PDA

You are viewing a trimmed-down version of the SkyscraperPage.com discussion forum.  For the full version follow the link below.

View Full Version : London Construction - Development News Thread#1



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 [19] 20 21 22 23 24

london2020
Aug 24, 2009, 6:12 AM
They've begun ripping out trees/shrubs and relocating utilities for the Wonderland widening north of Gainsborough. One small step....

MolsonExport
Aug 24, 2009, 1:07 PM
^very overdue. I can't understand why they rezone/develop areas prior to improving the infrastructure.

manny_santos
Aug 24, 2009, 7:43 PM
They've begun ripping out trees/shrubs and relocating utilities for the Wonderland widening north of Gainsborough. One small step....

Chances are the widening might start soon in that case. Historically I've found utility relocations happen fairly soon before the backhoes show up. One example being Commissioners between Wharncliffe and Wellington, where utility relocations took place in 2001 and widening started in 2002. There are cases such as Sarnia Road where power lines were moved years ago and there is wide ROW to widen the road, but not everything has been moved yet - there is still the odd pole from the old power lines.

I'll have to get a look up there soon. Haven't been on that part of Wonderland in some time.

go_leafs_go02
Aug 24, 2009, 11:20 PM
Haha...don't complain.

In BC they WIDEN roads around utility poles, because the Utilities don't believe it's a priority to them, and there's no legal obligation to them apparently.

MolsonExport
Aug 25, 2009, 4:56 PM
Chances are the widening might start soon in that case. Historically I've found utility relocations happen fairly soon before the backhoes show up. One example being Commissioners between Wharncliffe and Wellington, where utility relocations took place in 2001 and widening started in 2002. There are cases such as Sarnia Road where power lines were moved years ago and there is wide ROW to widen the road, but not everything has been moved yet - there is still the odd pole from the old power lines.

I'll have to get a look up there soon. Haven't been on that part of Wonderland in some time.

I am really sick and fucking tired of waiting for the widening of Sarnia between Western Road and Wonderland. C'mon!! wtf is going on? Why widen only one side?

Connected to the above includes the following annoyances:
1. The world's shittiest bridge over the tracks (Sarnia)
2. Turning right from Western road onto Sarnia between 4-530pm. Cars are often backed up into the Springett parking lot.
3. the deadly merge lane from Sarnia, northbound onto Wonderland.

manny_santos
Aug 26, 2009, 2:06 AM
I am really sick and fucking tired of waiting for the widening of Sarnia between Western Road and Wonderland. C'mon!! wtf is going on? Why widen only one side?

Connected to the above includes the following annoyances:
1. The world's shittiest bridge over the tracks (Sarnia)
2. Turning right from Western road onto Sarnia between 4-530pm. Cars are often backed up into the Springett parking lot.
3. the deadly merge lane from Sarnia, northbound onto Wonderland.

There's an easy solution to the right-turn lane problem - that lane should be channelized directly into the right-hand lane on Sarnia Road, leaving the left lane only accessed from Philip Aziz Ave and Western Road northbound. This setup is used at the north end of Wortley Road, where the right lane defaults onto the right lane of York Street. Trouble is, the majority of traffic stop there, even though there is no yield sign!

Did you mean the merge lane from Wonderland northbound onto Sarnia? One of the other problems in that area is the left turn arrow from Sarnia onto Wonderland southbound. Way too short for the amount of traffic.

ldoto
Sep 1, 2009, 2:38 PM
A long-vacant property in the heart of downtown has been deemed structurally unsafe, though the building's long history of decay and deterioration could soon reach a happy ending.

Just weeks after city officials issued a mandatory repair order for 142 Dundas St. -- a move that can result in a building's demolition -- the century-old structure near the John Labatt Centre has been purchased by new owners intent on fixing it up quickly.

"It's just an extraordinary building and it fully deserves the restoration it's about to receive," said Peter Mullins, the realtor who brokered the sale of the three-storey building.

"It's wonderful."

The building's pre-sale plight, though, was anything but.




It has been empty for more than a decade -- its last tenant was a Grandma Lee's restaurant -- and damage from a fire several years ago has still not been fully repaired, say city officials who posted a public safety warning on the building's windows last month.

Mullins, who listed the property for $150,000, says the new owners will take advantage of the ground floor that fronts both Dundas and Carling streets -- turning the former into a retail space and the latter into offices.

The previous owners were from outside London.

It's rare for a downtown property to be declared structurally unsound but the move in this case by city officials underscores what could become a growing problem among the core's aging building stock, said Janette MacDonald of MainStreet London.

As the old, empty commercial properties age further, she said, the main concern for downtown boosters like her could shift more and more from getting them occupied to simply keeping them safe.

The challenge, she said, is some owners bought downtown buildings in the 1960s, '70s and '80s hoping to realize huge profits as the property values skyrocketed -- except the values have steadily gone the other direction.

"That's our biggest challenge -- convincing people who paid too much on these to reinvest in them," MacDonald said. "If you do invest in it, the value will return."

To illustrate her point, MacDonald noted a downtown building that sold in 1975 for $775,000 and years later was seized by a bank, eventually hitting the market for $175,000.

But by 2003, with a solid tenant, it sold for $248,000 and after $150,000 in renovations was appraised in 2007 for $548,000.

"The value will go up but there has to be investment," she said.

So-called "orders to make safe" like the one issued by city hall against 142 Dundas St. make repairs mandatory for the owner, who may face legal action and fines of as much as $100,000 if they're not done "in a timely manner."

The ultimate decision, made by the city's chief building official, is to order a building demolished, said Frank Galera, a city building inspector.

City-wide, about one structure is ordered demolished each month, Galera said, noting the most recent case is an abandoned Lorne Ave. home that was razed in recent days.

london2020
Sep 7, 2009, 7:42 PM
The other day I heard something on the radio about London developing a new transportation master plan. But I can't find any stories on that....

london2020
Sep 17, 2009, 6:47 AM
First stage of Oxford widening west of Hyde Park has begun. Trees and shrubs have been cut back and all the fences have been torn down. I believe they are going to install the sound wall now.

MolsonExport
Sep 17, 2009, 1:31 PM
Funny, most of London seems gripped in Narrowing (due to construction) rather than widening. Pisses me off, as there are only a couple of through roads in the entire city (and no freeways, excepting on the southermost fringes). And, of course, no real "rapid" transit.

manny_santos
Sep 17, 2009, 9:09 PM
First stage of Oxford widening west of Hyde Park has begun. Trees and shrubs have been cut back and all the fences have been torn down. I believe they are going to install the sound wall now.

Looks to me like the rear portions of the backyards have been expropriated as well. I recall the City's capital budget called for residential property acquisitions as part of the project.

The new transportation plan might have to do with that rapid transit idea mentioned in the Free Press a day or two ago. Bud Polhill said it wouldn't be done in his lifetime, but that's not to say it won't be done in my lifetime. :cool:

MolsonExport
Sep 18, 2009, 3:08 AM
yup: london planners/council-->think small.

london2020
Sep 26, 2009, 4:40 AM
I think I found out what I heard about on the radio the other day.

LF Press reports the city recently published an "Urban Structure Plan Concept."

The plan calls for several streetcar lines running north, south, east and west, an orbital rapid transit line around the city, Go Transit lines connecting us to nearby communities, all connected to a central transportation hub downtown, presumably a high-speed rail centre connecting us to Toronto and Windsor.


source: http://www.lfpress.ca/cgi-bin/publish.cgi?x=letters&p=31942&s=letters

I think this stuff sounds pretty good but there needs to be a focus on improving the road system too. I think trams will be great, but I am still a strong proponent of a real expressway.

I think we need an expressway either down Oxford or perhaps Springbank/Hamilton/Horton. I think London should have a depressed freeway along one of these alignments.

Here is my quick drawing of where I think a freeway could go. Option 1 is pink and Option 2 is green. :)

http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/9278/fwyr.th.jpg (http://img97.imageshack.us/i/fwyr.jpg/)

http://www.aaroads.com/mid-atlantic/maryland150/i-170_eb_exit_001a_07.jpg

QuantumLeap
Sep 30, 2009, 4:53 PM
http://www.terrasan.com/ca/terragroup/terrasancorp/london.htm: at least this is on their website now!

GreatTallNorth2
Oct 1, 2009, 3:30 AM
I think we need an expressway either down Oxford or perhaps Springbank/Hamilton/Horton. I think London should have a depressed freeway along one of these alignments.

Here is my quick drawing of where I think a freeway could go. Option 1 is pink and Option 2 is green. :)

http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/9278/fwyr.th.jpg (http://img97.imageshack.us/i/fwyr.jpg/)

http://www.aaroads.com/mid-atlantic/maryland150/i-170_eb_exit_001a_07.jpg

Hey london2020. London has ZERO chance of building a freeway in the city. There was nothing but dithering in the 1970's with regards to London building a freeway and London back then was not nearly as built up as it is today. The chances of having an in-city freeway in London now, apart from the ring road (which isn't in the city really) is nil. There is no political will to build it. I was in Kitchener/Waterloo on Sunday and freeways take up a lot of space. Can you imagine telling Londoners they are building a 6 lane highway through the city? We have a better chance of getting the olympics.

MolsonExport
Oct 9, 2009, 4:08 PM
..

Excellent point. I might add {


:jester:

london2020
Oct 10, 2009, 9:53 AM
Hey london2020. London has ZERO chance of building a freeway in the city. There was nothing but dithering in the 1970's with regards to London building a freeway and London back then was not nearly as built up as it is today. The chances of having an in-city freeway in London now, apart from the ring road (which isn't in the city really) is nil. There is no political will to build it. I was in Kitchener/Waterloo on Sunday and freeways take up a lot of space. Can you imagine telling Londoners they are building a 6 lane highway through the city? We have a better chance of getting the olympics.

Out of the 80 cities of over 285,000 people in North America, only three other cities in addition to London have no urban freeway servicing the downtown area. I define this as a freeway either passing through the downtown, or passing within 2.0 km of the city center. Even if you look at cities over 200,000 people, none of them have a freeway as far away as the 401 is to London's core, and the vast majority of them have urban downtown freeways.

So what biggish cities don't have a freeway? One is Tucson, AZ, which has a major parkway 3.0 km from its core, slightly outside the definition above because it's a bit too far away and the parkway is a limited-access highway rather than a true freeway. Victoria is another example, with the closest freeway 4.3 km from its downtown. However, the freeway they do have bisects an urban area, and is twice as close to the city core as the 401 is to London. Lastly we have Winnipeg, but there are literally no freeways in all of Manitoba so this is to be expected.

Look at the lists below and search google maps one by one if you don't believe me.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_cities_by_population
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_100_largest_metropolitan_areas_in_Canada

London's leadership is a joke. Truth hurts.

SlickFranky
Oct 11, 2009, 5:39 PM
A 401-DT-402 freeway would be pretty great, but I think it's too late now. There's just no room anymore, unless you plan on cementing over the Thames.

I do sort of like that London doesn't have a freeway though. To get across the city you actually pass through the city. In K-W you just blast down the freeway until you hit your exit. You don't really get any sense of the city or its people...it's very disconnected.

MolsonExport
Oct 13, 2009, 1:08 PM
I think that the best shot at a freeway for London would be to upgrade Veterans Memorial Parkway...then convert Sunningdale or Medway to the Northern Ringroad....then perhaps West del Bourne to connect Southward. I would of course prefer Fanshawe Park Road, but I think that it is already too developed and proximate to residential areas.

The city needs a ring road, absolutely.

QuantumLeap
Oct 22, 2009, 7:19 AM
Does anyone have any news on the new Regional Mental Health Care building to be constructed at the Parkwood Site?

JrUrbanDesigner
Oct 22, 2009, 12:25 PM
Does anyone have any news on the new Regional Mental Health Care building to be constructed at the Parkwood Site?
I believe they are doing the 1st phase- which is infrastructure, they are digging a trench from the incenerator to the site of the new building to run ?steam-for heat? im guessing.

JrUrbanDesigner
Oct 22, 2009, 12:32 PM
What eventually happens to the hospital buildings near the Thames River, however, will be a dominant issue for the proposed redevelopment

By JONATHAN SHER

Dream big.

That was the undeniable message yesterday from London city designers and planners as they unveiled three-dimensional images of what might one day replace the hulking hospital buildings that block the view of the Thames River from South St.

The hospital facilities south of the street would be gone, replaced by residential buildings with ground-floor cafes and stores that open to a promenade that restores the connection between community and river.

The buildings themselves would be models of urban design, rising only a couple of storeys near the street and promenade, to blend with the mostly-residential neighbourhood south of Horton St., known as SoHo.

Farther from the street, the centres of the buildings rise many storeys and would be home to a concentration of people needed to draw vital and basic services, such as a grocery store.

"It's a dream, more than a plan and it's designed to help Londoners imagine the incredible potential for a very special development on this site," city planner John Fleming said.

It's a vision that's driven people in the area to look past the troubles they face today, problems such as street prostitution and empty stores on nearby Wellington and Horton streets.

"I'm really excited about it," said Marie Claire Bilyk, one of about 50 SoHo residents who gathered at the Wellington Street United Church to listen to city officials and brainstorm about neighbourhood plans.

The meeting was the third for the neighbourhood and the city as they create a plan for SoHo, and while that plan will have many facets, one issue dominates -- what will happen to the South St. hospital.

By the summer of 2011, London Health Sciences Centre will abandon its buildings south of South St. So far, none of the involved parties has agreed to pay for their demolition.

"It's Mt. Everest," Coun. Judy Bryant said after speaking at the church gathering.

If the buildings are removed and the land available for redevelopment, there will be community euphoria, she said. If demolition stalls over money, hopes of revitalizing the neighbourhood will be dealt a terrible blow.

In 2005, LHSC estimated demolition of the buildings and remediation of the lands would cost between $9.7 million and $13.15 million.

Some city councillors have demanded the hospital and Ontario government pay the full costs because a decade ago, hospital officials had promised to assume the cost if council gave city hospitals $15 million for restructuring. Council made the grant.

But LHSC officials say they'd banked on provincial funds that never came -- their board wants to cap the hospital contribution to $1.2 million plus the value of 1.8 hectares of hospital land there and some work already completed.

Source:LFPress.ca Oct 22nd 2009

sparky212
Oct 22, 2009, 1:58 PM
I see it every few days not much happening right now jus digging. There are huge piles of dirt though.
woops, didn't read JrUrbanDesigner's post.

manny_santos
Feb 5, 2010, 3:36 AM
I looked through the draft 2009 budget and these are my findings in terms of road work in the next several years. Some of it is good, while other stuff is disappointing.

Where: Wonderland Rd (Gainsborough to Fanshawe)
What: Widening to 4 Lanes
When: 2010
Cost: $11.8 million

Where: Hale St / Trafalgar / CN Rail
What: Grade Separation
When: 2011-2013
Cost: $16 million
Notes: $4 m already spent, apparently. I have no idea what this will look like. It's a real mess now though.

Where: Commissioners Rd (Wonderland to Viscount)
What: Widen to 5 lanes
When: 2012
Cost: $13.7 million
Notes: Well, it's obviously a good idea. But why did they waste all that money repaving it recently?

Aside from Hale/Trafalgar, Wonderland North, and Sarnia Road west of Wonderland, have there been any revised timelines put forward for other projects? I overheard the tail-end of a report on A-News a couple weeks ago about road projects but couldn't find any info on it. What about the Bradley extension westward from White Oak Road, any idea when that is finally happening?

manny_santos
Feb 5, 2010, 3:44 AM
Can anyone explain to me what the purpose of Bathurst St is? Did this used to be a proper through road? Why do they use the bridge over Wellington as a parking lot rather than a road to make Bathurst actually useful? :shrug:

I've found a little more out about Bathurst Street, now that I work in that area...

The parking strip on the north side of Bathurst Street including on top of the Wellington Street subway used to be in railway use. The rail lines ran right up to the south edge of the structure and the Bathurst/Wellington roadway confuguration simply hasn't changed at all since the railway right-of-way was scaled back. My understanding is that the parking area is under private ownership and is only permitted for use by employees working in the buildings in the area.

Since we're in that area, I'm not sure closing off Bathurst Street just west of Wellington near the Salvation Army building is necessary. Working in the area, I can't say I've seen many people loitering in that direct area, loitering seems to be more of a problem on the west sidewalk on Wellington itself. And even then, it's less of a problem than the loitering in front of the Central Library entrance on Dundas Street or near McDonald's at Market Tower.

sparky212
Feb 14, 2010, 5:55 PM
found this in the buisness london mag.
Q:finnaly how do things stand in the core
Schnurr: almost no condo development except for a small building and a reasonably sized building.But still that could come.
So I wonder if this means we are gona see some development dt or I wonder if he is talking about the old east proposals. Lets hope for the previous:shrug:

ldoto
Mar 6, 2010, 12:38 PM
Update!!!

Second-hand duds to get new digs

By RANDY RICHMOND, The London Free Press

A regional social service agency has taken the first step in a $12-million redevelopment enhancing the gateway to London's downtown.

Goodwill Industries officially opened its temporary store and donation centre at 205 Horton St. Friday, allowing work to start on its new facility on its property a block east.

"We are starting our project," a jubilant Michelle Quintyn, president of the Great Lakes region Goodwill, said. "We ought to be ground-breaking in March or early April."

Best known as a second-hand clothing shop, Goodwill offers employment counselling that last year served 7,000 people in the London region. Goodwill's new facility will include more than the agency's well-known store and donation centre, and its regional corporate offices.

Called the Social Enterprise Abilities Centre, the 80,000-square-foot facility also will include a cafe, community space, and a training and conference centre.

The expansion will add 75 to 100 new jobs to the 40 staff positions at the existing centre.

The temporary quarters will allow Goodwill to continue running its operation and bring in revenue while the new centre is built, Quintyn said.

"We wanted to stay in the neighbourhood, but that was going to be a challenge."

York Developments came to the rescue, buying and renovating a building down the street that was abandoned for a decade, Quintyn said.

York and Goodwill worked together to get the agency into the temporary headquarters.

"They made major improvements to allow us a place for maybe only 15 months," Quintyn said.

"They can see the renaissance of this area."

The area known as SOHO, for south of Horton, is home to about 1,200 homes, dozens of businesses, South Street hospital and several large social service agencies.

In recent years, the traditionally working class, tightly knit neighbourhood has attracted an artistic and activist community that is working with longer-term residents to combat increasing prostitution and illicit drug use in the area.

At the same time, the city has invested money in turning Wellington St. into an attractive gateway into the downtown area to the north.

sparky212
Mar 6, 2010, 3:00 PM
great:banana: found this on the same topic on the cities website

255 Horton Street East – Goodwill Industries – Request to: expand a legal non-conforming use (retail store) into the R3-1 zone south of the existing Goodwill Industries; permit a rear yard setback 0m whereas 7.5m is required under the AC4 zone portion and the said setback of 0.75m whereas 6m is required under R3-1 zone; permit a north interior side yard setback of 0m whereas 2.4m is required and an overall building height of 12.7m whereas 10m maximum is permitted in the AC4 zone and 10.5m maximum is permitted in the R3-1 zone; permit a lot coverage of 52% (63% existing) whereas a lot coverage maximum of 40% and 45% respectively is permitted; permit gross floor areas of 1022m2 for retail, 2272m2 for warehouse, 1130m2 for community centre, and 2200 m2 whereas 800m2 maximum is permitted for industrial uses; permit 128 parking spaces whereas 142 parking spaces are required and to locate the said parking spaces 0m from the ultimate road allowance whereas 3m is required and in an adjacent residential zone in place of a commercial zone.

FazDeH
Mar 9, 2010, 7:41 AM
Well ladies and gentlemen of our wonderful local forum, I was very luckily given the chance to sit in on a conversation with some local business men and investors over the weekend, I couldn't believe my ears but it seems that we're going to have quite the project under way in the next year or so.

Heres a basic breakdown of what I heard, they are looking to purchase a plot of land around Ridout near Carling, The project would include a restaurant and lounge on the main floor, aswell as 100-200 botique hotel rooms and 200ish apartments.

When I heard this I asked a few questions to probe the gentlemen who were speaking, basically what I was told was that it will be the first development of its kind in London and would fill a niche that is not yet being filled. I'm excited so I hope you guys keep your ear to the grindstone on this one!

ldoto
Mar 9, 2010, 3:25 PM
:previous: Are you kinding me!!!! This would be one of the greatest Construction Projects in the london like the One London Place in the 90's.:yes:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a138/ldoto/2010/41663506OldLondon7-1.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a138/ldoto/2010/OneLondonPlace.jpg

sparky212
Mar 10, 2010, 3:02 AM
this is gona be sweet. if it happens. wish we knew the hight sounds like a 35+

MolsonExport
Mar 10, 2010, 2:21 PM
Well ladies and gentlemen of our wonderful local forum, I was very luckily given the chance to sit in on a conversation with some local business men and investors over the weekend, I couldn't believe my ears but it seems that we're going to have quite the project under way in the next year or so.

Heres a basic breakdown of what I heard, they are looking to purchase a plot of land around Ridout near Carling, The project would include a restaurant and lounge on the main floor, aswell as 100-200 botique hotel rooms and 200ish apartments.

When I heard this I asked a few questions to probe the gentlemen who were speaking, basically what I was told was that it will be the first development of its kind in London and would fill a niche that is not yet being filled. I'm excited so I hope you guys keep your ear to the grindstone on this one!

wow. I expect updates! :tup:

manny_santos
Mar 11, 2010, 1:20 AM
:previous: Are you kinding me!!!! This would be one of the greatest Construction Projects in the london like the One London Place in the 90's.:yes:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a138/ldoto/2010/41663506OldLondon7-1.jpg

Nice photo! Somewhere here I have a photo of the construction site I took in June 1991, before the tower began to rise. I will try to scan that soon (as well as my dead mall photos for the other thread, haven't forgotten about that Mr. Export)

MolsonExport
Mar 11, 2010, 3:19 AM
excellent. I have a strange fascination with urban grit and dead malls. :D

GreatTallNorth2
Mar 11, 2010, 1:27 PM
If this project is one tower, it will be a new tallest for London. Let's hope that it is well designed!

ldoto
Mar 11, 2010, 11:40 PM
Downtown London to get new commercial building

What are these? A new, $8 million commercial building is coming to downtown London.:cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers: :cheers:

A three-storey, 30,000 square foot building will go up at Richmond and Carling streets on what is now 15,000 square feet of parking space and a Sammy's Souvlaki stand, next to Moxies restaurant.

"We have not had new, freestanding retail construction for a long, long time," said George Kerhoulas, sales representative with commercial realtors Cushman Wakefield Ltd.

"This is a sign that not only has residential noticed the downtown, but now the commercial market is noticing it also."

The new space will feature a "funky" exterior design and just may be a new home to a new Shoppers Drug Mart in the core.

"This is excellent news," beamed Janette MacDonald, manager of Downtown London, formerly MainStreet.

"It will be well built, the builder has an eye for urban design."

Kerhoulas has seen artist's renderings and agreed, adding, "the designs I have seen are modern, urban and say something about the future of downtown London."

The builder is Rocco Tullio, who owns Rock Developments in Windsor.

"London is a good market, it is somewhat insulated from the economy," he said.

"That is a good corner, in the heart of downtown, it's a great site and we are looking forward to building a first class office building."

He would not comment on rumours a Shoppers may locate there, but did add a major tenant is interested.

"I am confident we will make this go."

It is not his first building in London, as he also redeveloped the former Canadian Tire store in Masonville into a commercial plaza.

"It's a great city. I think putting your hockey rink downtown really helped the city, It provides life after the day-to-day business is gone," said Tullio.

Construction could begin later this year or in spring, 2011, depending on how fast the development moves.

The land, about one third of an acre, was sold by Dennis Dimitrakopoulous who operates several parking lots in the city.

"This will bring more people downtown, it is good for London," said Gus Dimitrakopoulous, Dennis's son.

The space behind the new building will remain parking, said Tullio.

Downtown London has seen new building, including commercial space in Tricar's Renaissance towers and a new office for Lerners, the law firm, and other new apartments.

"The more new builds we get, the more it instills confidence," said MacDonald.

If the tenant is a new Shoppers, that will help the downtown as the existing store on Dundas Street is small, old and does not have the larger grocery line now found in new stores.

It is not a grocery store, but along with the market, will offer a good lineup of foods for downtown residents, said MacDonald.

"It is good, but we still need a grocery store and we are working on it," said MacDonald.

FazDeH
Mar 12, 2010, 3:36 AM
^^^^ Wow sounds like that block is on an upswing. I've managed to eek out some more details from a friend of a friend etc etc etc... He knows one of the principle investors.
So I was given a visual that sounded more like a small scale vegas style hotel then the traditional condo buildings we see here in London. Considering the size of the lot, I could invision quite a sizable building there. My buddy tried to explain the idea but Architecture or design,.. not really his thing.
What I extrapolated from what he said was that the main floor of the building would include a large recration/pool area, and that the condo/hotel would flank it on one side. I dont believe that this building would be the next tallest, but would definitely make its mark on the London skyline.

sparky212
Mar 12, 2010, 4:08 AM
what is an office building they speak of??? A vegas style condotel wouldnt be that bad if done right

manny_santos
Mar 12, 2010, 4:14 AM
excellent. I have a strange fascination with urban grit and dead malls. :D

Things are getting really bad for London Mall. The samosa and fax place isn't even there anymore. The southeast corner of Oxford and Wonderland desperately needs to be redeveloped.

MolsonExport
Mar 12, 2010, 3:04 PM
bold prediction: within 2 years, the London Mall will be demolished. It is a prime location, currently wasting space.


Dammit, now when I need Samosa and Fax, I will have to go to 2 different stores! :D

QuantumLeap
Mar 12, 2010, 8:38 PM
I sure hope you are right, Molson! But I hope any redevelopment happens as part of an integrated plan for that intersection. Wonderland and Oxford is one of about a half-dozen London intersections that would make great "uptown centres", sort of like Yonge and Eglinton or North York here in Toronto.
These centres would be pedestrian-friendly, main-street shopping districts with higher density residential and some office uses.
Other candidates:
Wellington and Commissioners (LHSC)
Highbury and Oxford (Fanshawe College)
Fanshawe Park and Richmond (Masonville)
Wellington and Bradley (White Oaks)
Commissioners and Wonderland (Westmount)

manny_santos
Mar 12, 2010, 9:47 PM
The biggest thing Wonderland and Oxford has against it is the big elevation drop. What I think should happen with the site, is the mall demolished, the easternmost part of the property allowed to re-naturalize (as it is very close to Mud Creek), and then put in a multi-storey multi-use building close to the intersection, with stores lining the areas closest to Wonderland and Oxford. The rest of the site could be used for a London Transit park-n-ride hub.

Dmajackson
Mar 16, 2010, 4:53 AM
Hey,

The Tallest U/C In Your City (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=174954) thread has been reactivated recently and in hopes of updating the list I am going from city thread to city thread to see if the tallest under construction has changed recently.

I currently have the 180 Mill listed as the tallest in London. If this is completed or something taller is underway just message me or post it here and I'll add it to the list.

:cheers:

-DJ

ldoto
Mar 17, 2010, 2:24 AM
:previous: Don't forget about the The Renaissance Phase 2 28 stories 93.5m


And here is three more!!!!

1503 Hyde Park Road II 14 under-construction
80 Capulet 12 under-construction
70 Capulet 11 under-construction
Blossom Gate III 11 under-construction

Crane is on site and up!!!!! I have pics!!!!!

drjohnnyfever
Mar 29, 2010, 2:12 PM
I read smatterings of the changes at Westmount Mall, but can't really get a handle on the overall plan.

Does a coherent plan exist in an article somewhere that I've missed? Have there been any site plans released?

ldoto
Mar 29, 2010, 2:33 PM
A move by Westmount Shopping Centre to demolish a large chunk of space is pushing some retailers out of the south end mall.

The mall has applied to tear down up to 80,000 square feet to make way for more parking, and retailers being pushed out of the ara to be torn down have been hit by increases in rents to relocate, as well as high renovation costs on their new space, and little time to move, they said Friday.

"It's been nerve wracking," said Nancy Shaw, who is closing the Merle Norman store, the mall's oldest tenant, there for 37 years. "Your whole life is turned upside down."

About five years ago Shaw moved from the top floor to the main floor, paying $70,000 to renovate a new store. The mall has told her she must now pay $130,000 to renovate a new space, and then pay an increase of $2,500 a month on her rent of $5,000 a month — a 50 per cent increase in addition to her renovation fees, and she cannot afford it, opting for retirement instead.

She has also had little communication from the mall management or its owner, Bentall, adding that the mall is pushing them out quickly.

"The information has been very limited and we got termination notices saying we had to be out by the end of the month," she added.

Bentall could not be reached for comment, but realtor Tim Schnurr believes the moves will make for a more viable shopping centre.

"The focus is to make it a more vibrant communiy centre. We need to reposition the ground floor to focus it differently," he said.

Bentall has applied to the city for approval for the changes and city staff does not anticipate any hurdles to the demolition, said Bruce Henry, the city's manager of site plan approval.

"The old theatre is dead space and they want to remove that portion of the building and end up with more parking," said Henry. "It is an effort by the owner to revitalize it, make it more attractive and I know they are busy marketing it."

The mall will demolish the former movie theatres, as they are now closed, and much of the the area below it all the way to the Merle Norman store. Tenants in the area to be demolished have to be out by the end of March. The mall wants the demolition to happen this summer with changes completed by year end. The mall will also be without a food court for about 18 months, said Shaw.

The grocery store Metro and two small clothing retailers opposite it, Sirens and Urban Planet, will be a stand alone store.

The mall is also looking to add pads facing Wonderland and Viscount roads where restaurants and other stores will be located.

Like many other retailers Brenda Trudel, who owns Riverbed Aqua Massage, has been driven out by the rent hike and long leases. She will open her store in Elgin Mall, in St. Thomas, Monday after she was told she must pay a 25 per cent increase and sign a five year lease at Westmount.

"I could go on and on about what has happened here, and how we have been treated," said Trudel. "I am starting all over again, after four years here."

The mall's second floor is becoming a centre for offices and services, including health care with London Health Sciences Centre opening a Renal Dialysis Centre, a health clinic with eight doctors and a pyhsiotherapy centre. It is also adding office space, with financial planner locating there, added Schnurr.

Outside his salon, Style Plus, Ron Bonasia just wants all the uncertainty to end.

"It is good and bad, at the end it may be really good but we are concerned about losing business. It is all happening so fast, it coud have been handled gracefully," said the tenant of 16 years, who will move to a new location in the mall.

"Now, it is like a bad dream, I just want to to wake up and it will all be over."

sparky212
Apr 28, 2010, 9:13 PM
was walking down dundas in dt and saw a sign that said request for land zoning changes in that parking lot that puts that ugly gap in the street wall

manny_santos
Apr 29, 2010, 2:22 AM
was walking down dundas in dt and saw a sign that said request for land zoning changes in that parking lot that puts that ugly gap in the street wall

It is my understanding there's been talk of developing the former London Mews site. Last year I recall the property owner received a two-year extension or something like that to allow a parking lot on the site, and it was at that time I recall there being a mention of future site redevelopment. I'd like to see that gap filled in, as well as get some storefronts in right at Clarence and King.

ForestryW
Apr 30, 2010, 4:29 AM
was walking down dundas in dt and saw a sign that said request for land zoning changes in that parking lot that puts that ugly gap in the street wall

http://www.london.ca/Planning/PDFs/TZ-7734Dundas.pdf

Looks like they're keeping the parking lot.

ldoto
May 19, 2010, 12:23 AM
OLD McCORMICK HOME SITE: London developer buys land fro Calgary firm for three-buidling project

By HANK DANISZEWSKI, The London Free Press


That big hole in the ground on the site of the former McCormick seniors' home in London may finally be filled with new luxury condos.

London developer Hampton Group is buying the one-hectare property at Richmond and Victoria streets from Calgary-based Statesman Group.

David Tennant Jr. of The Hampton Group said his company plans to build three four-storey buildings on the site with 110 luxury "adult lifestyle" condos. He said the site also may include a separate pavilion-style building that could house a restaurant, fitness centre and health-care offices.

The old McCormick Home was demolished in the summer of 2007 after the seniors home moved to a larger facility in west London.

The Statesman Group announced plans to build Manor Village, a 136-unit upscale seniors home on the old McCormick site. The site was excavated and a temporary sales centre was located on the property. But Tennant said the Statesman Group decided to drop the project.

"We have gone through an unprecedented recession where getting financing for a project that size became difficult," Tennant said.

Tennant said Hampton's plans are in the early stages, but the units likely would be one-floor, two-bedroom models selling for about $300,000.

Tennant said the site shouldn't require rezoning even though it's being converted from an institutional use in the old McCormick home to a private residential development.

He said his company has met with Ward 6 Coun. Nancy Branscombe and a residents' association to discuss the development. Feedback from that meeting prompted Hampton to come up with the plan for several smaller buildings rather than one large one, he said.

Branscombe said Hampton Group appears to be responding to neighbourhood concerns. "It's all looking pretty positive. It sounds like they are listening to the community."

Hampton is preparing sketches of the buildings to be presented at a future neighbourhood information meeting.

"We hope to engage the neighbourhood in the redesign," Tennant said.

Hampton is also building a four-storey luxury condo building in Wortley Village that has run into opposition from area residents.

"We felt that process on Wortley was very successful and we ended up with a better building after meeting with the neighbourhood," said Tennant.

Tennant said construction at the old McCormick site wouldn't begin until next spring.

ericlewis91
May 24, 2010, 4:57 PM
is something finally coming to Dundas and Richmond?

i thought some retailer was?

sparky212
Aug 14, 2010, 2:11 AM
heres the render of the office building going up by moxies here is a pic sorry for the quality its a cell pic
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4889234313_11eeb65fc8.jpg

bolognium
Aug 14, 2010, 6:10 AM
heres the render of the office building going up by moxies here is a pic sorry for the quality its a cell pic
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4889234313_11eeb65fc8.jpg

The lot on the corner of Carling and Richmond where there's a Sammy's truck?

Right on.

sparky212
Aug 14, 2010, 3:05 PM
yup right on the corner

ldoto
Oct 1, 2010, 12:48 AM
The city is preparing a bid to buy the Bell building to escape overcrowding at 300 Dufferin Ave.

The Dundas St. Bell building (Free Press file photo) London wants to make Bell Canada’s downtown building its new city hall and is preparing a bid to buy the tower.

But owner Shmuel Farhi, the downtown’s major landlord, insists the Dundas St. building is not for sale. Instead, he prefers the city — out of room at its 40-year-old city hall, and facing huge upgrading costs there — lease space in his newer tower partly occupied by 700 Bell workers.

“I am not a seller — I do not sell and I do not need to sell,” said Farhi. “I bought (the building) for a reason. It is part of the puzzle and Bell is a big part of my vision.”

That vision is to own anchor properties in every area of the core, bustling with tenants.

The issue now is being discussed at city council and the offer may be on the table soon, said city chief administrator Jeff Fielding.

Even if costly renovations are done to city hall, the Dufferin Ave. site may not be large enough for the city’s needs.

Farhi bought the Bell building in 2008 for $11 million. The city also tried to buy it then with an offer of $15.5 million, but it had conditions attached while Farhi’s offer did not.

“We will try again. It is the only building in the downtown with sufficient space to accommodate us,” said Fielding, who acknowledges Farhi has other ideas.

“We are exploring the opportunity now. He has not said he wants to sell it, but we will take a look at that opportunity,” said Fielding.

With its space crunch, London already has city hall operations spread across other downtown locations.

Farhi is urging the city to lease space at the Bell site — either for all of city hall, or two floors for some departments — to ease the crowding.

It’s a solution that’ll save the city $120 million, he added.

A long-term lease for 250,000 sq. ft. would give the city enough room for its growing staff at a fraction of the cost of building a new city hall, or renovating the existing one, he said.

His math works like this:

Renovating city hall may cost $10 million just to remove asbestos, and a total renovation may top $35 million, he estimates.

Building a new city hall of 250,000 sq. ft., the space needed, would top $80 million. At 5.5%, interest would cost the city about $4.4 million a year.

Farhi is offering 250,000 sq. ft. at the Bell site for $1.2 million in annual rent, more than $3 million savings over interest. During a 40-year-lease, the city could save more than $120 million, he said.

Mayor Ann Marie DeCicco-Best declined comment, declaring a conflict since the bar she owns with her husband, Tim Best, leases space in a Farhi building.

But Deputy Mayor Tom Gosnell said council won’t support the city leasing a new city hall, since it wants to own its own.

“I am not sure the city wants to be in a situation of a long-term lease, or to leave a city hall that is still functional,” he said.

He supports the idea of renovating the Dufferin Ave. site and continue to lease space in the core.

“I am leaning more that way. As a rule, city halls are not leased. A city owns them.”

City hall opened in 1971 owning it has saved the city money for years, he added.

“We have paid that off many times over.”

In 1980, when it was built, the Bell building cost about $68 million. If built today, it would cost about $100 million, said Farhi.

Farhi owns 87 properties in downtown London, with about 500,000 sq. ft. of vacant space, he said.

Fielding declined comment on how much council is preparing to bid, saying that’s been the subject of closed meetings at city hall.

The issue will go to the next council meeting.

The city now pays Farhi about $2.1 million a year in leases on other downtown properties.

--- --- ---

BELL BUILDING


100 Dundas St., at Talbot St.

Eight floors, five occupied by 700 Bell workers

360,000 sq. ft.

Built in 1980.

Sold to London developer Shmuel Farhi in 2008 for $11 million.


CITY HALL


300 Dufferin Ave., at Wellington St.

Built 1971.

12 floors

120,000 sq. ft. of work space

11th-floor upgrades of more than $1 million, if repeated on every floor, would push renovation costs to $20 million, with little extra space.

MolsonExport
Oct 1, 2010, 1:19 PM
exchange one crappy mediocre building for another. Both a couple of fuglies.

Kokkei Mizu
Oct 1, 2010, 4:54 PM
Why doesn't the city build a brand new building for their city hall? Replace one of the Impark parking lots! Like, how about the southeast corner of Wellington and York? Nothing is there but a huge parking lot!

And here's another article in the Free Press about it:

It’s not just a real-estate deal — now it’s also about 700 jobs.

Behind all the talk and politics about whether London should lease space in a downtown office tower, or buy it as a replacement for its cramped city hall, the future of Bell Canada’s 700 jobs there has suddenly reared its head.

Owner Shmuel Farhi says he’s prepared to close the half-empty building at 100 Dundas St. if the city doesn’t take two floors off his hands.

The city, preferring to own its own digs, is preparing a bid to buy the tower — an option Farhi, a major downtown landlord, rejects.

If the tower were closed, Bell would have to find a new home. That’s fuelling worker fears jobs could be moved outside London.

The telecom giant has ample room in Kitchener, Hamilton and St. Catharines, among other places.

“To say we are concerned is an understatement. I am worried about my job — the jobs of my members, of all workers here,” said Noel Burgon, president of Local 6005 of the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers union, which represents the workers.

“It is scary to hear your job may be on the block, that they are hanging in the balance.”

But while the 700 jobs are important, “there is a bigger issue here,” says London Deputy Mayor Tom Gosnell. The city shouldn’t be dictated to by a developer on renting space, even if jobs are at stake.

“We should not subsidize two floors to keep Bell Canada workers. It puts the city between a rock and a hard place,” he said.

Bell confirmed it’s in talks to extend its lease and wants to stay in London, but the company wants the flexibility to reduce its space to three floors from five in the eight-storey building in a bid to save money.

The Bell workers — with pay ranging from $20 to $24 an hour — handle a variety of jobs, from working in commercial and residential call centres, to network administration and management roles.

“If we can consolidate and reduce costs, that is an approach we will use,” said Bell spokesperson Jacqueline Michelis in Ottawa.

The city is doing “everything we can to keep (Bell) here,” said Mayor Anne Marie DeCicco-Best.

“We are working with them, we are reminding them of how important they are. They want to stay here and we are doing whatever we can to make sure that happens,” she said.

For Farhi, it’s all about money. If Bell occupies only three floors, “it will be cheaper for me to close” the building, he said.

“I will not have to pay security, heat, hydro, cleaning. I can close it and then just charge for parking.”

Farhi now has about 500,000 sq. ft. feet of vacant space among his properties — and said he can’t afford much more.

Closing the building would save about $3 million a year in operating costs. Parking revenue could top $1.2 million, he added.

“I do not want Bell to leave. I will do everything in my power to keep 700 jobs,” he said. “Their lease is up in 2012 and they need to know soon. ... I know Bell would welcome city hall.”

But the city doesn’t need two floors of space and doesn’t want to lease a new city hall. It sees the solution as buying the building, and is preparing a bid now to do just that, said city chief administrative officer Jeff Fielding.

“We are exploring our options. At the end of the day the preference of council is to own,” he said.

The solution for Farhi is for London — its overcrowded city hall in need of costly upgrades — to lease space. He wants the city to take two floors or move the entire city hall over to his building, at a discounted rent of $5 a sq. ft.

Burgon said Bell workers are waiting to see how the Farhi-city standoff unfolds.

“We will come to work, do our jobs and let it play out the way it plays out,” he said. “If our lease is up in 2012, we will look at whatever we have to do.”

haljackey
Oct 2, 2010, 12:59 AM
Ugh.

Will this ever end?

Just build a new shity hall like many other Ontario cities have done. Kitchener's is a prime example.

But where will the money come from? This should have been a stimulus job!

ldoto
Oct 6, 2010, 12:13 AM
Downtown London could soon get a boost with city council set to approve an $8-million commercial building at Richmond and Carling streets.:cheers:

A site plan for the three-storey, 30,000-sq.-ft. building received approval from planning committee last week and goes to full city council Monday, the last meeting before the Oct. 25 civic election.

If approved, it would be the first new retail-commercial building in the core in years. There are indications a Shoppers Drug Mart will be the major tenant, said planning committee chairperson Joni Baechler.

“This is a sign there is confidence in the core,” said Baechler.

Baechler noted that if the Shoppers Drug Mart were the main tenant, the store would include a grocery section badly needed in the core.:banana: :banana:

Greg Priamo, representing Windsor developer Rocco Tullio, agreed to relocate a loading bay from Carling St. to the rear of the building at the request of the planning committee. The developer would also consider adding more windows at street level.

The site is now a parking lot located next to Moxie’s restaurant. A Sammy’s Souvlaki trailer operates at the site.

Ward 13 councilor Judy Bryant said the new development is “fantastic” news for the core and will help to generate foot traffic in the area.

Tullio, who owns Rock Developments in Windsor, couldn’t be reached for comment but has described London as “a good market, somewhat insulated from the economy,” and praised the city for developing the John Labatt Centre.

Tullio’s company also redeveloped the former Canadian Tire store in Masonville into a commercial plaza.

MolsonExport
Oct 6, 2010, 4:47 PM
Can you imagine? If this was KW, Waterlooinverstor would have 8 million smilies and dancing bananas.

ForestryW
Oct 6, 2010, 6:41 PM
Yes, the London forumers are noteably less enthusiastic (I haven't seen a photo update in...well a long time).

Still it's nice to see some intensification downtown.

haljackey
Oct 6, 2010, 11:15 PM
Can you imagine? If this was KW, Waterlooinverstor would have 8 million smilies and dancing bananas.

Haha. I love how those in K-W go nuts over 2-3 floor developments. :haha:



Yes, the London forumers are noteably less enthusiastic (I haven't seen a photo update in...well a long time).

I took some pictures of our crazy roundabout rail overpass (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?p=5002294#post5002294) the other day. It's not technically a (building) development but it is a development nonetheless!

Also, have you been over to the London Roads thread (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=167666&page=6) lately? A lot of new photos there too.

ssiguy
Oct 7, 2010, 6:33 PM
I must be going blind or you guys are playing tricks on me.
That's a new building downtown that isn't concrete. Low rise or not I thought concrete had become the 21st century facade as yellow brick was of a hundred years ago.
I can't believe it......that's not only a building that is the perfect size and height for the location but a damn handsome looking building to boot. Nice work!
To me this is more of the development downtown needs than one or 2 tall towers. Yes the towers make for great skyline shots but it's low rise infill that downtown needs. Even one or two small gaps on a street scape {ie Dundas} can make street look uninviting, depressed, and even somewhat crime ridden.
This is what makes RR so inviting and downtown depressed.
Like I have said many times before this is that empty lot was always the #1 priority for me when it comes to infill.
This was the gap that had to be filled to create a RR/Downtown connection.
This will bring a real continuity between the two and will help both areas.
You get the odd instance of where small commercial development can have a huge impact on an area and this is one of those rare examples.
A relatively small project that will have an amazingly large and positive impact.
This is great, great, great news!

haljackey
Oct 7, 2010, 7:38 PM
Oh snap!

I didn't really look at it that way before. Seeing that downtown has a pretty sizable office vacancy rate I questioned the need for this building other than what the ascetic qualities provide.

Yep, this ain't your average concrete, gluten of a development, it's actually something that will serve a purpose.

With Shoppers moving in, I would assume the one in Market Tower would be closed? I also heard rumors that it might have a small grocery section, something London's downtown has been craving.

ssiguy
Oct 8, 2010, 4:01 AM
The current location is a good sit so I don't think it will have to big a problem getting filled.
Yes, infill is essential for a city of London's size. Not only to connect downtown with RR but also because it is right on Richmond. It is essential that both Dundas and Richmond are totally filled. Those are the main drags that people associate with downtown.
This is a great project and the fact that it will also have a large grocery section is ideal for the core as well.
In Halifax the main uptown drag is very busy with, like RR, a lot of bars, restaurant, and student and it has a two story Shoppers.

MolsonExport
Oct 8, 2010, 1:23 PM
^a good site that would be much better if they moved the transit terminal off of Dundas, along with the piss-smelling bums.

haljackey
Oct 9, 2010, 3:39 AM
Yeah it's pretty crazy that London doesn't have a bus terminal. If you as me, it's kinda primitive. Then you have to multiply that statement by several times considering how large the city is.

You could say the same for a freeway network. Does London ever get anything right transportation-wise?

QuantumLeap
Oct 10, 2010, 10:41 AM
Since I haven't seen it anywhere else, I thought I would post this link to a site plan and front elevation of the new Goodwill Centre on Horton Street. Not shabby. Its funny how publicly funded projects serving disadvantaged people often look so much better than privately built crap.
http://www.lfpress.com/news/london/2010/06/21/14467491.html

Kokkei Mizu
Oct 10, 2010, 8:54 PM
http://storage.canoe.ca/v1/dynamic_resize/?src=http://www.lfpress.com/news/london/2010/06/21/LDN20100621dr_goodwill3.jpg&size=640x374&quality=90
http://storage.canoe.ca/v1/dynamic_resize/?src=http://www.lfpress.com/news/london/2010/06/21/LDN20100621dr_goodwill2.jpg&size=640x480&quality=90

Very nice :)

manny_santos
Oct 11, 2010, 12:49 AM
Down at the corner of Colonel Talbot and Southdale Roads on the south edge of Byron, there's a new Tim Hortons and a No Frills going in.

Blitz
Oct 11, 2010, 5:14 AM
Yes, that ghetto Shoppers Drug Mart is finally going to be replaced! I just moved into City Place last week....argh, somebody needs to find a giant rug for those hobos at Dundas and Richmond to be swept under.

ssiguy
Oct 11, 2010, 5:15 AM
I took a look at the 180 Mill and it looks OK but I can't figure out if it has a brown/beige exterior or another concrete slab. Any ideas?
What I don't understand about London is that most other cities are all building glass & steel towers as they are cheaper for materials and labour costs so what is it with London?

haljackey
Oct 11, 2010, 5:43 AM
Yes, that ghetto Shoppers Drug Mart is finally going to be replaced! I just moved into City Place last week....argh, somebody needs to find a giant rug for those hobos at Dundas and Richmond to be swept under.

City Place is a really good downtown apartment complex. I have a couple friends that live there and they love the location.

Yep Shoppers' decision to move is one I am supporting. Besides, their decision could have made or broke the building's construction.

About the hobos, as I've stated before a bus terminal could help. In addition moving more social services away from the area could be a benefit, as well as continued downtown restoration.

I took a look at the 180 Mill and it looks OK but I can't figure out if it has a brown/beige exterior or another concrete slab. Any ideas?
What I don't understand about London is that most other cities are all building glass & steel towers as they are cheaper for materials and labour costs so what is it with London?

You got me. I have no clue. Somebody must like it? :yuck:

Snark
Oct 11, 2010, 7:06 PM
What I don't understand about London is that most other cities are all building glass & steel towers as they are cheaper for materials and labour costs so what is it with London?

Outside of an occasional new city hall, I'm not aware of any City in Ontario building any highrises.

If you mean to say the private sector constructing high rises, outside of the GTA and occasionally Ottawa and Niagara Falls (both of which have very unique socio-economic circumstances) what other cities in Ontario have had the private sector construct high rise residential developments that are predominantly of curtain wall design?

And... "steel & glass" curtain walled towers are not cheaper for typical residential high rise construction and operations. Not by a long shot. Pound for pound, concrete is the cheapest, strongest, most plentiful and most locally produced building material available. Keep in mind the expense of purchasing manufactured specialty components such as wall panels off-site, and also keep in mind the operating and maintenance costs of the structure over its 100 year life. Concrete is all but bulletproof against the elements experienced in this part of the world.

And although it's a bit of an apples to oranges comparison, consider the Renaissance 1 & 2 construction costs of well under $90 M (the permit value of each tower is $35M) to the single One London Place tower - which would easily cost over $150M to reproduce (it cost well over $100M 20 years ago). The combined Renaissance towers are likely 50% more building for half the cost to construct.

The only time that curtain walled residential developments get constructed is when the developer believes that the local housing market will support the additional expense for a unit that he will have to charge the customer in order to pay for the added expense of constructing such a building. In the end, the reasoning for constructing with concrete is simply that:economics.

GreatTallNorth2
Oct 12, 2010, 2:47 AM
Ok meathead. We get it. You LOVE concrete and you hate design. I will name you a city that is building some nice looking buildings - Kitchener/Waterloo area is putting up some very nice towers. They are not all glass, but they have nicer design than what we are getting.

You did nail it when you said developers only build what they think they can sell. London has proven to be a city of non risk takers. This seems to be very true of developers as well. I know they are dealing with a lot of money, but I do think if a developer put up something a little nicer, it would sell.

Actually, I guess we are seeing a couple of Toronto developers come to Old East Village and those towers look pretty nice. Hopefully it will force our own developers to rethink the concrete you luv so much.

MolsonExport
Oct 12, 2010, 1:05 PM
http://storage.canoe.ca/v1/dynamic_resize/?src=http://www.lfpress.com/news/london/2010/06/21/LDN20100621dr_goodwill3.jpg&size=640x374&quality=90
http://storage.canoe.ca/v1/dynamic_resize/?src=http://www.lfpress.com/news/london/2010/06/21/LDN20100621dr_goodwill2.jpg&size=640x480&quality=90

Very nice :)

approximately 1000 times better than the abandoned buildings that formerly occupied this site ("Gold, Watch Repairs" "Pawn: Buy and Sell", etc.)

Blitz
Oct 12, 2010, 3:29 PM
There have also been a few glass towers built along the riverfront in Windsor over the past few years that are quite swanky.

ldoto
Oct 13, 2010, 2:00 AM
Very Nice!!!!:D

go_leafs_go02
Oct 13, 2010, 5:49 PM
approximately 1000 times better than the abandoned buildings that formerly occupied this site ("Gold, Watch Repairs" "Pawn: Buy and Sell", etc.)

drove by it last night, and was quite impressed to see something new going up on that corner. Man that used to be depressing when you drove into London. Horton/Wellington I think was the only real depressing place you had to drive through from the 401 to downtown along Wellington.

Any reason why it's a stimulus project as well?

Simpseatles
Nov 11, 2010, 11:40 PM
I just have a couple comments, and a question hopefully someone could clear up.

1. What exactly is being built around Dundas and Lyle street? I've seen the crane up for some time now and I've only been following construction news on the website recently. From what I've researched, It's called Old East 1 or something, and the design is supposed to be quite nice. Is it a condo, apartment, or a seniors centre? I'm just asking because it's a substantial project east of downtown, that I would love to see updates for. It would be great if someone could clear that up for me!

2. I really hope they don't build the Renaissence phase 2! The first one looks mediocre, but it works because of the bulk it brings to that end of the skyline, and because it's a nice addition to the best part of downtown. It will just ruin it for me, if a twin is built. We already have enough twins, and it'll remind me of City Place. I like the one, but I think two, is too much of a good thing.

3. The new Goodwill is looking great! It'll really improve Horton Street, and hopefully it's visible from Wellington.

ForestryW
Nov 12, 2010, 3:18 AM
Hey Simpseatles!

1) I believe the Dundas/Lyle crane would be fore the Medallion development (condos and apartments I believe). The few renderings I've seen look great.

2) I agree fully about the Renaissance, as I imagine a great many forumers here do as well.

3)Yes the new Goodwill is a great addition to Horton St and SOHO. It's a shame they're building a parking lot across the street, though.

Kokkei Mizu
Nov 12, 2010, 5:01 AM
Here are two images of what the development at Dundas and Lyle will look like, and you can look at the thread discussing it here (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=167726).

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a138/ldoto/News%20Paper%20Photos/000_07812.jpg

http://www.londontopic.ca/artimages/lg/EOAproposeddevelopment.jpg

Simpseatles
Nov 12, 2010, 1:20 PM
^:cheers: Wow, those look astounding! I remember seeing them in the Free Press a while ago, but I never thought they would get built. I just don't understand why the London forumers haven't been making a bigger deal out of this. I know I haven't always kept track of the forum, but to see that a project like this is under construction, not only in stucco city, but in a less than fasionable neighbourhood is awesome. And 21 and 24 storeys is a great height.

Sorry for not being in the loop about this project, but thanks for letting me know Kokkei Mizu, and van Hemessen!

bolognium
Nov 24, 2010, 8:54 AM
The Medallion development really is impressive. With construction progressing quickly it will be exciting to see what these buildings do for the look of the area. You've likely noticed already, Simpseatles, but there are 2 other large projects happening in Dundas East. The seniors apartments being built at the old Centretown Mall site and the Terrasan project at the site of the Embassy. I know I probably sound like a broken record, but I am really hopeful that all of this recent work will give Old East the kick in the ass that it needs.

And unfortunately I agree with you about Renaissance 2. Having yet another concrete twin tower complex is not what London's skyline needs. However, I'd imagine the benefits of the building's occupants on downtown far outweighs whatever aesthetic impact the second building will have on the look of London. Still ugly as sin, though.

MolsonExport
Nov 27, 2010, 4:21 AM
When was the last time anybody visted the oxbury mall? On the shittiness scale, where does it rank? London mall ranks a perfect ten; Argyle mall, a nine.


"2 bedroom Apartment steps from Oxbury Mall Apartments For Rent London Ontario" http://www.prop2go.com/viewlisting.aspx?id=1134

Sign me the fark up!!

http://www.joycebyrnerealtor.com/imageresize.aspx?h=140&w=175&img=107_Oxbury%20Mall%20at.jpg

http://www.homesforsaleinlondon.com/images/listings/107_Oxbury%20Mall%20at.jpg

Simpseatles
Nov 27, 2010, 4:37 AM
^I know someone who used to go there for the liquidation store, but once it left they stopped going. When your mall can't support a liquidation store you know it's in trouble!:haha:

I think London just has way too many malls, and especially a lot of mini-malls. Argyle, Cherryhill, London Mall, the one at Gainsbourough and Wonderland, and the former Oakridge Mall. I mean if your gonna build a mall, build a mall, and if your gonna build a strip plaza, then build one. I wouldn't be surprised to find that these old half-malls, half-plazas are the first to lose buisness to Smart Centres.

haljackey
Nov 27, 2010, 6:39 AM
I think I've been to Oxbury once... looks like a strip mall from the outside.

I've been to the London mall a few times and the same goes for the Superstore (or something like that) mall north of the 401.

I also used to go to the Wonderland Mall before that was converted to the Athletic Club, Adventures on Wonderland and Angelos.

London does indeed have too much commercial retail zone. I know people at Western who have wrote their graduate thesis on this issue. To quickly summarize them: it's nuts.

bolognium
Dec 4, 2010, 3:34 AM
I doubt many of you have noticed the redevelopment of this walk-up on Princess, but it's coming along very nicely. They've gutted the entire building and are turning it into affordable housing for seniors. The place used to be a dive with shady characters sleeping on picnic tables and rusted bikes locked up all over the property. The back of the building faces onto Hope St. (Hopeless St.) which was even more seedy.

http://imgur.com/y92w6.jpg

http://imgur.com/9MLBK.jpg

Love seeing this kind of redevelopment.

ldoto
Dec 6, 2010, 3:04 AM
It looks great!!!:tup:

ForestryW
Dec 6, 2010, 11:40 PM
Yea I was in London for the weekend and drove by. It truly does look great. It's always been one of my favorites.

Simpseatles
Dec 12, 2010, 2:43 PM
Anybody seen the progress made on the Medallion Towers. I would love to see photo updates every little while! Same goes for the Renaissence, but I'm much more interested in these ones.

I don't get the chance to go by very often, and I'm not so skilled with my camera!:rolleyes:

Kokkei Mizu
Dec 20, 2010, 10:51 PM
Anybody seen the progress made on the Medallion Towers. I would love to see photo updates every little while! Same goes for the Renaissence, but I'm much more interested in these ones.

I don't get the chance to go by very often, and I'm not so skilled with my camera!:rolleyes:

Here's a few photos I snapped the other day for ya. I took them from my car, so not the best quality, but you get the idea.

As seen from King St. looking north:
http://www.commutebyrail.org/stuff/medallion1.jpg

As seen from the corner of King St. and Hewitt St. looking west:
http://www.commutebyrail.org/stuff/medallion2.jpg

As seen from Hewitt St. looking southwest:
http://www.commutebyrail.org/stuff/medallion3.jpg

manny_santos
Dec 20, 2010, 11:47 PM
I've been in Oxbury Mall twice in the past four months. If London Mall is a 10, Oxbury Mall is an 8. The only saving graces it has is that it has a grocery store and a post office. The inside, like London Mall, looks really run down, and I also found it very cold in this particular mall. It's just far enough away from Fanshawe College that it doesn't get much Fanshawe traffic; both times I was in there it was filled with seniors, although not as crowded as Cherryhill Village Mall.

That Pizza Pizza is now called Mr. Pizza. It looks identical to Pizza Pizza.

Years ago the anchors in that mall were Zellers and Miracle Foodmart.

Simpseatles
Dec 21, 2010, 1:27 AM
Here's a few photos I snapped the other day for ya. I took them from my car, so not the best quality, but you get the idea.

As seen from King St. looking north:
http://www.commutebyrail.org/stuff/medallion1.jpg

As seen from the corner of King St. and Hewitt St. looking west:
http://www.commutebyrail.org/stuff/medallion2.jpg

As seen from Hewitt St. looking southwest:
http://www.commutebyrail.org/stuff/medallion3.jpg

^Nice! :cheers:

Thanks for the update Kokkei Mizu! I can't wait for this one, It's unlike anything else being built in the city.

MolsonExport
Dec 21, 2010, 7:22 PM
I've been in Oxbury Mall twice in the past four months. If London Mall is a 10, Oxbury Mall is an 8. The only saving graces it has is that it has a grocery store and a post office. The inside, like London Mall, looks really run down, and I also found it very cold in this particular mall. It's just far enough away from Fanshawe College that it doesn't get much Fanshawe traffic; both times I was in there it was filled with seniors, although not as crowded as Cherryhill Village Mall.

That Pizza Pizza is now called Mr. Pizza. It looks identical to Pizza Pizza.

Years ago the anchors in that mall were Zellers and Miracle Foodmart.

Mr. Pizza. How original. Kinda like Mr. Muffler, Mr. Sub, Mr. Donut. Mister Mister (take...these broken wings!!).

I demand photos of Oxbury mall interior!

Time to take another trip to London mall. Just for the shittiness. Why does this fascinate me?

Simpseatles
Dec 22, 2010, 1:29 AM
I demand photos of Oxbury mall interior!

Time to take another trip to London mall. Just for the shittiness. Why does this fascinate me?

http://deadmalls.com/malls/galleria_london.html

Not sure if you've ever been on this website, but it's pretty cool for the dead mall enthusiast. The only one they've got from London is Galleria, but they should add Westmount.

I share your bizarre interest in these empty monoliths. There's just something about seeing, or walking in these huge ghost towns of suburbia that fascinates me! I'd be more interested to see some pics of Westmount (so many memories!), but any are good.

Maybe we should put them in the London Malls thread though. :shrug: Then we can combine this exploration of London's seedy mall culture into one place!:)

MolsonExport
Dec 22, 2010, 2:05 PM
^great idea.

Blitz
Dec 23, 2010, 12:53 AM
I was just in Oxbury Mall for the first time last week and it is quite crappy. I can't figure out why they chose to use that particular floor tile, it's actually really annoying just to walk on.

ssiguy
Dec 27, 2010, 8:13 PM
The redevelopment of the Princess street apt is very nice and as an ex-Londoner I have to admit I have no idea where it is.
Can someone let me know?

ssiguy
Dec 27, 2010, 8:24 PM
I noticed on the deadmalls website that it includes the Galleria. I would have definetly agreed 10 years ago but not so much now. It has done a great job of filling the space up with the library and UWO and Fanshaw campuses and call centre. It is still a nice mall and I understand a fairly large tenant has decided to move back into the mall.
All that was a resurgence of downtown, a growing downtown population, and the fall of Westmount I think it, unlike most dead malls, has turned the corner and is going to continue to get back, at least some, of it's former glory.
It died as did downtown 20 years ago but like downtown which has done a 189 I think it's fortunes are going the same way.
If London finally gets a new downtown grocery store and part of it is attached or part of Galleria {which I can definately see} it will soar back to life.