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phesto
Nov 13, 2006, 12:25 AM
dont alot of flights from east usa stop in vancouver on route to asia? if so then its probable that cathay or SA or some other asian airline with A380s would stop here.

There aren't many flights from the East coast US that go through YVR. In fact the only two I can think of are Cathay and Asiana flying JFK-YVR-HKG.

Last year Cathay applied to fly ORD-YVR-HKG as a code share with AA. This would be in addition to the JFK route, not sure what the status of this is right now, but it would be interesting considering UA has a monopoly on YVR-ORD.

Wrt the A380 - even if some of these Asian carriers manage to increase their frequencies at YVR, they're likely to do so with existing aircraft, maybe with some upgrades as well, but I would be very surprised to see any of them use the A380 on any of the YVR routes in the near future.

SpongeG
Nov 13, 2006, 1:43 AM
i watched a show on Discovery once and it was showing how a plane leaves from Chicago bound for beijing and it flies over the north pole instead of what one might think flying west over north america, the pacific etc.

it can do it directly that way without having to stop anywhere en route

excel
Nov 15, 2006, 12:15 AM
dont alot of flights from east usa stop in vancouver on route to asia? if so then its probable that cathay or SA or some other asian airline with A380s would stop here.

Cathay isn't getting a380's. but if Vancouver completes the open skies agreement with Singapore i can definitely see them flying the a380 on their Vancouver route because they mentioned a large increase in demand on the Singapore Vancouver route.

tayser
Nov 19, 2006, 3:16 AM
Singapore Airlines has quite a few A380s on order and some of those for next year I think. Could it be possible SA will use an A380 on their route to Vancouver in the near future?

It'll be either Singapore or Qantas (possibly from SYD) who fly them there. Both Singapore and Qantas have upped their orders for A380s recently!

______

this also looks to be good too, both Qantas (Jetstar) and Air Canucker flying 787s between Melbourne & Vancouver:

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=7868560b-aca9-4ef0-b422-9ae8b364d5e1&k=65573


Air Canada sees savings in fleet upgrade
The Montreal Gazette
Published: Friday, November 10, 2006

Air Canada expects major cost-savings as it accepts deliveries of new Boeing 777ERs next year along with more 100-seater Embraer 190s, Robert Milton, CEO of parent Ace Aviation Holdings told analysts today. When Boeing 787s come later, "the whole game is going to change and we'll fly 200 people from Vancouver to Melbourne, Australia, for instance, at much lower cost than using four-engined Airbus A340s."

Milton said the 777ERs will come with video and other high-tech services installed and "we'll exploit every way to make them produce extra revenue."

He said Air Canada will gradually phase out some its A340's as the new equipment arrives. It has just received its 17th ERJ190. "With the two-year delay in A380 deliveries, we should be able to sublease into a pretty tight world market."

Also Air Canada hasn't seen "any meaningful pricing impact" from Porter Airlines' start-up of turboprop services from Toronto Island airport, he added.

Earlier ACE Aviation, which plans to sell about 21 per cent of Air Canada in a $400 million initial public offering, posted third-quarter net profit of $103 million or 95 cents a share including a special charge of $70 million. Revenue rose 4 per cent to $2.95 billion. A year earlier, Ace reported net earnings of $271 million or $2.23 a share, including $125 million exchange gains.

"The first quarter was very solid and we're making good progress implementing ACE's overall business strategy," Milton added.

bring on the competition :banana:

http://www.jetwaymodels.com/Images/DW/AC787.jpg

http://www.airways.cz/images/novinky/jetstar-international_boeing-787.jpg

jetstar's inaugural international flight at MEL (A330s initially moving to the above 787s).

http://thehoddlegrid.net/dump/1133777.jpg

excel
Nov 20, 2006, 7:50 AM
^cool news thanks.

SpongeG
Nov 20, 2006, 11:27 PM
any more info on when the A380 will be landing time wise?

nothing on YVR's web site yet that I can see - apparently they plan on releasing a press release beforehand

SpongeG
Nov 20, 2006, 11:38 PM
ok another A380 question - which runway do you think it will use? the north one?

I read on some other forum that people will be camping out over night to get a good spot - yikesmaybe i should just head down after work the night before

smasher000
Nov 21, 2006, 1:41 AM
Apparently a lot of people were at YVR today, welcoming the BC Lions (and the grey cup!) back home.

Bokimon
Nov 21, 2006, 6:28 AM
Is anybody heading out to spot at YVR the day the A380 arrives?

SpongeG
Nov 21, 2006, 6:43 AM
i might if i know the time

me and my friend often go and hang out down there anyway

excel
Nov 21, 2006, 7:44 AM
i am pretty sure it will be arriving around 730am on wed nov 29th. and departing sometime in the later afternoon.
the runway use will depend on wind of course. It is likely they will use the north runway for the arrival and the south runway for the departure. however, recently i have noticed them landing the 47's and 340's on the south runway. they south runway is longer, but only by a thousand or so. the worst possible runway that they could use for the arrival is 08R. There is no real good location to watch it land. 08L, 26L and 26R all have prime watching spots. lets hope they dont use 08R! or 26L for the take-off. (if they are using the 26's for the take-off, there is a good chance they will use 26L. which sucks for watching it)

SpongeG
Nov 23, 2006, 1:52 AM
ok here is a press release for media:

A380 at YVR - Media Registration Information



RICHMOND, BC, Nov. 22 /PRNewswire/ - Media are invited to Vancouver
International Airport (YVR) on November 29 to see the Airbus A380 on its
only North American stop. The visit is part of a series of four
certification flights for the aircraft and includes 10 airports around the
world.
YVR has been preparing for newer, larger aircraft such as the A380 for
many years as part of ongoing expansions and upgrades. The airport's
runways are A380 capable today and, by 2007, two gates to commercially
accommodate these aircraft will be available as part of the new
international terminal wing.
MEDIA REGISTRATION
The day has been divided into four parts; media may choose to
participate in one or more portion(s). Please note that there is limited
space for the airside portions of the day (1, 3 and 4).
1. Aircraft Landing (photo opportunity: aircraft landing and taxiing to
parking location)

Sign-in 6:30 a.m. East Concourse, Departures Level,
International Terminal, YVR
Aircraft Lands 7:30 a.m.
Bus Returns 8:15 a.m.

2. Briefing (presentations by YVR and Airbus, questions & answers)

8:30 a.m.-9 a.m. East Concourse, Departures Level, International
Terminal, YVR

3. Exterior Tour of Aircraft (photo opportunity: aircraft close up, on-
site interviews)

Sign-in 9 a.m. East Concourse, Departures Level,
International Terminal, YVR
Bus Returns 10:30 a.m.

4. Aircraft Take-Off (photo opportunity: aircraft departing)

Sign-in 3:30 p.m. East Concourse, Departures Level,
International Terminal, YVR
Aircraft Takes Off 4:30 p.m.
Bus Returns 5 p.m.

Security Requirements
Media participating in the airside portions (1, 3 and 4) will be
required to present valid government-issued photo identification (driver's
license or passport). Specific names are not required in advance, although
this information is helpful, but you must register the number of people
attending the event(s).
Vehicle Parking Information
Please park vehicles on P2 or P3 of the parkade; parking passes will be
provided. Please indicate when you register if you would like to request
parking for live-transmission vehicles (times and desired locations), and
we will do our best to accommodate requests.
About Vancouver International Airport Authority
The Airport Authority is a community-based, not-for-profit organization
that operates Vancouver International Airport (YVR). The second largest
international passenger gateway on North America's West Coast, YVR is on
track to welcome 16.9 million passengers in 2006.
-YVR-
NOTE TO EDITORS: We ask for your help in informing your audience that
they should not come to YVR on November 29 expecting to see the A380.
The aircraft will not be visible from any pre-security parts of the
terminal and, due to the parking position of the aircraft and the time of
day for arrival and departure, there will be no outdoor viewing points.
We are encouraging those who want to see the A380 to look to media
coverage for the best view.
CONTACT: MEDIA REGISTRATION CONTACT INFORMATION, George Lenko, (604)
646-3566, georgel@pacegroup.com



SOURCE Vancouver International Airport Authority

excel
Nov 23, 2006, 3:31 AM
Thanks for the offcial info.

phesto
Nov 25, 2006, 4:51 PM
Vancouver excited to host superjumbo
AVIATION I $14-billion A380 will visit city on test flight

Bruce Constantineau, Vancouver Sun
Published: Saturday, November 25, 2006
After 12 painstaking years of development costing some $14 billion, the world's largest passenger plane touches down in Vancouver next week for nine hours.

The Airbus A380 superjumbo jet is still a year away from regular commercial service but its brief Vancouver visit Wednesday, part of a global test flight, has generated tremendous excitement in the aviation community.

"I think it's fantastic," Vancouver flight instructor Dan Martens said of the plane's pending arrival. "It's a huge aircraft and a big jump up for aviation."

The Vancouver visit is the final leg and only North American stop of 17 days of technical tests for the A380. It's stopping at 10 airports around the world, with the final portion of the trip heading from Johannesburg, South Africa, to Sydney, Australia, and then on to Vancouver before flying home to Toulouse, France.

Expect scores of plane spotters around the airport Wednesday to catch a glimpse of the A380's scheduled 7:30-a.m. landing and 4:30-p.m. takeoff.

While it's parked in Vancouver, it won't be visible from any public pre-security area of the airport itself and airport officials advise the public to look to media coverage for the best view.

(Diehards might get a decent takeoff or landing view from a couple of popular plane-spotting locations at Flight Path Park on Russ Baker Way at the eastern end of the south runway or on Templeton Road near the east end of the north runway.)

So what's the big deal?

European-based Airbus touts the A380 as the future of long-haul, high-capacity global aviation, capable of carrying from 555 to 840 passengers on two levels. It's 2.3 metres longer (73 metres), 4.6 metres higher (24.1 metres) and a whopping 15.4 metres wider than a Boeing 747-400, which can carry from 416 to 524 passengers.

Airlines are extremely tight-lipped about their plans for the roomy new jet, but some are considering installing luxuries like a gym, a lounge, a play area, a duty-free shop or even a casino.

But as great as it sounds, the A380 has been plagued by delays and Airbus is currently two years behind its original delivery schedule, with Singapore Airlines now expecting the first A380 by October 2007.

Problems with installing more than 500 kilometres of wiring in each aircraft have been cited as the main reason for the delays and executive heads have rolled at Airbus.

The company has had four chief executive officers in the past 18 months and it recently pointed to A380 production delays as a major factor in reporting its first quarterly loss in three years -- $247 million US.

Airbus also took a big hit this month when FedEx Corp. announced the cancellation of its multi-billion-dollar order for 10 freighter versions of the A380, deciding instead to buy 15 wide-body jets from rival Boeing Co.

But Airbus still has 149 firm orders, and commitments for 17 more, from 15 global airline customers. The A380 sells for about $300 million.

Emirates Airlines, the top A380 buyer with 43 orders, has sent its own team of engineers to Airbus plants in France and Germany to audit the assembly process.

Other top buyers include Qantas (12 orders and eight commitments), Singapore Airlines (10 orders and nine commitments), Lufthansa (15 orders), Air France (10 orders) and UPS (10 orders). No Canadian airlines have ordered the A380.

Airbus says it will deliver one A380 next year to Singapore Airlines, 13 to various airlines in 2008, 25 in 2009 and 45 in 2010. Company spokesman Mary Anne Greczyn said that delivery schedule will "remain in stone, as we see it right now."

"It's important that we deliver as promised because we made a commitment to our customers and our customers have been disappointed," she said in an interview. "We understand that they wanted their aircraft a while ago because the market needs this aircraft."

Airbus expects global air passenger traffic will nearly triple over the next 20 years, increasing the demand for high-capacity planes that can fly into congested airports with limited landing opportunities.

The A380 has been to Canada once before, undergoing cold-weather testing in Nunavut about eight months ago. Greczyn said a lot of big U.S. cities want to see the plane but Airbus officials don't have time to waste on a publicity tour now.

"To take even a week or two out for something like that could really affect the delivery schedule," she said.

Airline industry analyst Rick Erickson said if Airbus was private, a failure of the A380 project would likely kill the company. But it is majority-owned by the governments of France, Germany, the U.K. and Spain and they're highly unlikely to let Airbus collapse, he said.

"They won't let this thing go down the tubes because there are just too many jobs attached to all of this [about 55,000], not to mention prestige," Erickson said in an interview.

"So, one way or another, it will go ahead but will it make any money? The Concorde didn't make any money but no one seemed to really worry about that."

The supersonic Concorde jet, another European venture, served the trans-Atlantic market from 1976 until it ceased operations in 2003.

Erickson said Airbus needs to sell more than 400 A380s before it recovers its massive investment but its order book appears to be "stalled" now at fewer than 200. He noted Boeing has a "burgeoning" order book for its smaller 225-to-275-passenger 787 aircraft, with the plane being sold out through 2014.

"Boeing has decided that the high-density, ultra-long-range plane has a limited market and thinks more passengers want to fly point-to-point on smaller planes [serving second-tier airports] rather than hub to hub [on huge planes serving mainly the world's busiest airports]," Erickson said.

He said the A380 is simply too big for the Canadian market, which explains why no Canadian carrier has ordered one.

"Air Canada would rather have a bunch of smaller planes offering more frequent service because that's what Canadian international travellers want," Erickson said. "High-yield passengers don't really want to fly with 550 of their 'pals' and take something like two hours to unload and get their bags."

Airbus insists the A380 will have similar turnaround times (for unloading, cleaning, baggage handling and refuelling) as a Boeing 747 -- about 90 minutes -- although that theory might be tested for any airline that decides to fly 840 passengers by offering only economy-class seats.

Erickson said Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver are the only three Canadian airports likely to handle the A380 and predicts Montreal will be the first, with Air France flying the jet into Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport at some point. He said a Vancouver-to-Hong-Kong or Vancouver-to-Shanghai A380 service might make sense one day but doubts it will happen any time soon.

Singapore Airlines vice-president Campbell Wilson, whose airline has ordered up to 19 A380s, said it does not expect to serve Vancouver with an A380 for at least the next five to six years.

"The aircraft is better suited to routes that have a lot of slot [landing] constraints, like London or Sydney or Paris," he said. "We're currently restricted to operating just three times weekly out of Vancouver, so our main focus is to try and operate daily. It's very hard to offer business travellers a compelling proposition when you don't offer a daily service."

About 70 Airbus employees will be on board the A380 when it arrives in Vancouver to test issues like standard aircraft maintenance, cleaning and catering, refuelling, reboarding and general airport compatibility.

Vancouver International Airport is building two new large, A380-compatible gates in its international terminal expansion due to be completed next year. But the gates won't be ready for the jumbo jet next week so the plane will be parked and refuelled in a remote airport stand.

Brett Patterson, the Vancouver airport authority's director of operations for safety and planning, said the airport expects to be among a group of second-tier airports that will accommodate the new superjumbo at some point in the future -- after the "mega-hubs" of the world like JFK, Narita, Heathrow and LAX.

He said airport taxiways have already been widened to meet the demands of several new aircraft designs, including the A380, and one taxiway will have to be moved north if the A380 ever comes into regular service. Patterson said the airport will do whatever it can to accommodate the new Airbus megajet.

"As an international airport positioning ourselves as a gateway to North America, we have to show flexibility to carriers so they can develop their markets," he said. "We have to show them we can handle the full mix of aircraft in their fleets."

Despite the A380's growing pains and uncertain future, Erickson said it could develop a very strong following among well-heeled travellers who don't care about the cost of a ticket, as long as they get lots of room and in-flight extras like a lounge or gym.

"If you have money, this is going to be a godsend," he said. "This might make flying more interesting and fun than it has ever been in the past."

bconstantineau@png.canwest.com

© The Vancouver Sun 2006

SpongeG
Nov 26, 2006, 5:30 AM
(Diehards might get a decent takeoff or landing view from a couple of popular plane-spotting locations at Flight Path Park on Russ Baker Way at the eastern end of the south runway or on Templeton Road near the east end of the north runway.)


haha - they are only miles apart - well ok it feels that way - getting to the other one isn't easy at all in a car or walking

smasher000
Nov 27, 2006, 4:11 AM
Erickson said Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver are the only three Canadian airports likely to handle the A380 and predicts Montreal will be the first, with Air France flying the jet into Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport at some point. He said a Vancouver-to-Hong-Kong or Vancouver-to-Shanghai A380 service might make sense one day but doubts it will happen any time soon.


How about Toronto? Do they get it second or third?

Canadian Mind
Nov 27, 2006, 6:22 AM
lol, they testing snow or what? that plane better be up for the conditions.

excel
Nov 27, 2006, 7:31 AM
^its already landed in iqaluit, so im sure it can handle this weather.

Canadian Mind
Nov 27, 2006, 7:08 PM
i know, was more concerned about flurries when it landed. little to no visibility means either no flying or we can't see th plane when it does.

Coldrsx
Nov 27, 2006, 8:36 PM
YVR was suprisingly fast this morning...kinda cool to watch 5 plows hit a runway

Bokimon
Nov 29, 2006, 2:30 AM
Alright, the time has come mates.
Prepare to shat your pants for the mighty A380. It is now enroute and so am I.
Will plan to spend whole day tomorrow nailing her front, side, and rear.
Qantas returns Friday.
Time to kick ass and chew bubble gum.. :D

Bigtime
Nov 29, 2006, 3:53 AM
^^^ Get some good shots for us YYC'ers Bo!

Now if only you guys get weathered in and she has to divert to Calgary tomorrow, that would be funny!

Well funnier would be diverting to Seattle, but I doubt they'd do that! :D

n a m
Nov 29, 2006, 4:27 PM
Emergency landing of plane and also arrival of largest plane at YVR

November 29, 2006 - 7:06 am
By: Dean Recksiedler/Province


Click here to find out more!



RICHMOND (NEWS1130) - A scare for close to 300 people on a Philippines Airlines flight out of Vancouver last night. It had to make an emergency landing three hours after takeoff because of a problem with a wing flap. Fire crews from YVR and Richmond were on the runway when the Airbus A340 came down but the landing went without a hitch.



Airplane geeks are already crowding into their favourites spots just outside of YVR. They're waiting for the world's largest passenger airplane to arrive. The Airbus A380 is expected to touch down in about two hours. The double-decker airliner can carry over 800 passengers, and it comes with it's own restaurant, six kitchens, a bar and even a duty-free store.

http://www.linternaute.com/savoir/diaporama/airbus_a380/images/test-center.jpg

MistyMountainHop
Nov 29, 2006, 8:29 PM
World's largest commercial aircraft visits Vancouver today
Nov, 29 2006 - 2:40 AM

RICHMOND/CKNW(AM980) - Vancouver International Airport will have a special visitor today. The Airbus A380 arrives this morning and departs this afternoon. The visit is part of a certification process for the world's largest airliner demonstrating its capabilities on a continuous typical airline schedule.

Unfortunately, the A380 visit to YVR is not open to the public. The aircraft will not be visible from any part of the terminals and due to the parking position of the aircraft and time of day for arrival and departure, there will be no suitable outdoor viewing points.

The airport wants you to know the best view of the A380 will be through local media coverage.

SpongeG
Nov 29, 2006, 9:05 PM
its gonna be on the noon news in minutes or seconds

i never made it this morning - TV will have to do

officedweller
Nov 29, 2006, 10:15 PM
Philippine Airlines jet makes second emergency landing
November 29, 2006 - 7:06 am
By: Tamara Slobogean

RICHMOND (NEWS1130) - The same Philippine Airlines jet that had to make an emergency landing at YVR last night three hours after take-off, has made another emergency landing this morning. The plane is safely back on the ground at the Vancouver International Airport again, after reporting more problems with its flaps. The plane had been carrying just over 200 passengers.

World's largest passenger plane touches down at YVR
November 29, 2006 - 12:50 pm
By: Lyle Fisher/News1130 Staff

RICHMOND (NEWS1130) - It was quite the sight for airplane buffs at the Vancouver International Airport this morning as the world's largest passenger plane landed for a nine hour layover. Hundreds turned out in their toques, gloves, and scarves to watch this big blue and white bird touch down. The large crowd gave today's event an almost concert-like atmosphere. The Airbus A380 will spend the day here in Vancouver and is scheduled to take off at 4:30 this afternoon.

Designed in close collaboration with major airlines, airports and airworthiness authorities, the 550-seat plane is the most advanced, spacious and efficient airliner ever conceived. Many who came out were amazed at just how quiet the plane is and the amount of technology and research that went into it. Launched in December 2000, the A380 will enter passenger service next year. The double-decker airliner can also be equipped with its own restaurant, six kitchens, a bar and even a duty-free store.

officedweller
Nov 29, 2006, 10:43 PM
Posted on Flickr by someone named Glenn:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/glyoung/309630558

SpongeG
Nov 29, 2006, 11:01 PM
sigh - apparently the YVR had a special parking lot and view area for the public to watch it land and the coverage i saw on the news showed a lot of people there - grrr

anyway... a seattle slant:

VANCOUVER, B.C. -- Steven Halinen was supposed to be in college Wednesday, but instead he abandoned his classes to watch what will soon be the world's biggest commercial jetliner make a quick stop at the Vancouver International Airport.

"Wow, it's gorgeous," Halinen, 22, said as he stood in snow and bitterly cold morning temperatures when the big Airbus A380 taxied past him after landing at 7:32 a.m. Dawn was just breaking over the airport as the double-decker jet, which will typically seat about 100 more passengers than a 747, approached from the north after a flight across the Pacific from Sydney, Australia.

"Oh my, just look at that thing. It's huge," Halinen said.

The plane was due to depart Vancouver at 4:30 p.m. for its return via the North Pole to the Airbus headquarters of Toulouse, France.

It stopped in Vancouver as part of a series of technical route-proving flights, the final process in a long test flight program that is required before a new jetliner receives a critical airworthiness certificate and is allowed to carry paying passengers for airlines.

That certification for the A380 from the FAA in the United States, and from European regulators, is expected Dec. 12, Airbus said at an airport news conference following the plane's arrival here.

But because of wiring problems that have set the program back nearly two years, the first A380 won't be ready for delivery to Singapore Airlines until October 2007.

The 150 hours of route-proving flights, which began Nov. 13 from Toulouse, took the A380 around the world three times to 10 different airports.

The stop in Vancouver was the plane's first visit to an international airport in North America. But the A380 has been to Canada before. Last winter, it landed in Iqaluit, a remote area of the country, for cold weather testing.

Vancouver may not have been all that much warmer than Iqaluit Wednesday. The temperature was well below freezing when reporters and photographers were bused out to a remote section of the airport to watch the plane's arrival.

The A380 was parked far away from the airport terminal, in an area that is used to de-ice planes when there is snow. Media were not allowed inside the plane.

Airbus disclosed that the A380 will make its first flights to cities in the United States next year before entering airline service, though exactly which airports it will visit has not been determined. Several airports in the U.S., including Los Angeles and New York's Kennedy, are being readied to accommodate the A380, which has a much bigger wingspan -- nearly 262 feet from tip to tip -- than the 747.

But don't expect to see the A380 at Sea-Tac Airport anytime soon. The runways are big enough to handle the plane if it needed to land there, but the airport does not intend to spend the millions of dollars that would be required before the A380 could operate in regular airline service from gates at Sea-Tac, an airport spokesman said.

a picture gallery accompanies the story here: http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/business/294048_airbus29ww.html

Coldrsx
Nov 29, 2006, 11:22 PM
http://www.flickr.com/images/spaceball.gif

officedweller
Nov 30, 2006, 12:10 AM
Nice shots! Seattle papers provide pretty good coverage on Vancouver issues... although this one is also a Boeing competition issue...

**********

Airbus A380 grounded due to bad weather
November 29, 2006 - 2:51 pm
By: Lyle Fisher/News1130 Staff

RICHMOND (NEWS1130) - The world's largest passenger plane was scheduled to depart from Vancouver International at 4:30 this afternoon. But that take-off has been cancelled due to the bad weather.

It was a different story earlier today when the plane touched down at YVR just after 7:30 this morning. Hundreds turned out in their toques, gloves, and scarves to watch this big blue and white bird touch down. The large crowd gave today's event an almost concert-like atmosphere.

Designed in close collaboration with major airlines, airports and airworthiness authorities, the 550-seat plane is the most advanced, spacious and efficient airliner ever conceived. Many who came out were amazed at just how quiet the plane is and the amount of technology and research that went into it.

Launched in December 2000, the A380 will enter passenger service next year. The double-decker airliner can also be equipped with its own restaurant, six kitchens, a bar and even a duty-free store.

Jared
Nov 30, 2006, 12:32 AM
I bet all those planewatcher weirdos are estatic; they can, well, look at it more; for another few days at least.

Canadian Mind
Nov 30, 2006, 1:38 AM
lolz, awsome where was it suppost to go from here?

hollywoodnorth
Nov 30, 2006, 2:33 AM
the big bastard finally took off >>

Airbus A380 takes off from YVR after weather delay
November 29, 2006 - 4:52 pm
By: Megan Cameron/News1130 Staff








RICHMOND (NEWS1130) - The weather may be difficult for drivers, but it wasn't enough to keep the world's largest passenger plane grounded for long. Earlier this morning, hundreds gathered to watch the Airbus A380 touch down at YVR just after 7:30 and despite weather concerns, the huge aircraft managed to take off at 4:30 this afternoon, as had been planned.



Mary-Ann Gretchen with Airbus says the superjumbo A380 has been a huge attraction in all the cities it has landed in. She says the call the plane their "rockstar" because, "wherever it goes it attracts thousands and thousands of people. That has happened since its very first flight." She points out tens of thousands had camped out outside the company's Toulouse, France headquarters for the A380's maiden flight.

SpongeG
Nov 30, 2006, 3:07 AM
too bad i wanted to go watch it :( if it left tomorrow or something

tayser
Nov 30, 2006, 10:23 AM
lolz, awsome where was it suppost to go from here?

Tolouse > Jo'burg > South Pole > Sydney > Vancouver > North Pole > Tolouse.

one big arse RTW flight. polar test flights.

phesto
Nov 30, 2006, 3:25 PM
http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/media.canada.com/idl/cahr/20061130/25129-8473.jpg
Staff at Vancouver International Airport walk past the Airbus A380, the world's largest passenger plane, which was making its only North American stop on a global test flight.

Double-decker Airbus A380 lands in Vancouver

Published: Thursday, November 30, 2006
VANCOUVER - The future of civilian aviation arrived in Vancouver early Wednesday when the Airbus A380 the world's largest airliner touched down at the airport.

Standing on the apron about 150 metres from the side of the north runway, two things were striking as the jumbo aircraft made its historic first visit to North America: its sheer size and near-silent arrival.

''It's an aircraft designed for the 21st century,'' said Corrin Higgs, Airbus's A380 marketing manager, who was among 80 people to arrive on the plane after a 14-hour, 25-minute flight from Sydney, Australia. The A380 can carry up to 800 passengers on two decks.

Higgs said the $300-million airplane, which is expected to be certified next month for delivery in October 2007, carries more people than the Boeing 747-400, with a higher climb rate, from a shorter runway but with the same speed. And it does all that for 20 per cent less cost and 17 per cent less fuel per passenger than the 747.

The aircraft also lands at 138 knots, 19 knots less than a 747, and similar to the landing speed of a small, single-aisle passenger jet.

''One of the benefits of flying more slowly is we generate less noise,'' Higgs said, adding the lower noise ''footprint'' means four A380s can land for every one 747 under noise regulations at some international airports.

Higgs also praised the aircraft's record-high use of lighter, composite materials 25 per cent of its components which makes the A380 15 tonnes lighterthan if traditional materials were used.

The A380's size will mean more comfort for passengers, both in the luxurious business and first-class sections as well as in economy, where the extra girth means the seats will be 2 1/2 to four centimetres wider, which ''doesn't sound like much'' but will add a lot of comfort on long-haul flights, said Higgs.

Vancouver Province

phesto
Nov 30, 2006, 3:28 PM
http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/media.canada.com/idl/vasn/20061130/23853-8113.jpg

Largest passenger plane visits YVR
Viewing of takeoff of Airbus A380 cancelled due to freezing weather

Bruce Constantineau, Vancouver Sun
Published: Thursday, November 30, 2006
The world's largest passenger plane -- looking every bit like a massive, steroid-enhanced offensive lineman -- left Vancouver airport Wednesday after a nine-hour visit dominated by hype and Arctic-like conditions.

A viewing of the Airbus A380's late-afternoon takeoff was cancelled because of the poor weather as airport officials focused on getting the superjumbo de-iced and safely on its way home to France.

The A380 landed on time and without incident on the north runway just after dawn, with hundreds of freezing plane-spotters and anxious journalists recording its every move. About 300 cars carrying fascinated plane-spotters were parked near the airport's north side when the plane landed at 7:32 a.m.

Airbus test pilot Frank Chapman said the Vancouver landing was relatively routine.

"We knew you had some snow in the last few days, but everything looked fine," he told reporters shortly after the aircraft landed. "When you have a little bit of ice on the ground, you have to be a little bit careful."

The aircraft left a balmy, 24-degree environment in Sydney, Australia to arrive in Vancouver 14 hours and 25 minutes later to -8 degrees, with a wind chill that took the temperature to -15. Chapman said pilots delayed the landing for 15 minutes to give photographers better lighting.

Vancouver was the only North American stop on a two-and-a-half-week "technical route proving" exercise designed to give the A380 150 more hours of flight time leading to its international airworthiness certificate, expected from global regulators by the end of December.

The plane has yet to land in the U.S., but Airbus plans to take the A380 there next year, and a group of Los Angeles International Airport officials was in Vancouver Wednesday to view the new plane.

Airbus representative Corrin Higgs said U.S. immigration laws make it more difficult to get flight crews in and out of the country.

Chapman said Vancouver was also chosen because of its convenient location along the plane's flight path that took it over both the south and north poles on its Johannesburg-Sydney-Vancouver-Toulouse route.

Wiring problems have caused a two-year delay in the delivery of A380s to commercial airlines anxious to put the jet into service. Singapore Airlines is scheduled to receive the first one by October, with Qantas and Emirates Airways next in line.

Fifteen airlines have ordered a total of 149 A380s so far, with commitments to take another 17. The planes sell for about $300 million US each.

The A380 can carry about 500 passengers on two decks in a three-class configuration, and up to 840 if all seats are economy class. The plane is only about two metres longer than a Boeing 747-400 but it is clearly deeper and wider, with an 80-metre wing span that's about 15 metres wider than a 747.

Higgs said it will give more space to all passengers, noting A380 economy seats will be about four centimetres wider than conventional economy-class seats.

"It doesn't sound like an awful lot, but that [four centimetres] will be very, very valuable to passengers," he said. "Aircraft fly longer today than they used to and people are also a little bit wider today."

Higgs said the A380 is built with lighter composite materials which cut the aircraft's weight by about 15 tonnes, allowing for greater fuel efficiency. He noted it also lands at a speed of 138 knots, which is 19 knots slower than a 747-400's landing speed, resulting in a quieter landing.

Higgs said 37 global airports are either ready to handle the A380 now or plan to be ready soon, with a total of 71 airports expected to be accessible by 2011. Many airports will have to modify their existing facilities to make themselves capable of handling the new jet, with improvements to baggage systems and widening of taxiways and runways being among the major improvements required.

Vancouver International Airport will have two new large A380-ready gates available when its international terminal expansion project is completed next year, but no airline expects to fly the new plane to Vancouver in the near future.

Bokimon
Dec 2, 2006, 11:20 PM
What shitty weather it was.
I missed her landing and takeoff due to shit weather and the fact that some people who went out ruined one of the spotting areas by parking at an employee parking lot. So when I came the entire spot was closed off and while going around it landed.
I got her on the ramp and that was about it. Despite all this it was worth the trip out and nice to finally see the A380 in my own eyes.

Wicked super jumbo!

phesto
Dec 3, 2006, 7:28 PM
Region's airspace gets a major revamp for safety, efficiency

Larry Pynn, Vancouver Sun
Published: Saturday, December 02, 2006
Fewer arrival routes for passenger jets, reconfigured air space for aviation training schools, and slower speeds for small aircraft are among the sweeping changes in the works to make the movement of aircraft over the Lower Mainland simpler, safer and more efficient.

NavCanada, the not-for-profit agency responsible for air-traffic control since 1996, is nearing the end of a three-year process aimed at improving control in a highly complex airspace.

The challenge extends beyond geography -- water on the west, mountains on the north -- to aircraft operating on visual and instrument flight rules, private and commercial operators, jets and propeller aircraft, helicopters and floatplanes, and training schools.

NavCanada service analyst Rob Bishop said the goal is to improve the air-traffic system before the airspace gets any busier. Among the changes planned to be phased in starting in May:

- Mandatory transponders on aircraft operating out of Abbotsford airport, followed by Langley and Pitt Meadows airports in 2008. Transponders, already mandatory at Vancouver and Boundary Bay airports, transmit information such as speed and altitude to make it easier for air-traffic controllers to monitor aircraft and for pilots to avoid each other.

- Reduce the number of entry points to Vancouver airspace to four for inbound aircraft and redesign the approach procedures to the airport, both to simplify the job of air-traffic controllers and result in fewer delays and less fuel burned.

- A recommendation that smaller aircraft flying below 2,500 feet (762 metres) on visual flight rules outside of air-traffic control travel no faster than 150 knots or 275 km/h (which compares with closer to 220 knots or 400 km/h for a commuter twin-propeller Dash 8), over the Strait of Georgia to give pilots more time to react to the presence of other nearby aircraft.

- Reconfigure Class F airspace dedicated to flight training, aerobatics and hang gliding. Air space in Glen Valley north of Aldergrove will be reduced, while opening up new areas north of the Fraser River extending about halfway up Pitt and Stave lakes east to the edge of Harrison Lake.

- Provide a new flyway for pilots of smaller aircraft operating on visual flight rules to fly around the Vancouver terminal control area without having to contact air-traffic control.

- Increase the number of departures on the north runway (currently reserved mainly for landings) to reduce delays and balance operations. Planes headed for destinations such as Europe, Alaska, Hawaii and Asia, as well as Canadian cities such as Prince George and Edmonton would mostly use the north runway.

- Expand the Abbotsford air-traffic control zone to five from four nautical miles, and discuss changes with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration to improve the movement of planes between the airspace at Bellingham, Wash., and Abbotsford airport and allow for the extension of the Victoria control zone to the east into U.S. airspace.

Bill Yearwood, regional manager of the federal transportation safety board, noted in Richmond on Friday there have been several close calls over the years (which The Vancouver Sun has reported) involving conflict between aircraft operating on visual flight rules and aircraft on instrument flight rules.

He said he is encouraged by the planned changes, saying they should reduce the complexity of the region's air space and give controllers more time to monitor the skies for conflict.

The safety board reports there were 43 fatal aircraft accidents in Canada in 2005, 16 of those in B.C. That compares with 29 and nine accidents, respectively, so far this year.

Andy Vasarins, vice-president of flight operations for the Air Transport Association of Canada and former regional director for NavCanada, said commercial aviation companies support the changes.

NavCanada will have an easier time training air-traffic controllers under the changes, and jet aircraft will save fuel and have shorter waits, he predicted.

The package of changes will position Vancouver to handle increased traffic in 2010, Vasarins added from his Ottawa office. "We want everything in good shape for the Olympics. The changes will make better use of the airspace and keep it safe."

Patricia Kennedy, chief operating officer of the 350-member Pacific Flying Club in Delta, said she is happy with the changes since NavCanada decided to scale back on one proposal that would have reduced airspace for training north of Pitt Meadows.

"They felt our pain and went back to the drawing board," she said.

Kennedy added that the busy skies around Vancouver mean that the romantic days of "flying around without a radio or transponder" are gone.

lpynn@png.canwest.com

© The Vancouver Sun 2006

Boris2k7
Dec 3, 2006, 7:41 PM
Wicked super jumbo!

Super Jumbo - Sumbo? :)

smasher000
Dec 4, 2006, 1:07 AM
Plane makes emergency landing at Vancouver airport
Published: Sunday, December 03, 2006
VANCOUVER — An Air Canada flight from Tokyo to Vancouver has landed without incident after one of its engines went down.

Air Canada says emergency crews were on stand-by at Vancouver International Airport as a standard precaution.

All 170 passengers on Air Canada Flight 004, an Airbus A-340, are safe.

This is the third emergency landing at Vancouver’s airport in the last few days.

Last week, two planes had to turn back after experiencing problems during take-off.

Source: canada.com/vancouversun

mr.x
Dec 4, 2006, 1:27 AM
Awesome.....we're the world's aircraft emergency room.

phesto
Dec 13, 2006, 4:25 PM
Frontier to launch Vancouver to Denver service

It will be the first low-cost U.S. airline to serve Vancouver when it begins its new service in May

Bruce Constantineau, Vancouver Sun
Published: Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Frontier Airlines will become the first low-cost U.S. airline to serve Vancouver next year when it launches a year-round, daily non-stop service between Vancouver and Denver.

Vancouver International Airport officials hope the move encourages other major discount U.S. carriers such as Southwest Airlines and JetBlue Airways to follow suit.

Denver-based Frontier announced Tuesday it will begin its new Vancouver service on May 5 with a 132-passenger Airbus A319 aircraft, about a year after entering the Canadian market this year with a Calgary-Denver service that uses a 70-passenger Bombardier CRJ-700.

"We feel there's a tremendous cross-seasonal opportunity in Vancouver," Frontier official Joe Hodas said in an interview.

"We can leverage the huge Vancouver-Alaska cruise ship traffic and in the winter, there's still a great draw between Denver and Vancouver."

More than 80 per cent of the one million annual Vancouver-Alaska cruise passengers are Americans, so Frontier's summer schedule will focus on serving that market.

Hodas said the winter schedule will change for the convenience of Vancouver passengers who want to connect with Denver flights bound for Mexican destinations such as Cancun, Puerto Vallarta, Cabo San Lucas and Guadalajara.

"We will come in and offer lower fares and a better product in that market," he said, noting the A319 has 84 cm of leg room and a choice of 24 live TV channels or three pay-per-view movies in every seatback.

Hodas feels other low-cost U.S. carriers have not yet tested the Canadian market due to "barriers to entry" such as different regulatory and banking issues that come into effect when flying outside the U.S.

"With Vancouver being our second Canadian market, things should go a little easier because we learned our lessons the first time around," he said. "We think there's plenty of potential left for us [in other Canadian markets], but there's nothing imminent right now."

The Calgary service is operated through a partnership with Horizon Air, which is branded as Frontier Jet Express. Hodas said the new Vancouver service will be a "mainline" Frontier aircraft.

Frontier will offer introductory fares as low as $218 US, excluding fees and taxes, for a Vancouver-to-Denver round trip. United Airlines is the only airline currently offering a direct daily flight between Vancouver and Denver, although Air Canada has a codeshare agreement on that service.

Frontier Airlines, which began operations in 1994, serves 49 destinations with a fleet of 55 aircraft. The company posted a $14-million US loss last year on revenues of $994.3 million US.

Vancouver International Airport Authority chief financial officer Tony Gugliotta said Frontier's decision to fly to Vancouver is significant, and the airport will do whatever it can to attract other large discount U.S. carriers. He said he met with senior Southwest Airlines officials in Texas last year to discuss that airline's chances of coming to Vancouver.

"Right now, they feel they have enough expansion opportunities within the U.S.," he said. "But I think they have tentative plans to extend their routes to international destinations within three years. They are very interested in Canada and they are very interested in Vancouver. But there are no hard commitments about whether they'd come to Vancouver first."

Calgary-based airline industry analyst Rick Erickson doubts that Frontier's move to the Canadian market will blaze the trail for bigger U.S. discount airlines, noting Canada has only attracted a few "nibbles" from those carriers since an open skies deal with the U.S. came into effect in 1995.

"Our Canadian carriers are pretty aggressive in the U.S. marketplace on price so the low-cost guys don't really hold a terrific advantage," he said in an interview. "We also have higher taxes and fees in Canada because of the nature of our economy, and the U.S. carriers can find that difficult."

Erickson welcomed Frontier's expanded service in Canada but doubts it will provide a huge benefit to consumers.

bconstantineau@png.canwest.com


© The Vancouver Sun 2006

raggedy13
Dec 13, 2006, 10:10 PM
YVR plans to lower international landing fees

Bruce Constantineau, Vancouver Sun
Published: Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Vancouver airport will slash international landing fees next year to comply with new open-skies deals negotiated with the U.S. and U.K.

The move to equalize domestic and international landing fees will cost the airport about $8 million in revenues next year, as landing fees for international jets will drop 26 to 47 per cent, starting Jan. 1.

Vancouver airport authority chief financial officer Tony Gugliotta said the new open-skies deals forbid any price difference between international and domestic fees.

"Because of our strong financial position, we chose to do it this way, rather than increasing domestic fees to the international rate," he said in an interview. "Over time, we hope this will be positive for us by stimulating more traffic to Vancouver."

He said the landing fee for an international Boeing 747 will drop by 32 per cent next year, to $1,763 from $2,598.

Singapore Airlines vice-president Campbell Wilson said the lower fees will save airlines between a few hundred thousand dollars to nearly a million dollars a year. "Anything that can be done to reduce costs is very welcome. "Although it's a reasonably small component of total costs, airports are competing with each other, so anything that makes Vancouver that little bit more attractive certainly gets our attention."

The Association of Airline Representatives in Canada, which represents foreign airlines in Canada, said the Vancouver fee cuts stand in stark contrast to constant fee hikes at Pearson International Airport in Toronto.

Cathay Pacific Airways vice-president Philippe Lacamp said in a news release: "Both airports must pay rent to the federal government, and both airports have significant capital expansion plans, yet only Vancouver appears to view airlines as facilitators of growth rather than cash cows to be milked."

© The Vancouver Sun 2006

officedweller
Dec 13, 2006, 10:23 PM
Ouch.

Coldrsx
Dec 13, 2006, 11:13 PM
thats good news for YVR IMO.....makes it much more attractive than PEARSON INTERBLINGANAL......which asks for $10,000 for a 747 now.....

excel
Dec 13, 2006, 11:56 PM
Thanks for the good news. looks like vancouver might see a handful of new airlines by summer. so far only fly globe span and frontier.

crazyjoeda
Dec 14, 2006, 7:27 AM
thats good news for YVR IMO.....makes it much more attractive than PEARSON INTERBLINGANAL......which asks for $10,000 for a 747 now.....


Toronto is more that 5x more expencive than Vancouver to land in???

Coldrsx
Dec 14, 2006, 7:28 AM
toronto is now #1 in the world to land in....hence the controversy over the taj - T1

mr.x
Dec 14, 2006, 7:40 AM
may i ask why in the world would toronto set fees so high?

Hourglass
Dec 14, 2006, 8:23 AM
may i ask why in the world would toronto set fees so high?

Depends who you talk to. A simplified explanation:

The airlines blame the GTAA for spending massive amounts of money building a gold-plated terminal -- which is then passed on to airlines in the form of landing fees.

GTAA blames the federal government for setting land rents on the airport too high, resulting in higher landing fees to cover these costs.

Bottom line: Pearson is by far Canada's #1 airport located in its most populous region and economic heartland (oilsands notwithstanding). Hence, they probably can get away with charging exorbitant landing fees, since where else are the airlines going to fly?

Good to see YVR lowering their fees. Wouldn't be surprised to see increased frequencies to Asia as well as a number of new airlines setting up shop. There was a rumor on airliners.net that China Southern was looking to start service between either YVR or YYZ and CAN. This could tip them over the fence towards YVR.

Coldrsx
Dec 14, 2006, 5:37 PM
"Bottom line: Pearson is by far Canada's #1 airport located in its most populous region and economic heartland (oilsands notwithstanding). Hence, they probably can get away with charging exorbitant landing fees, since where else are the airlines going to fly? "

Hamilton and Ottawa are already benefitting from this, but yeah....basically airlines have to hit toronto.

Hourglass
Dec 15, 2006, 11:07 AM
"Bottom line: Pearson is by far Canada's #1 airport located in its most populous region and economic heartland (oilsands notwithstanding). Hence, they probably can get away with charging exorbitant landing fees, since where else are the airlines going to fly? "

Hamilton and Ottawa are already benefitting from this, but yeah....basically airlines have to hit toronto.

Interestingly, Hamilton airport is run by YVRAS, the airport management subsidiary of YVR.

I know they got hit when Westjet moved their eastern hub to YYZ, but from afar, it seems Hamilton could be doing more to attract traffic given their location and YYZ's high airport fees.

Incidentally, anyone have any recent pictures of YVR's international terminal expansion?

LeftCoaster
Dec 15, 2006, 3:11 PM
I will tomorrow morning when I get back for christmas... I'll be sure to have the camera charged up.

twoNeurons
Dec 15, 2006, 4:33 PM
^^^ I wanna see the aquarium in the International wing.

excel
Dec 21, 2006, 5:43 AM
Rumor has it Harmony is getting 737's next summer. Not sure which versions but i would guess 700's and 800's. They will keep the 757's for the hawaii routes. but will likely only have 2 757's becuase one is having a lot of maintenance problems, (802 C-GMYD) and one of the other aircraft's lease is up in march.

EastVanMark
Dec 27, 2006, 5:59 AM
Pearson is a monument to money well wasted. Esthetically it is beautiful, but functionaly speaking, its a nightmare. Half empty terminals, LA freeway style off ramps, monorail... no wonder they have to charge so much to land there.

westcoast604
Jan 5, 2007, 7:43 PM
^ That road network is absolutly ridiculous. Is there really a need for that many ramps, twists, and turns? Im sure a more simple design could have been prepared, but that is just like Toronto. Trying to impress, look big, and be over the top, in your face. It really looks stupid and is not practical.

http://www.gtaa.com/Images/TerminalNewGallery/images/Aerial.jpg

crazyjoeda
Jan 5, 2007, 8:47 PM
^ Its not really impressive. It looks like they hired an 8 year old to design the roads. There are many Airports bigger than Toronto and none of them have a ridiculace network of roads. I think a rail connection to an airport is more impressive, which Vancouver will have in 2years.

Nutterbug
Jan 5, 2007, 11:08 PM
^ I take it this whole mess could have been avoided if they'd put everything into one terminal building. I believe they're now trying to concentrate everything into the new Terminal 1, no?

Instead of this messy knot of intertwining freeways, what would have been so bad about having fewer roads neatly aligned and providing all the necessary connections, crossing at a few intersections with traffic lights anyways?

smasher000
Jan 7, 2007, 8:39 PM
Wtf I Say!

Jared
Jan 8, 2007, 1:07 AM
^ That road network is absolutly ridiculous. Is there really a need for that many ramps, twists, and turns? Im sure a more simple design could have been prepared, but that is just like Toronto. Trying to impress, look big, and be over the top, in your face. It really looks stupid and is not practical.

http://www.gtaa.com/Images/TerminalNewGallery/images/Aerial.jpg


http://www.marions-kochbuch.com/food-pic/spaghetti-carbonara.jpg

mr.x
Jan 8, 2007, 3:39 AM
^ Lmao.

Canadian Mind
Jan 8, 2007, 5:22 AM
To pay for gold-plated terminals and the crazy highway system

edit - woops, responding to a post on a previous page. :p

phesto
Jan 26, 2007, 3:33 PM
YVR-Airport Station And Elevated Guideway Update

Construction of the Canada Line, YVRAirport Station adjacent to the main parkade near the International Terminal will begin this month and continue until the end of 2008.

Elevated guideway construction activity adjacent to Grant McConachie Way and near the International Terminal will continue through 2007. At times, there may be minor delays to motorists and pedestrians during construction, although crews will make every effort to minimize any inconvenience to the public. Access to the airport and its facilities remains open and accessible at all times, and there will be no loss of parking during construction. However, motorists and pedestrians are encouraged to allow extra travel time prior to arrival or departure at YVR in the event of temporary construction delays.

This next stage of work includes site preparation, piling, foundation and column construction work for the elevated guideway and the station structure and walkway. This activity will typically occur during daytime and nighttime hours on weekdays, with the possibility of weekend work, if necessary. The public in this area may experience general disruption associated with truck traffic, noise from crews and heavy equipment, vibration, dust and inconvenience.

The north and south elevators from the main parkade to the International Terminal will remain open and accessible from January to May 2007. In May, when the launching girder (crane) is installing the concrete guideway segments, the north elevator will permanently close to the public. The south elevator will remain in use, and crews will make every effort to maintain the south elevator throughout all construction activity. All walkways from the main parkade to the airport terminals will also remain open and accessible.

Construction of the YVR-Airport Station includes building two new elevators, which will replace the existing north and south elevators. Once the new
elevators are operational, the existing south elevator will be permanently decommissioned. A new walkway will also be built to connect the station to the main parkade.

A traffic management summary for this work is available on the Canada Line website. If you have questions or comments about traffic management during
construction, please contact their office at (604) 608-0200.

officedweller
Jan 26, 2007, 7:54 PM
north and south elevators from the main parkade to the International Terminal

I only recall one bank of elevators???

YYCguys
Jan 27, 2007, 3:14 PM
[QUOTE=phesto;2591062]YVR-Airport Station And Elevated Guideway Update

Construction of the Canada Line, YVRAirport Station adjacent to the main parkade near the International Terminal will begin this month and continue until the end of 2008....
This next stage of work includes site preparation, piling, foundation and column construction work for the elevated guideway and the station structure and walkway. This activity will typically occur during daytime and nighttime hours on weekdays, with the possibility of weekend work, if necessary....

In other words, construction will be 24 hours a day! :koko:

A new walkway will also be built to connect the station to the main parkade.
QUOTE]

What is the point in this?!?! People taking the train will need to connect to the terminal, NOT the parkade! Duh!

smasher000
Jan 27, 2007, 5:55 PM
LOL! good point!

LeftCoaster
Jan 27, 2007, 6:18 PM
A new walkway will also be built to connect the station to the main parkade.
QUOTE]

What is the point in this?!?! People taking the train will need to connect to the terminal, NOT the parkade! Duh!

Dont forget the YVR section of the Canada line will also double as a airport shuttle link when the new terminal is eventually built, so travlers from the new terminal will need to take a train to the main station to get to their cars in parkade.

SpongeG
Jan 28, 2007, 6:51 AM
I only recall one bank of elevators???

there's elevators for the domestic and the international

one on the west side and one on the north side of the parkade

officedweller
Jan 28, 2007, 11:31 PM
OK - that's what I was thinking, but the north/south description was odd.

SpongeG
Feb 4, 2007, 9:55 AM
Third airline lands in Terrace

Vancouver-bound air passengers will have a third airline to choose from beginning March 12 when B.C.-based Pacific Coastal Airlines begins service in Terrace.

The company, founded more than 30 years ago and with its origins in Powell River, will be flying a 30-passenger Saab 340 on the Vancouver-Terrace run seven days a week, says company president Quentin Smith.

He said Pacific Coastal has been gradually expanding into the interior and north coast from original southerly coastal routes and has been looking at Terrace for the past three years.

The company did have a few talks with local carrier Hawkair about buying it before the latter went into bankruptcy protection in 2005, he said.

“But it just wasn’t feasible,” Smith continued of any Hawkair purchase plan.

Hawkair is now being bought by Alberta-based Bar XH.

Pacific Coastal also flies between Vancouver and Masset, into Williams Lake and into the Kootenays in addition to more southerly coastal locations. It has 20 aircraft, five of which are the Swedish-built Saab 340, 14 bases and more than 300 employees.

Smith said the company has concentrated on a gradual expansion, adding one route at a time and then adapting and adjusting to meet market demand.

“We may have a lot to do with Vancouver, but we see ourselves as being very community-oriented. And we can make adjustments quickly because of our size. And that’s been the key to our growth,” he said.

Smith estimates the Vancouver-Terrace flying time in the Saab 340 at approximately two hours, roughly the same as the Dash 8s now being used by Hawkair and Air Canada Jazz.

Based on expanding into the Interior, Smith is anticipating having a good number of Terrace-Vancouver passengers wanting to continue to Victoria.

“At that point you begin to feed yourself,” he said of the ability of Pacific Coastal to put arriving passengers on already-existing flights to Victoria from the South Terminal.

Pacific Coastal’s southerly routes include Powell River, Comox, Campbell River and, moving northerly, Port Hardy on Vancouver Island. In addition to Williams Lake in the Cariboo, it also flies into Anahim Lake. On the coast, stops include Rivers Inlet, Hakai Pass, Bella Coola, Ocean Falls, Bella Bella and Klemtu.

Smith said there’s room for another air service into Terrace based on continued passenger growth of the past several years.

The airport had a record year last year with 105,086 passenger movements recorded.

http://www.wltribune.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=37&cat=59&id=824789&more=

phesto
Feb 4, 2007, 3:50 PM
^I didn't even know Saab built planes...

Hopefully some more competition will lower prices on the northern BC routes. It's often cheaper to fly from YVR to Hawaii than to fly YVR to Terrace or Prince Rupert.

YYCguys
Feb 4, 2007, 6:02 PM
Dont forget the YVR section of the Canada line will also double as a airport shuttle link when the new terminal is eventually built, so travlers from the new terminal will need to take a train to the main station to get to their cars in parkade.


Very true. Thanks for the clarification. :)

SteelTown
Feb 4, 2007, 6:46 PM
Interestingly, Hamilton airport is run by YVRAS, the airport management subsidiary of YVR.

I know they got hit when Westjet moved their eastern hub to YYZ, but from afar, it seems Hamilton could be doing more to attract traffic given their location and YYZ's high airport fees.

Starting in May Flyglobespan will be flying out of Hamilton with direct fights to London Gatwick, London Stansted, Manchester, Glasgow, Dublin, Shannon, Belfast, Edinburgh, Newcastle, Exeter, Birmingham, Doncaster and Liverpool. Soon to have the 2nd most transatlantic flights in Ontario. With Flyglobespan addition the passenger number will be near what they were when WestJet had Hamilton as it's hub.

On top of that the airport is currently doubling the size of the terminal should be completed once Flyglobespan arrives, light blue Phase 1 (currently)
Plan of the expansion http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v174/Appster/yhm11.jpg

eduardo88
Feb 4, 2007, 6:47 PM
^I didn't even know Saab built planes...

Hopefully some more competition will lower prices on the northern BC routes. It's often cheaper to fly from YVR to Hawaii than to fly YVR to Terrace or Prince Rupert.

Saab originally built planes. they still do but its a different company from the one that produces cars, that was bought by GM years ago.

phesto
Feb 10, 2007, 3:51 PM
Some updates on new and changing YVR service:

Air Pacific is dropping Vancouver service and is going to codeshare with Harmony. Not really surprising as the Hawaii market was overserved.

Harmony has dropped both JFK and OAK service, at least for now. These were supposed to act (at least partially) as feeders to the China markets that Harmony had been pursuing. I thought they would keep these as seasonal service, but HQ has returned one of their 757's. Looks like they are still pursuing the China routes, but they are tied up in red tape, so who knows when they'll get off the ground. For now it looks like HQ is focusing on YVR/YYC/YEG to Hawaii, YYZ and palm springs, and charters.

Rumor has it that Air New Zealand will announce YVR-AKL service beginning winter 07, as a codeshare with AC.

China Southern is going to announce YVR-HKG service in the next few months.

Westjet announced a daily YVR-YOW service, and is increasing YVR-YYZ to 6 times daily.

MistyMountainHop
Feb 10, 2007, 7:32 PM
YVR Construction Update

http://www.yvr.ca/authority/images/airmail/construction.JPG

If you've visited YVR recently, you may have noticed how construction projects in and around the airport are flying along.

With a growing number of passengers and changes within the airline industry, we are continuing to expand and adapt to meet the needs of the industry and our customers.

International Terminal Expansion

The largest construction project underway at YVR is a $420-million, nine-gate expansion to the International Terminal. Phase one of the expansion, four gates, is nearly complete and scheduled to open in March. Crews have recently installed lighting, carpet, gate counters and art murals in each of the four new gates. Building upon YVR's distinctive design tradition, the new wing will celebrate the spectacular nature of the Pacific West Coast with a large aquarium showcasing indigenous marine life, a jellyfish tank, and a stream running through the centre of the building. Passenger forecasts indicate that the additional five gates will be required between 2011 and 2014.

Link Building

So named because it will link the International and Domestic terminals, the $117-million Link Building will provide increased international check-in capacity, passenger screening, additional baggage systems and office space. This five-story building will be connected to the Canada Line station via a covered walkway, and will serve as a central hub for passengers traveling through YVR.

Construction crews are currently focusing on the completion of the Link Concourse, including the check-in area, baggage conveyors and the transfer corridor and pre-board screening areas on Level 4. Completion of the Link Building is scheduled for summer 2007.

Canada Line

In keeping with our goal of being a sustainable and environmentally conscious organization, the Airport Authority has committed up to $300-million to fund the airport portion of the Canada Line rapid transit line, which will link downtown Vancouver, Richmond City Centre and Vancouver International Airport.

Now that the last section of the Canada Line guideway adjacent to the International Terminal has been completed, work on the YVR Canada Line station has begun. Crews are preparing the site, piling, constructing columns and building two new elevators.

Meanwhile, bridge construction continues on the Middle Arm of the Fraser River. This involves mobilizing equipment and materials, concrete and steel work, piling, pier and guideway construction and assembly of the bridge deck segments using cranes. Crews are also busy lifting and locking segments of the elevated walkway into place on Sea Island. Track installation work on the elevated guideway also begins this month. Later this year, the guideway will "walk" across the completed Middle Arm bridge to complete the last few sections near the Arthur Laing Bridge.

Parking at YVR will not be impacted by the construction process. Passengers and visitors may notice some minor changes to traffic patterns near the terminals, but every effort is being made to minimize disruption. For more information on the Canada Line, please visit www.canadaline.ca.



Air Carriers Cleared for Savings at YVR

http://www.yvr.ca/authority/images/airmail/landing.jpg

YVR now has the lowest international landing fees among all major Canadian airports.

The Airport Authority has lowered landing fees for international flights into YVR. The new rates bring international fees in line with domestic fees, which will remain the same.

Not only will these substantial cost savings be passed along to airlines, but reduced fees may also encourage more international carriers to fly into YVR in the near future, offering customers more options for air travel.

Operators of larger and heavier aircraft in particular will see significant cost savings as a result of these reduced fees. For example, cargo operators using Boeing 747 freighters on international routes will pay 32% less in landing fees in 2007 than they paid in 2006. Airlines operating passenger flights from the U.S. using Boeing 747, Boeing 777 and Airbus 320 aircraft will see year-over-year cost savings of 10%, 9% and 6%, respectively.

The Airport Authority's decision to reduce international landing fees addresses conditions of Open Skies agreements, such as the one between Canada and the United States, that require airports to equalize domestic and international landing fees.

In consideration of YVR's airline customers, its growing reputation as an international gateway and the positive impact of the airport on our region's economy, the Airport Authority made a decision to reduce international fees rather than increase domestic fees.



President's Perspective

POISED FOR GROWTH - YVR'S LOW-COST, HIGH-VALUE PROPOSITION

The Airport Authority was pleased to kick off 2007 with the announcement of lower international landing fees for our airline partners. We now offer the lowest international landing fees of all major airports in Canada.

Equalizing landing fees for domestic and international flights, both cargo and passenger, was one of the stipulations of Canada's Open Skies agreements with the United States and the United Kingdom, but we had the option of raising our domestic landing fees in order to achieve this balance.

Why did we decide to lower our international rates instead? Because being a low-cost airport is central to our operating philosophy and our strategic goal to become the premier gateway to the Asia Pacific. Passing along substantial cost savings to our airline customers encourages more international carriers to use YVR, which provides more options for passengers, as well as economic benefits for our communities.

Lowering our fees is just the latest initiative in our ongoing efforts to grow our international gateway. Of course, some barriers to an expanded gateway are beyond our control, and they represent significant challenges for the aviation industry. A recent national opinion poll conducted by the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada for the Globe and Mail found that 58% of Canadians agreed with the statement: "Looking 20 years ahead, trade with Asia will be more important to Canada than trade with the U.S."

Yet, while Canadians on the whole seem ready to seek deeper economic and political ties with Asia, our market share in Asia continues to fall. The Asia Pacific Foundation has said that the biggest weakness in our ties with Asia is our chronic underinvestment in the hard and soft infrastructure that connects us to Asia.

There is great potential for an airport like YVR, which is strategically located on the great circle routes and the closest major West Coast airport to Asia. With the biggest expansion project in the airport's history well underway, we are ensuring we will have the gate and terminal capacity to meet future demand and seize the opportunities available to us through increased trade and tourism with Asia.

Our biggest single constraining factor is restrictive regulation: we need smarter borders and government policies that support the success of airports and airlines, and air policy that fosters competition and openness on a global scale. We are on the right track with the announcement of the federal government's Blue Sky initiative, but still lack the Approved Destination Status agreement with the People's Republic of China, necessary to grow this major tourism market.

As an airport, we will continue to work to maintain a low-cost, high-value facility. As a partner in the transportation industry, we will continue to advocate for changes to Canada's regulatory framework that will allow us to build on our gateway advantage and pass on the benefits to our business partners and communities.

mezzanine
Feb 10, 2007, 8:13 PM
I'm flying Lufthansa YVR-Frankfurt this March, so hopefully the new chevron will be open by then!!!

Pics of the new international chevron (non-interesting old PCL pics):

http://westcoast.pcl.com/media/files/Projects/22_BC_Region/2200428_1_300.jpg

http://westcoast.pcl.com/media/files/Projects/22_BC_Region/2200428_3_300.jpg

From PCL:

Our project remains on schedule. Power and heat are being distributed throughout the building. Mechanical commissioning is well underway, and electrical has completed final connections. Curtainwall doors are nearing completion. Level 2 walls and soffit finishes are well underway. Millwork panels to cores are being installed, together with final trims. Level 4 Moving walkways installation near completion and finishes are being applied. Carpeting on passenger level is now 2/3 through. Tenant areas have been turned over to Owner/Tenants as required.

Flooring removing in the actively operating Terminal Building is progressing together with Starbuck demise area. Thematics creek topper is completed to new building area. Washroom finishes are progressing. Food court Area Terrazzo is completed.

Bridge cladding & Apron drive bridges are well underway, internal finishes ongoing. We have begun demolishing existing temporary passenger walkways and installing permanent gate bridges.

Wellfield mains are completed, tested. Pumps installation underway.

mezzanine
Feb 10, 2007, 8:22 PM
Pics of the Link building from the steel frame fabricators. The tower actually is a small component, it seems that the back stucture extends quite a bit...

http://www.wesbridge.com/projects/photos/4314/4314-01.jpg

http://www.wesbridge.com/projects/photos/4314/4314-03/images/IMG_8755.JPG

http://www.wesbridge.com/projects/photos/4314/4314-13/images/IMG_1395-1.jpg

http://www.wesbridge.com/projects/photos/4314/4314-13/images/IMG_1405.JPG

http://www.wesbridge.com/projects/photos/4314/4314-13/images/IMG_1461.JPG


http://www.wesbridge.com/projects/photos/4314/4314-13/images/IMG_1463.JPG

mezzanine
Feb 10, 2007, 11:51 PM
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/167/374217010_f38a4eb51c.jpg?v=0

Hourglass
Feb 11, 2007, 12:07 AM
China Southern is going to announce YVR-HKG service in the next few months.


Just a correction - China Southern would be flying YVR-CAN, not HKG. Air Canada announced they would be launching this route as well in '07, but unfortunately doesn't look like that will be happening.

tayser
Feb 11, 2007, 12:33 AM
Just a correction - China Southern would be flying YVR-CAN, not HKG. Air Canada announced they would be launching this route as well in '07, but unfortunately doesn't look like that will be happening.

I'm so tempted to book a sale fare as soon as China Southern start flying to Vancouver. The cheapest way to Vancouver from Australia is via Asia and at the moment you can fly via Taipei on China Airlines for $1376+tax (AUD).

mr.x
Feb 11, 2007, 12:58 AM
I'm flying Lufthansa YVR-Frankfurt this March, so hopefully the new chevron will be open by then!!!

Pics of the new international chevron (non-interesting old PCL pics):

http://westcoast.pcl.com/media/files/Projects/22_BC_Region/2200428_1_300.jpg

http://westcoast.pcl.com/media/files/Projects/22_BC_Region/2200428_3_300.jpg

From PCL:

I hope it opens before spring break...I'm flying to Asia then.

ckkelley
Feb 11, 2007, 3:01 AM
I love this picture.

It's very Blade Runnerish.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/167/374217010_f38a4eb51c.jpg?v=0

officedweller
Feb 12, 2007, 8:37 PM
Nice! Thanks for the update.

SpongeG
Feb 15, 2007, 8:34 AM
Terrorists cleared for takeoff

With a few clicks of the keyboard, anyone with access to the Internet can download details of how to disable one of the country's biggest airports.

A technical report posted on the Vancouver International Airport Authority's website provides information and diagrams detailing the airport's fuel distribution and water and electrical systems.

It also provides what security experts are calling a terrorist's guide to the busy facility.

"I'm not aware of any airport anywhere in the world that [posts such data]," Mike Toddington, director of the International Association of Airport and Seaport Police, told The Province yesterday.

Toddington, former chief of police for the Port of Vancouver, said technical details like those on the airport website are generally considered classified. Releasing similar information about ports would have been considered a serious breach of security during his tenure.

"[The website posting] certainly wouldn't enhance security at the airport," he said. "You would have to assume that it provides an opportunity for those people who may not necessarily have the best intentions."

A retired RCMP officer who was asked to review the technical report said that, given the report's detail, attackers with a half-pound of C-4 military explosives -- readily available on the black market -- could take everything down with a single charge.

"It is absolutely incredible to me that the airport authority would publish this sort of stuff on a website," said the former officer, who asked not to be named.

"It's almost a malicious disregard for public safety."

The master plan can easily be found with a Google search. The same search on other Canadian airports produced no similar results.

RCMP declined to say whether police have security concerns over the availability of the report.

"I can confirm that we as an agency are aware of the report," said Richmond RCMP Cpl. Peter Thiessen. The detachment is responsible for the Vancouver airport.

Officials from Transport Canada, which oversees, funds and regulates security measures at airports, were asked about whether the diagrams' availability was a concern. They did not return repeated calls.

Ali Hounsell, spokeswoman for the Vancouver Airport Authority, said an RCMP member had sent an e-mail expressing concerns about the report, but airport officials decided to leave it on the website.

She said the authority has not been advised to remove the report for security reasons.

"Our view is this information is available in other places as well," Hounsell said.

"Have we made it available all in one place? Yes. But as far as we're concerned, it's also available elsewhere.

"You can Google just about anything in this day and age."

Hounsell said the airport authority is required to produce regular updates of its master plan for the federal government, and the technical report provides background information.

The authority must also consult widely on its plans, and the website is the most efficient way to distribute the details, she said.

http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/media.canada.com/canwest/111/prov_yvr_021407_210.jpg?size=l

"We always intended to make the report publicly available on the website -- that was top of mind," she said.

The airport authority's comments come days after federal Public Safety Minister Stockwell Day vowed to "aggressively" address security at Canada's airports. Day was responding to an aviation-safety audit by the United Nations International Civil Aviation Organization that said screening and training at airports could be improved.

Day's office referred queries to Transport Minister Lawrence Cannon, who did not return calls.

An airport security expert contacted by The Province said the packaging and posting of the information makes the airport more vulnerable to attack.

"If you have an airport that does this, and an airport that doesn't, draw your own conclusions about which is more vulnerable," said the Vancouver-area resident, now an industry consultant.

He asked that his name not be used.

"If you're looking to determine a viable target [for an attack], that's what I would be looking for. They're making it easier."

wmclellan@png.canwest.com

cmontgomery@png.canwest.com

- - -

DIAGRAMS ONLINE

Vancouver International Airport Authority has posted its 20-year "master plan" for the facility on its website. The technical part of the plan offers schematic diagrams for the airport's:

- Aviation fuel-distribution system.

- Electrical power-distribution system.

- Electrical power-backup system.

- Cable and fibre-optic communications network.

- Potable water-distribution system.

- Sewage-collection system.

- Sea Island dike system.

- Storm water-drainage system

- Proposed fuel and utility corridors.



http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/story.html?id=86fe2156-1fd9-410f-8907-877df0642fda&k=40662&p=2

SFUVancouver
Feb 16, 2007, 3:16 AM
Yikes! Extremely remote possibility of terrorism! The sky is falling!

SpongeG
Feb 18, 2007, 11:54 PM
Air NZ likely to fly long-haul to Vancouver

Air New Zealand is expected to announce a new long-haul route this week - most likely Vancouver, Canada.


New routes typically have about a five-month lead time, suggesting the first flight would be about July.

Air New Zealand would not be drawn on the speculation.

House of Travel retail director Brent Thomas said Vancouver would be an exciting year-round tourism destination.

British Columbia offered spectacular mountain and water scenery in summer as well as easy access to some of the best skiing in the world. It would also open the direct inbound market from Canada. Air New Zealand and Canada code-share via Honolulu at present

The airline's new Boeing 777-200ERs can fly direct to Vancouver with a restricted cargo load.

Air New Zealand has committed to adding a new long-haul route each year, with an announcement due in the first quarter of this year.

San Francisco became the first new route for more than a decade in July 2005, followed by Shanghai last year.

Chief executive Rob Fyfe has previously said he wanted to add direct flights to Vancouver, Johannesburg, Mumbai, Sao Paulo, Santiago, and Beijing to the departure board.

Some of these could be developed as one-stop services using the 777, before going non-stop using the longer range Boeing 787-9s which were due to arrive from 2011.

Meanwhile, analysts expect Air New Zealand's half-year profit, due to be announced on February 27, to confirm a turning point in its financial fortunes.

Forsyth Barr head of research Rob Mercer was forecasting Air New Zealand to report a half-year operating profit to December of $100 million, up from $73 million in 2005, and a tax-paid profit of $67 million.

"It will be the first confirmed turning point of the company's earnings for the last two years. The (new) fleet is in place, the yield environment is coping with the current high fuel price, and we see improvement in global economic conditions putting a favourable outlook on demand," Mr Mercer said. However, fuel costs of $580 million for the six months compared with $440 million a year earlier, would drive operating costs higher.

Air New Zealand's share price reached a record high of $2.19 last week. It closed at $2.04 on Friday.

Goldman Sachs JB Were head of research Marcus Curley said the second half of the year was expected to be even better as the impact of record fuel prices eased and yields continued to improve, albeit at a slowing rate.

He expected an operating profit of $108 million and a 49 per cent gain after tax to $68 million. Revenue would gain 9 per cent from $1.9 billion with operating costs up 7 per cent from $1.56 billion, including a 29 per cent increase in fuel costs.

Average yields were improving largely as a result of the new business class and premium economy seats which was creating strong demand.

However, the airline was under pressure to cut fuel surcharges, which would lower yields.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/dailynews/3966629a13.html

SpongeG
Feb 18, 2007, 11:55 PM
Yikes! Extremely remote possibility of terrorism! The sky is falling!

true dat

but you have to admit putting such detailed plans online where anyone can access them is pretty dumb

twoNeurons
Feb 20, 2007, 7:35 AM
Pics of the Link building from the steel frame fabricators. The tower actually is a small component, it seems that the back stucture extends quite a bit...

http://www.wesbridge.com/projects/photos/4314/4314-01.jpg



Unfortunately, I don't think we'll be able to watch planes take-off and land from the top... as it's planned to be offices according to a friend who works in the planning dept. of the airport.

excel
Feb 21, 2007, 7:07 AM
Air New Zealand, thats great news. Cant wait to see who else arrives this summer to the new terminal.
http://www.boeing.com/news/releases/2005/photorelease/q4/051027g1.jpg
777-200ER

Hourglass
Feb 23, 2007, 12:15 AM
Air New Zealand, thats great news. Cant wait to see who else arrives this summer to the new terminal.
http://www.boeing.com/news/releases/2005/photorelease/q4/051027g1.jpg
777-200ER

Official announcement today. Great news for YVR...

Air New Zealand Announces New Non-Stop Service Between Vancouver and Auckland
Beginning in November of this year, Air New Zealand will launch non-stop flights between Vancouver, Canada and Auckland, New Zealand. With the announcement of this new international route, Air New Zealand is making a significant step in its focus on strengthening its trans-Pacific network.

The service will initially operate between November 2, 2007 and March 28, 2008 to coincide with the peak travel season between the two destinations, allowing Canadians to escape the snow by enjoying outdoor adventures in New Zealand's warmest summer months and giving Kiwis an opportunity to head north and take advantage of some of the best ski slopes in the world.

"We are committed to creating at least one new long haul international destination each year and Vancouver proved an ideal strategic fit, due in part to Canada's thriving economy," said Roger Poulton, Air New Zealand Vice President - the Americas. "At any one time, we have more than 20 routes under consideration as part of our long-term strategy to grow the airline."

Last year, Air New Zealand became one of the select carriers to offer round-the-world flights with the announcement of its non-stop flights between London and Hong Kong completing the loop; and in 2005, the airline widened its west coast gateway with non-stops flights from San Francisco to Auckland.

"In 2006, Canadians set a new record with 46,000 travelers visiting New Zealand, which marks an increase of more than 10,000 visitors in just a little more than five years," said Bruce Lahood, Tourism New Zealand Vice President for North America. "But even more importantly, according to a survey focused on Canadian travelers in January of 2006, 99 percent returned home satisfied with their vacation to New Zealand and more than 95 percent would recommend the destination to their friends, family and colleagues."

Air New Zealand is going to help make that recommendation even more appealing with three non-stop flights each week between Vancouver and Auckland. The new route reduces travel time to a little over 14 hours, whereas previous itineraries from Vancouver to New Zealand totalled an average of around twenty hours. Now, passengers will be treated to a luxuriously direct flight aboard Air New Zealand's new fleet of Boeing 777-200ERs, which feature lie-flat beds, vast entertainment options and award-winning food and wine. Star Alliance partner Air Canada will also be code sharing on this service.

Flight schedules from Vancouver will leave on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays and are designed to meet the needs of both business and leisure passengers with an early evening departure time.

This new service will provide a convenient one-stop route for Canadians travelling to many Australian destinations and will minimize the requirement of transiting through the U.S.

Air New Zealand will operate the following schedule from Vancouver to Auckland, subject to timeslot, capacity and regulatory approvals:

Flight number Schedule

NZ83 Departs Vancouver 1830
Arrives Auckland 0600(a)

NZ84 Departs Auckland 1915
Arrives Vancouver 1200

(a) Note - The average length of the flight is around 14 hours,
however, due to time differences, arrival in New Zealand is two days
later than departure date.

Tickets are available beginning today with prices starting at CAD$1498 (excludes airport tax and fuel surcharges). For more information or to book online, please visit www.airnewzealand.com.

excel
Feb 23, 2007, 8:34 AM
Great thanks for the conformation^

tayser
Feb 23, 2007, 9:10 PM
pity it's only seasonal :(

not the greatest price either! $2100AUD return (NZ6 MEL-AKL NZ84 AKL-YVR & NZ83 YVR-AKL NZ5 AKL-MEL) for a mid-november departure returning 2 weeks later.

phesto
Feb 23, 2007, 9:51 PM
^QA extended their seasonal YVR-SYD service by a couple of months due to demand; if this route does well, who knows what will happen...anyway it is a great first step. QA and AZ coming to YVR in one year isn't bad either!

Canada Line guideway at YVR from a couple of weeks ago (from flickr):
http://img408.imageshack.us/img408/4511/37788007648be9992c7onf2.jpg

excel
Feb 23, 2007, 9:59 PM
Some more good news for YVR:

Air China will be swaping their 767 for a A330-200 starting in June.
http://us.airliners.net/photos/middle/0/3/6/1179630.jpg

Eva Air will be swaping thier 747-400 for their brand new 777-300ER's (good and bad news loosing a 747 but gaining a new 777)
This now means YVR will see 5 777's this november: Air New Zealand 777-200ER, Air Canada 777-300ER, Eva Air 777-300ER, Singapore Airlines 777-200, Korean Airlines 777-200
http://www.aviationandmarineusa.com/EVA_AIR_777-300x750.jpg


And the biggest piece of news: AIR TAHITI will be coming to YVR starting in November (same time as Air New Zealand) bringing their A340-300's!
http://www.air-and-space.com/20060228%20LAX/DSC_3434%20340-313X%20F-OSEA%20Air%20Tahiti%20Nui%20left%20rear%20take-off%20l.jpg

excel
Feb 23, 2007, 10:15 PM
New airlines announcing service direct to YVR this year so far include:

Flyglobespan 767-300ER to Manchester, London Gatwick and Glasgow

Frontier Airlines A319 to Denver

Air New Zealand 777-200ER to Aukland

Air Tahiti A340-300 to Tahiti

muzhav84
Feb 24, 2007, 12:22 AM
does anyone have a source, or confirmation of this Air Tahiti service, or is it just a rumour?

phesto
Feb 24, 2007, 12:46 AM
^There had been rumours of a CDG-YVR-PPT service a couple of years ago, but I hadn't heard anything since. Any news?

Apparently Air Tahiti uses YVR somewhat regularly to refuel on charters and military flights.