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Delirium
Sep 12, 2006, 3:57 AM
here's a pretty recent pic of yvr.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y101/oct2gon/231416315_0e7a6c7625_o.jpg

excel
Sep 12, 2006, 9:10 AM
Great pic. thanks

SpongeG
Sep 13, 2006, 9:47 AM
cool pic

I wonder if they will ever duplicate on the south side what they have on the north side

hollywoodnorth
Sep 13, 2006, 5:28 PM
nice stuff :)

mr.x
Sep 14, 2006, 3:14 AM
cool pic

I wonder if they will ever duplicate on the south side what they have on the north side

they have to. it's the only other way the airport terminal can be expanded after the NorthEast terminal is done.

officedweller
Sep 14, 2006, 7:11 PM
The distance from the terminal to the South Runway is narrower though. Another option in the plans was to extend the domestic terminal outwards (to the west)

SpongeG
Sep 17, 2006, 7:56 PM
RICHMOND/CKNW(AM980) - A security breach at Vancouver International Airport has brought flights in and out of YVR to a standstill.

A source tells CKNW that a suspect image at a screening point caused concern around 8 this morning with departure lounges immediately evacuated.

What that suspect image was has not been revealed, but a number of flights that had already departed had to turn around to be re-screened.

Police dogs and officers continue to sweep the departure lounges.

Passengers on various flights have been told to expect delays of up to two and a half hours with long line-ups the order of the day at YVR.

from cknw

phesto
Sep 18, 2006, 6:09 PM
Story in the Sun today regarding cargo development:

Airport Authority looks to double cargo

B.C.'s robust economy, combined with increased trade with Asia and the introduction of larger aircraft, are expected to lift air cargo volume

With the massive growth in Asian trade, the airport authority expects cargo volumes at YVR to double in 20 years.

Wency Leung, Vancouver Sun

Published: Monday, September 18, 2006

Vancouver International Airport Authority says it will need to nearly double the air cargo processing area at YVR to handle a projected surge in cargo volumes from Asia.

Cargo volumes at the airport have been relatively stable over the past decade, but that all changed with the Chinese trade boom. The airport authority expects volumes to more than double over the next 20 years.

John Korenic, director of aviation marketing for the airport authority, said: "The growth in Asia, specifically China, we see as a significant opportunity."

B.C.'s robust economy, combined with increased trade with Asia and the introduction of larger aircraft, are expected to lift air cargo volumes to 500,000 tonnes by 2027, compared with just under a quarter of a million tonnes last year.

To accommodate that growth, the airport authority anticipates it will need to increase the amount of space used for air cargo processing to about 70 hectares by 2027 from its current 38 hectares.

YVR is even examining the possibility of building an entire cargo village as part of the airport's expansion plans.

The airport authority has recommended reserving 15 hectares in the north area of the airport for a new cluster of cargo facilities to replace the current cargo village on Miller Road, making room for terminal expansions and parking.

YVR has for years been upgrading its passenger terminals to become a premier gateway for travellers between Asia and North America.

"We certainly see there's an opportunity to develop the cargo component to the same extent," Korenic said.

Growth in cargo volumes has been strongest over the past couple years among companies such as FedEx, UPS (United Parcel Service) and Purolator Courier, known as integrators, Korenic said.

In 2004, UPS opened a $32-million air and ground transport hub at the Vancouver airport as part of its move to address larger volumes of cross-Pacific trade.

But, Korenic noted, the bulk of the cargo handled at YVR is transported by other carriers in all-cargo freighters and in the bellies of passenger aircraft.

Dozens of passenger planes each week fly between Vancouver and Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and mainland China.

Cathay Pacific Airways also operates a three-times weekly all-cargo freighter from Vancouver to Hong Kong.

Cargo flown from Asia to Vancouver consists mostly of electronics, textiles and value-added commodities, Korenic said. Headed in the opposite direction, air cargo destined for Asia consists largely of seafood, fruit and other perishable food.

At Cathay Pacific, cherries make up a significant portion of the cargo it transports to Hong Kong.

During cherry season between mid-June until August, Cathay Pacific increases its freighter flights to four times weekly to keep up with demand, airline spokeswoman Jennifer Pearson said.

Cathay Pacific's freighter service can transport 100 tonnes of cargo per flight, but about half of that cargo is loaded from the U.S. at San Francisco or Los Angeles. The rest is loaded in Vancouver.

On the airline's twice daily passenger service from Vancouver to Hong Kong, each flight holds about 45 to 50 tonnes of cargo.

Recently, Cathay Pacific has seen strong cargo shipments from YVR to the Pearl River Delta, one of China's leading economic regions, located in the country's south near Hong Kong.

"The development in this area is huge," Pearson said.

Among the materials destined there, she said, the airline has recently flown large shipments of grass seed from Vancouver for golf courses being built in the region.

But flights heading to Asia carry significantly less cargo than those laden with goods coming back to North America, said Claude Morin, president and CEO of Air Canada Cargo.

"The issue that we face is there is a significant imbalance in trade between North America and Asia," he said.

"We get very good utilization east-bound. West-bound is more challenging to fill. That's a challenge every single cargo [carrier faces]."

At YVR, Air Canada transports cargo in the belly of passenger aircraft to and from Japan, mainland China, Hong Kong and South Korea.

China is the fastest-growing market in Asia for cargo services, Morin said.

But on this side of the Pacific, the airline's cargo division has seen far greater growth at Toronto's Pearson International Airport than at YVR.

Air Canada last year launched a three-times all-cargo service between Toronto and Shanghai, whereas all of the cargo that the airline transports between Vancouver and Asia is on passenger flights.

"The Vancouver market is a good market, but you don't have the population base in Toronto," Morin said. He added that Toronto's proximity to other major U.S. cities and the frequent flights it has between South America make the city better suited than Vancouver as a hub for air cargo.

Air policy is also a major hurdle to the expansion of YVR's cargo business, said Korenic of the airport authority.

"In the past and still, Canada's air policy has been fairly restrictive," he said.

For instance, he said, the airport would not be able to accommodate an air freight route between Vancouver and Taiwan because Canada has no agreement with the country that allows such flights.

The government needs to remove such restrictions to take advantage of the tremendous potential for growth in the cargo business, said Jim Facette, president and CEO of the Canadian Airports Council.

"We need air-service agreements to maximize the opportunities the cargo market can bring," Facette said.

He acknowledged that the federal government has made progress in opening up air services in China, India, the U.S., and the U.K. But, he said, Canada is falling behind other countries.

The U.S., for instance, has about 75 bilateral "open skies" agreements with various countries, which allows foreign carriers to land and pick up passengers and cargo for onward service to a third country.

Canada, in comparison, has established open skies agreements with only the U.S. and the U.K.

Canada's relationship with top traders and sources of tourists, such as Japan and South Korea, are still much too restrictive, Facette said.

Unless Canada establishes more air service agreements with these countries, he added: "We're going to miss out."

wleung@png.canwest.com

SKY IS FILLING

Vancouver International Airport is bracing for an air cargo surge from Asia.

221,601 tonnes: Air cargo volume at YVR in 2005.

500,000 tonnes: Projected air cargo volume in 2027.

38 hectares: Amount of airport land currently used for cargo processing.

70 hectares: Amount of land needed for cargo processing by 2027.

Source: Vancouver International Airport Authority

excel
Sep 18, 2006, 7:52 PM
Airport security scare disrupts flights
Passengers stuck in airport after officer notices suspect item

Wency Leung, Vancouver Sun
Published: Monday, September 18, 2006
To listen to story, click the VoicePrint link (http://www.voiceprintcanada.com/audio/64806.mp3)

A security scare caused massive delays at the Vancouver International Airport on Sunday morning, forcing the cancellation or postponement of about 50 domestic and international flights. Things were back to normal by early evening.

Concerns were sparked by a security officer who noticed that a carry-on bag passing through an X-ray appeared to contain a prohibited item, said Renee Fairweather, director of communications for the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority. By the time the officer noticed the item, the bag had already passed through the security checkpoint, prompting airport officials to halt operations and rescreen passengers who had already been cleared for boarding, she said.

"When they rescreened everybody, no item seems to have been found," she said.

At least four planes on the tarmac were asked to return to the terminal so passengers could be rescreened.

Richmond RCMP issued a statement saying they also responded to the report of a security breach at the airport's domestic checkpoint, but no one was detained, nor were any arrests made.

Fairweather said she did not know what type of prohibited item the officer believed to have seen.

"I don't want to speculate," she said. "I don't know what the bag looked like."

Fairweather added she was "extremely confident" in the security at YVR, lauding their swift move to re-screen passengers.

She said the air transport security authority, Transport Canada and the RCMP will conduct a full analysis and issue a report on the incident within a few days.

Vancouver International Airport Authority spokeswoman Kate Forrester said the hold-up took about 90 minutes, and gates reopened around 10 a.m.

She said no U.S. flights were affected.

Most of the backlog had cleared by late afternoon and by 7 p.m. Sunday things were back on track.

"At the moment everything seems to be back to normal," Forrester said. "Most of the flights are on time and leaving as scheduled."

However, those expecting to fly today are still advised to check YVR's website for updated flight schedules.

wleung@png.canwest.com, with files from Chad Skelton

© The Vancouver Sun 2006

http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/story.html?id=0f786368-ebc8-4d1b-b2eb-cbcf5073f822&k=90147

Jeffy78
Sep 21, 2006, 8:00 AM
here's a pretty recent pic of yvr.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y101/oct2gon/231416315_0e7a6c7625_o.jpg

What a stunning image. Really, if you look at it... what a distinctive location for an airport. It's on an island, with the perfect amount of land (granted, more is slated to be created for the fourth runway). Not to mention its close proximity to the city. However it's not very convenient for those living in the Fraser Valey, as there's no real direct route to YVR from there. I'm really excited to see how it will continue to develop, with the Canada Line coming along at full speed and the ongoing terminal expansion!

SpongeG
Sep 24, 2006, 9:50 PM
people in the FV can use the ever expanding Abborsford airport

well expanding routes

you can now fly out of abbotsford to mexico, london, usa, canada etc.

i think as time goes on it will get more flights to more places

Stingray2004
Sep 24, 2006, 10:29 PM
Yup, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX) had, for all intense purposes, negligent scheduled passenger traffic until circa 1997 and growth has been continuing with WestJet and Air Canada (21% in the first quarter of 2006).

It's more convenient for users in its catchment area and a less hectic experience.

On the flip side of the coin, it does not offer the consumer what YVR offers in terms of flights, destinations, etc.

Here's some conceptual visuals of future anticipated YXX airport improvements (love that last pic with Mt. Baker as a backdrop).

http://www.abbotsfordairport.ca/pdf/openhousePP_0623_web.pdf

My only concern is that the growth of YXX will displace the 40-year Abbotsford International Airshow.

Hmmmm, a possible relocation to Boundary Bay Airport utilizing the same AIA branding, perhaps?;)

SpongeG
Sep 24, 2006, 10:35 PM
ah

yeah that would be a downfall to lose the airshow there

but most cities who want to be "world class" have more than one airport

london has three major ones, LA, NY each have a few too etc.

Its bound to happen here and abbotsford is perfect for such a role

twoNeurons
Sep 25, 2006, 6:30 PM
If I'm anywhere south of the Fraser, YXX is more convenient than YVR.

YXX is what Standsted or Gatwick are to Heathrow. Albeit on a smaller scale... STD/LGW are outside the M25 and serve the outer city. Heathrow (and London City) serve the inner city.

excel
Sep 25, 2006, 7:40 PM
New Yorks three majors are JFK, La Guardia and Newark

excel
Sep 25, 2006, 7:42 PM
Abbotsford now has daily flights to Toronto on the Embraer 190.

phesto
Oct 10, 2006, 2:56 PM
Airport looks at bridge toll, restrictions
Arthur Laing changes would force commuters onto Oak and Knight streets

http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/media.canada.com/idl/vasn/20061010/84439-33473.jpg

William Boei, Vancouver Sun
Published: Tuesday, October 10, 2006
Vancouver International Airport is considering imposing tolls on the Arthur Laing Bridge and dedicating one or two lanes exclusively to airport traffic.

That would send thousands of motorists who travel between Richmond and Vancouver east to the already congested Oak Street and Knight Street bridges.

The Arthur Laing Bridge, owned by the airport and originally built to serve the airport exclusively, is operating at full capacity -- it is congested in both directions during both rush hours -- and two-thirds of the traffic is commuters driving between Richmond and Vancouver.

The airport, which last month unveiled a long-term growth plan that will further increase traffic, doesn't have much choice, said its transportation and planning manager, John Lenahan.

A decision won't be made for several years, Lenahan said, "but my personal guess would be that within 10 years we're going to have to have something implemented."

That leaves several years for planning, during which traffic on the bridge is likely to become even more congested.

Richmond is considering allowing its population to increase by half to about 300,000, which would generate more traffic.

The airport can't add lanes to the Arthur Laing Bridge or twin it, Lenahan said, because Vancouver has a long-standing policy of not allowing new lanes or bridges to funnel more traffic into the city.

The Canada Line rapid transit line will take a little pressure off, but not nearly enough.

"We're in a bit of a tight spot between the City of Richmond and the City of Vancouver," Lenahan said. "In the meantime, people have to get to the airport."

Unless Vancouver changes its mind about accommodating more traffic, "the only other option would be to take some of the existing capacity and redirect it from commuters to the airport."

That has Richmond council up in arms.

"It will mean further bottlenecks, further traffic jams, and access for emergency vehicles could be problematic," said Richmond Coun. Linda Barnes, who heads the council's public works and transportation committee.

"The committee looked at it and said we didn't want anything to do with it," Barnes said.

She said the issue will likely come before the full Richmond council this week.

The Arthur Laing spans the Fraser River's north arm from the bottom end of Granville Street in Vancouver to Sea Island, where it connects to the No. 2 Road Bridge into Richmond.

Ninety-thousand vehicles a day cross the bridge. Enough of a reverse commute has developed that "it's getting to capacity in both directions morning and afternoon," Lenahan said.

The 30-year-old bridge was originally built as an airport-only bridge. Transport Canada couldn't get either Richmond or the provincial government to help pay for it, and so it wasn't connected to the regional road system.

Motorists got creative. They ignored stop signs and no-right-turn signs, Lenahan said, "and people were getting tickets for taking short cuts to try and go from Richmond to Vancouver, for quite a number of years."

"It was really disruptive," Barnes said, "not only for Richmond, but for anybody going to and from the airport; taxis, buses, a whole variety of traffic."

It took 16 years for a deal to be made. In 1992, the Arthur Laing was finally connected to the new No. 2 Road Bridge from Sea Island to Richmond.

Since then it has filled up, and the airport is still growing. The airport authority now wants passengers and staff and trucks carrying freight to have priority on the bridge.

Airport officials are hoping the Canada Line will be carrying up to 12 per cent of airport passengers and employees within a couple of years of its 2009 opening, eventually ramping up to 18 to 20 per cent.

Most airport rapid transit systems in North American carry six to 10 per cent of airport traffic. The most successful, Washington, D.C.'s Reagan Airport, gets about 14 per cent.

Twenty per cent "would make us the most successful airport in North America for transit use," Lenahan said. "That still means 80 per cent are coming some other way -- buses, cars, rental cars, taxis. And with the growth we have projected here, the Canada Line can't solve all our problems."

Richmond council may have another three or four years to find another solution, Barnes said, adding that Richmond has to push the airport for the details behind its plans.

"What's behind this request? What is the need? And are there other ways of getting that need met without dedicating these lanes?"

TransLink, the regional transportation authority, has no sway over the Arthur Laing Bridge, said spokesman Ken Hardie.

"It's owned by the airport," Hardie said. "It's not part of the major roads network. Therefore it's not subject to any approval process from TransLink."

But Lenahan said, if there's another solution, it has to be found at the regional level.

"We all have to start looking at this as a regional problem, not just Richmond's problem or our problem or Vancouver's," he said.

"We need a regional approach to transportation. We've started to see some of that, but it's still a little parochial sometimes."

-------------------------------

Interesting that YVR has different options planned, like modifying the arthur laing, and tunnelling; but these will not be received well by Vancouver or Richmond.

The option to redirect Richmond bound traffic to Oak St. sounds like a nightmare...

Lee_Haber8
Oct 10, 2006, 3:03 PM
What are they talking about when they say the Canada Line will only take a little off the traffic from Richmond to Vancouver - it will carry the passenger equivalent of ten lanes of traffic. Maybe those motorists who are stuck in traffic should think of taking the transit or changing their travel patterns instead of complaining incessantly about congestion and demanding wider roads. I think tolls is a great idea, make drivers pay for the infrastructure they wear down.

murman
Oct 10, 2006, 3:12 PM
"We need a regional approach to transportation. We've started to see some of that, but it's still a little parochial sometimes."

A little? :jester:

Sometimes? :jester:

phesto
Oct 10, 2006, 3:16 PM
What are they talking about when they say the Canada Line will only take a little off the traffic from Richmond to Vancouver - it will carry the passenger equivalent of ten lanes of traffic. Maybe those motorists who are stuck in traffic should think of taking the transit or changing their travel patterns instead of complaining incessantly about congestion and demanding wider roads. I think tolls is a great idea, make drivers pay for the infrastructure they wear down.

I think they're referring to trips to an from YVR only, not Richmond. In this case, they estimate of total passenger and employee trips to and from YVR, between 12 and 20% will use the Canada Line.

rwiggam
Oct 10, 2006, 6:07 PM
ah

yeah that would be a downfall to lose the airshow there

but most cities who want to be "world class" have more than one airport

london has three major ones, LA, NY each have a few too etc.

Its bound to happen here and abbotsford is perfect for such a role


It's worth remembering that in its bid to become 'world class', Montreal charged ahead and built Mirabel back in the day. However, Montreal didn't keep up with projected growth, and Mirabel became a white elephant. When I lived there in the late 1990s, it was still underused, primarily with cargo planes and charter flights flying from there.

That being said, if YXX is allowed to grow organically, we could very well benefit from a second airport in the region.

It's also worth considering that even when a city has more than one airport, there's always the 'preferred' terminal that people would rather fly from. Generally, they're the ones that are closest to the city, and/or best connected by public transit - Laguardia in NYC (for proximity), Heathrow in London (for proximity and connections).

PS: From a few pilots I've spoken with, the Embraer jets have a horrible reputation. JetBlue, for instance, is having major maintenance headaches with their Brazillian fleet. Better to fly on the Canadian-made Bombardier jets.

eduardo88
Oct 10, 2006, 6:31 PM
PS: From a few pilots I've spoken with, the Embraer jets have a horrible reputation. JetBlue, for instance, is having major maintenance headaches with their Brazillian fleet. Better to fly on the Canadian-made Bombardier jets.

Embraer planes are so much better than Bombardier. seems more like nationalistic bullshit than common sense to choose canadian planes over brazilian.

officedweller
Oct 10, 2006, 6:57 PM
The option to redirect Richmond bound traffic to Oak St. sounds like a nightmare...

It'll be a tougher fight for Richmond to build another bridge into Vancouver than for the twinning of the Port Mann.
Maybe they'll have to look as far east as a Boundary Road bridge (on the Burnaby side) - but Burnaby always sides with Vancouver.
Maybe when traffic backs up on Oak and causes gridlock well into Vancouver from the afternoon rush (and the morning countercommute), then Vancouver may do something. It has a more direct impact on the City of Vancouver than tie-ups over at the Port Mann.

rwiggam
Oct 10, 2006, 8:57 PM
Embraer planes are so much better than Bombardier. seems more like nationalistic bullshit than common sense to choose canadian planes over brazilian.

Sorry, no nationalistic BS here. I couldn't care less where the planes are built.

However, I've talked to a couple pilots from Air Canada and Comair (Delta's regional carrier). From what I've been told, they and 'most of their colleagues' don't trust Embraer planes, and would 'prefer not to fly them'.

Here's an article on JetBlue's early problems with Embraer planes:

http://www.usatoday.com/travel/flights/2006-01-27-jetblue-embraer_x.htm

"the plane, which JetBlue began flying between Boston and New York in November, had reliability rates "a few percentage points less" than its Airbus planes in terms of glitches which delayed flights."

bils
Oct 10, 2006, 11:02 PM
The airport, which last month unveiled a long-term growth plan that will further increase traffic, doesn't have much choice, said its transportation and planning manager, John Lenahan.

honestly, i don't see what putting a toll on the arthur laing would accomplish. sure, that will mean that airport passengers will be able to zoom onto the bridge.... but once they get to the granville/70th area, it'll be just as congested. they'd simply be moving the bottleneck upstream, in my opinion.

Nutterbug
Oct 10, 2006, 11:12 PM
honestly, i don't see what putting a toll on the arthur laing would accomplish. sure, that will mean that airport passengers will be able to zoom onto the bridge.... but once they get to the granville/70th area, it'll be just as congested. they'd simply be moving the bottleneck upstream, in my opinion.
North of the bridge, the traffic will be spread out onto other streets (Marine, Oak, Cambie, etc.). Plus it'll be a way to discourage overall traffic and reduce its total volume.

bils
Oct 11, 2006, 2:06 AM
North of the bridge, the traffic will be spread out onto other streets (Marine, Oak, Cambie, etc.). Plus it'll be a way to discourage overall traffic and reduce its total volume.

Oak & Cambie would be congested because all the Richmond traffic will be diverted there. People would then try shift over to Granville hoping for less congestion.

Listen, putting a toll on a bridge doesn't solve anything. It moves the bottleneck to other bridges and into Richmond/Vancouver. Discouraging people to drive downtown can be successful only up to a point. There's two certainties: i) a good proportion of us will always want to drive, and ii) Richmond will continue to grow at a fast pace.

There's currently six lanes leaving Richmond into Vancouver, and regardless of a huge shift towards public transportation, it's not enough to sustain a successful economy between two growing cities and an airport.

mr.x
Oct 11, 2006, 2:28 AM
Oak & Cambie would be congested because all the Richmond traffic will be diverted there. People would then try shift over to Granville hoping for less congestion.

Listen, putting a toll on a bridge doesn't solve anything. It moves the bottleneck to other bridges and into Richmond/Vancouver. Discouraging people to drive downtown can be successful only up to a point. There's two certainties: i) a good proportion of us will always want to drive, and ii) Richmond will continue to grow at a fast pace.

There's currently six lanes leaving Richmond into Vancouver, and regardless of a huge shift towards public transportation, it's not enough to sustain a successful economy between two growing cities and an airport.

What needs to be done:

1) Arthur Laing, Knight, and Oak Street Bridges are all tolled.
2) Additional bus service in Richmond and into Vancouver via the bridges, higher frequency for all Richmond bus routes, bus shelters for all Richmond bus stops


It's the only way....tolling Arthur Laing simply wouldn't work.

SpongeG
Oct 11, 2006, 3:51 AM
It's worth remembering that in its bid to become 'world class', Montreal charged ahead and built Mirabel back in the day. However, Montreal didn't keep up with projected growth, and Mirabel became a white elephant. When I lived there in the late 1990s, it was still underused, primarily with cargo planes and charter flights flying from there.

That being said, if YXX is allowed to grow organically, we could very well benefit from a second airport in the region.

It's also worth considering that even when a city has more than one airport, there's always the 'preferred' terminal that people would rather fly from. Generally, they're the ones that are closest to the city, and/or best connected by public transit - Laguardia in NYC (for proximity), Heathrow in London (for proximity and connections).

PS: From a few pilots I've spoken with, the Embraer jets have a horrible reputation. JetBlue, for instance, is having major maintenance headaches with their Brazillian fleet. Better to fly on the Canadian-made Bombardier jets.

ah

maybe some airlines could set up some exclusive deals or something with it

I know Delta Airlines only flys into Gatwick

and Southwest chooses smaller airports over the main ones - mainly to do with landing fees etc. I think South West wanted to use boeing field in Seattle instead of Sea-Tac not too long ago but were not allowed

I am sure it (YXX) will get some good use fro the olympics - they could handle some of the charters

squeezied
Oct 11, 2006, 4:03 AM
What needs to be done:

1) Arthur Laing, Knight, and Oak Street Bridges are all tolled.

lol i like that idea!

SpongeG
Oct 11, 2006, 4:19 AM
or have a man made earthquake and have richmond be done in once and for all

Glacierfed
Oct 11, 2006, 4:33 AM
YVR set a record for passengers in August (previous high was Aug '01) with 1.841 million.

http://www.yvr.ca/pdf/authority/statistics/Passengers%20Aug%202006.pdf

excel
Oct 11, 2006, 6:41 AM
Thanks for the link^

phesto
Oct 11, 2006, 1:29 PM
YVR set a record for passengers in August (previous high was Aug '01) with 1.841 million.

http://www.yvr.ca/pdf/authority/statistics/Passengers%20Aug%202006.pdf

Those numbers are looking pretty healthy. Wouldn't be surprised to see 1 million+ domestic next summer.

officedweller
Oct 11, 2006, 7:57 PM
It's the only way....tolling Arthur Laing simply wouldn't work.

It's about jurisdiction again.

Arthur Laing Bridge is under YVR/federal jurisdiction
Oak Street Bridge is under Provincial jurisdiction (Provincial Highway 99)
Knight Street Bridge is under Translink jurisdiction

Here's an excerpt from the Major Road Network map showing jurisdictions of various roads.
Yellow is Federal, Red is Provincial and Blue is Translink.

(Side note - apparently, before the Knight Street Bridge was completed, there was a bridge from the foot of Fraser Street to No. 4 Road in Richmond. Main Street and Shell Road seem to line up nicely as well. Too bad Vancouver wouldn't allow another bridge.)

http://img121.imageshack.us/img121/7520/mrnuntitled1yu7.jpg

SpongeG
Oct 11, 2006, 11:14 PM
couldn't the province put in a bridge without input from Vancouver? or whatever city involved

officedweller
Oct 11, 2006, 11:30 PM
In theory, yes, but not without trampling on a lot of toes in the process. There would also have to be cooperation with the road connections on each side of the bridge.

SpongeG
Oct 11, 2006, 11:52 PM
yeah

maybe they should explore a Richmond-Burnaby connection since there isn't one now

hollywoodnorth
Oct 12, 2006, 12:26 AM
well YVR may think they have the trump card.........but at the end of the day....the only way to get onto the Federal Road network on Sea Island.........is by using Translink Roads or Provincial Roads............I say block off access to the fricken Arthur Lange Bridge for a few days.........and then see if YVR changes thier mind about listening to outsiders input.

bils
Oct 12, 2006, 3:13 AM
i really don't understand vancouver's problem with bridges
if anything, building another one would make the region much more 'livable'.
but the bridge would just fill up, critics would say.
well maybe that's cuz the region's growing.

Stingray2004
Oct 12, 2006, 3:29 AM
YVR apparently wants to "twin" the Arthur Laing Bridge in its long term plans but apparently some bizarre City of Vancouver policy is playing interference - "no additonal bridge capacity into Vancouver"?

So, YVR is now considering tolls to attempt to achieve the same conclusion as a result of this knucklehead Van City policy.

There's bigger problems down the horizon involving the Oak St. Bridge as well as the Knight St. Bridge.

Long term BC Ministry of Transportation plans calls for the twinning of the Massey Tunnel in conjunction with "system wide" upgrades along the 99 Fwy -those "system wide" upgrades include upgrades and expansion to the Oak St. Bridge.

The Knight St. Bridge also requires additional "auxilary" lanes for safety upgrades - many areas along that corridor are currently deemed to be some of the most accident prone areas in the province.

I doubt this seemingly "knucklehead" Van City policy will interfere with these aforementioned plans.

SpongeG
Oct 12, 2006, 5:24 AM
the infrastructure hasn't really caught up with the huge growth since the 1980's and the changing traffic patterns

the city of Vancouver is going to have change its stance at some point or get its neighbours working on somethings like a richmond - burnaby bridge

excel
Oct 12, 2006, 9:07 AM
Harmony Update:

Temporary downgrade in flights out of YVR due to annual C checks by maintenance.

Vancouver - Calgary route temporarily canceled until an aircraft is decided on for use, as the contract for the CRJ-100 they were leasing from Voyageur has expired.

Vancouver - Oakland is now Vancouver - Palm Springs for the winter season. 2 times weekly

Vancouver - New York (JFK) is now 4 times a week, down from daily.

Vancouver - Maui/Honolulu 5 times each weekly, up from 4

Vancouver - Toronto 2 times daily, down from 3

Vancouver - Las Vegas remains 2 times weekly

These numbers will change again come December. Harmony will have all 4 aircraft in operation again in time for winter break. Harmony is getting rid of one of their 757's, due to frequent maintenance issues and is looking for another 2 757's as their short term plan.

excel
Oct 25, 2006, 8:32 PM
YVR now has all four major cargo companies operating aircraft. FedEx, UPS and Purolator have now been joined by DHL. DHL now operates a DC-9 out of YVR 5 times weekly. Im pretty sure they fly to Cincinnati which is one of the main North American DHL hub cities. Dont know for sure tho. DHL uses Purolators ramp for now. They have future plans of building their own facility north of the north runway beside UPS. They also plan on upgrading to 757 service to Vancouver.

hollywoodnorth
Oct 25, 2006, 11:39 PM
YVR now has all four major cargo companies operating aircraft. FedEx, UPS and Purolator have now been joined by DHL. DHL now operates a DC-9 out of YVR 5 times weekly. Im pretty sure they fly to Cincinnati which is one of the main North American DHL hub cities. Dont know for sure tho. DHL uses Purolators ramp for now. They have future plans of building their own facility north of the north runway beside UPS. They also plan on upgrading to 757 service to Vancouver.


wow nice! I have actually noticed that DHL is getting faster the last little while.

phesto
Oct 27, 2006, 4:28 PM
Flyglobespan will be starting service from YVR to London Gatwick, Manchester and Glasgow beginning Summer 2007.

Coldrsx
Oct 27, 2006, 4:46 PM
^will it be YVR-YYC- england?

cause calgary is getting the same

East Van
Oct 27, 2006, 4:58 PM
yeah

maybe they should explore a Richmond-Burnaby connection since there isn't one now

you think there will ever be connection around boundary road or east of it into richmond ?

officedweller
Oct 27, 2006, 7:02 PM
Yes - Boundary to No. 8 Rd. to the Connector - who knows when, though.

phesto
Oct 27, 2006, 7:38 PM
^will it be YVR-YYC- england?

cause calgary is getting the same

A few direct, a few through YYC. Here's what it'll look like:

YVR-LGW 2x weekly (direct)
YVR-YYC-LGW 1x weekly

YVR-GLA 1x weekly
YVR-YYC-GLA 1x weekly

YVR-MAN 1x weekly
YVR-YYC-MAN 1x

zahav84
Oct 27, 2006, 9:44 PM
Regarding Harmony, the JFK route is actually cancelled completely until April 30. Also, there will only be 1 daily flight to Toronto, execpt for a few days around Christmas when there will be 2. As for Hawaii, there will be 6 Maui flights a week, and 5 Honolulu flights. As Excel said, the Las Vegas and Palm Springs routes will be twice weekly.

As for their aircrafts, there will basically be only 3 a/c in operation for Vancouver this winter. 1 a/c will be used almost exclusively for routes from Calgary, Edmonton, Kelowna, and Victoria to Hawaii.

excel
Oct 27, 2006, 10:12 PM
^Thanks for the corrections. My info was from a third party source.

East Van
Oct 28, 2006, 1:54 AM
Yes - Boundary to No. 8 Rd. to the Connector - who knows when, though.

maybe when they start the development of the south fraser lands...

lubicon
Oct 30, 2006, 7:26 PM
A few direct, a few through YYC. Here's what it'll look like:

YVR-LGW 2x weekly (direct)
YVR-YYC-LGW 1x weekly

YVR-GLA 1x weekly
YVR-YYC-GLA 1x weekly

YVR-MAN 1x weekly
YVR-YYC-MAN 1x

All those you have listed are direct flights if they don't require a plane change in YYC. There is a difference between non stop and direct.

excel
Oct 30, 2006, 10:05 PM
Flyglobespan will be operating a 767-300ER from YVR.

phesto
Oct 31, 2006, 2:57 AM
All those you have listed are direct flights if they don't require a plane change in YYC. There is a difference between non stop and direct.

I meant non-stop. Sheesh, what is this airliners.net?

queetz@home
Oct 31, 2006, 2:59 AM
:previous: Its a really cool site for aviation enthusiasts and a good source for anything about the aerospace and airline industry. You have to pay for membership though... :(

phesto
Oct 31, 2006, 4:02 AM
:previous: Its a really cool site for aviation enthusiasts and a good source for anything about the aerospace and airline industry. You have to pay for membership though... :(

I know the site well, I just made the comment because I didn't think people here would really care about the difference between 'direct' and 'nonstop', which is something they'd jump on you for on a.net.

I'm actually surprised that more of these flights aren't stopping in YYC.

lubicon
Oct 31, 2006, 6:00 PM
I meant non-stop. Sheesh, what is this airliners.net?

Didn't mean to jump on you phesto. It's just a pet peeve of mine that drives me nuts.

Coldrsx
Oct 31, 2006, 6:08 PM
Anyone think there will be a narita/HK/SH-YVR - YEG/YYC?


im kinda thinking yes...

tuffyy
Nov 1, 2006, 5:00 AM
A asia service to YYC/YEG has been being pursued for sometime.Will it happen?Not likely as Asia-Alberta traffic tends to be low yield tourist traffic and that doesnt make airlines money.CP used to fly DC-10's from YYC-NRT and YEG-NRT in the early 90's and they were full but not with the traffic that makes airlines the coin they want.JAL will be taking over the ''Aurora'' charters from ANA this year between Japan and Edmonton and that is about as close as I see Alberta getting to asia for now.

Bokimon
Nov 2, 2006, 5:03 AM
For all you YVR spotters out there, on Wedesday November 29th the whalerider A380 will be making its debut visit to North America with a stop in Vancouver from Sydney direct continuing on towards Toulousse Blagnac.
The plane is MSN#002 WWXL.

You lucky bastards, now I have to go and book a flight to visit from cowtown.. :D

excel
Nov 2, 2006, 7:19 AM
^holy shit are u serious!
amazing news. ill be camping at the runway waiting for it for sure!

phesto
Nov 2, 2006, 5:14 PM
^Great news! Althought the jetways won't be operational until 07/08.

http://www.joconl.com/images/archives/2006/11/01/550.jpg

Link building ties buildings and transit together

Jean Sorensen
Correspondent

Passengers arriving from the Canada Line at VIA will disembark from the elevated guide way station and walk into a new $100 facility that provides a spectacular view of B.C.’s best artistic talent and natural beauty. The YVR line connects to the Link building’s upper-floor mezzanine via a covered walkway. Once inside and within the Link’s balcony area, passengers will be able to look around – and down – at the large atrium created in the building and used as a focal point within. This attraction houses the building’s totem pole carved by Don Yeomans. The floor has been tiled to resemble the ocean’s seaweed. While the atrium lighting gives the illusion of the northern aurora borealis. Together, the facility brings together the themes of land, sea and sky. This atrium area is also expected to prove popular with “meet and greet” arrivals and guests.

The five-storey Link building is also the lynch-pin bringing together the two major terminals (International and Domestic) within the airport. Top floors are reserved for office space, while the entrance level from the transit line is also a passenger check-in area. The lower level below provides baggage handling. “Our budget is $117.7 million and we are 50 per cent complete,” says Cowan, adding that the facility should be opened by summer 2007.

Kasian Architecture is providing the design for the Link building, while Keen Engineering is providing the mechanical, R.A. Duff and Associates the electrical, and Ledcor Industries is the general contractor.

Cowan says the Link building – with its ability to provide almost seamless travel for arriving and departing passengers – “stacks up with the best of them” when other international airport transit stations are considered.


----------------------


Vancouver Airport Brings B.C. and First Nations design into $1 billion revamp

Jean Sorensen

Correspondent

Vancouver International Airport Authority is spending $1 billion on capital expenditure improvements, but when work is finished – on the cusp of the Olympics – the Authority will land not just a state-of-the-art airport as a simple transit point but a transit attraction.

Vancouver International Airport (VIA) will still offer all the features of a modern international airport but its terminals will showcase striking architecture, native art, and such features as an aquarium displaying B.C. coastal aquatic life. The upgrade, showing off B.C.’s talents and natural attributes, will accommodate an increased volume of traffic as traffic is expected to climb from 17 to 21 million passengers annually by 2010. Current capacity is being fully utilized and projections indicate that B.C. will develop more tourism and commercial links within the Asia Pacific area to which VIA is the major gateway.

Bob Cowan, VIA Authority senior vice-president of engineering, describes how the new revamped airport will leave a lasting impression on B.C. visitors.

“When there has been a need for increased capacity or restoration, we have carried them out using the YVR style of building, and the YVR style is to build in a way that reflects the company. We are trying to bring a bit of what is B.C. and the First Nations into the current design,” he says.

phesto
Nov 2, 2006, 5:15 PM
http://www.joconl.com/images/archives/2006/11/01/560.jpg

Glass loading bridges for jumbo jets


Jean Sorensen
Correspondent

Things are bigger and better at the International terminal. It is going through a $420 million expansion with the addition of a new wing and nine new gates. Phase I, expected to complete in March-June 2007, will see the first of four new gates added, with two designed to handle the coming generation of wide-bodied, double-decker jetliners (A380s) arriving from large-volume markets such as China.

The gates will feature something new to Vancouver - glass, loading bridges serving both upper and lower decks of the jumbo jets. An enhanced baggage handling and screening system has also been installed to expedite the millions of pieces of luggage flowing through the international airport terminal annually. Phase II (the other five gates) could be completed as early as 2009, before B.C. hosts the 2010 Olympics.

The 30,000 square-metre new wing – double the size of Vancouver’s convention centre – will also bring under its roof a B.C. meandering coastal stream (albeit man-made) flowing through the interior. Departing passengers will move through the building enjoying the stream and seating areas along the flowing water. The Fog Woman and Raven, a yellow-cedar carving of a creek woman, by B.C. master carver Dempsey Bob, will be added to the stream scene but will also be another piece of distinctive B.C. artwork joining that of Bill Reid, the 20-foot long canoe sculpture known as Spirit of Haida Gwaii, The Jade Canoe, which is on display at the terminal food court.

“We are building a piece of B.C. in the terminal building,” says Cowan, who is over-seeing the $1 billion expansion, addition, and upgrade of facilities.

Where the stream ends, it flows into an aquarium. “This is a substantial aquarium,” says Cowan. Along with a jellyfish tank, the aquatic show will provide visitors to B.C. with an insight into the wide range of indigenous marine life offered. The terminal project – which includes a kilometre of moving sidewalk – is currently 75 per cent complete. The design is by Stantec Architecture, structural engineering by Bush Bowan, mechanical engineering by Keen Engineering, and electrical engineering is by R.A. Duff and Associates, while PCL Constructors Westcoast are serving as general contractors.

excel
Nov 2, 2006, 6:24 PM
This airport is going to be unbelievable. Thanks for all the information.

j4893k
Nov 5, 2006, 6:15 AM
Could someone please explain to me what this building is...
http://www.joconl.com/images/archives/2006/11/01/550.jpg

mr.x
Nov 5, 2006, 6:39 AM
Could someone please explain to me what this building is...
http://www.joconl.com/images/archives/2006/11/01/550.jpg

read the article. o_o

j4893k
Nov 5, 2006, 6:57 AM
read the article. o_o
oh my god! i never would have thought about doing that! i guess you really can learn a lot from children...

sorry if i was confused, but i was under the impression this was the link building.
http://www.kasian.com/images/transport/YVR-Link-img1a.jpg

maybe it's just me, but the two buildings look very different. o_o

mr.x
Nov 5, 2006, 7:07 AM
oh my god! i never would have thought about doing that! i guess you really can learn a lot from children...

sorry if i was confused, but i was under the impression this was the link building.
http://www.kasian.com/images/transport/YVR-Link-img1a.jpg

maybe it's just me, but the two buildings look very different. o_o


O_O......it is the link building. I'm actually surprised that it looks so different from the rendering.

crazyjoeda
Nov 5, 2006, 7:30 AM
Is the link building going to be short? Or are they building it taller?

phesto
Nov 5, 2006, 6:06 PM
Could someone please explain to me what this building is...
http://www.joconl.com/images/archives/2006/11/01/550.jpg

I'm pretty sure this is the back (airfield side) of the Link Building.

Here is a construction shot of the front side from 2 weeks ago:

http://img519.imageshack.us/img519/3015/img9673pw0.jpg

There are quite a few construction photos here: http://www.wesbridge.com/projects/photos/4314/4314-06/default.htm

And here: http://www.wesbridge.com/projects/photos/4314/4314-04/default.htm

j4893k
Nov 6, 2006, 2:55 AM
thanks

also, check out the airport's master plan for 2027. it's a bit of an update from the previous one. some interesting things...

"the Airport Authority recognizes that some form of people mover (shuttles, buses or skytrain-type technologies) will be required."

also a better pic of terminal expansion to the east
http://www.yvr.ca/authority/images/masterplan/terminal_northeast.jpg

clooless
Nov 6, 2006, 7:59 AM
With all these improvements to the international terminal, the domestic side is looking a bit aged. I am referring to the domestic departures wing as the domestic terminal itself was completely renovated about two years ago with a glass roof and other changes. The Westjet gates ("B" gates) look fine and completely modernized, but the Air Canada side ("C" gates) is looking dated to me.

The same can be said for YYC, Calgary, as the Air Canada departure gates are looking downright neglected compared to the brand new Westjet departure wing. But that's another forum. I notice this every time I fly Calgary to Vancouver, which is often.

mr.x
Nov 6, 2006, 8:01 AM
With all these improvements to the international terminal, the domestic side is looking a bit aged. I am referring to the domestic departures wing as the domestic terminal itself was completely renovated about two years ago with a glass roof and other changes. The Westjet gates ("B" gates) look fine and completely modernized, but the Air Canada side ("C" gates) is looking dated to me.

The same can be said for YYC, Calgary, as the Air Canada departure gates are looking downright neglected compared to the brand new Westjet departure wing. But that's another forum. I notice this every time I fly Calgary to Vancouver, which is often.

The future expansion plan map above does not note it, but there are future plan s to improve and expand both the domestic terminal and its departure wings.

phesto
Nov 6, 2006, 4:21 PM
http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/media.canada.com/canwest/111/vs_jal_biz_top_061106_210.jpg?size=l

Aviation pacts hit airport growth
Restrictions prevent Asian carriers from adding Vancouver service

Wency Leung, Vancouver Sun
Published: Monday, November 06, 2006

Canada's current aviation agreements with several Asian countries are holding back growth at Vancouver International Airport, airport authority officials said.

Director of aviation marketing John Korenic said a number of Asian carriers, including Singapore Airlines, are looking to expand service to Vancouver, but restrictions on air traffic are preventing them from doing so.

That's why a recent announcement by the federal government, stating it intends to pursue new "open skies" agreements with other countries, comes as welcome news to the Vancouver airport authority.

"That's something we're very supportive of," Korenic said, adding that YVR's hope is to "let the marketplace decide what is the right level of competition."

International air services are governed by bilateral agreements and arrangements between countries.

That means unless Canada negotiates more liberal agreements, the Vancouver airport's ability to claim its share of increasing Asia-Pacific air traffic remains limited, said Gordon Chu, YVR's senior policy advisor.

Late last month, Transport Canada introduced a consultation paper outlining its plans for a new air transportation policy, which would see negotiations for more liberal agreements with other countries.

Chu and Korenic said the Vancouver airport would benefit, in particular, from more liberal agreements with Singapore, Taiwan, South Korea and the Philippines, where restrictions are strict yet demand for flights is increasing.

Campbell Wilson, the Canadian vice-president for Singapore Airlines, said his airline wants to eventually introduce daily flights between Singapore and Vancouver.

Singapore Airlines is currently allowed to fly to Vancouver only three times a week, which it does via South Korea.

But Wilson said there is enough demand to support additional services between Vancouver and Singapore.

The airline's flights between the two locations were 85 per cent full last year, and about one-third of its passengers are flying to and leaving Canada via the U.S., he said.

This year, he added, the proportion of seats filled on its Vancouver-Singapore flights are close to 90 per cent.

Canada does not have a formal air service agreement with Singapore, Wilson said, noting that the airline operates in Canada under a temporary operating permit that must be renegotiated annually.

That makes it difficult for the airline to make long-term plans here, he said.

Though Singapore Airlines wants to continue operating in Vancouver, it may make more sense in the future to introduce flights out of the nearest major U.S. city, Seattle, he said. And if that were to happen, he added, it might not be viable to keep operating out of Vancouver.

"We don't want to do that, but that's just the business reality," Wilson said, noting that under the U.S.' bilateral agreement with Singapore, his airline is free to fly to as many U.S. cities and as frequently as it chooses. "We want to be here another 20 years, but if we're still restricted to three times a week, where do we go to grow?"

According to Transport Canada, Canada has air transport agreements and arrangements with more than 70 bilateral partners that specify how many airlines from each country can operate, the routings and frequency of flights.

But Wilson warned that the U.S. is ahead of Canada when it comes to developing open skies agreements, and Canada could risk losing air traffic to its neighbour.

"Vancouver could be a much bigger hub to North America," Wilson said, noting that Vancouver International Airport has a geographic advantage over competitors in the U.S. due to its proximity to northeast Asia.

He added that Vancouver also has the opportunity to attract more air traffic between Asia and Mexico and Latin America, catering to travellers who, for visa reasons, can't go via the U.S.

Wilson said that if Singapore Airline were allowed to fly daily to Vancouver, it could add an estimated 166 jobs to the local economy.

He added that, if it were given the right, the airlines could begin expanding services to Vancouver within a year or two.

It's not just YVR that's hoping to capitalize on increased Asia-Pacific air traffic.

The Prince George Airport Authority is looking to expand its main runway to accommodate trans-Pacific cargo aircraft wanting to stop and refuel.

Airport manager Stieg Hoeg said Prince George could offer an alternative for cargo planes travelling between North America and Asia that currently refuel in Anchorage, Alaska.

"Anchorage is congested. They are facing some severe delays," he said. "The strength of Prince George is it's on the great circle route [that's] heavily travelled between the east coast of the United States and Asia."

He noted that the Miami to Shanghai route passes right through Prince George, and that if cargo planes were to refuel there, they would not need to travel any additional distance.

Hoeg said the Prince George Airport Authority is putting together a financial package for the $33 million plan to expand its runway to 11,400 feet from its current 7,400 feet.

Details as to the time line of the project have not yet been announced.

While Hoeg said Prince George airport's expansion plans will help it take advantage of existing air traffic, he also expressed support for more open skies negotiations.

"The more unrestricted access becomes, the better it is for us," he said.

But while more liberal agreements might bring more business to Canada's airports, it also brings more competition for carriers like Air Canada, said YVR's Chu.

According to Transport Canada's consultation paper, "under no circumstances" would the new policy include the right for a foreign airline to carry domestic traffic between locations in Canada.

But Chu said he expected competition to increase for international services.

"Open skies policy in any country will increase competition for any national carrier," he said. "We feel competition is health for any market economy. But when you're a domestic or national carrier, you might take a different view."

Asked about how more liberal air agreements would affect Air Canada, spokeswoman Angela Mah said the airline shares the view of the industry's Air Transport Association of Canada.

She referred to a statement from the association, which noted that the Canadian airline industry welcomes fair competition.

But, it said: "As with all international trade negotiations, the Government of Canada should pursue discussions with those trading countries that offer significant reciprocal opportunities for Canada, while working to put the Canadian aviation industry on a level playing field with our international competitors."

Transport Canada said it will accept industry input on its proposed new policy until Nov. 8.

wleung@png.canwest.com

phesto
Nov 6, 2006, 4:33 PM
And here is the info on the A380's first arrival at YVR on Nov.29. Someone get out there and take some pics!

Route-proving flights take A380 to Vancouver
Airbus must show plane can handle airline service

By JAMES WALLACE
P-I AEROSPACE REPORTER

The 555-passenger Airbus A380 will make an appearance at the Vancouver (B.C.) International Airport later this month as part of a series of route-proving flights that are needed before the double-decker plane goes into airline service.

The Vancouver visit will be the first time the A380 has landed at an international airport in North America. But the plane has been to Canada before. Last winter, it landed in Iqaluit, a remote area of the country, for cold-weather testing.

As part of the certification process, the A380 must be operated for more than 150 hours on a continuous typical airline schedule.

Airbus said Tuesday these flights will begin Nov. 13, starting from the Airbus headquarters in Toulouse, France.

One of four A380s in flight tests will visit 10 airports on four trips. They include Singapore and Seoul during the first trip, then Hong Kong and Narita, Japan.

The third trip is a flight to Guangzhou, Beijing and Shanghai.

The fourth and final trip will take the A380 around the globe, via both poles. It will depart Toulouse to reach Johannesburg, South Africa, and then fly over the South Pole en route to Sydney, Australia. From Sydney it will fly across the Pacific to Vancouver, arriving there Nov. 29. The plane will then return to Toulouse via the North Pole.

During this technical route-proving exercise, the A380 will have to demonstrate that it can be turned around as required in normal airline operations. Tests will cover, among other things, checks on standard aircraft maintenance and behavior, as well as typical airport operations and compatibility. These will include monitoring functions such as bridge docking, cleaning and catering, refueling and boarding procedures.

The A380 will supplant Boeing's 747 as the world's biggest commercial jetliner once it has entered airline service. Singapore Airlines is supposed to get the first one in October 2007 -- nearly two years late. The A380 has been delayed by wiring problems, though that has not affected the flight test program. Airbus has four planes in flight tests. One more is undergoing cabin installation.

excel
Nov 6, 2006, 8:43 PM
^Thanks for the information. Too bad it doesnt mention what time its coming in.

excel
Nov 9, 2006, 12:15 AM
not 100% sure but i heard that the a380 will be arriving around 730AM on Wed nov 29th

officedweller
Nov 9, 2006, 1:38 AM
Can't you just see this across Grant MacConachie Way in 20 years time?
This is in Singapore:
http://us.airliners.net/photos/middle/9/8/1/0957189.jpg

mr.x
Nov 9, 2006, 2:01 AM
^ Wow.

SpongeG
Nov 9, 2006, 10:15 AM
omg i can make it there at that time :)

excel
Nov 10, 2006, 8:49 AM
and its supposedly not due to leave until late afternoon.

mr.x
Nov 11, 2006, 3:41 AM
YVR eyes creating runway across habitat
Although the airport said it expects broad public support, one environmental group calls it 'madness'



William Boei, Vancouver Sun
Published: Friday, November 10, 2006

Vancouver International Airport is considering building a $1.2-billion runway more than four kilometres into the Strait of Georgia, over the sensitive fish and wildlife habitat of Sturgeon Bank.

The foreshore runway would extend 4,270 metres west from the dike on the ocean side of Sea Island, according to YVR planning documents. It would be 60 metres wide and capable of handling aircraft in use now and anticipated in the future.

Although the airport said it expects broad public support for the foreshore option, one environmental group calls it "madness," while the City of Richmond and the Greater Vancouver Regional District are urging the airport to consider other options.

The foreshore runway is one of three options the Vancouver International Airport Authority is keeping open in its draft 20-year master plan, which extends airport planning to 2027.

The other two options are for runways of either 2,740 metres or 2,130 metres to be built on Sea Island south of existing runways. The south runway options would cost $300 million or less, but would create new noise problems for residents in nearby Richmond.

The airport expects to reach capacity on existing runways by about 2022 to 2025, even if it improves the runways and taxiways to boost capacity from 400,000 takeoffs and landings a year to about 450,000, the planning documents say.

The airport saw 275,000 landings and takeoffs in 2005, and demand is forecast to rise to 484,000 by 2027.

A 10- to 15-year head start is needed to get a runway built, said Anne Murray, the airport's vice-president for community and environmental affairs, and a runway decision will probably not be made until 2012 to 2015.

"We don't want to build something if it's not required," Murray said. "We don't need to make that decision yet."

Adding a runway to a major airport can be a decades-long process. For example, YVR's north runway, opened in 1996, required some 50 years of planning, government input, public hearings, and construction, according to the airport authority.

The foreshore runway would boost capacity by about 210,000 takeoffs and landings to more than 600,000, which is expected to meet demand until 2044.

Preliminary studies showed the foreshore option, by moving takeoffs and landings away from residential areas, would reduce the number of people bothered by airport noise by 7.6 per cent, while a south runway would increase noise problems by up to 12 per cent.

Because of the noise factor, the 20-year plan said, the foreshore runway was "likely to fare well with public opinion because of its minimal impact on residential areas in Vancouver and Richmond, despite the other environmental impacts."

The document doesn't detail them, but it says there are "significant environmental impacts on the foreshore and river habitat, and these would have to be well mitigated before approval for such a project would be forthcoming."

However, the Vancouver Natural History Society says in a letter to the airport that the foreshore runway "would destroy a large area of Sturgeon Bank, which is part of one of the richest wildlife habitats in Canada."

"The Delta foreshore, including Sturgeon Bank, supports millions of overwintering, migratory and resident birds and is a key stopover on the Pacific Flyway," the society said, warning that the runway also risks a serious bird-strike problem that could kill thousands of birds.

"It's madness," said John Werring, a salmon conservation biologist with the David Suzuki Foundation, adding that the foreshore runway is the most environmentally destructive runway option available.

Werring said it would mean extensive damage to bird habitat, resident and migratory, and that "Sturgeon Bank is one of the most sensitive areas for fish habitat," including green sturgeon.

The airport would have to keep birds away from the runway to prevent collisions with aircraft, and whether it does that by killing birds or firing boom cannons, it will affect an area much larger than the runway itself, he said. A fuel spill or plane crash on or near the runway could be devastating to wildlife.

Regional district staff say the runway would affect the operations of Iona Beach Regional Park. It would require the Iona sewage outfall jetty -- part of the park -- to be relocated, and would have "significant impacts on the aquatic and migratory bird habitats in this part of the Fraser River Estuary."

A GVRD staff report says the airport should wait for a regional airport strategy to be developed, which could lead to smaller airports handling more small aircraft to ease the load on the international airport.

Richmond city council has rejected a staff recommendation to endorse the foreshore runway.

"They were concerned about the environmental impact," said Richmond spokesman Ted Townsend.

Council was also unhappy about the potential noise from a south runway.

"They weren't convinced of the actual need for a third runway," Townsend said. "There was some feeling that perhaps capacity issues could be addressed by other regional airports."

Murray said other airports in the region are in the picture, but many of the small aircraft that now use the international airport connect to national and international flights and can't use other airports.

"Even with those other airports," she said, "we think we'll need a new runway at YVR about 2025."

Murray said the airport is aware of environmental concerns and agreed that a south runway -- especially the shorter option -- would have much less environmental impact. "But it moves the noise closer to the community."

bboei@png.canwest.com
© The Vancouver Sun 2006

mr.x
Nov 11, 2006, 3:49 AM
Airport plans alarm GVRD
Major expansion, residential developments may conflict with district's long-term plans



William Boei, Vancouver Sun
Published: Friday, November 10, 2006

International airport expansion plans and the prospect of new residential and industrial development on first nations land in Delta are ringing alarm bells at the Greater Vancouver Regional District.

GVRD staff reports warn that the plans, which are largely out of the region's control, may conflict with its long-term planning strategy and cause sprawl instead of compact growth.

The region is worried about several options outlined in Vancouver International Airport's draft 20-year master plan, including:

n A new runway extending more than four kilometres into the Strait of Georgia, crossing the sensitive fish and wildlife habitat of Sturgeon Banks and slicing through a jetty that is part of Iona Beach Regional Park.

n A car-dependent office park on the east side of Sea Island that puts new jobs far away from homes instead of in regional growth centres.

n Tolls or dedicated lanes on the Arthur Laing and Dinsmore bridges -- both owned by the airport -- without reference to a regional transportation strategy.

In Delta, GVRD staff warn, the imminent settlement of B.C.'s first urban first nations treaty, with the Tsawwassen First Nation, poses several problems.

About 400 hectares of protected farmland is expected to be part of the settlement, and the provincial government has indicated it may unilaterally take the land out of the Agricultural Land Reserve to allow industrial and residential developments.

That could set a precedent for other treaty settlements involving farmland in the Lower Mainland and put new pressure on protected farmland, says a GVRD staff report.

The report also warns that the Tsawwassen First Nation may be planning to develop some of the land jointly with the neighbouring Musqueam reserve.

If that happens, "there are serious implications that urban sprawl will occur with the creation of a very large residential and industrial town adjacent to TFN lands," the report says.

GVRD chairwoman and Delta Mayor Lois Jackson held out little hope that the province will change its mind about the Delta farmland.

"I'm not encouraged," Jackson said. "I think the province is simply going to put it in the treaty or do an order-in-council and take that land out."

She said Agriculture Minister Pat Bell had told her the decision should not be made by the Agricultural Land Commission, which normally handles farmland exclusion bids.

The GVRD staff report was triggered by stories from The Vancouver Sun's legislature bureau that said the province may bypass the application process. The stories said the government is worried the normal process might lead to a contentious public debate and an uncertain outcome that could jeopardize the treaty.

But the GVRD report says such a move would:

n Create an uneven playing field, with first nations' priorities trumping those of the region's municipalities.

n Jeopardize "the integrity of the green zone within Greater Vancouver's regional growth strategy."

n Lead to land-use conflicts between farm operations in the land reserve and non-farm uses on adjoining land, "and potentially compromising the agricultural use of ALR lands."

Jackson didn't know if the Greater Vancouver Airport Authority will be sympathetic to the region's concerns. The authority did brief the GVRD last summer on its proposed 20-year master plan.

The new runway would be built by 2025. The airport hasn't decided whether it should be built south of its existing runways, which would cause noise problems and is already being opposed by neighbouring Richmond, or along the foreshore, which would cause environmental concerns and be much more expensive.

GVRD staff are recommending the region make its concerns about Delta known to the provincial government, and ask the airport to maximize the capacity of existing runways and hammer out a regional airport strategy with other airports in the region, the GVRD and TransLink "prior to pursuing an additional runway."

GVRD officials say 52 hectares of airport land whose zoning allows office parks should be designated for airport-related and industrial uses only.

"Every effort should be made to concentrate office uses in established centres near housing, shops and services that are well served by transit," the report says.

Bridge tolls and dedicated lanes are consistent with the region's outlook, but the airport should help develop a regional transportation strategy before it starts tolling bridges, it says.

The Tsawwassen farmland report will be presented to the GVRD's agriculture committee today and the airport report goes to the land use and transportation committee on Friday. Both may appear on the GVRD board's agenda later this month.

bboei@png.canwest.com
© The Vancouver Sun 2006

bils
Nov 11, 2006, 5:41 AM
as co-dependent as YVR & richmond are with each other, I think there has to be an upper limit as to how much the airport can grow before its relationship with richmond becomes a detrimental one. i've always thought that another airport (abbotsford perhaps) will have to pick up the slack as the GVRD's population grows in the next few decades. YVR cannot continue to keep pace with the expected increase in population, nor should it try to.

as an aside.... the article mentions the possibility of a 3rd runway that is "south of existing runways". where exactly would this be? just lookin' at the airport on google right now and there doesn't seem much room to squeeze in another runway. if anything, there's more land on the north side of the island.

MistyMountainHop
Nov 11, 2006, 6:52 AM
as an aside.... the article mentions the possibility of a 3rd runway that is "south of existing runways". where exactly would this be? just lookin' at the airport on google right now and there doesn't seem much room to squeeze in another runway. if anything, there's more land on the north side of the island.

Here are two pics from the YVR website:

http://yvr.ca/authority/images/masterplan/airside_southparallel_long.jpg http://yvr.ca/authority/images/masterplan/airside_southparallel_short.jpg

Canadian Mind
Nov 11, 2006, 7:13 AM
for the 4 km into the strait idea, would that be an extension to the main runway or a whole new super-massive one?

mr.x
Nov 11, 2006, 7:20 AM
for the 4 km into the strait idea, would that be an extension to the main runway or a whole new super-massive one?

a massive new runway, at a cost of $1.2 billion.

http://www.yvr.ca/authority/images/masterplan/airside_foreshorerunway.jpg

bils
Nov 11, 2006, 7:39 AM
Here are two pics from the YVR website:

http://yvr.ca/authority/images/masterplan/airside_southparallel_long.jpg http://yvr.ca/authority/images/masterplan/airside_southparallel_short.jpg


hmm.... how would that work?! that '3rd' runway appears to be 100ft south of the existing one..... would two planes be able to use them simultaneously at that proximity?!

and would this location really make much difference to richmond noise-wise? how much louder could it be

CleverHans
Nov 11, 2006, 8:15 AM
not 100% sure but i heard that the a380 will be arriving around 730AM on Wed nov 29th

Is there a gate at YVR that can handle an A380?

mr.x
Nov 11, 2006, 8:24 AM
Is there a gate at YVR that can handle an A380?

i would think at least one gate of the new terminal expansion is complete. 4 gates will be completed by spring.

EastVanMark
Nov 11, 2006, 8:48 AM
It seems the airport is screwed anyway it turns. Build out on the ocean the enviro police is on them. They build the runway on the south side, the residents say no way. Then the GVRD gets in on the act by encouraging YVR to find other alternatives such as using other regional airports for some flights?!? The GVRD as usual heads planted firmly up their a**!

phesto
Nov 11, 2006, 7:17 PM
Apparently the A380 will not actually be going up to any of the gates as it won't be required in this part of the route-proving. I'm sure YVR would like to test out the new gates, but I don't think they'll be ready until next year anyway.

It will sit out on one of the west de-icing pads for the day, so I'm not sure how easy it will be to spot unless you're actually in the terminal. But anyone can catch the arrival and departure...

Interesting to note that after this month, the only A380's we're likely to see at YVR in the next few years is if Lufthansa decides to upgrade YVR-FRA during the summers. So with the possible exception of the Olympics, we're not likely to see the Whalejet again for a LONG time.

smasher000
Nov 11, 2006, 8:55 PM
It seems the airport is screwed anyway it turns. Build out on the ocean the enviro police is on them. They build the runway on the south side, the residents say no way. Then the GVRD gets in on the act by encouraging YVR to find other alternatives such as using other regional airports for some flights?!? The GVRD as usual heads planted firmly up their a**!

LOL! So true! :jester:

The one on the ocean would probably be better... they're just fish right?

Dorian G.
Nov 12, 2006, 2:20 AM
Why does it need to be 4 km long, while the other options are about half that length? (and 1/4 of the cost). Just build the south one—when they finally have to; planes are getting quieter all the time, and floatplanes already fly over the NW corner of Richmond anyway (even though they're not supposed to).

mr.x
Nov 12, 2006, 7:26 AM
Why does it need to be 4 km long, while the other options are about half that length? (and 1/4 of the cost). Just build the south one—when they finally have to; planes are getting quieter all the time, and floatplanes already fly over the NW corner of Richmond anyway (even though they're not supposed to).

The south option would boost capacity by 150,000 planes annually. The offshore option would allow larger and future generation planes, boosting capacity by 250,000 planes annually. I would think both options would be implemented eventually.

Overground
Nov 12, 2006, 9:33 AM
Interesting to note that after this month, the only A380's we're likely to see at YVR in the next few years is if Lufthansa decides to upgrade YVR-FRA during the summers. So with the possible exception of the Olympics, we're not likely to see the Whalejet again for a LONG time.

Singapore Airlines has quite a few A380s on order and some of those for next year I think. Could it be possible SA will use an A380 on their route to Vancouver in the near future?

eduardo88
Nov 12, 2006, 10:07 PM
Singapore Airlines has quite a few A380s on order and some of those for next year I think. Could it be possible SA will use an A380 on their route to Vancouver in the near future?
dont alot of flights from east usa stop in vancouver on route to asia? if so then its probable that cathay or SA or some other asian airline with A380s would stop here.

Canadian Mind
Nov 12, 2006, 11:27 PM
dont alot of flights from east usa stop in vancouver on route to asia? if so then its probable that cathay or SA or some other asian airline with A380s would stop here.

a number of them, but not all, many go through seattle.

regardless, they all end up flying over my house at either 36 500 feet or 38 500 feet. ;)