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whatnext
Nov 18, 2009, 4:24 PM
virgin america is going to start is it not?

I read someone's facebook and he sais he was flyng virgin america to california - I assumed he left from here as he lives here

Flying from SEA.

MalcolmTucker
Nov 18, 2009, 4:55 PM
Just thought all you YVRers would just love this:

I'm mainly a lurker in this forum, but thought this might catch a few glipses here...

Air Canada launches Calgary-Tokyo direct flight


By Gina Teel, Calgary HeraldNovember 18, 2009 9:38

CALGARY - A decade-long effort to land direct flights connecting Calgary to Asia is over, as Air Canada will start flying between YYC and Tokyo non-stop on March 27, 2010.

In what’s being called extremely good news for Calgary, particularly from a business and tourism perspective, Air Canada will offer the flights three times a week, the maximum currently allowed under the bilateral air agreement between Canada and Japan.

Air Canada, the nation’s top carrier, intends to provide daily service from Calgary to Tokyo's Narita Airport as soon as the respective governments can reach an agreement on more capacity.

The flights go on sale online today.

In September, Air Canada chief executive Calin Rovinescu told the Herald that the carrier could offer direct flights to Asia from Calgary as soon as 2010, provided it had the support of the business community.

The Calgary Airport Authority has worked diligently to secure a direct connection from YYC to Asia, long considered the missing link in the Calgary network - until today.

More to come...

© Copyright (c) The Calgary Herald
http://www.calgaryherald.com/Canada+launches+Calgary+Tokyo+direct+flight/2236984/story.html

Gordon
Nov 18, 2009, 6:34 PM
That's good news for Calgary.

Hopefully Air Canada will restore the majority of the Asian services that they have cut from YVR in the last couple of years, and if they don't those slots should be released for other carriers to filll

Yume-sama
Nov 18, 2009, 6:40 PM
I think with that you will see a lot of Japanese people coming through Vancouver, driving through the Rockies (most likely on a tour bus) and then going home, more easily.

OR the other way around, as I could see people wanting to spend a couple of days in Vancouver... but umm... yeah, not the other way around.

Calgary is traditionally a gateway to the Canadian Rockies and people hop on a bus as soon as they arrive.

spaceprobe
Nov 18, 2009, 7:22 PM
why to Tokyo? There are so few Japanese people in all of Canada, and especially few in Calgary. Why not to China or somewhere where there are more immigrants?

Yume-sama
Nov 18, 2009, 7:25 PM
why to Tokyo? There are so few Japanese people in all of Canada, and especially few in Calgary. Why not to China or somewhere where there are more immigrants?

Tourism! You would be very surprised at the amount of Japanese tourists who go through the Rockies. They are actually quite well known in Japan. You will see a half dozen JTB (Japan Travel Bureau) buses any given day in places like Lake Louise, Banff, etc. Obviously they came through Vancouver, and now, they won't have to fly back to Vancouver before going home to Japan.

If it were not for that, there would be no way this route would make sense economically, even if it is only a 3x per week seasonal route.

mr.x
Nov 18, 2009, 8:47 PM
The media reports on yvr 's Olympic plans mention temporary terminal facilities being built.
Does anyone know where it is being built?

According to the Sun, it'll be built next to Sea Island Centre Station.

bar1967
Nov 18, 2009, 10:49 PM
Forgive me if this was already posted...

American Airlines has loaded the schedules for its planned Chicago – Calgary (eff 05APR10) and Chicago – Vancouver (eff 10JUN10) service in Summer 2010.

Schedules are:
Chicago – Calgary
AA3733 ORD1515 – 2012YYC CR7 D
AA3734 YYC0805 – 1220ORD CR7 D 06APR10-

Chicago – Vancouver
AA2397 ORD0910 – 1135YVR 738 D
AA2398 YVR1230 – 1830ORD 738 D

Yume-sama
Nov 18, 2009, 10:59 PM
Interesting, we already have 3x daily with United (codeshare with Air Canada). I have had positive experiences with American Airlines, from the sounds of it I might be alone :P

bar1967
Nov 18, 2009, 11:07 PM
and for the Olympics from AC..

Air Canada 10 Winter Olympics extra domestic service

As per 18NOV09 GDS timetable display, Air Canada is operating extra flights as well as increase capacity on selected domestic routes during the 2010 Winter Olympics. Note some of the existing flights may be operated by larger aircraft on selected dates. Other 2010 Winter Olympics related operation by Air Canada can be found here.

Following are the schedules for extra flights.

Vancouver – Calgary
AC2010 YVR1030 – 1249YYC E90 28FEB10 / 02MAR10
AC2010 YVR1130 – 1349YYC E90 01MAR10

AC2021 YYC1335 – 1402YVR E90 28FEB10 / 02MAR10
AC2021 YYC1535 – 1602YVR E90 01MAR10

Vancouver – Edmonton
AC2045 YEG1825 – 1902YVR 763 01MAR10

Vancouver – Montreal 11FEB10/12FEB10, 24FEB10 – 03MAR10
AC2182 YVR2355 – 0738+1YUL 32S x345
AC2129 YUL2100 – 2334YVR 32S x345

Vancouver – Toronto
AC162 YVR1730 – 0055+1YYZ 763 11FEB10/12FEB10
AC2152 YVR2330 – 0655+1YYZ 763 28FEB10
AC162 YVR2345 – 0710+1YYZ 763 08FEB10
AC2156 YVR2355 – 0720+1YYZ 763 11FEB10/27FEB10/28FEB10/01MAR10

AC1137 YYZ0830 – 1038YVR 763 12FEB10
AC1167 YYZ1100 – 1259YVR 77W 01MAR10
AC2151 YYZ2030 – 2238YVR 763 28FEB10/01MAR10

During the Olympics period, certain flights sees larger aircraft operating on selected days. In addition, there may be extra flights operated during this periods, not just on selected dates.

Vancouver – Winnipeg 12FEB10 – 28FEB10 only
AC2098 YVR2045 – 0121+1YWG 320 67
AC2099 YWG2110 – 2217YVR 320 67

Rusty Gull
Nov 18, 2009, 11:15 PM
Interesting, we already have 3x daily with United (codeshare with Air Canada). I have had positive experiences with American Airlines, from the sounds of it I might be alone :P

I was not happy with my last Chicago-Vancouver experience on United. I'm looking forward to some much-needed competition on this very lucrative route.

Rusty Gull
Nov 18, 2009, 11:21 PM
why to Tokyo? There are so few Japanese people in all of Canada, and especially few in Calgary. Why not to China or somewhere where there are more immigrants?

Aviation routes aren't driven by immigration - although some immigrants do travel frequently to their home country. But they are driven by business travel and by tourism. And sometimes they are driven by logistics, especially when the airport is a major hub (the Vancouver-Denver service comes to mind - and even the YVR-KIX route played that card, until Air Canada killed it)

spaceprobe
Nov 18, 2009, 11:50 PM
one things that's always confused me is why Air Canada doesn't fly from Vancouver to Frankfurt. They even fly Calgary to Frankfurt, but don't fly from Vancouver even though I would have thought Vancouver was a bigger market.

wrenegade
Nov 18, 2009, 11:56 PM
Lufthansa does, don't they code share?

Gordon
Nov 19, 2009, 12:15 AM
Ac Codeshares with Lufthansa To Frankfurt Ac 9100

Yume-sama
Nov 19, 2009, 12:34 AM
:D Believe me you'd rather have Lufthansa service than AC Service. Lufthansa is very highly regarded, in the league of Singapore Air and Emirates.

whatnext
Nov 19, 2009, 12:42 AM
Tourism! You would be very surprised at the amount of Japanese tourists who go through the Rockies. They are actually quite well known in Japan. You will see a half dozen JTB (Japan Travel Bureau) buses any given day in places like Lake Louise, Banff, etc. Obviously they came through Vancouver, and now, they won't have to fly back to Vancouver before going home to Japan.

If it were not for that, there would be no way this route would make sense economically, even if it is only a 3x per week seasonal route.

Except tourism from Japan to Canada has been dropping like a stone for years. The time for this route was 10 years ago.

Actually, its rather a stupid move by AC, as they're merely siphoning off traffic from the YVR-NRT route. Those Rockies-bound tourists who landed in Calgary had no other option but to return through YVR, and YYC-YVR is a short, easy connection.

Yume-sama
Nov 19, 2009, 12:49 AM
Well, I would be surprised if the route DID become more than 3x a week Spring - Summer season route. I just can't see the demand for it, but surely, they know things we don't.

I imagine people could connect in Tokyo to other Asian destinations like Singapore, and China, with other airlines in the Star Alliance.

Korean Airlines will also be flying a 747 in to Calgary a couple of times per week during the Summer, and ANA does several charters with a 747.

Yume-sama
Nov 19, 2009, 12:59 AM
As I thought, you can book flights to Singapore from Calgary through Air Canada, connecting in Tokyo with Singapore Airlines. It is about $200 more than a standard flight to Tokyo.

That is actually pretty good, and opens up that part of the World, a lot easier, for people in Alberta / Saskatchewan.

s211
Nov 19, 2009, 1:33 AM
:D Believe me you'd rather have Lufthansa service than AC Service. Lufthansa is very highly regarded, in the league of Singapore Air and Emirates.

:cheers: LH rocks.

nova9
Nov 19, 2009, 2:09 AM
I was not happy with my last Chicago-Vancouver experience on United. I'm looking forward to some much-needed competition on this very lucrative route.

I hated this route too. But mostly because of the passengers. I've taken it twice this year and both times have been really trying experiences.

Yume-sama
Nov 19, 2009, 8:17 PM
Air Canada is returning to daily service out of YVR to Beijing and Shanghai on June 1st. :banana:

They are currently at 3x and 4x weekly, respectively.

However, they have cut service to Seoul to 5x weekly, instead of daily.

SpongeG
Nov 19, 2009, 11:43 PM
YVR invests $30 million on new snow gear

By Martin van den Hemel - Richmond Review

Promising to prevent a repeat of last year's winter performance when a metre of snow brought airport operations to a virtual halt, YVR has thrown lots of money at the problem.

And with the busiest day in the airport's history expected on the day after the closing ceremonies of the 2010 Winter Olympics, it comes none too soon.

On Tuesday, officials from the Vancouver International Airport Authority unveiled their operation plans for the games and displayed some $30 million worth of snow removal and de-icing equipment.

231,000 extra passengers are expected to walk through the airport during the games period, and many of them will be lugging a lot of extra bags.

While the average passenger carries 1.6 bags, Olympic athletes travel with an average of six, most of them oversized.

The Olympics will see 50 per cent more passengers than airport's previous busiest day, which came in August of 2008 and saw just 26,0000 passengers.

"We know that our biggest challenge will be moving the increased volumes of people, planes and bags through our airport systems as quickly and efficiently as possible," airport authority vice president Don Ehrenholz said. "We've developed a reservation system for landings and takeoffs, centralized our de-icing system, increased our snow removal equipment, and will be taking a 'virtual YVR' to the athletes' village so that athletes and officials can check in there, just as they would at the airport."

This virtual YVR will enable athletes and officials to check-in 24 hours prior to their flight, and this will be the first time an off-site check-in facility will be made available at a winter games.

Should there be another massive snowstorm this winter, the airport is confident that $6.5 million in new plows and other snow-removal equipment will reduce runway clearing times.

Unlike previously, when airlines had to supply their own de-icing equipment, the system will now be centralized through a contract with Aeromag, which will make 20 de-icing trucks available to all carriers.

A number of changes and restrictions will go in effect at the airport from Feb. 1 to March 23, 2010.

All commercial vehicles—with a few exceptions—which are authorized to operate at the Vancouver airport will pick-up and drop-off passengers at the Templeton station of the Canada Line. Taxis, Aerocar sedans, limousines, Pacific Coach Lines buses will be permitted to continue to operate from the airport's curb.

The Canada Line is free between stations on Sea Island.

Hotel and parking shuttles will be restricted to pick-ups and drop-offs solely from the international terminal's second-level shuttle zone.

Double the number of Green Coat volunteers will be available at the airport to help passengers get to their destinations or seeking assistance.

Additional wheelchairs, specialized narrow wheelchairs and golf carts will be available as well.

Language Line services, normally available at 39 locations in the terminal, will be expanded to all retail locations, offering translation services in more than 170 different languages.

http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/70392227.html

Yume-sama
Nov 20, 2009, 12:07 AM
That's a lot of money to spend for like... 2 days per year :P

SpongeG
Nov 20, 2009, 12:10 AM
hey we had some snow yesterday it melted and not many people saw it - lol but it snowed in downtown vancouver and the valley got snow the other day too

its freakin cold here

twoNeurons
Nov 20, 2009, 12:42 AM
That's a lot of money to spend for like... 2 days per year :P

They have to find reasons to keep charging for the AIF. :D

As for YYC - NAR. Narita is obviously a massive gateway to Asia. It's the Heathrow/Gatwick of Asia.

Lots of Vietnamese moved to Calgary when Vancouver got expensive. There is a steadily growing population there of other Asians too.

I agree with the Rockies gateway comment as well. It's pretty much an assumption that almost every Japanese tourist will go to the Rockies.

The route makes sense.


In other news... I saw them installing a green wall at the airport today. Looks REALLY nice... I'll post a shot later.
Of course, I also think YVR - KIX makes sense.

Johnny Aussie
Nov 20, 2009, 10:50 AM
Well, I would be surprised if the route DID become more than 3x a week Spring - Summer season route. I just can't see the demand for it, but surely, they know things we don't.

I imagine people could connect in Tokyo to other Asian destinations like Singapore, and China, with other airlines in the Star Alliance.

Korean Airlines will also be flying a 747 in to Calgary a couple of times per week during the Summer, and ANA does several charters with a 747.

KE will be flying 3x per week for the month of August only and ANA has not had any charters to YYC for over 2 years now.

Also, AC has loaded the 77W for the daily flight to NRT from YVR summer 2010. So 3x week 763 from YYC to NRT will not have that much affect on the YVR-NRT route.

Johnny Aussie
Nov 20, 2009, 11:22 AM
Air Canada is returning to daily service out of YVR to Beijing and Shanghai on June 1st. :banana:

They are currently at 3x and 4x weekly, respectively.

However, they have cut service to Seoul to 5x weekly, instead of daily.

AC YVR-ICN is cut to 5 x week for the winter season only. Daily flights return for Summer 2010 scheds.

YVR to Asia/Pacific for summer 2010

NRT daily 77W
HKG daily 77W
PVG daily 763
PEK daily 763
ICN daily 763
SYD daily 77L

Hourglass
Nov 20, 2009, 12:35 PM
Singapore cut service between Singapore-KOREA-Vancouver. They could not make a go of it without siphoning off travellers from an intermediate market. There is little (read almost none) demand between Singapore and Vancouver.

There is no regulation prohibiting any US carrier starting service between the USA and Canada. Its totally Open Skies. The fact that Allegiant, Southwest, Jetblue, Virigin America etc haven't started service should tell you something. Despite all the Air Canada-bashing here, it was Air Canada that grabbed the opportunity to serve Canada-US markets and ran with it. Hate to burst folks anti-East bubble.

Sigh. Not this again. Singapore Airlines dropped Vancouver because they were limited to 3x weekly SIN-ICN-YVR. SIN-YVR non-stop is at the edge of the practical operating range for most aircraft, especially in winter, and a nonstop route simply doesn't make business sense -- just like doesn't make sense for much larger US markets. Contrary to your belief, YVR-SIN was a popular route for travelers to India and SE Asia -- not only Korean travelers.

Are you not aware of -- or do you choose to ignore -- the fact that airlines such Southwest, Virgin America are low-cost carriers IN THE US, and as such are unlikely to launch Canadian routes because of their business model? Air Canada 'ran' with the US opportunity, you say? I say that they haven't leveraged the opportunity as well as they could have. Considering that they likely hold a dominant market share on most routes from Canada to the US, Europe and Asia, they've done pretty crap over the past decade.

But enough of that. You clearly are a complete Air Canada homer, and anything I state that doesn't pay homage to the airline with the toothpaste-colored airplanes will constitute Air Canada bashing anyway.

Gordon
Nov 20, 2009, 3:20 PM
Before the recession hit the was going to be a Nonstop from YvR to India(Kingfisher Airlines).

I wonder how long it will take Air Canada to replace the 767s on YVR's Asian routes with 787s once they start taking delivery of the new planes?

Yume-sama
Nov 20, 2009, 6:20 PM
So, apparently Calgary's YYC - NRT flight originates in Toronto.

Three days a week people will have to go YYZ - YYC - NRT rather than YYZ - NRT.

This makes much more sense, now. And now, YYC will fly to YYZ 3x per week with a 767 and lie-flat seats!

We can ponder no more :P

eemy
Nov 20, 2009, 6:48 PM
Sigh. Not this again. Singapore Airlines dropped Vancouver because they were limited to 3x weekly SIN-ICN-YVR. SIN-YVR non-stop is at the edge of the practical operating range for most aircraft, especially in winter, and a nonstop route simply doesn't make business sense -- just like doesn't make sense for much larger US markets. Contrary to your belief, YVR-SIN was a popular route for travelers to India and SE Asia -- not only Korean travelers.

SIN-YVR is about the same distance as YYZ-HKG or LAX-MEL, neither of which stretch aircraft range. SIN is a small market from Canada, and it is poorly positioned as a hub to other destinations (as opposed to its ideal location for Australia to Europe traffic). As a result, SQ relies on supporting its flights with intermediate destinations such as ICN. Range is definitely not an issue, as the aircraft SQ regularly flew into YVR could easily make the flight non-stop.

Emirates and Singapore Airlines or two airlines which have been very successful at targeting external markets to counteract the low origin and destination of their home market. Transport Canada has taken the stance that further opening up access to the UAE and Singapore (actually, I'm quite sure that they would be perfectly willing to allow Singapore daily or more rights to Vancouver, direct, just not with an intermediate stop) is not in the interest of Canadians or Canadian businesses. Emirates in particular would likely greatly reduce the viability of future direct air service to India.

Yume-sama
Nov 20, 2009, 6:55 PM
With a 777-LR like the type AC uses to fly from YVR - Sydney you could *definitely* make it to Singapore. It's range is 17,370 km, and was specifically designed to fly routes like LAX - SIN, Dallas - Tokyo, etc.

I would love to see Singapore Airlines come back to Vancouver.

Would an A380 make it :P?

Hourglass
Nov 20, 2009, 8:03 PM
SIN-YVR is about the same distance as YYZ-HKG or LAX-MEL, neither of which stretch aircraft range. SIN is a small market from Canada, and it is poorly positioned as a hub to other destinations (as opposed to its ideal location for Australia to Europe traffic). As a result, SQ relies on supporting its flights with intermediate destinations such as ICN. Range is definitely not an issue, as the aircraft SQ regularly flew into YVR could easily make the flight non-stop.

Not exactly. During the northern winter, the jetstream over the Pacific does indeed make the range an issue. I've been on a number of flights from YVR-HKG which in winter needed a technical stop in Taipei because of strong headwinds. On the Great Circle route, Singapore is further than HK. So either planes would likely in winter either need to make a technical stop or be weight-restricted. Either is not good for business.

Emirates and Singapore Airlines or two airlines which have been very successful at targeting external markets to counteract the low origin and destination of their home market. Transport Canada has taken the stance that further opening up access to the UAE and Singapore (actually, I'm quite sure that they would be perfectly willing to allow Singapore daily or more rights to Vancouver, direct, just not with an intermediate stop) is not in the interest of Canadians or Canadian businesses. Emirates in particular would likely greatly reduce the viability of future direct air service to India.

The bilateral that was signed between Canada and Singapore indeed allows daily direct nonstops between YVR and SIN. But at the risk of sounding like a broken record, Singapore Airlines flies to San Francisco and LA (much larger markets) via Hong Kong, Taipei and Tokyo -- despite the impact on US carriers. Is the impact to Canadians any different? Is Air Canada so much more fragile than United Airlines or American Airlines?

Singapore Airlines demonstrated admirable commitment to the Canadian market, serving Vancouver for well over a decade. This is not a 'slash and burn' approach (as many fear with Emirates). Unfortunately, their withdrawal from the market means Canadian consumers and businesses actually suffer from less competition and choice.

SpongeG
Nov 20, 2009, 8:07 PM
I thought the reason was Singapore was in financial trouble and they were cutting troutes all over the world not just Vancouver

whatnext
Nov 20, 2009, 8:41 PM
Sigh. Not this again. Singapore Airlines dropped Vancouver because they were limited to 3x weekly SIN-ICN-YVR. SIN-YVR non-stop is at the edge of the practical operating range for most aircraft, especially in winter, and a nonstop route simply doesn't make business sense -- just like doesn't make sense for much larger US markets. Contrary to your belief, YVR-SIN was a popular route for travelers to India and SE Asia -- not only Korean travelers.

Are you not aware of -- or do you choose to ignore -- the fact that airlines such Southwest, Virgin America are low-cost carriers IN THE US, and as such are unlikely to launch Canadian routes because of their business model? Air Canada 'ran' with the US opportunity, you say? I say that they haven't leveraged the opportunity as well as they could have. Considering that they likely hold a dominant market share on most routes from Canada to the US, Europe and Asia, they've done pretty crap over the past decade.

But enough of that. You clearly are a complete Air Canada homer, and anything I state that doesn't pay homage to the airline with the toothpaste-colored airplanes will constitute Air Canada bashing anyway.

LOL, your choice of words reveals how "unbiased" you are. Had you followed the discussion you'd realize my point about Southwest et al was in response to a poster wishing for more deregulation (sic) so we'd get Ryanair type carriers entering the market. Regardless, US legacy carriers have not taken advantage of Open Skies to the extent Air Canada (or Westjet) have.

I won't go into SQ's situation further, as your defense of them has been rebutted above.

Yume-sama
Nov 24, 2009, 3:14 AM
As we learned a few weeks ago, JAL would stop flying MEX - YVR - NRT and back, and would instead fly YVR - NRT most days.

WELL, today, it was announced Mexicana Airlines has joined the OneWorld Alliance, and the times are such that they will arrive and be able to depart on the JAL flight.

Considering JAL announced Mexicana joining in a press release, it's almost like they planned this ;)!

Hourglass
Nov 24, 2009, 7:25 AM
I thought the reason was Singapore was in financial trouble and they were cutting troutes all over the world not just Vancouver

Indeed, they cut routes across a number of cities. However, the question is this: Do you think if SQ had been flying daily to Vancouver instead of being limited to 3x weekly they might not have cut the route? It's quite likely.

Consider the facts: Only a number of months before they cut the route, Singapore launched a public relations push in Canada to allow greater access to Vancouver, and claimed their load factors were in excess of 90%. This was probably in conjunction with the ongoing open skies negotiations between Singapore and Canada. At this time, comments made to the press indicated that 3x weekly was not viable and that they had other choices and opportunities should they continue to have limited access to Vancouver. There was speculation in various quarters that, following successful completion of a new bilateral agreement, Singapore Airlines would launch SIN-HKG-YVR 7x weekly IN ADDITION to the 3x SIN-ICN-YVR. How cool would that have been? I can already see Whatnext cringing now at the impact to his beloved Air Canada.

It is POSSIBLE that even flying daily, Singapore might have cut the route, but more likely, continuing to have limited access to the Canadian market with the flights they wanted means they simply cut their losses. The issue is that from a business perspective, flying to a destination 3x weekly simply doesn't give business travelers the flexibility they need.

trofirhen
Nov 27, 2009, 7:41 PM
With the advent of the bankruptcy of Dubai, which apprently made much of its money from real estate and not from direct oil revenues, it seems that Emirates is unlikely to ever fly to Vancouver. One more complication solved. Now, if we could get back Singapore and Osaka, and then work on a couple of European destinations, we'd be back on the right track.

Yume-sama
Nov 27, 2009, 7:55 PM
There's a difference between a Country being "bankrupt" and two crown corporations asking for time to re-pay a $60 billion loan. All of these corporations could go bankrupt, and leave everything else still standing. It's why every development has it's own company name aside from the developer, so that if the project goes belly up, it doesn't bring the developer down with it. Perfect example of this is Arriva in Calgary, which has 1 of 3 towers complete, and the other two stopped below ground level. Arriva is bankrupt, Torode, the developer, is not. AND, if Dubai really was "bankrupt" the stock market would have gone down a lot more than 155 points, considering them and China kind of own America.

So, Emirates Airlines, a completely separate entity, is unlikely to see any changes as a result of this.

whatnext
Nov 27, 2009, 8:21 PM
There's a difference between a Country being "bankrupt" and two crown corporations asking for time to re-pay a $60 billion loan. All of these corporations could go bankrupt, and leave everything else still standing. It's why every development has it's own company name aside from the developer, so that if the project goes belly up, it doesn't bring the developer down with it. Perfect example of this is Arriva in Calgary, which has 1 of 3 towers complete, and the other two stopped below ground level. Arriva is bankrupt, Torode, the developer, is not. AND, if Dubai really was "bankrupt" the stock market would have gone down a lot more than 155 points, considering them and China kind of own America.

So, Emirates Airlines, a completely separate entity, is unlikely to see any changes as a result of this.

We may have just seen the tip of the iceberg here. HSBC is apparently heavily exposed. It will be interesting to see the effect on Emirates.

One look at Dubai and everyone should have seen it was a classic bubble devloping.

SFUVancouver
Nov 30, 2009, 1:33 AM
Terminal frustration: Why are airports such hellholes of design?
Globe and Mail
Lisa Rochon

When they separated the women from the men, things turned ugly at Frankfurt am Main airport.

Three hundred of us, business commuters and sleep-deprived tourists, were crammed into a windowless room. We'd been trudging along the cattle lines for nearly an hour, and security officials were ignoring requests to move people ahead who risked missing connecting flights. Only four X-ray machines were staffed that morning. As the pace slowed from a crawl to a standstill, it became clear there weren't enough female employees to perform security pat-downs on female flyers.

Realizing I was about to miss my flight to Venice, I protested loudly about the absurdity of the system. The women behind me joined in. The security guards laughed at us. And, just to further the humiliation under the fluorescent lights, an armed police officer with grey wolf eyes appeared out of nowhere to stand a metre in front of me. That was when, in my mind, Frankfurt Airport became Frankfurt Alcatraz.

How did we land here? Postwar, airports were conceived as beacons of the future. Think of the sensuous swells of concrete by architect Eero Saarinen for New York's 1962 TWA Airport, now John F. Kennedy International. Implicit within the grace of those exhilarating curves was a spirit of optimism: space travel, the Jetsons, the arrival of Camelot. Badly designed airports, with endless underground corridors, and floor plans interrupted by stairs, elevators and ramps, are the curse of mass travel.

Somehow, over the last couple of decades, the elegance of air travel has been demolished. Gone is the notion that the airport is a symbol of seduction for the city that lay just beyond. Airports have become their own bloated cities, with restaurants, nail salons, enormous shopping malls and gated communities jealously guarded by first-class travellers.

I missed my flight to Venice, so there was plenty of time to think about airports these days. It seems that either you find yourself in a punishing, prison-like fortress such as Frankfurt's, or you land in an exquisite zone of high design, as I did a few days later in Zurich. There, floors are richly veined limestone; ticket desks are crafted in wood, with corners displaying intricate joinery; the interior is a composition of all that is modern and minimal. Passengers are separated into more intimate departure zones with smaller, fast-moving lineups. I nearly skipped through.

Based on my movements around the world, here are some thumbnail observations on the kinds of airports dotting the most intensely populated parts of the planet.

Light-filled, guilt-free shopping cathedrals

Since the 1990s, a new generation of airport has been designed with an epic use of glass and barely visible steel. There's more room to move, breathe – and, especially, shop duty-free. Kansai International Airport, a major hub for Asia, is located on an artificial island in Osaka Bay, Japan. It's designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano as a 1.7-kilometre-long structure curved to resemble an airfoil. Riding on its bright red people mover – the Wing Shuttle – is a dazzling experience.

The new Terminal 1 at Toronto Pearson, led by design architect Moshe Safdie, contains too many level changes, but its sky-high glass rooms and clean signage by Pentagram Design can inspire the world traveller. The monumental Beijing airport, opened last year in time for the Olympics, pursues a similar building type as that of Kansai and of Stansted (1991), a major hub for low-cost charters located northeast of London. At Beijing (designed, as was Stansted, by Foster + Partners), there's attention to a more sustainable terminal building, and a colour range that shifts from red to yellow as passengers move through.

Airports designed with some heart and soul

Scandinavia figured out a long time ago the value of an airport as a tactile, sensory experience. For one thing, it makes you fall immediately in love with the country. Danish architect Arne Jacobsen delivered the Scandinavian Airlines System hotel and airline terminal (1960) in Copenhagen as a Babette's feast of visual delights. He designed everything from the organically shaped furniture to the lamps, textiles and door handles. (The tableware was later used by Stanley Kubrick for the set of 2001:A Space Odyssey. ) Travel to Scandinavia – whether Copenhagen, Oslo or Stockholm – to see what I mean. Everything from the sensitively designed baby-change tables to the dark wood flooring in Stockholm-Arlanda Terminal 5 is memorable.

Kuala Lumpur international airport (1998) in Malaysia, by the late Japanese star architect Kisho Kurokawa, is exhilarating and regionally inspired. The wood-clad parabolic roof presents as a series of tents or Islamic domes. Outside, the extended roof structure offers shade from the glaring sun.

Vancouver International Airport is a standout for its use of wood, water and its display of aboriginal art, including Bill Reid's sculpture in bronze, The Spirit of Haida Gwaii . Drawing from local sources, it will create positive first impressions for those arriving for next year's Olympics.

Places to hobble the weak, the old, the exhausted

Here, my first nomination is Caracas, for the hoops, the paperwork, the special fees required to fly in and out of Venezuela – and because it's a death-defying trip to travel into the dangerous city from the airport.

For its enormous size and endless, exhausting corridors, there's the gargantuan Amsterdam Airport Schiphol, designed on a scale to damage the mind and body; it has a lot in common with Heathrow, Frankfurt and Paris Charles de Gaulle.

A saving grace at Schiphol: For those who discover that their flight has changed gates and that another half-marathon is required to relocate one's self, carry-on baggage and, perhaps, an ailing aunt, there are some very cool resting lounges. Under dimmed lights, framed by walls of dark wood, it's possible to bunk down in a well-designed chair and grab a nap. That's the kind of human gesture that architects of future airports need to observe, ingest and move ahead on.

In the meantime, I'm flying clear of Frankfurt.


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/arts/terminal-frustration-why-are-airports-such-hellholes-of-design/article1380252/

Rusty Gull
Nov 30, 2009, 3:34 AM
^Shaking my head.

I mean, yes, Frankfurt's airport is fairly rudimentary, though it's clean and efficient.

But I shudder at the thought of some diva Toronto journalist throwing a hissy-fit at security, which I'm sure was met with some German chuckles at best, and at worst some stern awkwardness.

Thanks for posting that, though. Interesting read, to say the least.

By the way, has anyone on this forum ever actually flown to Frankfurt with the intention of actually visiting the city (and not transferring somewhere else?)

Rusty Gull
Nov 30, 2009, 3:37 AM
At least Rochon is nice to YVR.

Here's what Anthony Perl, the professor of transportation at SFU, had to say about our airport in a Vancouver Magazine article earlier this year:

"What we show people there is an embalmed version of B.C. nature and culture. You have fake water, fake bird noises—it’s like being in a mausoleum.

Even the smell is like embalming fluid. It’s different from other airports, where you’re fed through a chute like cattle, so maybe that has some benefit—it certainly shocks you."
:haha: :haha: :haha:

http://www.vanmag.com/News_and_Features/Off_the_Rails

jlousa
Nov 30, 2009, 3:40 AM
*l* funny you mention it, I've been in Frankfurts airport about a couple dozen times and the only time I ever left the airport was due to a delayed flight and had to be holed up at a hotel overnight. Didn't get a chance to see the city though.

Yume-sama
Nov 30, 2009, 3:49 AM
So, I expect she won't be complaining the next time she goes through a metal detector, and a male security agent has to feel her up because she set it off :P? It seems like an efficient system... assuming it is done the way I would assume, with female wanders... and not having to wait for one to be called over. And no, I can't say the thought to actually explore Frankfurt has occurred to me. Though, I'm sure it is a lovely city! :D

Though my friend in Germany says it is a terribly boring place, and one ought to go directly to Hamburg :P

Anyways, I advise Ms. Rochon to steer clear of the middle east if she can't handle segregated gender based security lines. :haha:

mezzanine
Nov 30, 2009, 4:45 AM
For YVR-europe flights, FRA beats LHR anytime. (haven't been there since their new terminal opened, though).

I've always experienced efficient service with minimal waits there. I remember seeing how they had a special return chute for the XR-scanner trays (ie. guards didn't have to carry the trays back to the head of the line, they slide them down, similar to a bowling ball return.)

At LHR, i've always had a delay in trying to find a gate once we land, and all the shops have super-expensive british prices! (as opposed to regularly expensive euro prices at FRA).

Never been to the city, though....

Millennium2002
Nov 30, 2009, 6:24 AM
So, I expect she won't be complaining the next time she goes through a metal detector, and a male security agent has to feel her up because she set it off :P? It seems like an efficient system... assuming it is done the way I would assume, with female wanders... and not having to wait for one to be called over. And no, I can't say the thought to actually explore Frankfurt has occurred to me. Though, I'm sure it is a lovely city! :D

Though my friend in Germany says it is a terribly boring place, and one ought to go directly to Hamburg :P

Anyways, I advise Ms. Rochon to steer clear of the middle east if she can't handle segregated gender based security lines. :haha:

If you read the note more clearly... she's not concerned about segregation... but the fact that she was missing her flight due to understaffing at the wrong time.

Hourglass
Nov 30, 2009, 2:26 PM
If you read the note more clearly... she's not concerned about segregation... but the fact that she was missing her flight due to understaffing at the wrong time.

Actually, though, I think she's pretty bang on for most of the airports she assessed.

Kuala Lumpur is indeed a gorgeous, if underutilized airport. Copenhagen is cool. Frankfurt is terrible (I actually prefer going through London Heathrow -- at least there are things to do when transferring). I don't agree with her on Osaka Kansai or Stockholm Arlanda. Kansai is rather sterile and Arlanda seemed to go on forever.

For my money, though, give me Singapore Changi or Hong Kong International Airport. From a design perspective, there are few airports designed better than Hong Kong's. Upon arrival through immigration through baggage claim and onto the Airport Express there isn't a single elevator, escalator or level change -- which is great if you have luggage to carry.

I'm not sure whether Vancouverites realize how lucky they are when it comes to their airport. The Airport Authority runs a pretty tight ship. They've put together a great facility without throwing a huge amount of money at it and are still able to keep landing charges for airlines very competitive.

Spikester
Nov 30, 2009, 6:07 PM
For YVR-europe flights, FRA beats LHR anytime. (haven't been there since their new terminal opened, though).

I've always experienced efficient service with minimal waits there. I remember seeing how they had a special return chute for the XR-scanner trays (ie. guards didn't have to carry the trays back to the head of the line, they slide them down, similar to a bowling ball return.)

Same thing at LHR's new terminal 5, with a vision system controlling the exit belt that stops the belt when a loaded tray arrives in its field of view and starts it again when it detects that the tray is empty. Quite clever.

My main beef with FRA the few times I've connected there is that the A340-600 which LH flies from here is too long to park at the gate, so you have to do the stairs-and-shuttle-bus shuffle.

SpongeG
Dec 2, 2009, 5:27 AM
Vancouver airport to get language makeover before Olympics: officials


OTTAWA — The Vancouver International Airport will undergo a radical transformation between now and February, but officials must work hard to ensure they can properly welcome visitors to the Olympic Games in Canada’s two official languages, said officials from the event’s organizing committee on Monday.

http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/www.vancouversun.com/news/Vancouver+airport+language+makeover+before+Olympics+officials/2287095/2287121.bin
Passenger jets taxi and take off at Vancouver International Airport in July 2008.Photograph by: Mark van Manen, Canwest News Service

“I think as we get closer to the games, you will see a remarkable difference in how the airport looks,” the organizing committee’s CEO John Furlong told a Senate committee on official languages. “We’re optimistic it will become a very good part of the overall story between now and Feb. 12.”


The federal government’s language watchdog, Graham Fraser, has repeatedly warned that the airport is failing in its obligations to provide services in French, and must make drastic changes before the event starts to ensure it reflects Canada’s linguistic duality.


Paul Levy, the vice-president of planning for the event at the airport authority, said the problems were not a question of having enough funding, but rather the challenge of trying to co-ordinate preparations among 26,000 workers at the airport from different agencies, airlines and merchants.


“The challenge has been with some of our tenants to provide the service,” Levy told the senators. “We’ve got work to do there, I acknowledge that.”


But he said the airport was actively recruiting new staff and volunteers to provide services in French and assist merchants such as car rental companies to serve customers in both official languages. A toll-free number will also be offered to provide translation help for the merchants or customers if needed.


Last September, Heritage Minister James Moore said he believed there was still time left to address all concerns about bilingualism, announcing $7.7 million in new federal funding for that purpose.


“Clearly the government has made the question of official languages a priority for the Games and it’s a priority that we share,” said Levy. “The work that is happening will now create a lasting legacy at YVR (the Vancouver airport).”


The airport was also planning to test its merchants and partners in the coming weeks and during the event with a “mystery traveller” who would check if they were providing adequate services.

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Vancouver+airport+language+makeover+before+Olympics+officials/2287095/story.html

I wonder if westjet paid for the photo - hehe

jsbertram
Dec 2, 2009, 8:26 AM
We may have just seen the tip of the iceberg here. HSBC is apparently heavily exposed. It will be interesting to see the effect on Emirates.

One look at Dubai and everyone should have seen it was a classic bubble devloping.

I saw a BBC news clip late last year saying that foreigners who had moved to Dubai to get rich quick during the boom were leaving the country in droves. They would abandon their car at the airport - unlocked & keys on the drivers seat - with the keys &tc to their abandoned home / condo on the passenger seat with a "Buh-Bye" note.

Yume-sama
Dec 2, 2009, 8:45 AM
I'd go to Dubai and scour the parking lot for free cars and apartments, but, I fear, I could end up opening the wrong car and leave Dubai with one less arm.

jlousa
Dec 2, 2009, 3:21 PM
One of the biggest issues that helped with their crash, is their own laws. Foreigners are second class and never have the rights of citzens. If you lose your job you must leave the country within 30days, but you are obligated to pay all your debts before you leave, otherwise you go to jail. So pretty well you had 30days to find another job in the middle of the economic crisis. Since that wasn't possible, and most of these people are educated with options back home, they simple all packed up and left town in the middle of the night. Leaving behind cars, condos, everything they had there to avoid going to jail. The complete flooding of the market of these condos certainly did not help them.
Cars on the other hand, one could probably make a killing buying them up at a fraction of their price and reselling them elsewhere.

Yume-sama
Dec 4, 2009, 2:35 AM
Came in to YVR today. They sure are ready for the Olympics. There are Coca Cola Olympic billboards everywhere, and every single pole in the place is wrapped with Samsung Olympic art (though, I struggled to find even one depicting Ice Hockey, there simply wasn't one :P). I also took the Canada Line home, it was enjoyable and quick. VERY busy, there was a large group of school children on today, I suppose perhaps they visited the observation area. Luckily I don't mind wrestling a 9 year old for a seat. :haha: :tup:

They are EVERYWHERE!
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2687/4157072374_b25b183ef1.jpg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/syume/4157072374/

The lovely link building
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2496/4156339845_8c8ca75e7f.jpg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/syume/4156339845/

Totem pole with a freakin' laser.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2553/4156343611_4f382246a6.jpg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/syume/4156343611/

SpongeG
Dec 4, 2009, 4:13 AM
looks good - is the construction in there done? last time i was there there were still large areas blocked off

Yume-sama
Dec 4, 2009, 8:41 PM
No, there is still quite a bit of construction in the baggage claim areas before the elevators that take you to the 4th floor of the Link Building.

Rothwell
Dec 7, 2009, 6:04 AM
Why is there such a lack of moving sidewalks at YVR?? Every other major airport I've been to seems to have them in spades.

teriyaki
Dec 7, 2009, 7:18 AM
Why is there such a lack of moving sidewalks at YVR?? Every other major airport I've been to seems to have them in spades.

Whenever I go through YVR, I don't seem to miss the lack of moving sidewalks. We have relatively well-spaced gates and when you do have to walk, its usually in a nicely spaced atrium with plenty of shops and architecture to distract you.

deasine
Dec 7, 2009, 8:14 AM
I never found that an issue either. In the Int'l Terminal, moving walkways are right after the security check point. The end of the moving walkway is the foodcourt/river/aquarium area, and after that, are more moving walkways.

Yume-sama
Dec 7, 2009, 8:16 AM
The only time I need a moving walk way is on the way to customs after having my back go out on me from sitting on an airplane seat for 9 hours.

YVR actually has a really nice design, and a lot of shopping, things to do, things to eat, things to buy, things to see!

Rothwell
Dec 7, 2009, 8:36 AM
I never found that an issue either. In the Int'l Terminal, moving walkways are right after the security check point. The end of the moving walkway is the foodcourt/river/aquarium area, and after that, are more moving walkways.

I've never been passed the international security. But I used to use trans-border quite frequently before deciding to just fly out of sea-tac and I noticed they only had like 1 moving sidewalk.

deasine
Dec 7, 2009, 8:41 AM
I've never been passed the international security. But I used to use trans-border quite frequently before deciding to just fly out of sea-tac and I noticed they only had like 1 moving sidewalk.

The transborder side has much fewer, and fewer stores. That side of the airport is... well... not really cared for as much =) Not to worry, once the new transborder terminal opens up, that side of the airport will be much better.

trofirhen
Dec 7, 2009, 12:12 PM
The transborder side has much fewer, and fewer stores. That side of the airport is... well... not really cared for as much =) Not to worry, once the new transborder terminal opens up, that side of the airport will be much better.

About when is the new transborder terminal sceduled to open? Has any preliminary work started on it yet?

SpongeG
Dec 7, 2009, 8:48 PM
they have a nice new moving sidewalk you can watch from the eats area in the domestic terminal - its funny sometimes people don't realize they are on display as you watch them standing there oblivoiously going by

Zassk
Dec 7, 2009, 8:56 PM
Why is there such a lack of moving sidewalks at YVR?? Every other major airport I've been to seems to have them in spades.

YVR has lots of moving sidewalks nowadays... see all of the white stripes on this map (http://wwwnew.yvr.ca/Libraries/Maps/YVR_Map.sflb.ashx).

twoNeurons
Dec 9, 2009, 1:28 AM
I took this picture a few weeks ago coming back to Vancouver.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2771/4169997835_cddf7e675b_o.jpg

They were just finishing up the wall.

officedweller
Dec 9, 2009, 2:00 AM
Probbaly replacing dead sections.

Tafryn's pics show that are completed back in June:

http://www.seataf.com/blogs/canadaline/2009-06-24/images/KICX6584.jpg

Yume-sama
Dec 9, 2009, 3:51 AM
I don't know when it happened, but the new domestic food court (before security) is open. They have some good stuff going on there, a new Subway

And, of course a Starbucks, Tim Hortons, Pizza Hut, and random other places. All with a nice view out big windows. MUCH better than the old food court :)

SpongeG
Dec 9, 2009, 4:06 AM
it happenned in august - i took the canada line out there august 18 and sat in the new upstaiors part above the food court for a bit - nerd yes

well most of it was open than one or two places were not ready at that time

Yume-sama
Dec 9, 2009, 4:12 AM
Hmm, I've been there a few times since August... :haha: I guess it takes me awhile to notice things.

SpongeG
Dec 9, 2009, 4:17 AM
it is pretty easy to miss it just looks like another hallway to nothing

Yume-sama
Dec 9, 2009, 4:27 AM
Well, now what was the A&W and Tim Hortons are wrapped up with big plastic and a sign pointing towards the food court, with the logos of each of the places. I guess I notice big shiny things :D

whatnext
Dec 10, 2009, 3:32 AM
Just read in the G&M that HST will apply to airline tix. Thanks Gordo.
..Harmonization will result in taxation of items that previously didn't carry provincial taxes, such as haircuts and Canadian air travel...
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/house-of-commons-approves-hst/article1395012/

Spork
Dec 10, 2009, 3:53 AM
That comment deserves its own thread alone. I will keep my comment short and simple. Government services are not free. We currently have a provincial deficit. We can either keep that and make our children, grandchildren, and likely ourselves pay for it later, or we can pay for it now by raising taxes or cutting services. Which do you prefer?

Mr.Airport
Dec 10, 2009, 4:01 AM
About when is the new transborder terminal sceduled to open? Has any preliminary work started on it yet?

There won't be a new transborder terminal for awhile.
Look for renovations of Pier B and some Cargo facilities in the new year.

whatnext
Dec 10, 2009, 7:28 AM
That comment deserves its own thread alone. I will keep my comment short and simple. Government services are not free. We currently have a provincial deficit. We can either keep that and make our children, grandchildren, and likely ourselves pay for it later, or we can pay for it now by raising taxes or cutting services. Which do you prefer?

I "prefer" not to be lied to by my elected representatives.

Air travellers already pay horrendous fees and taxes in Canada.

PaperTiger
Dec 10, 2009, 5:34 PM
I took this picture a few weeks ago coming back to Vancouver.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2771/4169997835_cddf7e675b_o.jpg

They were just finishing up the wall.

I hop ethey come up with some kind of system for maintainence. It seems like it would kind of defeat the purpose to build this beautiful wall and then park a massive orange scissor lift in front of it so the gardeners can do their pruning.

nova9
Dec 10, 2009, 5:45 PM
I hop ethey come up with some kind of system for maintainence. It seems like it would kind of defeat the purpose to build this beautiful wall and then park a massive orange scissor lift in front of it so the gardeners can do their pruning.

They aren't pruning.

The plant on the walls don't look like they grow that large. I'm sure that was thought of.

hankthetank
Dec 10, 2009, 10:40 PM
I hop ethey come up with some kind of system for maintainence. It seems like it would kind of defeat the purpose to build this beautiful wall and then park a massive orange scissor lift in front of it so the gardeners can do their pruning.

Something tells me that the professionals they hired to design the wall did not choose bamboo and other plants that grow wildly out of control.

deasine
Dec 10, 2009, 10:42 PM
Having studied Green Walls before, like Green Roofs, they aren't designed to have tall, expansive, invasive plants to grow on them.

SpongeG
Dec 11, 2009, 2:29 AM
Open the skies; Opportunities to grow Canada's international air access are neglected in the name of protectionism

The federal government has been reinforcing its commitment to free trade in recent years through new agreements signed around the world. Speaking to business leaders in New York a few weeks ago, Prime Minister Stephen Harper attributed one of the reasons for Canada's relatively strong economic performance to our unwavering commitment to free trade.

Under the surface, however, Canada's commitment to free trade is not entirely unwavering. When it comes to aviation, Canada continues to take a guarded, case-by-case approach to liberalization. As the government works on developing a national tourism strategy, keeping access to Canada open through open aviation should be a key component.

In aviation, the rules that govern air service between two countries are very different from the rules on trade between countries in other industries. For example, a retail business entering Canada just has to set up shop and comply with all our local rules and regulations. In aviation, the rules for how an airline from a foreign country can serve Canada are governed by bilateral agreements between countries. Traditionally, these agreements were very restrictive, limiting flights to particular communities or limiting flights per week, for example.

full article: http://www.kelowna.com/2009/12/10/open-the-skies-opportunities-to-grow-canadas-international-air-access-are-neglected-in-the-name-of-protectionism/

Hot Rod
Dec 12, 2009, 4:57 AM
:(

I think Vancouver should succeed from Canada. I get sick and tired of the burgeoning city getting the shaft from back east.

I think Vancouver is positioned easily to be the next Singapore if the freaking government of Canada would let it happen or we form our own nation.

vansky
Dec 12, 2009, 5:29 AM
a nation of 2 million, or maybe a nation of 4 million, without nukes, would be easily defeated by others....but it seats beside a great power, i guess it's fine being independent.

jlousa
Dec 12, 2009, 5:38 AM
Yup I'm sure Canada would continue using Vancouver as it's main port and Pacific rim airport hub if we separated. The only thing that would happen is Prince Rupert would boom unbelievable and we would wither and collapse. The whole idea is as silly as those advocating Toronto to become a city state not realizing that the only reason it is what it is has to due with the rest of Canada just like us.

Does the fairmont at the airport have a high end restaurant in it? It would be nice to have a nice meal in an airport someday. And no Chillis in Calgary doesn't count.:cheers:

usog
Dec 12, 2009, 9:10 AM
Sooo, with the new agreement between Japan and USA, will we we flying to Japan through Seattle in the future?

Delirium
Dec 12, 2009, 2:49 PM
Does the fairmont at the airport have a high end restaurant in it? It would be nice to have a nice meal in an airport someday.

absolutely! Globe @ YVR. excellent excellent restaurant. high end but well worth it. i know people that actually make the drive to the airport just to eat there.
some really amazing views of the tarmac, airplane landings and the north shore mountains..

http://www.vancouverdining.net/dine_images/globe.jpg
http://www.fairmont.com/vancouverairport/GuestServices/Restaurants/Globeyvr.htm

whatnext
Dec 13, 2009, 1:02 AM
absolutely! Globe @ YVR. excellent excellent restaurant. high end but well worth it. i know people that actually make the drive to the airport just to eat there.
some really amazing views of the tarmac, airplane landings and the north shore mountains..

Yes! And now you can enjoy it by taking the Canada Line and avoiding YVR's extortionate parking fees.

cornholio
Dec 13, 2009, 1:16 AM
Yes! And now you can enjoy it by taking the Canada Line and avoiding YVR's extortionate parking fees.

YVR parking pay machines arent hooked up to a network and have no electronic verification....ahhmm, not advocating anything here. :hmmm:

cornholio
Dec 13, 2009, 1:22 AM
I always thought that they should build a nice big casino past customs. Gouge all the travelers passing through with out them ever having to clear customs and leave the airport. Time will fly by for the travelers which is good, the airport will make money, lots and lots of money from bored and trapped travelers, and most importantly our city and region doesnt have to deal with any of the negative effects of a casino as most of the gamblers arent even residents.

Just always seemed like such a easy cash cow for the airport, and a benfit to many travelers.

Millennium2002
Dec 13, 2009, 7:09 PM
Las Vegas does that don't they? =P

Maybe the only issue would be... would it cause problems back home? =S As much as we can pass responsibilities off to others that doesn't sound very fair either.

PaperTiger
Dec 15, 2009, 6:19 PM
Ha Ha.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/c6/Nelson_Muntz.PNG/160px-Nelson_Muntz.PNG

Richmond, B.C. — The Canadian Press
Published on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2009 11:52AM EST

Last updated on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2009 1:00PM EST


An SUV is not meant to fly, but that wasn't the case early Tuesday morning at Vancouver International Airport.

The vehicle practically became airborne as it plowed through the glass doors of the departures terminal, skidding to within a few metres of the check-in line up at the Delta Airlines counter.

No one was hurt but passengers scattered as the SUV curled toward them.

RCMP say a valet driver mistakenly shifted the vehicle into reverse and accelerated backward through the airport doors.

A damage assessment is being prepared and Mounties and airport staff continue to investigate.

They say airport operations were not affected.


Article: The Globe and Mail, Picture: Wikipedia

Yume-sama
Dec 15, 2009, 6:26 PM
:haha: Well, at least it didn't stop operations at the airport. In the USA they'd still be on lockdown, and he'd be in a dark plane on the way to Guantanamo.

trofirhen
Dec 15, 2009, 6:43 PM
Anybody have any information the proposed new Transborder terminal? When will construction start? What size will the building be? How will it be linked to the present terminal? What will become of the current transborder portion of the existing terminal?

If anyone has any information, plans or design drawings, I'd be really interested if you'd be willing to post them. Thank you

twoNeurons
Dec 15, 2009, 7:13 PM
The Boeing 787 is in the air!
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13860_3-10415701-56.html?part=rss&subj=news&tag=2547-1_3-0-20

The 787 is better news for mid-sized cities like Vancouver than the Airbus 380... as it is supposed to open up more direct flights ( as opposed to herding through the hubs ) to smaller cities with more efficiency than a larger plane.

Yume-sama
Dec 15, 2009, 7:26 PM
This is the plane that I can't wait to fly on :)

deasine
Dec 15, 2009, 7:55 PM
Epic fail....


Crash sends unexpected arrival into Vancouver airport
Updated: Tue Dec. 15 2009 11:03:31
Darcy Wintonyk, ctvbc.ca

Vancouver's International Airport received an unexpected arrival early Tuesday morning after a large SUV crashed into the international terminal and drove more than 50 feet inside.

A valet was behind the wheel of the black SUV when it careened through the automatic sliding glass doors and deep into the U.S. departures area around 5:30 a.m.

In Pictures: SUV crashes into airport (http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/gallery/html/airport_suv_091215/photo_0.html)


Police say the man appeared unaware the vehicle was in reverse when he hit the gas.


"[He] was parking the vehicle at the curb, backing up against the curb, and hit the gas a little too hard and came shooting through the doors," Staff Sgt. Murray McCaulay told CTV News.


The driver is shaken up but is not injured, he said.
The speeding vehicle knocked out a three-person bench and a small counter before coming to rest beside a Christmas tree near the Delta check-in counter.


The SUV came close to hitting a staff member who was working on the newly-constructed counter. It was to open in two days.


"[He] left the area immediately when he heard the impact of the vehicle coming through the front doors," McCaulay said. "A very close call."


The rest of the terminal was relatively empty, he said.
RCMP and airport cleanup crews are on scene investigating and assessing the damage.


A YVR spokesperson said airport operations and traffic are not affected.
The owner of the vehicle had just checked in for a departure when the accident happened. He provided a statement to police before catching his flight.


Via Darcy Wintonyk of CTVBC (http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20091215/bc_airport_crash_091214/20091215/?hub=BritishColumbiaHome)

deasine
Dec 15, 2009, 8:04 PM
Anybody have any information the proposed new Transborder terminal? When will construction start? What size will the building be? How will it be linked to the present terminal? What will become of the current transborder portion of the existing terminal?

If anyone has any information, plans or design drawings, I'd be really interested if you'd be willing to post them. Thank you

Your question has been partly answered in the previous page.

There won't be a new transborder terminal for awhile.
Look for renovations of Pier B and some Cargo facilities in the new year.

Clearly, everything's quite preliminary. The transborder terminal is an extension of the airport eastwards from the Int'l terminal. A new Canada Line station will be built (at the point where there are two tracks). It will be broken up into two phases. Phase 1 is expected to be complete in 2015, phase 2 in 2023. YVR's been expanding quite quickly: you might see these two phases built as one. No, there are no renderings, but the expansion is covered in the 2027 Masterplan.

Refer to plan: http://wwwnew.yvr.ca/en/about/future-planning/YVR-Your-Airport-2027.aspx

MalcolmTucker
Dec 15, 2009, 8:12 PM
Epic fail....




Via Darcy Wintonyk of CTVBC (http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20091215/bc_airport_crash_091214/20091215/?hub=BritishColumbiaHome)

No security bollards?

PaperTiger
Dec 15, 2009, 9:24 PM
I can't believe he made it this far into the terminal! This is more than hit the gas in reverse instead of drive. this is hit the gas in reverse and leave it down until you come to a stop 150 feat away. Crazy.

http://images.ctv.ca/gallery/photo/airport_suv_091215/image3.jpg from CTV