Statistics Canada said comparing just January and February doesn't reveal a trend and adds Hamilton's employment picture hasn't changed much from last February to this one.

The biggest job losses, 5,000, were in finance, insurance, real estate and leasing, followed by 4,000 fewer jobs in the retail and wholesale trade sector.

The manufacturing sector did not change much, she said. The largest job gains were in the information, culture and recreation sector, with 6,000 new jobs, followed by 3,000 new professional, scientific and technical service sector employees.

Neil Everson, Hamilton's director of economic development, took a more positive view Hamilton's unemployment rate.

"We're still below the provincial average and still below other areas," he said, although added the Siemens news is not good.

"Generally the city is doing pretty good," he said, pointing out that industrial building permits are up and that Burlington and Milton have far more vacant industrial and commercial space than Hamilton.

Numbers showing fewer people employed in Hamilton can be deceiving he said.

"It could be retirements. It could be people leaving the workforce ... You have to remember this is based on a survey."

But Ontario NDP Leader and Hamilton Centre MPP Andrea Horwath said Hamiltonians have been losing jobs every month. "We need a recovery that works for everyone," she said in a statement yesterday after she and Hamilton Mountain MP Chris Charlton met with Siemens workers.

realcity
Mar 14, 2010, 11:20 PM
Wow!.

SteelTown
Apr 8, 2010, 11:08 AM
Hamilton's economy bouncing back

April 08, 2010
Steve Arnold
The Hamilton Spectator
http://www.thespec.com/News/Local/article/749729

Hamilton is poised for its strongest economic growth in a decade.

The Conference Board of Canada is predicting Hamilton's economy will grow 3.3 per cent this year -- its best performance since 2000 and the third-fastest growing city economy in the country.

At the same time, the Realtors Association of Hamilton-Burlington reported the real estate market is booming, with March sales up 38 per cent over the same month last year and the average price of $335,633 up almost 21 per cent.

The Conference Board report says the only key number that's not going up for Hamilton in the next five years is the unemployment rate -- it's set to fall by almost half by 2014.

Hamilton's growth will trail only Vancouver's post-Olympic 4 per cent and Toronto's 3.7 per cent.

The rosy report, released yesterday, matches the business outlooks the city's economic development staff have seen, said Norm Schleehahn, manager of business development.

"Our numbers would certainly agree with that trend," he said.

The Conference Board, an Ottawa-based think-tank, takes the economic temperature of Canada's largest cities throughout the year. The most recent review for Hamilton projects growth in all sectors -- including the battered manufacturing segment, where output and employment have fallen every year since 2003, bleeding more than 17,000 jobs, or 22 per cent of its workforce. More than 7,000 jobs were lost in the last two years alone.

The report notes: "Manufacturing output posted positive growth in the final two quarters of the year, as global demand picked up. And this strength is expected to continue through 2010 as well, despite the ongoing challenge posed by a strong Canadian dollar."

In total, the board predicts manufacturing output in Hamilton will increase 4.4 per cent this year as the auto and construction sectors pick up, boosting the steel industry especially.

The improvement will continue next year, adding another 4.3 per cent in growth.

In Hamilton, those numbers are backed up by announcements such as the new coffee roasting plant of Tim Hortons, the Canada Bread bakery and Metro Freightliner's decision last year to consolidate its Stoney Creek and St. Catharines transport truck sales and service operations here, said Schleehahn.

That move, he added, was one of three where new companies moved into space vacated by firms that had downsized because of the recession.

"Even in bad times, some people were investing," he said. "That was happening from big companies all the way down to the small business operator."

One segment that will be especially important to Hamilton's improved outlook is construction -- a turnaround from 2009 where housing starts dropped by almost half to a 27-year low and output for the sector dropped by 10 per cent.

This year, the board predicted new housing activity will improve by 30 per cent, with starts rising to 2,420 from last year's 1,860.

Also boosting the sector will be $7.1 million in federal and provincial affordable housing projects and ongoing work including $290 million in hospital renovations, work on several roads, water treatment facilities and sewers as well as the CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory at the McMaster Innovation Park.

There are more potential gains from the proposed light-rail transit system and developments for the 2015 Pan Am Games awarded to Toronto and Hamilton.

The realtors' association report for March shows sharp increases over the same month in 2009 and steady increases through the first three months of this year.

"March was just an amazing month for numbers of listings and sales," association president Joe Ferrante said in a news release.

"We set a new record for the number of listings taken in a month, ever."

Specifically, the Hamilton-Burlington area saw 1,436 units sold in March, an increase of 38.2 per cent over March of last year and 29.4 per cent over February.

To date, the board reported unit sales are 45.7 per cent higher than the same period in 2009 and listings are up 21.5 per cent.

Ferrante said the pace is expected to continue through the spring, although hikes in mortgage interest rates may cool the market slightly.

SteelTown
Apr 9, 2010, 12:52 PM
Fortinos to add 80 jobs with head office move
$4-million investment on east Mountain

By Mark Newman, News Staff
News
http://www.hamiltonmountainnews.com/news/article/207096

Fortinos is coming home.

In a major economic boost for the city, the 20-store supermarket chain is moving its head office from Burlington to the Nebo Hill Plaza at 1275 Rymal Rd. East in June, not far from its former head office on Glover Road.

“Our roots are in Hamilton,” said Vince Scorniaenchi, executive vice president of Fortinos, who added the company is investing about $4 million in its new 30,000 square-foot head office and are looking to increase the number of head office staff from the current 20 to as many as 100.

Scorniaenchi said the timing of the move meant they needed to find an existing building.

Part of the Loblaws empire, Scorniaenchi said company officials decided last December to have each of the supermarket chains within the organization operate independently and he credits city officials with helping ensure all necessary zoning changes were in place for the east Mountain location.

“I believe the prestige of a head office coming to Hamilton … it’s going to provide a domino effect for other head offices to consider coming to Hamilton in the future,” said Ward 6 Coun. Tom Jackson, who was contacted by Fortinos officials before Christmas about helping the company work out the details of the move.

The east Mountain councillor said the move gives the city some positive news following word of the pending closure of Siemens and the Lakeport brewery.

Fortinos, which has eight supermarkets in the Hamilton area, began as a single store in 1961 and became part of the Loblaw’s empire in 1988.

Scorniaenchi, a nephew of company founder John Fortino, has been with the company for 34 years.

“I grew up through the stores,” said the 51- year-old St. Thomas More graduate, who started as a janitor at the former Fortinos at Mohawk and Upper Ottawa, eventually working his way up through a variety of other jobs, including shelf stocker before moving on to company management.

Despite stiff competition, Scorniaenchi said, the company is confident the business will grow in the coming years.

Two new stores are planned for Burlington and Toronto next year.

“The brand is strong and there is room for the brand to grow,” Scorniaenchi said.

SteelTown
Apr 29, 2010, 6:51 PM
New recycling plant in Hamilton brings 50 jobs

April 29, 2010
BY ERIC McGUINNESS
The Hamilton Spectator
http://www.thespec.com/News/BreakingNews/article/760420

Hamilton is about to get a construction-waste processing plant its builders say will create 50 jobs and recycle up to 96 per cent of the wood, plastic and metal received.

The company, Countrywide Recycling Inc., says it will be the first of its kind in Ontario and one of only two or three in Canada.

Rob Cook, president of the Ontario Waste Management Association, says there are several similar plants in Ontario, but none achieving a diversion rate of 90 per cent or better.

Countrywide is owned by home builder John Voortman; his wife, Marie, and partner Dave Burtt. They bought 4.5 hectares of city land on Nebo Road in the Red Hill Industrial Park where they are ready to erect a building big enough to hold four NHL-sized ice rinks. An Environment Ministry certificate of approval is pending.

SteelTown
May 27, 2010, 11:16 AM
Cadbury combines operations
West-end facility getting $10-million makeover for expansion

May 27, 2010
Steve Arnold
The Hamilton Spectator
http://www.thespec.com/News/Business/article/776581

A west-end candy factory is getting a $10-million makeover.

Cadbury Adams is spending that money to combine its Hamilton and Stoney Creek operations into one efficient factory.

"We're going to bring two facilities together," explained Stephanie Minna Cass, the company's Canadian corporate communications manager. "This will allow us to reduce the complexity of our operation and to ship directly from our Hamilton plant."

Cadbury currently has a production plant on Ewen Road in Hamilton's west end and a leased packaging-shipping plant in Stoney Creek. The candies and other treats made in Hamilton have to be moved clear across the city to be packaged before they can be shipped to customers across Canada and the United States.

"By doing this we can reduce our complexity, reduce our emissions and improve our work flow," she said. "We'll be able to ship directly from Hamilton to our U.S. and Canadian warehouses."

Work on the project, which will increase the west-end plant from 175,000 square feet to 200,000, is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

Minna Cass explained the Hamilton plant has been pegged as a "centre of excellence" for candy production for Kraft in Canada -- Kraft won control of Cadbury's earlier this year.

The Hamilton plant produces Maynard's Fuzzy Peaches, Swedish Berries, Sour Patch Kids, Swedish Fish and Sour Cherry Blaster candies "and a plethora of other brands."

Where many corporate consolidation decisions often mean the loss of a factory and jobs, Minna Cass said Cadbury decided to stay in Hamilton "because we already had a significant manufacturing operation there."

"It's critical for us to remain competitive so we are continuously re-evaluating our processes and facilities," she said. "We already have significant space at Ewen Road so making better use of it gives us much better costs."

The company refused to say how many people are employed at the plants, but said the consolidation should be accomplished with "minimal to no job loss."

Neil Everson, Hamilton's director of economic development, welcomed the expansion as a first step toward building up the food processing industry in Hamilton -- one of the targets of the new economic development strategy.

"We've been working with Cadbury Adams for months," he said. "This is a very exciting development."

Cadbury started making candy in Canada in 1905. The Hamilton plant continues a tradition of local candy making that started in 1950 with the founding of Allan Candy Group.

It was purchased in 1995 by U.K.-based Cadbury Schweppes and rebranded Trebor Allan Inc. In 2007, Cadbury sold the Allan Candy business to ReichmannHauer Capital Partners which, in turn, sold the Emerald Street North manufacturing plant to a new company called Karma Candy Inc.

SteelTown
Jun 5, 2010, 2:08 PM
'Cautiously optimistic' about saving Siemens jobs

June 05, 2010
Lisa Grace Marr
The Hamilton Spectator
http://www.thespec.com/News/Business/article/782419

City officials are holding out hope for the fate of the Siemens plant slated to close next year -- and for most of its affected workers.

Neil Everson, the city's director of economic development, said he and others are in the midst of ongoing discussions with Siemens Canada top executives, including Roland Aurich, president and CEO.

"We're cautiously optimistic," Everson said yesterday.

In March, Siemens Canada announced it would be moving its gas turbine division from its Milton Avenue plant to North Carolina, taking with it 550 jobs.

At the time, company officials indicated that in Ontario, the market for gas turbines was shrinking while the market for renewable technologies was increasing.

Last week, Aurich told a Bloomsberg News reporter the company may soon open a wind turbine blade factory in Ontario.

D.L. Leslie, Siemens' spokesperson, said the company continues to explore opportunities in Ontario, although he would not say whether southern Ontario or Hamilton were among those "opportunities."

"I can't say, but it makes sense to manufacture where the market is."

Ontario's new Green Energy Act and Feed-in-Tariff program comes with a requirement that 60 per cent of renewable technologies be built in Ontario.

"This is why we identified clean technologies as a growth area for the city," Everson said.

This week, Siemens announced it would start building photovoltaic inverters at its Burlington division, creating 50 jobs.

Don Liddle, Siemens' manager of communications of industry, said he wasn't sure if the Hamilton workers' skills would be transferrable, but he said displaced workers could apply.

Also, Everson said the city has had 12 leads from "clean technology" firms interested in locating here -- Hamilton was shortlisted by three.

Still, the Siemens plant remains "a priority," said Everson.

It's hard to say if that alone will boost morale for Siemens workers.

Doug Brown, unit chair of CAW Local 504, which represents about 340 of the affected workers, said he learned of Siemens' plans to expand the Burlington plant "in the newspaper."

"We may not have a great relationship right now."

The union is in the midst of contract negotiations with the company, in essence discussing "closure packages," Brown said.

He said as far as the workers at the Hamilton plant are concerned, they'll work until it closes in July 2011.

"The company expects everyone to stay until the plant closes," he said. "If you leave before it closes, all opportunities for severance are lost unless it's 16 weeks prior to closure, then there are some options."

markbarbera
Jun 30, 2010, 10:04 PM
Today Siemens announced it has moved its target closing date ahead from July 2011 to the new closing date of April 2011.

thistleclub
Jul 11, 2010, 9:57 AM
Job creation surge bypasses Hamilton (http://www.thespec.com/News/Business/article/805224)
National numbers encouraging but don't translate at local level

Steve Arnold
The Canadian Press
(Jul 10, 2010)
http://www.thespec.com/News/Business/article/805224

"Canada held a job creation festival last month, but Hamilton wasn't invited. The latest figures from Statistics Canada show the economy pumped out 93,200 new jobs in June. Almost all of them were in Ontario and Quebec and all were in the service sector. The net effect was to bring the national unemployment rate down to 7.9 per cent -- the first time that figure has fallen below 8 per cent since January 2009. Hamilton, however, saw the number of unemployed here increase compared with the same period last year and the year-over-year jobless rate rise half a percentage point to 7.7 from 7.2. The rate dropped marginally from 7.8 per cent in May. Compared with the same time last year, Hamilton's situation hasn't improved at all -- its population has grown but the workforce has shrunk and the ranks of the unemployed have grown... Compared with June 2009, the number of people employed in the Hamilton area shrank by about 10,000 while the number classed as unemployed rose by 1,500."

SteelTown
Aug 11, 2010, 10:47 AM
Hamilton in running for Siemens plant

August 11, 2010
Steve Arnold
The Hamilton Spectator
BURLINGTON
http://www.thespec.com/News/Local/article/823953

Siemens Canada has won a massive new order for wind turbines and plans to build a new factory to manufacture blades for them.

Two Hamilton locations are in the running for that new plant and the 300 jobs it's expected to create.

In a news release yesterday, the company said the new plant, the first blade manufacturing site in Ontario, could mean up to 300 direct jobs and another 600 construction positions.

Although the company release didn't say where the new plant will be located, the chance of drawing that many good paying jobs has sent ripples of excitement through Hamilton and Burlington.

"Those jobs should be in Hamilton and we're going to be involved with all three levels of government to make sure that happens," said Randy Smith, president of the Canadian Auto Workers Local 504.

Smith represents most of the 550 staff Siemens is throwing out of work early next year when it closes its Hamilton gas turbine plant on Milton Avenue. Since that closure was announced in March, he -- with local politicians and others -- has been pressuring the company to find a new product for the plant.

Yesterday's announcement took him by surprise. "The company didn't mention a word about this to us. We haven't been involved in those talks or been considered for those jobs."

Siemens is closing the Hamilton plant in order to move its production to North Carolina, where it was promised heavy incentives.

By directing new work to Hamilton, Smith argues the company will gain both a chance to recover from that public relations black eye and access to a highly skilled work force it already knows. "Our people are very skilled and could do any kind of work the company brings along. We've always satisfied them, meeting all their production, quality and profit targets."

In Burlington, where Siemens Canada has its headquarters and a small plant, anticipation is building.

"This has been kicking around on my professional radar for some time and we've been promoting Burlington as a great location," enthused Ian Cameron, business development manager for the Burlington Economic Development Corporation.

"Today's announcement is a bit of new news, but we'd obviously be very happy to see it locate here," he added.

Under the order, Siemens will supply 600 megawatts of wind turbines for the Ontario market. The deal resulted from an agreement between Siemens, Samsung C&T and Pattern Energy.

The agreement, under the provincial government's Feed-in Tariff program, will provide Ontario consumers enough sustainable electricity each year to power more than 240,000 homes. It's part of a package in which Samsung has agreed to develop 2,000 megawatts of wind power over the next six years.

Bill Smith, senior vice-president of the energy sector for Siemens Canada, said a decision about the new plant's location should be made by the end of September. The company is looking at 16 potential locations along the shores of lakes Ontario and Erie between Kingston and Windsor. Two Hamilton locations are in the running.

Among the deciding factors will be a location with good road and rail access -- access to a port would also be nice. A large space is required because the turbine blades can be 55 metres long.

Smith said Siemens' existing Hamilton plant has been studied, along with a second unnamed location here. The company has no preference for an established industrial building versus a "greenfield" site.

Employees of the Hamilton plant will be given a chance to apply for positions at the new factory once a location has been chosen. Applications will be taken at a job fair to be held by the company. A similar event for outside applicants will also be held.

SteelTown
May 20, 2011, 1:09 PM
http://chch.com/index.php/home/item/3405-province-siemens-to-unveil-plans-but-what-are-they

Province, Siemens to unveil plans - but what are they?

Friday morning in Burlington, the Ontario government and the CEO of Siemens Canada will be making an annoucement.

Sandra Pupatello, Ontario's economic development minister put out the news release Thursday afternoon.

Sean Cowan did some digging to see if the announcement will bring good news to the Hamilton-Burlington area.

DC1983
May 20, 2011, 1:44 PM
Any chance it has to do with LRT manufacturing?
It's obvious that since the announcement is in Burly, likely means no Hamilton plant :(

Now how bout converting the old Westinghouse office on Sanford into lofts!

scott000
May 21, 2011, 1:39 AM
http://chch.com/index.php/home/item/3405-province-siemens-to-unveil-plans-but-what-are-they

Province, Siemens to unveil plans - but what are they?

Friday morning in Burlington, the Ontario government and the CEO of Siemens Canada will be making an annoucement.

Sandra Pupatello, Ontario's economic development minister put out the news release Thursday afternoon.

Sean Cowan did some digging to see if the announcement will bring good news to the Hamilton-Burlington area.

Not really a newsworthy story yet

From TheSpec.com:

Ontario reaches an “understanding” with Siemens

BURLINGTON Ontario has signed a deal with Siemens designed to give the province a better shot at attracting new jobs the company creates.

Siemens’ Canadian president Roland Aurich and Economic Development Minister Sandra Pupatello signed the deal Friday morning.

In an interview, Pupatello said the deal gives Ontario a closer relationship with company decision makers.

“For Ontario what it is is the opportunity to talk to Siemens first. It allows us to have a more heightened relationship with the executives who are the decision makers in a global company that has serious facilities on virtually every continent in the world,” she said. “We want more investment for Ontario and as these multinationals change direction and start looking at market trends for different products etc we want to be on the forefront for investment by Siemens.”

The Memorandum of Understanding mirrors a similar agreement Ontario signed in 2009 with GE, a deal Pupatello said has already resulted in “hundreds of job” for the province.

The GE deal committed the company to help small Ontario companies bring new products and services to the market, provide management training for provincial staff and “Establish global centres of excellence within Ontario focusing on clean energy, water treatment, health care, information technology and state-of-the-art manufacturing sectors.”

...

Full article: http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/535075--ontario-reaches-an-understanding-with-siemens

SteelTown
May 21, 2011, 2:43 AM
DrFQw_UnQXY

LikeHamilton
May 21, 2011, 3:13 AM
I love this video!
:awesome:

bornagainbiking
May 21, 2011, 11:26 AM
For starter's I like that ED video too. Businesses larger and small come on down.
Funny every day I drive into work, I get the pleasure of stopping at Barton and Sanford (traffic light) and I gaze at the big empty Westinghouse office building. I think what a great location for a student residence or lofts. Hope someone with some money comes around. Oddly enough the Go Buses are parked around the corner and could set up a 1st stop at the corner near the Fire hall.
There is some good news I watched last night on the news that a plant in Thunder Bay just opened and the company was moving out of China and returning to Canada to make popicycle sticks and paint stir sticks.
Hopefully things are turning the corner.
:cheers::cheers:

flar
May 21, 2011, 12:49 PM
It shows a nice view. I hate to be negative, but this video looks very amateurish to me. Not very effective as a tool to sell Hamilton. The crappy font, nothing that ties the video to the theme of the video (sunny days are here again). It sounds really silly to say Hamilton has the biggest bakery (who cares about something like that? Every little hick town in North America claims the biggest something).

Sorry, but I honestly think stuff like this is why Hamilton doesn't attract investment. I still try to promote Hamilton as much as I can but this just doesn't inspire confidence and I'd say it's close to embarrassing.

Berklon
May 21, 2011, 2:17 PM
I agree with flar. Those claims don't really do much to sell the city. I had the same reaction to the bakery, although it's good - it's not a big deal. And when you are trying to sell, you avoid anything negative. Even though Hamilton's unemployment is low compared to Canada/Ontario - it's still negative to list it at all. It's like saying "we suck less than xxxx".

I'm also getting tired of the future claims. Top 10 Cities of the future in North America... #1 best place to invest in Ontario (#3 in Canada). I've been hearing this sort of stuff for a while - how about we get the ball rolling on all this potential we keep talking about? I'm not even talking about anything major either.

SteelTown
May 21, 2011, 3:02 PM
More aerial view...

qK4J8VEQzSo

Berklon
May 21, 2011, 6:36 PM
I do love those ariel shots. Thanks for posting the vidoes.

thistleclub
Jun 14, 2011, 1:02 PM
MODERATE HIRING CLIMATE EXPECTED FOR HAMILTON

(Hamilton, ON June 14, 2011) – Hamilton area employers expect a moderate hiring climate for the third quarter of 2011, according to the latest Manpower Employment Outlook Survey.

Survey data reveals that 20 per cent of employers plan to hire for the upcoming quarter (July to September), while 10 per cent anticipate cutbacks, stated Erica Giannou of Manpower’s Hamilton office. Another 67 per cent of employers plan to maintain their current staffing levels and three per cent are unsure of their hiring intentions for the upcoming quarter.

“Hamilton’s third quarter Net Employment Outlook of 10 per cent is a decrease from the outlook of 20 per cent which was reported in the previous quarter,” said Giannou. “It is also a 13 percentage point drop from the outlook reported at the same time last year. Despite this decrease area employers anticipate a fair hiring climate for the third quarter of 2011.”

Strengthened by an active Outlook in the Western Region, the national Net Employment Outlook for the upcoming quarter indicates a respectable hiring climate for the July to September time frame,” says Lori Procher, Vice President and General Manager for Manpower Canada. “Overall, Canadian employers are telling us that they plan to increase their payrolls during the upcoming summer months which is a good sign for job seekers. And looking at longer term hiring trends, compared to last year at this time, Outlooks are stable or improved.”

LikeHamilton
Jul 8, 2011, 3:19 PM
Extra Extra! - Hamilton Is The Place To Be!
The Globe & Mail visits Hamilton to learn how it became a small business hub, and why Canadian entrepreneurs should take notice.

http://www.bizclip.com/investinhamilton/index.php?streamname=globe-mail

thompsdk
Jul 8, 2011, 4:10 PM
I like EcDev (and BizClip) and all, but this video is dated I'm afraid in terms of production quality.

Can we get some higher-quality videographers please?

compare the above with a video about cycling in Detroit (http://vimeo.com/25805461)

Let's bring the quality up a notch.

SteelTown
Jul 13, 2011, 7:35 PM
Potato plant moving to Flamborough

http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/562508--potato-plant-moving-to-flamborough

FLAMBOROUGH The Ontario government will spend almost $500,000 to bring a new potato-processing plant to a rural field north of Millgrove.

The investment, announced Wednesday morning by MPP Ted McMeekin, means 80 jobs will be moving into the area when Toronto-based EarthFresh Foods transplants its current Etobicoke operation.

Building is expected to start in the fall, with the new plant ready to open by spring 2012.

The EarthFresh plant will wash and package potatoes from Ontario and from growers in Prince Edward Island and the northeastern United States.

The plant will mean a total investment of $5.5 million. Provincial support is being provided under the Rural Economic Development program.

markbarbera
Jul 13, 2011, 7:51 PM
...also this:

$5.5 million expansion for harbour grain handling terminal

Richardson International is investing $5.5 million to expand its port terminal facility in Hamilton to increase handling and shipping capacity.

The Hamilton project includes the addition of a third receiving pit and elevation leg with two new truck beam scales. This will increase truck receiving and handling capacity by one-third to meet the demand for grain deliveries. Richardson will also be adding a second vessel-shipping tower to increase shipping capacity.

“Hamilton has emerged as a major grain hub in Ontario and demand continues to grow,” Darwin Sobkow, Richardson’s Vice-President, Agribusiness Operations said in a news release. “We are committed to investing in our facility to improve efficiency and meet the needs of all of our customers.”

...

link to full article by Steve Arnold posted July 13, 2011 on thespec.com (http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/562524--5-5-million-expansion-for-harbour-grain-handling-terminal)

It's nice to see a couple of good economic news stories for Hamilton today.

thistleclub
Aug 12, 2011, 4:04 PM
Not brand-new and kind of grain-of-salty but still noteworthy.

Coalition Urges Jobs As Ontario Election Issue (http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/555098--coalition-urges-jobs-as-ontario-election-issue) [Steve Arnold, Hamilton Spectator, June 28 2011]

In Hamilton, a first glance at Statistics Canada figures for the area suggest the local economy has held its own during the recession — between 2008 and 2010 the area’s labour grew from 397,500 to 402,500 while the number of local people employed fell only slightly from 373,100 to 371,800. Behind those numbers.... is a more frightening picture.

During those same three years the number of full-time jobs in the Grimsby-Hamilton-Burlington area increased by only 3,300. The number of people classed as “employees” fell by almost 21,000, the number of “permanent” employees fell by 16,400 and the number of people calling themselves self-employed rose by almost 21,000. In addition, between 2004 and 2010 Hamilton lost 23,000 manufacturing jobs, and even though it gained 29,600 health care and service sector positions, most of the new jobs were part-time, temporary and low paid.

SteelTown
Sep 8, 2011, 12:17 AM
City succeeds in luring new corporate investment

http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/590793--city-succeeds-in-luring-new-corporate-investment

Hamilton is second only to Toronto among Canadian cities in attracting new corporate investment over the past year.

It’s the second year in a row Hamilton has ranked among the top cities in Site Selection magazine’s Canada Best to Invest.

The article will be published Thursday.

There were 21 eligible projects totalling $577 million in Hamilton between June 2010 and May 2011. To qualify for consideration, projects must be at least $1 million and generate at least 50 jobs or at least 20,000 new square feet.

Hamilton’s count came in only behind Toronto with 61. Among the local projects cited by the magazine are steel mill upgrades by ArcelorMittal Dofasco and Max Aicher North America, new facilities for HVAC provider AMTS Ltd., construction equipment manufacturer Top Lift Enterprises, call centre provider SP Data and Union Gas and a new corporate headquarters and training centre for Carstar Automotive Canada.

The strong showing reflects a record-breaking year for Hamilton in 2010, when it reached $1 billion in building permits for the first time.

In last year’s ranking, Hamilton placed fifth in corporate investment.

Hamilton’s economic development department was also named among Canada’s best 10 for the second year in a row.

“Our people telling our story is extremely important to our success,” said Mayor Bob Bratina. He says the city’s economy is often presented in negative terms that ignore falling unemployment numbers, gains made in tackling poverty and the vitality of the local manufacturing sector.

“We’re a little too critical about ourselves. We do have a great future,” said Bratina, pointing out the city still makes 60 per cent of Canada’s steel.

“I think what this really says is our manufacturing sector is vibrant. From the North-End end industrial corridor and into Stoney Creek, company parking lots, with the exception of U.S. Steel, are full.”

Site Selection is based in Atlanta and read by 44,000 corporate executives and consultants around the world who make decisions about locations.

Neil Everson, the director of the city’s economic development division, says his department has put a lot of effort into creating a useful online tool for site selectors that includes GPS mapping, plenty of statistical analysis and live links to real estate listings.

“I don’t think there is anyone better north of the 49th parallel.”

Everson says the city won’t match its building permit record this year but there is a lot of activity in leasing of buildings and a number of major projects that could put the city close to that level in 2011. He stressed that the Site Selection recognition goes well beyond the work at city hall to a local business community willing to make investments.

David Adames, CEO of the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce, says the ranking speaks to the city’s strategic investments in economic development.

“A rating system like this starts to change the narrative about our business development in Hamilton,” he said.

“It sends a message that Hamilton is open for business … we need to do everything we can to support a business-friendly environment in Hamilton. We can’t rest on our laurels.”

Site Selection particularly cited the city’s Hamilton Calling program in which economic development staff visited 400 companies in 2010. Those visits showed Hamilton has gained about 1,300 jobs over the year and that 68 per cent of companies plan to expand over the next three years.

“Agencies all over the world are paying more attention to business retention, especially in bad times,” said Adam Bruns, author of the Canada Best to Invest article and managing editor of the magazine.

“Competent economic development professionals have been paying attention to it a lot longer than that. The Hamilton program is a particularly strong one.”

Site Selection also praised Hamilton’s new comprehensive industrial zoning bylaw which replaced 41 industrial zones among the previous municipalities with six industrial zones in the amalgamated city.

“If cities make it easier to do business, it catches the attention of corporate executives, especially if it’s been difficult in the past,” said Bruns. “But plenty of jurisdictions on both sides of the border haven’t figured that out.”

Hamilton was also named the top real estate investment choice in Ontario and the third best in Canada over the next five years by the Real Estate Investment Network.

The Site Selection edition also named the Ontario Ministry of Economic Development and Trade the recipient of the magazine’s Canadian competitiveness award, pointing out that the province created more than half of the new jobs across Canada between June 2010 and May 2011.


Top Canadian cities
These areas were tops in corporate facilities projects from June 2010 to May 2011. To be eligible, projects must reach two of three milestones: be at least $1 million in investment, create at least 50 new jobs or at least 20,000 new square feet.

1. Toronto61

2. Hamilton21

3. Quebec City17

3. Montreal17

5. Windsor8

5. London8

Top Canadian economic development groups (alphabetical)

Canada’s Technology Triangle

Edmonton Economic Development Corp

Greater Halifax Partnership

City of Hamilton Economic Development and Real Estate Division

London Economic Development Corp

City of Mississauga Economic Development Office

Montreal International

Quebec International

Regina Regional Opportunities Commission

Windsor-Essex Economic Development Corp

flar
Sep 8, 2011, 3:13 AM
Nice to see some good news.

mattgrande
Sep 8, 2011, 12:04 PM
I'm surprised that no Western cities are in the top five.

Duckyboy
Sep 8, 2011, 3:50 PM
I'm surprised that no Western cities are in the top five.

Too expensive in Vancouver? That's all I got.

north 42
Sep 8, 2011, 4:00 PM
I'm just happy to see Windsor and London in the top 5. Good for Hamilton, looks like southern Ontario cities are starting to climb out of the recession finally.

fuller
Sep 8, 2011, 4:29 PM
They`re apparently doing a pretty good job down there at EcDev but they need to try better to refrain from using cliches and platitudes.

From an American perspective, `north of the 49th parallel`might work, but has Neil Everson looked at an atlas lately? Or perhaps he was in fact making comparison to the more western provinces.

thistleclub
Sep 9, 2011, 3:03 PM
Here's the related Site Selection article. (http://www.siteselection.com/issues/2011/sep/canada-best-locations.cfm)

Good on EcDev (I'm confident they're making hay while the sun shines) but there are obviously a thousand parents. The article might have been more generous with its praise of the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade, which has played a part (eg. investing $43.6 million at ArcelorMittal Dofasco in January (http://www.ontariocanada.com/ontcan/1medt/en/news_2011_01_18_en_dofasco.jsp)). It also elides the double-edged sword of government incentives (http://www.thespec.com/feature/article/571033--tears-and-memories-for-siemens-final-day), for example, as well as the nuances of the employment market (eg. Max Aicher bought a mill off US Steel that had employed 300, rehired 100 of those when it fired up the facility in November, then idled 40 in July).

Nitpicky, true.

Pity, though, that the list of projects isn't made available. After all, EcDev’s own year-end numbers showed institutional investments markedly up ($188.23m), commercial marginally up ($139.75m) and industrial ($163.63m) and other/misc ($13.78m) down: $505.4m non-residential investments in 2010 vs $410.2m non-residential investments in 2009, a year-over-year increase beefed up by a $102m institutional gain. In view of that fact (and a category as broad as “new corporate investment”), it'd be interesting to define the role of major public entities like Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation or the Corporation of the City of Hamilton.

thistleclub
Sep 13, 2011, 1:20 PM
Manpower press release:

FAVOURABLE HIRING CLIMATE EXPECTED FOR HAMILTON

(Hamilton, ON September 13, 2011) – Hamilton area employers expect a favourable hiring climate for the fourth quarter of 2011, according to the latest Manpower Employment Outlook Survey.

Survey data reveals that 23 per cent of employers plan to hire for the upcoming quarter (October to December), while seven per cent anticipate cutbacks, stated Erica Giannou of Manpower’s Hamilton office. Another 70 per cent of employers plan to maintain their current staffing levels for the upcoming quarter.

“Hamilton’s fourth quarter Net Employment Outlook of 16 per cent is an improvement from the outlook of 10 per cent reported for the previous quarter,” said Giannou. “It is also a 10 percentage point increase from the outlook reported during the same time last year indicating a positive hiring climate for the upcoming months.”


Larger context: Canada’s employment outlook droops (http://business.financialpost.com/2011/09/13/canadas-employment-outlook-down-but-still-steady/) [Eric Lam, National Post, Sept 13, 2011]

Canada’s employment outlook will get a little bleaker to close out the year, but there is still enough positive sentiment for a steady hiring climate, the latest Manpower Employment Outlook Survey said Tuesday.

The survey of more than 1,900 Canadian employers found 20% planned to increase their payrolls in the fourth quarter, compared with 26% a quarter ago, while 8% plan to shrink their payrolls compared with only 4% in the prior quarter.

Overall, the seasonally adjusted net employment outlook stands at +13%, down from +16% in the prior quarter. Meanwhile, 70% of employers plan to maintain staffing levels, while 2% are unsure....

The best sector for job hunters is the mining sector, with a seasonally adjusted +26% net employment outlook. The poorest, meanwhile, is the education sector, with only a +8% net employment outlook, down one percentage point from the previous quarter.

thistleclub
Oct 11, 2011, 4:13 PM
Another reflection on national vs local context:

Hamilton Jobless Rate Drops 1 Per Cent (http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/605983--hamilton-jobless-rate-drops-1-per-cent) (Steve Arnold, Hamilton Spectator, Oct 8, 2011)

The latest figures from Statistics Canada show the Hamilton area posted an unemployment rate of 6.7 per cent in September. In human terms that means almost 27,000 people here are officially looking for work. Behind that number, however, the September jobs report shows the total number of people working in Hamilton has fallen and the portion of the population in the workforce has fallen while the total population has risen compared to last year.

“All of that suggests the unemployment rate is going down because people have stopped looking for work, “ said McMaster economist Arthur Sweetman. “It means people are dropping out of the workforce.”

The StatsCan report shows the population of the Grimsby-Hamilton-Burlington area grew by 6.5 per cent in the year between September 2010 and 2011 to 619,200. However, the area’s labour force fell 6.1 per cent to 401,200 from September 2010. That means 64.8 per cent of the population was in the labour force, down 1.7 per cent from a year ago. The portion of that group actually working also fell 1 per cent.

SteelTown
Oct 12, 2011, 4:46 PM
The StatsCan report shows the population of the Grimsby-Hamilton-Burlington area grew by 6.5 per cent in the year between September 2010 and 2011 to 619,200.

That's a huge jump in population, 6.5%. From 2007 to 2008 the CMA increased by 1.5%.

flar
Oct 12, 2011, 5:11 PM
That's absolute garbage reporting.

For one thing, that's not the total population, but the total population age 15 and older. Hamilton-Burlington-Grimsby has had well over 700,000 people for several years.

Second, the population age 15 and older didn't increase by 6.5%, it increased by 6.5 thousand. The increase in population 15+ from sept 2010 to sept 2011 was 1.1%. The reporter made the same mistake with the labour force, which decreased by 1.5%, not 6.1%.

thistleclub
Oct 13, 2011, 12:35 AM
I'm not vouching for the article's accuracy (The Spec's business reporting is usually weak), just posting, partly as a follow-up to an earlier Arnold piece (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showpost.php?p=5377199&postcount=77). What seems clear to me is that Hamilton always looks better when it gets grouped with the A students, whether you're talking about incomes, housing starts or job growth. Hamilton's unemployment rate would be considerably steeper if we assessed Hamilton alone.

Five years ago, for example:

• The Grimsby-Hamilton-Burlington (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1=537&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Hamilton&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=) area had a combined population of 692,911, a labour force of 369,700 and 189,840 citizens (27.4% of the Grimsby-Hamilton-Burlington population at the time) not in the labour force. The CMA's unemployment rate stood at 6.0%, while Ontario's unemployment rate was 6.4%.
• Hamilton (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3525005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Hamilton&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=)'s participation rate was 64.7%. Its labour force was 263,600 citizens; its employment rate was 60.4% and its unemployment was 6.5%. Its population was 504,559, 143,995 (28.5%) of whom were not in the labour force.
• Burlington (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3524002&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=burlington&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=)'s participation rate was 69.8%. Its labour force was 92,590 citizens; its employment rate was 66.5% and its unemployment rate was 4.6%. Its population was 164,415, 40,110 (24.4%) of whom were not in the labour force.
• Grimsby (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3526065&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Grimsby&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=)'s participation rate was 70.2%. Its labour force was 13,515 citizens; its employment rate was 66.8% and its unemployment rate was 4.8%. Its population at the time was 23,935, 5,735 (24%) of whom were not in the labour force.

flar
Oct 13, 2011, 12:50 AM
Just imagine the stats if Ancaster, Dundas, Stoney Creek and the Mountain were factored out.

bigguy1231
Oct 13, 2011, 1:27 PM
Just imagine the stats if Ancaster, Dundas, Stoney Creek and the Mountain were factored out.

Then it wouldn't be Hamilton.

Duckyboy
Oct 13, 2011, 2:03 PM
• The Grimsby-Hamilton-Burlington (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1=537&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Hamilton&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=) area had a combined population of 692,911, a labour force of 369,700 and 189,840 citizens (27.4% of the Grimsby-Hamilton-Burlington population at the time) not in the labour force. The CMA's unemployment rate stood at 6.0%, while Ontario's unemployment rate was 6.4%.
• Hamilton (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3525005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Hamilton&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=)'s participation rate was 64.7%. Its labour force was 263,600 citizens; its employment rate was 60.4% and its unemployment was 6.5%. Its population was 504,559, 143,995 (28.5%) of whom were not in the labour force.
• Burlington (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3524002&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=burlington&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=)'s participation rate was 69.8%. Its labour force was 92,590 citizens; its employment rate was 66.5% and its unemployment rate was 4.6%. Its population was 164,415, 40,110 (24.4%) of whom were not in the labour force.
• Grimsby (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3526065&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Grimsby&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=)'s participation rate was 70.2%. Its labour force was 13,515 citizens; its employment rate was 66.8% and its unemployment rate was 4.8%. Its population at the time was 23,935, 5,735 (24%) of whom were not in the labour force.[/QUOTE]

Wow... with a population 3 times the size of Burlington, and 38(!) times the size of Grimsby's coupled with a higher unemployment rate = LOTS OF PEOPLE ON SOCIAL ASSISTANCE. That's just a massive chunk of people of welfare; 24% of 160K is a manageable amount, but 28% of 500K is UNREAL!

I'm stating the obvious, but I'm just blown away at how many people who live here receive some kind of government cheque.

Either they are getting shipped here from all over or people are getting on assistance from the first day they are eligible and not looking back.

These are some numbers that I should have looked at before I moved here to start a family.

OUCH!

PS: Is Burlington nice?

flar
Oct 13, 2011, 3:23 PM
Then it wouldn't be Hamilton.

It would be the lower city, where most the region's economic troubles are concentrated. Hamilton is very polarized, it suffers from the American-style donut effect more than any other city in Canada, exacerbated by the fact that Burlington is a separate municipality. Every part of the Hamilton CMA is above average economically except the lower city, which is very poor.

thistleclub
Oct 13, 2011, 4:19 PM
28% of 500K is UNREAL!

I would guess that the catch-all also includes those under 15, retired individuals and stay-at-homes. It's not cut-and-dried.

More 2006 figures for sake of comparison:

Toronto (City) ( http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3520005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Toronto&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom= ): 722,620 not in labour force (28.9% of 2,503,281 pop'n)
Toronto CMA (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1=535&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Toronto&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=): 1,306,975 not in labour force (25.6% of 5,113,149 pop'n)
Mississauga (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3521005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Mississauga&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=): 155,485 not in labour force (23.3% of 668,549 pop'n)

Hamilton does have socioeconomic challenges, but large cities often do.

Percentage of population in low income before tax, 2005:

Toronto (City) = 24.5% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3520005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Toronto&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Mississauga = 15.7% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3521005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Mississauga&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Brampton = 13.9% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3521010&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Brampton&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Oakville = 9.7% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3524001&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Oakville&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Burlington = 9.5% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3524002&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Burlington&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Hamilton = 18% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3525005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Hamilton&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Grimsby = 8.2% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3526065&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Grimsby&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)

Duckyboy
Oct 13, 2011, 6:57 PM
I would guess that the catch-all also includes those under 15, retired individuals and stay-at-homes. It's not cut-and-dried.

More 2006 figures for sake of comparison:

Toronto (City) ( http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3520005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Toronto&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom= ): 722,620 not in labour force (28.9% of 2,503,281 pop'n)
Toronto CMA (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CMA&Code1=535&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Toronto&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=): 1,306,975 not in labour force (25.6% of 5,113,149 pop'n)
Mississauga (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3521005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Mississauga&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Labour&Custom=): 155,485 not in labour force (23.3% of 668,549 pop'n)

Hamilton does have socioeconomic challenges, but large cities often do.

Percentage of population in low income before tax, 2005:

Toronto (City) = 24.5% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3520005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Toronto&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Mississauga = 15.7% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3521005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Mississauga&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Brampton = 13.9% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3521010&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Brampton&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Oakville = 9.7% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3524001&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Oakville&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Burlington = 9.5% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3524002&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Burlington&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Hamilton = 18% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3525005&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Hamilton&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)
Grimsby = 8.2% (http://www12.statcan.ca/census-recensement/2006/dp-pd/prof/92-591/details/page.cfm?Lang=E&Geo1=CSD&Code1=3526065&Geo2=PR&Code2=35&Data=Count&SearchText=Grimsby&SearchType=Begins&SearchPR=01&B1=Income%20and%20earnings&Custom=)

That's true; I didn't think of that. Thanks for pointing it out...

LikeHamilton
Dec 13, 2011, 4:59 PM
Hamilton hiring outlook not great

Jay McQueen 900 CHML 12/13/2011

Sounds like a disappointing hiring climate is on the horizon in Hamilton.

That from the latest Manpower Employment Outlook Survey.

The report suggests just 3% of employers in the city plan to hire between January and March, while 10% anticipate cutbacks.

A further 4% of employers surveyed are unsure.

However, despite the net employment outlook of minus 7, it's still 3 points ahead of the outlook for the same time last year.

thistleclub
Dec 13, 2011, 5:53 PM
Nationwide: (http://montreal.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20111213/manpower-employment-outlook-first-quarter-hiring-111213/20111213/?hub=MontrealHome)

"The survey of more than 1,900 Canadian employers shows 16 per cent of them plan to increase their payrolls in the first quarter.

Ten per cent anticipate cutbacks and 71 per cent of employers expect to maintain current staffing levels.

Just three per cent are unsure of their hiring intentions."

SteelTown
Jan 11, 2012, 4:38 PM
Hamilton economy to grow modest 2% in 2012 report

http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/652829--hamilton-economy-to-grow-modest-2-in-2012-report

The Conference Board says cities in Alberta and Saskatchewan will lead Canada in growth and prosperity over the next couple of years.

The Ottawa-based economic forecaster's new metropolitan outlook has Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton and Regina at the top of the heap this year.

Saskatoon is expected to grow 4 per cent. Strength in Alberta’s energy sector and solid domestic demand will boost Calgary’s GDP by 3.6 per cent and Edmonton’s GDP will grow by 3.4 per cent.

Hamilton’s economy will grow by a modest 2 per cent in 2012.

Next year Vancouver will join the leaders and Toronto will tie Regina for fifth.

thistleclub
Jan 12, 2012, 5:04 PM
The CBoC report is Metropolitan Outlook 1: Economic Insights into 13 Canadian Metropolitan Economies: Winter 2012 (http://www.conferenceboard.ca/e-library/abstract.aspx?did=4606).

Not that it's broken down this way, but you can sort the findings into a Top 10.

1. Saskatoon: 4%
2. Calgary: 3.6%
3. Edmonton: 3.4%
4. Regina: 2.9%
5. Toronto & Vancouver: 2.6%
6. Halifax & Winnipeg: 2.4%
7. Quebec City: 2.1%
8: Hamilton & Montreal: 2%
9: Victoria: 1.9%
10: Ottawa/Gatineau: 1.8%

drpgq
Jan 14, 2012, 9:19 PM
Calling all animators - The Spec (http://www.thespec.com/news/business/article/654521--calling-all-animators)
Hamilton is attracting new digital firms and plans an ‘aggressive’ campaign to bring more to the city
Courtesy Pipeline...
pipeline1
Pipeline Animation Studios now calls Hamilton home. The above are samples of the company's work.

Hamilton’s business community is a lot more colourful and playful these days.

Maybe even a bit more zany.

Animators are heading to the city, perhaps not in droves yet, but certainly in a noticeable cluster.

The city has attracted at least four animation companies over the last six months.

And those who have set up shop here — Pipeline Studios, Chuck Gammage Animation Inc., Huminah Huminah Animation Studios and Topic Simple — believe they are the front-runners on what will become a wave of digital media companies seeing the value of Hamilton.