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View Full Version : What are the major issues in YOUR City ?



Architype
Apr 3, 2010, 9:20 PM
What are the major issues in YOUR City ?

I thought it would be a good idea to have a thread here where people can post a more concise summary of the developments and hot topics, especially as discussed on SSP over the past year or two, in the various cities in this section. Often, people don't have the time to wade through the many pages of chit chat and comments in all the threads.

This way you can get a quick overview, a side by side comparison of what is going on in all the Atlantic cities. The topics can be of help to inform the rest of us about much discussed developments and related issues like planning, heritage, economy, transportation, etc. in your city, or any city of interest. You can put in links to informative posts or pages of your city's thread or to important media articles and developer's websites as required.

You can also use this thread to make a quick list of development proposals.

This thread can be used to tie everything together and provide an overview of what's going on in the Atlantic region,
a sort of Spacing Atlantic (http://spacingatlantic.ca/) for SSP.

This includes Halifax, which may be the most confusing !!

theshark
Apr 3, 2010, 9:26 PM
maybe not the major one for every cities but some do have a real problem with them.......NIMBY's!!!:hell:

Dmajackson
Apr 5, 2010, 4:14 PM
maybe not the major one for every cities but some do have a real problem with them.......NIMBY's!!!:hell:

Bingo. :tup:

It's defenitely the major one for Halifax.

Also the lack of vision doesn't help anything.

JimiThing
Apr 5, 2010, 4:53 PM
Moncton: Urban Sprawl = Encouraged car dependency = Increased Traffic Congestion

JHikka
Apr 5, 2010, 5:06 PM
Saint John: Everyone moving outside of city limits

Architype
Apr 8, 2010, 1:26 AM
There seem to be common themes here, but I was hoping people could be more specific about what has been or is going on in their various cities.

Taeolas
Apr 23, 2010, 1:52 PM
Just my own feel from living here, but in Fredericton, NIMBY's are one major issue we keep running into. They're slowly being shouted down as the momentum of changes keeps going on, but they're still a problem.

Overall, the city is starting to grow out of its "must protect everything over 100 years old, don't add anything that doesn't look 100+ years" phase, but it is only JUST starting to do that. (Convention centre and 11 story hotel will help with that to some extent)

As a don't-own-a-car person, I find Fredericton Transit is another issue, especially with it's "Government hours or nothing" mentality. I've posted on the Gleaner comments on every FT related story my thoughts about it, and even sent emails to FT directly. But overall I feel FT needs to make better use of the Regent mall substation (and make it better overall; it would probably be better set up over near the theatres somehow), set one up on the north side somewhere, and stop routing every last route they have across the river. And get more reliable service available outside of Government hours. Run all the routes hourly, increasing to half hourly and even 20minute runs as demand requires. The current "Ok half hour till 1830, then next bus at 2030, and the last bus at 2300" is horrible. (And makes getting to Regent mall a pain; luckily I live in walking distance)

OK enough with my transit rant. It scared off another issue I was thinking of... what was it? OH YEAH!

Sunday shopping! Get rid of those hypocritical blue laws and let a business be open whatever hours they think they can make money during. Why should a store be allowed to be open more hours just because it is smaller? Why can I go anywhere on Sunday and get precooked food, but if I want to buy food to cook myself, I'm limited to a 5 hour window? This came up last Christmas/Boxing Day and I did write my councillor, but it seems to have disappeared as an issue again.

So anyways, those are the major issues/personal beefs I have with my city. Others mileage may vary. :)

mylesmalley
Apr 23, 2010, 3:19 PM
One thing Moncton doesn't lack is ambition. It's an overall positive, but sometimes it can hurt us if that ambition isn't focused into definable goals.

Another issue is that of shared services/cost sharing between the three municipalities that make up Greater Moncton. Moncton tends to pay a disproportionately high share of policing and utility costs.

MonctonRad
Apr 23, 2010, 3:31 PM
:previous:

Agreed; there are many positives about greater Moncton. Specifically, ambition, positive attitude, location and bilingualism.

Bilingualism however is a double edged sword. Bilingualism's nasty little brother is Acadian nationalism which breeds tribalism and the failure to cooperate on achieving important civic and regional goals. This tribalism will prevent full municipal amalgamation and the cost benefits that could accrue from this. It also prevents U de M from being a "bilingual" university that could benefit both linguistic groups in the city and it forces the province to maintain two regional hospitals in the city whereas otherwise we could have a single uber-hospital that could effectively compete with the Saint John Regional Hospital for provincial dominance in health care.

I support bilingualism but ethnic nationalism hurts the metropolitan area.

joeyedm
Apr 23, 2010, 3:34 PM
having lived in moncton for 5 years, now living in halifax, i would say a major issue for moncton, is the fact that there are 3 communities. Moncton/Riverview/Dieppe should be amalgemated. One needs to look at the Dieppe sign by law. Why a community such as Dieppe would propose a french only sign law is beyond me (besides Acadian Pride). Thankfully it was changed to bi lingual, however having 3 communities so close together fighting for whatever business comes their way doesnt make sense in this day and age.

Smevo
Apr 24, 2010, 2:45 AM
I would say CBRM's biggest issue outside of NIMBYs and people generally thinking "well that will never happen here", is how the communities are disjointed geographically. While this promotes a stronger sense of community, and while that can be a good thing, it makes running the RM as a single, unified municipality cumbersome at best, and at times nearly impossible.

Architype
Apr 24, 2010, 3:15 AM
I would say CBRM's biggest issue outside of NIMBYs and people generally thinking "well that will never happen here", is how the communities are disjointed geographically. While this promotes a stronger sense of community, and while that can be a good thing, it makes running the RM as a single, unified municipality cumbersome at best, and at times nearly impossible.

How much population would it take to fill in the gaps in CBRM, at least in a linear configuration ?

Smevo
Apr 24, 2010, 4:09 AM
Residential only would probably only be about 3,000-4,000 people settling in the in-between areas along the corridors, however, there are several areas of industrial and business land in these corridors so it would be quite a bit higher in reality. Possibly 20,000-30,000 to propel the industrial and business zones to build out? If the port-to-port highway and corridor ever goes through, it would help fill the corridor between Sydney and Glace Bay and allow safer residential development along the existing Glace Bay Highway, which is already a 4-lane undivided highway with 80km/hr speed limit and countless residential driveways accessing directly onto the highway (mostly closer to the Sydney end). AADT's along there are well in excess of 20,000 as well, with most of that being through traffic, so a port-to-port highway would transfer that traffic off the current one and allow the current one to be downgraded to a more suitable avenue/boulevard for residential developments. The biggest stretches to develop would be Sydney-New Waterford along the harbour shore (Lingan Rd would be slightly less) and Sydney-North Sydney.

All that being said, I'm not sure if I actually want to encourage sprawl to fill in these areas, even if it would make running the municipality as a cohesive unit much easier. Keeping the physical situation as is would probably be the lesser of two evils. All that really needs to change is local attitudes, unfortunately, that's the hardest thing to change.