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phesto
Sep 30, 2005, 4:01 AM
Here's a link to the community consultation report for the YVR 2027 Master Plan: http://www.yvr.com/pdf/authority/publicoptions_2027.pdf

And (for those who haven't seen it) the link for what's already planned or u/c for 2010: http://www.yvr.com/pdf/authority/YourAirport2027summary.pdf

What does everyone think of the expansion options? I'd have to see more details regarding the connectivity to RAV but the Northeast terminal expansion option seems most favourable.

officedweller
Sep 30, 2005, 7:39 AM
Thanks Phesto!

The southeast terminal option could, in theory anyways, be linked in to YVR3 with an overpass. It is probably also why WestJet wasn't allowed to build its hangar on that site.

I think the satellite terminal is a non-starter since a peoplemover can't be underground on Sea Island. In that case, you may as well build the "Western Y" option.

Edmonchuck
Sep 30, 2005, 2:40 PM
I'm sorry - I am a huge fan of YVR, but why did they get the 3 year old with the blue crayon to draw out the runway options??????

Anyway, unless they use people movers like Dulles used to or an overhead pedway a la Terminal A - B at DEN, then a satellite is a non starter.

phesto
Sep 30, 2005, 3:54 PM
^lol. The runway options do seem a little crude. I guess they thought that for a community consultation report that the general public wouldn't understand normal schematics.

I'm not a fan of the satellite option either. The southeast terminal option isn't bad, but in the future you would probably wonder why RAV was never configured to meet the actual terminal.

btw, Dulles still uses those people movers. Coupled with the massive construction going on there right now it is an absolute nightmare!

officedweller
Sep 30, 2005, 7:31 PM
Are those the "lounges" on wheels?
I've heard that those were considered one of the "problems" at Mirabel.

Agreed with the RAV configuration. If the southeast was seriously being considered, then the original RAV route - looping through with the roadway would be built - at least for the tailtrack so as to preserve future expansion. As it is sconfigured now, it looks like the tail track dead ends perpendicular to the terminal.

MistyMountainHop
Oct 1, 2005, 12:52 AM
September 29, 2005 - 11:00 AM

VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AUTHORITY ESTABLISHES CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGEMENT COMPANY

Vancouver International Airport Authority has established YVR Project Management, a wholly owned subsidiary to oversee major expansion projects at Vancouver International Airport (YVR).

The Airport Authority is undertaking a $1.4-billion capital program that will ensure the airport meets the growing demand for air travel, and continues to be developed as a premier global gateway and economic generator for British Columbia. The program's projects are designed to accommodate the 21 million passengers projected at YVR by 2010, as well as handle the newer, larger aircraft of the future.

"In today's increasingly competitive marketplace, with B.C.'s robust economy, the construction industry is enjoying unprecedented growth," said Larry Berg, President and CEO, Vancouver International Airport Authority. "The Airport Authority has proved it can deliver major capital projects on time and on budget. This new company will guarantee that we have the expertise and resources available to complete our capital program over the long term."

The primary project the new company will be responsible for delivering is the $420-million expansion to the International Terminal Building, which will add nine new gates in two phases. The first phase, scheduled for completion in 2007, will provide four wide-body gates, two of which will be able to accommodate the new Airbus A380, the world's largest aircraft. This phase will also include the addition of a narrow-body gate to the existing east wing of the terminal. Phase two will add five new gates.

The new company will be governed by a Board of Directors whose Chair is Bob Cowan, Senior Vice President, Engineering, Vancouver International Airport Authority. The President is Ray Zibrik, an experienced construction manager and engineer who has managed construction projects at YVR, including the international terminal building, since 1992.



September 27, 2005 - 8:30 AM

HOTEL GUESTS CAN FLY THROUGH CHECK-IN

Common-Use Self-Service Kiosks Now in Lower Mainland Delta Hotel Locations

Vancouver International Airport Authority today officially launched common-use self-service (CUSS) check-in kiosks at Delta Vancouver Airport in Richmond and Delta Vancouver Suites in downtown Vancouver. The kiosks allow hotel guests at both locations to check in for flights departing from Vancouver International Airport (YVR) before leaving their hotel.

CUSS kiosks, pioneered by the Airport Authority and launched at YVR in 2002, allow passengers to access multiple airlines from one machine, check in faster, and avoid line-ups. Self-service check-in kiosks also provide a cost-effective solution for airlines and airports. The kiosks are free, easy to use, and can be used by all guests. It takes approximately 60 seconds to check in at a kiosk, making them a quick and convenient alternative to traditional check-in processes.

"The Airport Authority has been a leader in common-use technology, such as the CUSS kiosks, which have been embraced by both passengers and airlines," said Kevin Molloy, Vice President, Simplified Passenger Travel and Chief Information Officer, Vancouver International Airport Authority. "As airlines and airports around the world continue to adopt this system, YVR is once again leading the way in streamlined passenger processing by working with partners like Delta Hotels to bring self-service check-in to a variety of convenient off-airport locations."

Currently, guests at Delta Vancouver Airport and Delta Vancouver Suites can access WestJet flights through the CUSS kiosks, with more airlines slated to join the program later in the year. Once check-in is complete, hotel guests will receive a boarding pass to take with them, along with any baggage, to YVR, where they will proceed to the gate, either directly or after dropping off their baggage with the airline.

IntotheWest
Oct 1, 2005, 8:03 AM
^ 21 million passengers projected for 2010? Wow...think they're being overly optimistic. Considering the passenger traffic hasn't really increased at YVR in 7 years. 2000 was still the strongest at just over 16 million, and 1998 saw 15.5 million. 2004 was 15.7 million.

Unless they're really counting on the Chinese now taking advantage of travelling to Canada...but still 5 million. That's kinda like TO's projection of hitting 45 million.

CanadianCentaur
Oct 1, 2005, 8:19 AM
^Hmmmm. It does sound a bit optimistic. Maybe a bit too optimistic....

Like Edmonchuck here, I'm also kind of a fan of YVR.

tayser
Oct 1, 2005, 8:51 AM
older-ish news, nevertheless

http://theage.com.au/articles/2005/08/11/1123353419948.html

Qantas to start SF service, eyes Canada
August 11, 2005 - 11:24AM

Qantas will start flying to San Francisco from March next year, and has plans to extend its permanent network into Canada.

Qantas has announced the addition of the Californian city to its international network, taking the total number of Qantas return flights to mainland USA to 39 a week.

Qantas executive general manager John Borghetti said the new service would link the "sister cities" of San Francisco and Sydney.

"San Francisco is a great holiday destination and we are delighted to be flying there," he said.

Qantas will initially offer three non-stop weekly services on the new route, operating three-class Boeing 747-400 aircraft, with fares starting at $1299 return.

Mr Borghetti said Qantas would also introduce services to Vancouver, Canada, via San Francisco during the peak travel seasons from June 2006.

"This is the first step to establishing year round services to Canada," he said.

_________

http://gc.kls2.com/cgi-bin/gcmap?PATH=MEl-YVR

MEL (37°40'24"S 144°50'36"E) YVR (49°11'38"N 123°11'04"W) 13183 km

^ well within the range of an A380 (same with SYD if they decided to eventually do AU-CA non-stop), and Qantas loves big planes on the pacific.

chinookcity
Oct 1, 2005, 7:55 PM
^ 21 million passengers projected for 2010? Wow...think they're being overly optimistic. Considering the passenger traffic hasn't really increased at YVR in 7 years. 2000 was still the strongest at just over 16 million, and 1998 saw 15.5 million. 2004 was 15.7 million.

Unless they're really counting on the Chinese now taking advantage of travelling to Canada...but still 5 million. That's kinda like TO's projection of hitting 45 million.

Probably counting on the 4 million passengers for the 2010 olympics.
Calgary on the other hand is blowing away all projections, 2005 is tracking towards 10.3 million up from 9.2 million in 2004.
http://www.calgaryairport.com/fts/getfile.cfm?FID=6441

marts1x
Oct 2, 2005, 7:56 AM
good we will pass montreal within 3 years.

MistyMountainHop
Oct 2, 2005, 3:27 PM
September 2005

Managing Noise With Noise?

Can one noise actually cancel out another? The Airport Authority and the University of British Columbia (UBC) are looking at this possibility to help manage aircraft noise at YVR.

Eliminating noise by producing an opposite sound (equal in amplitude but opposite in phase) is known as Active Noise Control (ANC). This technology is already successfully used in enclosed spaces such as heating ducts and aircraft cabins. ANC-equipped headphones are used by pilots of propeller-driven aircraft to reduce low-frequency background noise, allowing them to hear conversations and warning signals in noisy cockpits.

The outdoor environment, however, presents several challenges for ANC technology. From temperature and weather fluctuations to uncontrolled background noise, successfully using ANC outdoors is extremely difficult.

Since 1997, the Airport Authority's Environment Department has been working in collaboration with UBC and the airlines to investigate whether ANC can be used to mitigate noise from ground-based engine run-ups. Engine run-ups are maintenance tests performed on aircraft engines and systems to ensure they are functioning safely before the aircraft is put back into service.

Every two years, a UBC graduate student from the Department of Mechanical Engineering is selected to participate on the project as part of his or her thesis.

Recent field tests at the airport have focused on quantifying the noise characteristics of aircraft performing run-ups, and noise measurements have been done on two propeller aircrafts, donated by Central Mountain Air and Air Canada Jazz, along with a larger Air Canada Jazz Regional Jet. ANC research has focused on propeller aircraft because their run-up noise signature tends to make them ideal ANC candidates. This is because the sound created by these aircraft is simple in tone, making it easier to find a counter tone to balance the noise.

While the research is ongoing, the work has resulted in computer simulation models, comprehensive reports, and laboratory experiments which continue to add valuable information to the possible application of ANC technology. Despite these gains, there are still significant hurdles to overcome before a working system can be realized.

Managing airport noise to balance the community's desire for safe, convenient, 24-hour air travel with enjoyable urban living is the Airport Authority's commitment to our neighbouring communities.

For further information on ANC research, please contact the Airport Authority's Environment Department at noise@yvr.ca.

phesto
Oct 3, 2005, 3:39 PM
Here's the building report for the terminal expansions, etc. Anyone know where exactly the 5-storey office bldg is to be located?

Start date: 07/2005

Completion date: 2010

Note: All Sub Trades went through a prequalification process. At present the only Sub Contract that has closed is the Underground Works. All other contracts are currently being called. A list of all major Sub Contracts awarded should be available by Nov/Dec 2005. Direct your enquiries to Sandy Kuan at PCL or Brian McDonagh (YVR) at 604-276-6593. This is the total budget up to 2010 including the RAV line portion.

Size: 45,000 m2 ; 4 storeys; 1 structure

Project: The new West Chevron Bldg includes the following: ADDN of 36,508m2 of new space on 4 levels (including a new retail/thematics area); 4 new aircraft loading/unloading gates, with associated holdrooms, equipped with dual Apron Drive Bridges & 5 relocatable gates with associated bldg space; an addn'l Transborder gate on the existing East Chevron; foundations, architectural finishes, curtain wall, skylights, roofing, electrical, mechanical & electrical systems. In total, the expansion will include 9 new gates, expanded international passenger & plane facilities (i.e. a larger gate to handle Airbus A380), passenger screening areas, baggage handling & customs, & the airport portion of the RAV rapid transit line & new 5-sty office bldg; reinforcing steel; concrete reinforcing; structural concrete; masonry; structural steel; skylights; structural glass curtain walls; wall finishes; interior decorating; airport control instrumentation; aircraft passenger loading.

officedweller
Oct 3, 2005, 6:29 PM
That would be the link building between the domestic and international terminals.

phesto
Oct 12, 2005, 7:45 PM
It's been interesting to see the news on terminal/runway expansions, and yet we haven't heard as much about new service at YVR, only expansions.

Here's a conference report from AC showing potential routes for expansion (on the maps): http://www.aircanada.com/en/about/investor/documents/CIBC_Frontenac_conference.pdf

Here are the routes mentioned. Int'l is nothing we haven't heard (although AUK is still surprising), but the transborder routes are interesting.

INTL: Manila, Aukland, Guangzhou, Taipei

Transborder: Sacramento, Orange County, Las Vegas, Pheonix

MistyMountainHop
Oct 13, 2005, 12:58 AM
Three new directors appointed at YVR
Oct, 12 2005 - 11:30 AM

VANCOUVER/CKNW(AM980) - Three new directors have been appointed to the Vancouver International Airport Authority board of directors: former mayor Phillip Owen, Peter Dhillon, the CEO of the Richberry Group, a BC based agribusiness, and Ronald Stern, a former UBC law grad who is now president and CEO for paper mills in Alberta, Oregon, Ontario and Texas.

CanadianCentaur
Oct 13, 2005, 3:24 PM
Here are the routes mentioned. Int'l is nothing we haven't heard (although AUK is still surprising), but the transborder routes are interesting.


Yeah, I'd find Auckland a surprise, too. If AC can get some 777-200 LRs and/or 787s, that should do, because I think both of these aircraft tyes can fly YVR-AKL nonstop as well as YVR-SYD.

BTW, just a little piece of trivia - AKL is the IATA code for Auckland. AUK is for Alakanuk, Alaska, some 1600 km NW of Anchorage. ;)

phesto
Oct 13, 2005, 4:09 PM
^Oops! Ya I'd probably prefer to go to AKL over AUK right about now.

Here are some other possible new int'l routes that have been talked about recently (not AC): Singapore, Bangkok, Paris CDG, and Tahiti.

MistyMountainHop
Oct 18, 2005, 12:39 AM
October 13, 2005 - 8:30 AM

YVR AWARDS DUTY FREE CONTRACT TO ALDEASA

Vancouver International Airport Authority has awarded the Duty Free concession contract at Vancouver International Airport (YVR) to Aldeasa, the fourth largest airport retailer in the world. Aldeasa, based in Madrid, developed its bid jointly with HMSHost, a subsidiary of the Autogrill Group Inc., a leading international developer of innovative shop and restaurant formats and world-renowned for creating innovative concession plans in travel venues.

"We're looking forward to working with Aldeasa," said David Huffer, Vice President, commercial development. "Aldeasa has a proven track record in airport retailing around the world, and our customers can expect an exciting mix of new brands in our Duty Free stores, and a strong focus on customer service that they have come to expect at YVR."

Javier G�mez-Navarro, Aldeasa's Chairman, commented, "It is extremely satisfying for us to see that not only YVR, but also suppliers, have placed their faith and support behind our bid. This will undoubtedly be our greatest motivation to step up our efforts and offer the best quality of service at Vancouver International Airport."

YVR currently has 12 Duty Free stores covering 2,685 square meters (28,902 square feet) of space, with an additional 1,110 square meters (11,948 square feet) being developed as part of the new wing of the International Terminal Building, the first phase of which is scheduled for completion in Spring 2007. YVR duty free net sales in 2004 were CAD $61,750,000 (43,225,000 euros).

The Airport Authority issued a Request for Proposals in May 2005, with five of the world's leading firms submitting bids. The proposals were judged on a number of criteria including customer service, marketing plans and pricing. The contract term is eight years, plus a two-year option. The request for proposal contemplated operation of the duty free stores at YVR in June 2007.

"We had a great deal of interest from some of the best retailers in the world," Mr. Huffer said. "It confirms the strength of our market and long-term potential at YVR. With Aldeasa and HMSHost on board, our new Duty Free program will be among the best in the world."

YVR's local and international travelers can look forward to an expanded range of Duty Free offerings. An improved selection of Canadian made gifts, fine fragrances and cosmetics, popular spirits and British Columbian wines, and the very best in international luxury designer clothing and accessories will be available at true duty free savings.

-YVR-

For more information:
Media Relations
Vancouver International Airport Authority
604.880.9815

phesto
Oct 18, 2005, 6:17 PM
Here's an update on the Self Service check-in kiosks that they introduced at a couple Delta hotels. Looks like they will be expanding the service:

Last month we officially launched the off-airport common-use self-service kiosk program, introducing kiosks at the Delta Vancouver Airport Hotel in Richmond, Delta Vancouver Suites Hotel in downtown Vancouver, and at the Vancouver Tourist Info Centre. Travellers can now check in for their flights before leaving for the airport. Once check-in is complete, pas-sengers will receive a boarding pass to take with them to YVR, along with any baggage, where they will pro-ceed to the gate directly if they have carry-on luggage or after dropping off their baggage with the airline.

In the not-too-distant future, we expect to see kiosks at numerous other downtown hotels, the Convention Centre and at a variety of convenient loca-tions around the Lower Mainland. Looking farther out, passengers will be able to check their baggage offsite and have it meet them at the airport, or use their cell phone or PDA to check in for flights. By 2010, self-service kiosks will be a common sight, not only in Lower Mainland hotels, but also in places like Whistler and the athletes’ village, as well as future RAV Line sta-tions.

officedweller
Oct 18, 2005, 7:28 PM
So my question is - if a passenger gets a boarding pass at the hotel, but gets stuck in traffic, at what point does the airline give up the seat to a standby passenger?

SSLL
Oct 18, 2005, 8:40 PM
Does Air NZ not fly to Vancouver right now from Auckland?

privatejet
Oct 18, 2005, 9:36 PM
^AZ is codeshare with a plane change in Hawaii

^^The airline wil likely start giving up seats at 15 or 20 minutes beofre departure. Since the luggage hasnt been loaded onto the plane, its ok from a security point of view.

phesto
Oct 19, 2005, 4:49 PM
United will be offering a new daily service direct to Dulles (IAD) beginning next year. (May through Oct probably to coincide with the cruise ship season)

Coldrsx
Oct 19, 2005, 5:26 PM
i still laugh at YVR from a couple of years ago when they were doing there 40 yr plan or whatever it was....they didnt take into account sea level changes......sorry but things like this are too funny to forget.

phesto
Nov 1, 2005, 6:48 PM
Another new seasonal int'l service courtesy of Zoom:

Zoom Launches New Vancouver--Belfast--Cardiff Flight Route

OTTAWA, Nov. 1 /CNW/ - Zoom Airlines announced today the introduction of scheduled transatlantic service from Vancouver to Belfast, Northern Ireland to Cardiff, Wales. Zoom Airlines is the only Canadian air carrier to provide non-stop service from Vancouver to Belfast and the only carrier servicing the Vancouver -Cardiff route.

The new service begins June 12, 2006 and will be available every Monday up to October 30, 2006. Prices for Zoom Airlines' high quality, full service flights to Belfast and Cardiff, which include meals, drinks and in-flight entertainment, will start from $299 one way.

"Buoyed by the continuing success of our transatlantic program, we are pleased to be adding Belfast and Cardiff to the list of now six gateways we offer from Vancouver to Europe" says Kris Dolinki, Chief Executive Officer, Zoom Airlines. "We are extremely excited to offer more choice and flexibility to trans-Atlantic travel and we endeavour to continue to offer the lowest scheduled airfares across the Atlantic."

"We're delighted with Zoom's new service from Vancouver and continued development of the Wales market," says Eirlys Thomas, Head of International Marketing, Tourism Wales. "This new flight makes travelling to Wales easier and more affordable then ever before."

According to Tourism Ireland, more Canadian travelers are also choosing to visit the island of Ireland, with a total of 130,000 trips having been made in 2004, 16 per cent more than the previous year.

"We are very pleased about the introduction of Zoom Airline's new directservice to Belfast from Vancouver," say Alison Metcalfe, Vice-President,Canada, Tourism Ireland. "It makes getting to Ireland from Western Canada so much easier and provides an opportunity for visitors to discover the unique heritage, culture and breathtaking scenery to be found in Northern Ireland,
the North West and other regions of the island."

excel
Nov 1, 2005, 8:57 PM
LTU announced flights from Vancouver to Dusseldorf and Munich which will start in May 2006. Most likely Airbus A330's.

excel
Nov 3, 2005, 5:57 AM
Chinese airliner makes emergency landing at YVR

A tense situation has ended in relief for passengers aboard a plane circling Vancouver International Airport. A China Eastern Airbus A340-300 has made an emergency landing with 273 people aboard including 16 crew members. The plane took off just before two o'clock from YVR when crew members discovered an engine problem. The decision was made to circle over Vancouver Island to burn off some of the fuel then make an emergency landing. A plane carrying this many people destined for an international location is quite large and weight is a crucial issue when trying to land. The airport says the next step is to let the passengers off the plane and check out the engine to see what the problem is. If they can fix it, they'll just put the passengers back on the plane and send them off to Shanghai later tonight. If not, then the passengers will have to be put up in nearby hotels and then send them off in another plane tomorrow.

MistyMountainHop
Nov 5, 2005, 2:09 AM
November 4, 2005 - 9:00 AM

YVR LANDS AWARD FOR NORTH AMERICA'S BEST RETAIL/SPECIALTY PROGRAM

Airports Council International Recognizes YVR for Superior Concessions Program

Airports Council International North America (ACI-NA) has recognized Vancouver International Airport (YVR) in its annual Airport Concessions Contest, giving it top honours in the Best Retail/Specialty Program category. YVR won for its U.S. Departures Concourse retail program, a themed area that offers U.S.-bound travellers the most comprehensive retail experience of any airport in Canada.

"The Airport Authority is proud to offer its customers a level of service that consistently ranks as one of the best in the world," said David Huffer, Vice President, Commercial Development, Vancouver International Airport Authority. "This award highlights our commitment to leading the way in offering travellers innovative products and services in a unique and characteristically West Coast environment."

Designed with one of Vancouver's oldest residential neighbourhoods, Shaughnessy, as its inspiration, storefronts in the U.S. Departures concourse reflect the estate-like character of the neighbourhood's heritage buildings. More importantly, the Departures area offers passengers unprecedented choice in "destination" merchandise from stores like National Geographic, which showcases gifts of adventure; Kids Works, featuring toys and games for young ones; Discover Vancouver, stocked with products developed by local galleries and museums; BC Sports Zone and Northern Reflections. The $15 Boutique offers budget-conscious travellers a vast array of accessories and gifts, all at one set price. Recently added are Roots, Christmas in Vancouver, Vancouver Kitchen and Crabtree & Evelyn stores.

YVR was the first airport in Canada to significantly expand retail offerings to U.S.-bound passengers post-security. Following years of discussions between the Airport Authority and Canadian and U.S. Customs agencies, an agreement was reached to increase the value of products that could be sold to U.S.-bound passengers in the post-security area. The agreement paved the way for YVR's U.S. Departures concourse retail expansion, which began in 2003 and now consists of more than 1,300 square metres of retail and concession outlets.

YVR customers have expressed their satisfaction with the expanded retail program, giving the Airport Authority's U.S. Departures area consistently increased ratings since the project began in 2003. In addition to enhancing customers' experiences at YVR, the program has brought increased concessions revenues and sales-per-square-foot amongst the highest in the industry. This has allowed the Airport Authority to remain a leader in providing a low-cost, high-value airport utilizing revenue streams other than airline and passenger fees.

ACI-NA's Airport Concessions Contest began in 1998 and this year received more than 50 entries from airports of all sizes throughout the U.S. and Canada. Entries were divided into three categories based on size; YVR was a winner in the medium airports category.

About Vancouver International Airport Authority
The Airport Authority is a community-based, not-for-profit organization that operates Vancouver International Airport (YVR). The second largest international passenger gateway on North America's West Coast, YVR expects to welcome a record 16.4 million passengers in 2005. The Airport Authority is undertaking a $1.4-billion capital program that will ensure the airport meets the growing demand for air travel, and continues to be developed as a premier global gateway and economic generator for British Columbia.
-YVR-

For more information:
Media Relations
Vancouver International Airport Authority
604.880.9815

phesto
Nov 7, 2005, 1:31 AM
Westjet is following America West's lead and will be discontinuing YVR-LAX next year. They will be starting YVR-LAS next year as well.

I heard that Abbotsford Airport (YXX) has recently completed a runway extension. Anyone know of any plans for more service out there? - WJ is the only airline with scheduled service (to YYC) and AC will also be starting YXX-YYC in Dec. I think Harmony and WJ are also planning mexico/hawaii service next year as well. And now with a runway extension YXX is poised for more cargo traffic...

I think Zoom also flew out of abbotsford (and still does?).

SSLL
Nov 7, 2005, 9:49 PM
So AC will be the only LAX to YVR service then? Is the route that unprofitable? That's surprising...

phesto
Nov 7, 2005, 10:11 PM
^The route was oversaturated with 6 carriers - the four left are AC, United, NWA, and Alaska.

Not surprising that Westjet dropped the route, but a bit surprising that they kicked up YVR-LAS, a route that I think is now serviced by 6 carriers as well.

privatejet
Nov 8, 2005, 7:35 PM
An idyllic stroll along the Seine or an awe-inspiring tour of the Louvre could become easier for Vancouver travellers if Air Tahiti or Zoom decide to try a non-stop service between Vancouver and Paris.

There is no direct air link between the two cities but Vancouver airport and Air Tahiti officials confirmed Monday they have talked about doing whatever is necessary to create a Vancouver-Paris connection.

"It's a possibility that we're working towards but at this moment, it's just a possibility," said Kate Forrester of Vancouver airport. "... We're working with Air Tahiti and other airlines about new services but right now, there are no definitive dates."

Air Tahiti currently flies between Tahiti and Paris, with a refuelling stop in Los Angeles, but airline representative Guy Champoux said increased security measures in Los Angeles have made that airport inconvenient for many passengers. That's why the airline has considered Vancouver as an alternative.

Champoux said European passengers on their way to Tahiti have to deplane in Los Angeles and go through an extensive immigration process. "If security gets any tighter, we're afraid it will be almost impossible to transit the aircraft through the U.S. So as a back-up plan, the airline would use Vancouver."

But Champoux stressed airline officials are currently just studying the costs of such a move.

He said factors in Vancouver's favour are that it's located almost exactly halfway between Paris and Tahiti and Vancouver-Paris is a slightly shorter flight than Los Angeles-Paris, requiring just two pilots instead of three.

"So the schedule [using Vancouver] is just perfect but it's a matter of looking at the costs," Champoux said.

Air Canada offers direct flights to Paris from Toronto and Montreal but airline representative Angela Mah said there are no current plans to offer a non-stop service from Vancouver to Paris.

Ottawa-based Zoom Airlines will begin a once-a-week Vancouver-Calgary-Paris service in June 2006 which airline chief executive officer Kris Dolinki said could evolve into a direct Vancouver-to-Paris service if market conditions warrant it.

hollywoodnorth
Nov 8, 2005, 7:50 PM
Business in Vancouver November 8-14, 2005; issue 837

Real estate round-up

Peter Mitham

Credit union boss upbeat about the province's housing market

Green buildings pay dividends to owners and occupants, Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors report says


Market not chilled

The latest rise in mortgage rates shouldn't cast a chill on the housing market, say observers.

The Bank of Canada reports a 0.2-percentage point increase in mortgage rates over the past month - back to where they were at the beginning of the year.

The relative lack of change has Credit Union Central of B.C. chief economist Helmut Pastrick remaining optimistic regarding the housing market in B.C. Pastrick's latest outlook forecasts province-wide home starts rising through 2007. Starts are poised to top 33,600 this year, rising to 35,700 next year and 38,200 in 2007.

That call outpaces the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp. forecast, which projects starts to fall next year to 31,600. The outlook for Greater Vancouver is 17,500 starts.

Rising land and construction costs, not borrowing costs, are the major threat to homebuying, analyst Cameron Muir told participants in last week's CMHC housing outlook conference.

"Longer-term mortgage rates are, if anything, lower than they were several years ago," concurred William Tharp of M. Murenbeeld and Associates Inc. in Victoria and senior economist with the Dundee Group of Companies.

Tharp feels a strong economy in B.C. will continue to give the housing market legs for another year to 18 months, though he fears a long, slow slump could follow as older homeowners retire into smaller quarters and the aging population requires less house space overall.


Concert enters Victoria

Vancouver builder Concert Properties Ltd. has been active in the Victoria development industry, now it's taken a bite of the investment opportunities the city offers. Concert picked up 712 Yates Street for $12.25 million at the end of October, adding the 79,000-square-foot property to an investment portfolio now valued in excess of $850 million.

During the first 10 months of this year, Concert has acquired $47 million in properties in British Columbia and Ontario.

It will retain the Victoria property for office use, said Andrew Tong, Concert vice-president, acquisitions. There are no plans for redevelopment of the property, which is fully leased to government tenants.

B.C. properties now represent 87 per cent of Concert's investment holdings, with Ontario and Alberta assets in the minority at 11 per cent and two per cent, respectively.


Green buildings pay

Green buildings will repay their owners and occupants, a recent report from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors says.

Three B.C. properties were presented as case studies in the report, which concluded a link exists between so-called green - or environment-friendly - features in a building and its market value.

Take the case of Cranberry Commons, a 22-unit Burnaby housing co-op that was one of the B.C. properties profiled. The co-op was built at a cost of $5.3 million, but residents now estimate the value of their units at 15 to 20 per cent above current market value for units of similar square footage. The higher valuation is only partially attributable to higher construction costs, the report states. It notes that operating costs were six to 10 per cent better than expected (an estimated $1,936 per unit last year).

Vancouver Island Technology Park, which reported similar advantages in terms of operating costs, noted that E-Traffic Solutions reported that employee productivity was up 30 per cent compared with its experiences in conventional offices. (Perhaps that helps explain why absorption exceeded owner expectations by between 21 per cent and 50 per cent.)

UBC, whose C.K. Choi Building for the Institute of Asian Research and the Liu Centre for the Study of Global Issues enjoyed a showing in the study, is meanwhile showing sustainability is viable in low-rise construction. It has launched the Residential Environmental Assessment Program, which has taken existing sustainability standards and adapts them for low-rise construction projects on campus.

More to follow on REAP, as the program's called, in a future column.

privatejet
Nov 8, 2005, 8:38 PM
^wrong thread. this YVR news

hollywoodnorth
Nov 9, 2005, 1:16 AM
opps :)

MistyMountainHop
Nov 9, 2005, 1:56 AM
opps :)

Two errors in a row! :haha:

yogiderek
Nov 9, 2005, 2:41 AM
meanwhile at YVR. It seems like there is almost no work going on at the Link project? They seemed to have done the initial foundations and stopped. However, on the international terminal expansion. They are now assembling the large circular addition which will have the aquatic feature. The roof assembly is actually hoisted up on a crane and attached to two Y figures, one being stouter, the inner support. The other more long, the outer wall. Oddly enough, this outer wall area is in fact higher than the present roofline of the International terminal building.
What else, rumor has it that Northwest airlines is pulling out of Vancouver. They are in chapter 11 at present and looking to cut costs anywhere.

MistyMountainHop
Nov 9, 2005, 3:43 AM
Northwest is pulling out of Vancouver?

Dang. I have flights to Hawaii (Kailua-Kona) on Northwest (via Seattle).

phesto
Nov 9, 2005, 5:53 PM
Northwest pulling out would be a big loss - especially the YVR-MSP route.

Other news:

-Cathay Pacific Opens Ticket Office At YVR

Last month, Cathay Pacific’s Vancouver Ticketing Office relocated from 550 West 6th Avenue, Vancouver, to YVR. The new office is located in International Departures, Level 3 (across from the Cathay Pacific check-in counters).

With the move, Cathay Pacific has added the convenience of extended operating hours. New ticketing office hours are: April to October (summer flight schedule)—10 a.m. - 4 p.m.; and 11 p.m. - 2:30 a.m. November to March (winter flight schedule)—9: a.m. – 3 p.m.; and 10 p.m. – 1:30 a.m. Cathay offers two daily non-stop flights from Vancouver to Hong Kong, daily non-stop service from Vancouver to New York, and thrice-weekly freighter service from Vancouver and Hong Kong.

-Zoom Says ‘Bonjour’ To The Heart Of Europe

Zoom Airlines has announced a new Vancouver-Calgary-Paris service, Western Canada’s only direct flight to Paris. The new service seeks to provide Western Canadians with easy access to the third-largest city in Europe, and is in addition to Zoom’s year-round U.K. program. Flights to Paris begin June 10, 2006, and will continue every Saturday until October 29, 2006. Consumers can purchase their tickets for as little as $299 one way. “There is tremendous opportunity for Zoom to penetrate a market that is currently under-serviced,” says Kris Dolinki, chief executive officer, Zoom Airlines. “The success of Zoom Airlines and our low-cost, full service model has allowed us to provide distinct products. Zoom is proud to be the only air carrier to offer service to Paris directly from the West Coast, providing Western Canadians with more choice and flexibility in their travel destinations. With our service to London, Glasgow, Manchester and now Paris, Zoom Airlines is truly Western Canada’s low-cost gateway to Europe.”

In the past four years, the numberof Canadians visiting France has increased by 33 per cent. Accordingto Statistics Canada, France has been one of the top five countries visited by Canadians for the last three years, with approximately 500,000 visits every year.

Designed for long-haul flights, Zoom Airlines’ wide-bodied 767-300 aircraft offer increased legroom for a more comfortable in cabin experi-ence. The airline’s full-service flightsinclude meals, snacks and in-flight entertainment.

-FasTrack Premium Check-In Lounge Arrives At YVR

First Of Its Kind In North America

Vancouver International Airport Authority continues to lead in customer service and cutting-edge technology with the opening of a new premium check-in lounge in the International Terminal. YVR FasTrack Premium check-in caters to business- and first-class passengers flying with Singapore Airlines and Cathay Pacific, and provides a dedicated and comfortable area to check in.

Passengers using the premium service are assisted with their lug gage and taken directly to the fully equipped lounge for an expedited premium check-in experience. “We are proud to be the first airport in North America to offer this service,” said Kevin Molloy, vice president, Simplified Passenger Travel and chief information officer, Vancouver International Airport Authority. “Together with our partners Singapore Airlines and Cathay Pacific, we are raising the bar for customer service.”

The lounge offers sumptuous leather chairs and fresh flowers. Once they have checked-in, passengers are directed to a dedicated security screening point and onward to each airline’s lounge. The premium check-in lounge, located just within the main doors of the International terminal, is the prototype of facilities that will be located in the new Link Building, which is scheduled to open in 2007. The building, so named because it is located where the Domestic and International terminals are linked, will also feature additional check-in facilities, baggage systems and officespace, and will serve as the main point of entry from the RAV Line terminal station.

SSLL
Nov 9, 2005, 10:32 PM
Where does NWA fly to (besides MSP) from Vancouver? Detroit? Sea-Tac? LAX?

Edmonchuck
Nov 9, 2005, 10:54 PM
NW's routes for Asia vis KSEA could be handled by Horizon/Alaska.

As for NW pulling out of YVR entirely, I would be surprised, unless they would also route you through SEA for domestic US travel as well - definitly a possibility.

westcoast604
Nov 13, 2005, 7:44 AM
Where does NWA fly to (besides MSP) from Vancouver? Detroit? Sea-Tac? LAX?

They also service Detroit and Memphis from YVR. Memphis is seasonal though.

phesto
Nov 14, 2005, 11:26 PM
November 14, 2005 - 10:00 AM

NEW CANADA-U.S. AIR TRANSPORT AGREEMENT WELCOMED BY VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AUTHORITY


Agreement Significantly Strengthens the YVR Gateway

A new, expanded air transport agreement between Canada and the United States is being welcomed by Vancouver International Airport Authority.

"This agreement levels the regulatory playing field with YVR's competitor airports down the West Coast, and I commend the efforts of Transport Minister Jean-C Lapierre and International Trade Minister Jim Peterson in concluding this agreement," said Larry Berg, President and CEO, Vancouver International Airport Authority. "The Airport Authority has been leading a campaign for the further liberalization of the Canada-U.S. air transport agreement for a number of years, with strong support from the Government of British Columbia, Vancouver Board of Trade, Richmond Chamber of Commerce, Tourism B.C., Tourism Vancouver and the Council of Tourism Associations. These efforts have paid off, and all of us will benefit greatly from this new agreement in the years to come."

The new agreement, which comes into effect on September 1, 2006, will provide increased flight options for travellers and greater efficiencies for air carriers. Among the key components of the new agreement are Fifth Freedom Rights for both passengers and cargo that give U.S. air carriers access to Canadian third country markets and Canadian air carriers access to United States' third country markets. That means air carriers of both countries can pick up passengers and/or cargo in the other partner's territory for transport to a third country. It also provides third country carriers, for example Chinese, with access to U.S. markets via Canada.

As the major North American airport closest to Asia, YVR has a significant geographic advantage over U.S. West Coast airports. Under the new agreement, for example, a U.S. carrier flying from Atlanta or Dallas to Taipei could fly via Vancouver, saving time and fuel instead of flying through Los Angeles or San Francisco. It would be permitted to pick up passengers and cargo in Vancouver, something that was highly restricted under the previous Canada-U.S. air transport agreement.

privatejet
Nov 14, 2005, 11:32 PM
Some more competition on the YVR-SFO route

Qantas Airways Announces New Service from Vancouver to Sydney, Australia and from Vancouver to San Francisco

LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Nov. 14, 2005--Qantas today announced it would offer three weekly round trip seasonal flights from Vancouver to Sydney via San Francisco on each Wednesday, Friday and Sunday from June 14 -- August 16, 2006.
ADVERTISEMENT


To accommodate passenger demand during the traditional peak travel seasons in both hemispheres, this new schedule allows travelers the opportunity to enjoy Qantas round trip services between Vancouver and Sydney or to sample the award-winning Qantas hospitality on flights between Vancouver and San Francisco.

For travelers to Australia, Qantas flight 74 will depart from Vancouver to Sydney at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. With a brief stop in San Francisco, the flight arrives in Sydney at 6:15 a.m. plus two. Qantas return flight 73 will depart Sydney at 1:55 p.m. and arrive in Vancouver at 2:20 p.m. the same day.

For travel between Canada and the U.S., Qantas flight 74 departs Vancouver on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. and arrives in San Francisco at 8:50 p.m. Returning Qantas flight 73 departs San Francisco on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday at 12:05 p.m. and arrives in Vancouver at 2:20 p.m.

Onboard Qantas, travelers can expect incomparable comfort and relaxation with the award-winning Skybed Business Class sleeper seat and in-flight entertainment options, including personal seat back video screens in all classes of service.

"As a first step to reestablishing year-round services to Canada, the introduction of these flights will enable travelers to take advantage of the Australian ski and North American summer cruise seasons," said Wally R. Mariani, senior executive vice president for Qantas Airways, The Americas and Pacific. "These new flights follow our recently announced three weekly non-stop services on the San Francisco-Sydney route, which will begin March 29, 2006," he added.

With the addition of San Francisco and Vancouver services, Qantas will provide passengers with convenient connections and unparalleled access to 50 domestic Australian cities and onward to Jakarta, Bali, Mumbai and Johannesburg.

MistyMountainHop
Nov 15, 2005, 1:13 AM
Some more competition on the YVR-SFO route

Qantas Airways Announces New Service from Vancouver to Sydney, Australia and from Vancouver to San Francisco

LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Nov. 14, 2005--Qantas today announced it would offer three weekly round trip seasonal flights from Vancouver to Sydney via San Francisco on each Wednesday, Friday and Sunday from June 14 -- August 16, 2006.
ADVERTISEMENT


To accommodate passenger demand during the traditional peak travel seasons in both hemispheres, this new schedule allows travelers the opportunity to enjoy Qantas round trip services between Vancouver and Sydney or to sample the award-winning Qantas hospitality on flights between Vancouver and San Francisco.

For travelers to Australia, Qantas flight 74 will depart from Vancouver to Sydney at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. With a brief stop in San Francisco, the flight arrives in Sydney at 6:15 a.m. plus two. Qantas return flight 73 will depart Sydney at 1:55 p.m. and arrive in Vancouver at 2:20 p.m. the same day.

For travel between Canada and the U.S., Qantas flight 74 departs Vancouver on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. and arrives in San Francisco at 8:50 p.m. Returning Qantas flight 73 departs San Francisco on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday at 12:05 p.m. and arrives in Vancouver at 2:20 p.m.

Onboard Qantas, travelers can expect incomparable comfort and relaxation with the award-winning Skybed Business Class sleeper seat and in-flight entertainment options, including personal seat back video screens in all classes of service.

"As a first step to reestablishing year-round services to Canada, the introduction of these flights will enable travelers to take advantage of the Australian ski and North American summer cruise seasons," said Wally R. Mariani, senior executive vice president for Qantas Airways, The Americas and Pacific. "These new flights follow our recently announced three weekly non-stop services on the San Francisco-Sydney route, which will begin March 29, 2006," he added.

With the addition of San Francisco and Vancouver services, Qantas will provide passengers with convenient connections and unparalleled access to 50 domestic Australian cities and onward to Jakarta, Bali, Mumbai and Johannesburg.

I wonder if they'll use the A380 sometime in the future for that route. :)

hollywoodnorth
Nov 15, 2005, 1:42 AM
Business in Vancouver November 15-21, 2005; issue 838

Harmony heading to China

Vancouver-based airline awaiting federal government approval of routes to the country's capital and business centre

Bob Mackin

Harmony Airways has chosen Beijing and Shanghai for its Chinese destinations, but it's waiting for the go-ahead from Ottawa.

President Gary Collins told Business in Vancouver that the Chinese government has given its approval.

The privately held Vancouver airline, started in 2002 by David Ho, applied to fly to China last year and was given a list of 14 cities from which to choose. Last summer, Collins told BIV that the airline was looking to avoid competitive routes like Beijing and Shanghai. Collins now says the airline wants a presence in the capital and the business centre because both cities have Canadian visa offices.

Collins said the other desirable destination is Guangzhou, but Vancouver's sister city in Guangdong province near Hong Kong probably won't have a Canadian visa office until 2007.

"There are other cities and ultimately we may start to serve those, it will depend on traffic and flows," Collins said. "That's an initial presence for us. We expect the market will build such that there's an ability to service a number of cities in China directly."

Harmony, he said, is negotiating a code share agreement with China Eastern Airlines, which already flies into Vancouver International Airport. It's part of a strategy to capitalize on increased trade with China and the imminent recognition by the Chinese government of Canada as an approved destination for Chinese tourists.

Collins said long-distance aircraft availability is another consideration. Harmony would have to lease a jet for the short-term until a new jet is ready for purchase or lease from Boeing or Airbus Industrie.

"You need an aircraft in the interim that'll get you to China. That market is very tight right now, there's not a lot available," Collins said.

The next window for Harmony to begin service would be from April 1, 2006 to March 31, 2007 - depending on the timing of Transport Canada approval. The China expansion will trigger further expansion in North America for Harmony so it can feed the route. Harmony's route to Toronto is mainly for business travellers, while its Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Las Vegas and Hawaii trips cater to sun seekers.

"We're having a great season into all of our sun destinations," Collins said.

Harmony is flying from Calgary, Kelowna, Abbotsford and Victoria to Honolulu and/or Maui. Collins said the Hawaii market is enjoying a resurgence as travellers are taking advantage of the Canadian dollar's rebound. Hawaii is seen as a safe, comfortable destination, he said.

"There is no all-inclusive market in Hawaii," he said. "People don't need to stay in their hotel or resort. They can get out and go around. There's a variety of restaurants, shopping, watersports, other things as well. Hawaii is really coming back into its own. We're seeing a bit of a trend away from the all-inclusive."

Collins said many flights have already sold out and the fuel surcharge hasn't been a deterrent.

"No matter where you go, even if you drive into the hills to go skiing, you're going to pay fuel costs. People are aware of that and it doesn't seem to be a big factor in peoples' booking patterns. Disposable income in western Canada is going up and people want a holiday."

Collins said many of the Hawaii bookings were done months in advance, so it's too early to tell if this fall's devastating hurricanes in Florida, Cuba and Mexico have caused travellers to look at west coast destinations. Harmony resumes its seasonal Palm Springs service next week. Its Las Vegas service remains strong for both tourists and business travellers, despite increased competition.

"There's new capacity, other carriers are starting to do it as well, but we haven't seen an impact on our loads," Collins said. "Vegas is a real repeat market, a lot of people go down three to four times a year. "

Travel agent Scott Clute of Global Travel said little is known of Harmony because it is privately held and doesn't release revenue or passenger-load figures.

"They don't legally have to," he said. "I would certainly encourage them to do that, because it would encourage the public to be a little more forthcoming on long-term commitments."

phesto
Nov 15, 2005, 4:41 PM
Another article on the new cdn-us agreement. They mention the possibility of 2 or 3 new routes, but I think even this is pretty optimistic.

Deal to bring YVR more U.S. business

Bruce Constantineau
Vancouver Sun

Tuesday, November 15, 2005

Vancouver International Airport should attract more business from U.S. airlines stopping here on their way to Asia but a new Canada-U.S. air transport agreement is still just a "small step" towards truly open skies, Canadian airline industry analysts said Monday.

Under a new deal to take effect in September 2006, U.S. airlines will be allowed to fly from the U.S. to a Canadian city, pick up passengers or cargo, and then fly to another country. Canadian carriers will gain the same access to the U.S. market -- enabling them to fly from Canada and stop in one U.S. city before flying to another country.

"It's a baby step toward allowing full access to each other's markets," Calgary-based airline industry analyst Rick Erickson said in an interview. "But Americans don't want to go down that path right now, given all the problems their airlines have had."

U.S. carriers still cannot service Canadian domestic routes and Canadian carriers still won't be allowed to fly from one U.S. destination to another.

Vancouver International Airport Authority president Larry Berg said the new deal will level the playing field and allow Vancouver to better compete for business with U.S. west coast airports like Los Angeles and San Francisco.

"As a gateway city, we have a geographic advantage in being along the shortest point between Asia and North America," he said in an interview. "Dallas-Beijing has a four-hour shorter turnaround time through Vancouver than through San Francisco. This agreement will let us use that advantage."

Berg said U.S. airlines like American and Delta don't currently have direct access to Asian markets so Vancouver airport officials will encourage them to use Vancouver as a gateway to those markets now.

He said there are still "border management issues" to deal with -- to make international borders both secure and convenient for travellers -- but expects the new deal will ultimately create greater choices for consumers and possibly lower prices on some routes.

Erickson said Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal airports should benefit most from increased use of their facilities but doubts the new agreement will have a huge impact on the industry.

"There are not lots and lots of routes just begging for this kind of service," he said. "There are a handful, though, and Vancouver might see two or three new routes as a result of this."

Erickson said a possible new route for Air Canada under the deal would be Toronto-Los Angeles-Auckland.

Queen's University professor Doug Reid said the agreement will essentially be unnoticed by consumers but feels it's a good thing because it removes some "silly rules" that have restricted airlines in the past.

"It's about the ability of airlines to run their businesses more intelligently and not have to fly empty sometimes because of stupid rules," he said. "I think it makes perfect sense and should have been done a long time ago. It's a step in the right direction but it's just a small step."

Reid said U.S. and Canadian carriers should have full access to each other's domestic routes and feels Canadians shouldn't fear U.S. carriers dominating the market.

"Look at the U.S. airline industry today and tell me why we're worried about being overrun by people who, generally speaking, are losing money," he said. "What are we worried about? We'd kick their ass."

Qantas Airways, meanwhile, announced Monday it will offer three weekly Vancouver-San Francisco-Sydney flights from June 14 until August 16 next year. Airline officials say the flights are a first step towards re-establishing year-round services to Canada.

The Australian airline left the Vancouver market about four years ago when it decided to add more capacity to its domestic routes.

bconstantineau@png.canwest.com

SSLL
Nov 15, 2005, 9:38 PM
Lots of good news coming out of YVR and Open Skies.

phesto
Nov 17, 2005, 6:16 PM
NW's routes for Asia vis KSEA could be handled by Horizon/Alaska.

As for NW pulling out of YVR entirely, I would be surprised, unless they would also route you through SEA for domestic US travel as well - definitly a possibility.

It sounds like they aren't pulling out entirely. They are suspending the YVR-MSP route in January, but will be restarting it in June for the higher summer demand.

phesto
Nov 21, 2005, 6:30 PM
According to a Sun article, it looks like YVR has also inquired about obtaining some fill from the RAV construction - this would presumably accomodate construction of a new runway out to the west of Sea Island beyond the existing north runway; or at least an extension of the N. runway - but this would require less fill.

MistyMountainHop
Nov 26, 2005, 12:10 AM
Some articles from the YVR newsletter:

November 2005

When Less Is More

Woolen toques and down parkas don't exactly evoke images of the beach. Packing bulky coats and clunky boots is a nuisance, but, for passengers travelling from snow to sun, lugging winter gear was unavoidable - until now.

Guests of the Fairmont Vancouver Airport are invited to check in and leave the extra weight, and stress, of their winter gear behind with the hotel's complimentary coat and boot check. Drop into the Health Club change rooms and emerge ready for the sun. The Fairmont will store your gear, until you return from your trip tanned, relaxed and ready once again for colder climates.

While at the Fairmont, slip into holiday mode early and treat yourself to a pedicure at Absolute Spa, or watch planes take off and land while sipping a Cosmopolitan at the Jetside Bar.

Located directly above the U.S. departures level in YVR's International Terminal, the hotel offers the ultimate in passenger convenience. Travellers can wake up, enjoy a leisurely breakfast at the hotel, and stroll to their boarding gate without leaving the terminal.

The next time you're headed for the tropics, visit the Fairmont and take advantage of their complimentary closets. Hit the beach in style and save some room in your bag for the souvenirs you really want... Kona coffee or Mexican tequila, anyone?

For further information, or for reservations call 1-800-441-1414 or visit www.fairmont.com.


Long-Term Planning On Display At YVR

Calling all passengers... next time you're catching a flight at YVR, take a few moments to check out our display on options for future airport development. View a 3-D scale model of the terminal buildings in 2009, and learn about options being considered for new runways, terminals and road access to the airport.

Display Locations

November 24 to 28: YVR's South Terminal, 4440 Cowley Crescent

December 1 to January 6: Main Terminal, between the Domestic and International check-in areas on Level 3, opposite the children's play area

We want to hear what you think of the options. Please stop by to provide your comments.

hollywoodnorth
Nov 29, 2005, 5:32 PM
Business in Vancouver November 29-December 5, 2005; issue 840

Air Canada remains YVR's top employer

Approximately 7,000 people now work for the restructured airline and the subsidiaries of its ACE Aviation Holdings parent company at Vancouver's airport

Andrew Petrozzi

If you work at Vancouver International Airport (YVR), there's a good chance it's for Air Canada or one of the many other subsidiaries its parent company ACE Aviation Holdings Inc.'s (TSX: ACE.RV) owns.

The difference these days is that the job is less likely to be as a flight attendant or pilot.

Air Canada and other ACE subsidiaries employ about 7,000 people at YVR and run more than 100 flights out of the airport daily between its Air Canada and Jazz services.

"It's a significant operation," said Angela Mah, Air Canada's spokeswoman in Vancouver.

Mah added that YVR is the airline's second largest hub after Toronto and its primary gateway to Asian destinations.

But Air Canada's corporate restructuring brought on by its bankruptcy filing in late 2003 spun off numerous subsidiaries that also operate out of YVR. They include Air Canada Jazz, as well as related companies like Air Canada Cargo, Aeroplan and Air Canada Technical Services (ACTS).

Montreal-based ACTS provides maintenance, repair and overhaul services for aircraft, engines and components. It also sells ground-handling services to airlines and training services for mechanics, flight attendants and pilots.

ACTS has major facilities in Toronto, Winnipeg, Montreal and Vancouver and a combined workforce of about 3,600 employees.

In March, ACTS signed a five-year agreement with Delta Air Lines, Inc. that could generate up to US$300 million in revenues for ACTS for the maintenance, repair and overhaul of Delta's fleet of more than 200 Boeing 757 and 767 aircraft.

Starting in May 2005, ACTS's Vancouver facility began doing the heavy maintenance work for the Delta contract. The project created approximately 300 jobs.

"A major contract such as this, one of the industry's largest, reflects ACTS's strong reputation for quality service and technical expertise in a number of fleet types including these Boeing aircraft," ACTS president Bill Zoeller said in a statement. "Our agreement with Delta Air Lines is consistent with our business strategy to leverage our MRO expertise, and knowledge of commercial airline operations, to grow as a stand-alone profitable business."

Other ACTS clients include Air Canada, Air Canada Jazz, JetBlue, United Airlines, ABX, Mexicana, Snecma Services, Chromalloy, Lufthansa Technik, International Lease Finance Corporation (ILFC) and Canada's Department of National Defence.

Air Canada Cargo has also been taking advantage of demand for air cargo services on daily Vancouver flights serving such Asian destinations as Hong Kong, Shanghai, Beijing, Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya and Seoul.

It's also the largest supplier of air cargo services to Canada Post Corp.

Aeroplan, meanwhile, operates a call centre at YVR, and new jets in the Air Canada and Jazz fleets like the Embraer 175 and Boeing's Canadair CRJ 705 are expanding the destinations accessible from YVR.

New destinations introduced this fall include San Diego and Las Vegas, she said.

"Vancouver continues to be a very important part in our operations," said Mah. "It's the second- largest hub and we do not see that changing."

According to the Vancouver International Airport Authority, YVR generates more than 26,000 jobs and its annual economic impact in the region is $5.2 billion.

Approximately 13,200 employees and 300 airport authority employees work in the main terminals, according to the VIAA. There are almost 400 businesses operating on Sea Island.

According to the most recent YVR economic impact study conducted in 2000, YVR annually generates $1 billion in wages and contributes a total of $690 million in taxes to the all three levels of government.

Every one million new passengers translate into an additional 1,200 new jobs, according to the study.

phesto
Dec 7, 2005, 10:18 PM
Year end commentary from YVR:

A Milestone Year For YVR

By LARRY BERG, President and Chief Executive Officer

This past year was a great one for YVR, and I would like to take this opportunity to share some of the highlights. With only a few weeks to go in 2005, we are on track to welcome some 16.4-million passengers, setting a new record for YVR. And with Canada finalizing new, more liberal air agreements with the United States, China and India, the stage is set for continued passenger growth in the years to come that will benefit all of British Columbia.

The Open Skies agreement with the United States levels the regulatory playing field with YVR’s competitor airports down the West Coast. When it comes into effect on September 1, 2006, the agreement will provide increased flight options for travellers and greater efficiencies for air carriers. Air carriers of both coun-tries can pick up passengers and/or cargo in the other partner’s territory for transport to a third country. The agreement also provides third-country carriers with access to U.S. markets via Canada.

After working for years on a strategy to capitalize on China’s potential as an emerging market, this year we made two great strides in the right direction. First, Canada was officially granted Approved Destination Status (ADS) by the People’s Republic of China. Second, Canada completed a new and expanded bilateral air transport agreement with China. Both developments provide a great advantage for YVR, as we are the major West Coast airport closest to Asia, and the ideal gateway connecting the Asia-Pacific Region and the Americas.

Another welcome piece of news this year was the long-awaited rent relief from the Federal Government. In May, Transport Minister Jean-C. Lapierrem announced that the Government of Canada would adopt a new rent policy for airports. For Vancouver, the new rent formula translates into a 54 per cent reduction over the term of our lease. Over the next four years, rent paid to Ottawa by Vancouver will be reduced by approximately $90-million. Between 2006 and 2020, the savings will total approximately $1.1- billion. The savings will go toward reducing airline charges and contributing to the Airport Authority’s capital program to ensure that YVR continues to be a premier global gateway and economic generator for the province of British Columbia. With the regulatory pieces falling into place and demand for air travel on the upswing, the time was right to kick off the major projects of our $1.4-billion capital program. Construction is now underway on the $420-million expansion to the International Terminal Building, which will add nine new gates by 2009; the $125-million Link Building, the new five-storey building linking the Domestic and International terminals; and, after years of active promotion, the RAV Line, recently renamed the Canada Line, linking YVR to Richmond and Downtown Vancouver.

After such a successful year it would be easy to rest on our laurels. But we’ve been around long enough to know that this is an extremely competitive industry and if you’re not preparing for the future you’re missing out on opportunities for your airport and for your region. And so we’re already well into the process of developing the next Master Plan to cover the period from 2007 to 2027, when we expect 33-million passengers at YVR. Along the way, we’ve sought input and feedback from our stakeholders and we expect to have a draft plan ready in the first half of 2006. There are exciting times ahead for YVR. With the holiday season upon us, I want to extend our sincerest appreciation to all of our business partners and patrons and wish a Merry Christmas to all.


YVR Third-Quarter Passenger And Cargo Numbers

For the third quarter ending September 2005, passenger numbers were up 4.8 per cent, with YVR continuing to track for 16.4-million passengers by the end of 2005. European traffic numbers, driven by a sharp increase in charter capacity, continued to be the leading growth sector with 12.6 per cent growth. Despite the loss of Canadian carrier Jetsgo earlier this year, the domestic sector has performed well, showing 5.4 per cent growth.

Transborder and Asia-Pacific sectors have experienced declines in the third quarter but are still showing growth of 2.8 per cent and 2.5 per cent, respectively, on a year-to-date basis. Cargo volumes are down three per cent year-to-date, mostly due to fewer volumes to and from Asia.

Domestic Transborder Asia-Pacific Europe Miscellaneous
Total

YTD Q3 04 6,054,884 3,152,372 1,834,633 886,308 225,337 12,153,534

YTD Q3 05 6,380,366 3,240,983 1,880,893 997,844 233,882 12,733,968

%Change 5.4% 2.8% 2.5% 12.6% 3.8% 4.8%

privatejet
Dec 14, 2005, 1:56 PM
The 787 order gives the Boeing plane a new and unique niche: It's going to be used in 2008 on the first low-cost carrier flying internationally, operated by Qantas subsidiary Jetstar International. One likely route, said Dixon: Sydney to Vancouver, B.C.

phesto
Dec 14, 2005, 5:27 PM
Another likely route that has been mentioned by Qantas (for ~2008) is YVR-MEL with the 787.

Other good news - looks like BA will be increasing their frequency on YVR-LHR starting summer 2006.

twoNeurons
Dec 14, 2005, 6:47 PM
isn't there lots of low-cost international carriers?

zoom airlines is one i can think of.

phesto
Dec 15, 2005, 7:25 PM
isn't there lots of low-cost international carriers?

zoom airlines is one i can think of.

Maybe they mean Australia? Or trans-pacific from Canada?

Asia/Australia don't offer many ideal routes for low-cost carriers.

SSLL
Dec 16, 2005, 4:05 AM
There are some out of Singapore, though (Air Asia, Tiger, Lion, Jetstar Asia).

phesto
Dec 19, 2005, 6:18 PM
YVR is looking for some feedback on logo's, branding etc:

http://www.yvr.ca/authority/airmail/index.asp?id=561

I think the logo looks a bit dated. Otherwise the scope of the survey is pretty narrow - I'd like to suggest that the arr/dep screens get updated to lcd like other leading airports.

Overground
Dec 19, 2005, 8:05 PM
I agree with the logo being updated. I suggested that they lose the leaf. It seems that so many companies in Canada use the leaf in their branding. We know it's Canadian, travellers coming here or leaving know it's Canadian, but do we really need it pointed out to us?
Updated screens would be cool!

phesto
Dec 22, 2005, 8:35 PM
Vancouver faces possible Xmas airport strike

Last Updated Thu, 22 Dec 2005 12:35:02 EST
CBC News

Vancouver International Airport could be shut down by a strike just before Christmas, although both sides are hoping for a deal before the Christmas Eve deadline.

District Lodge 140 of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, which represents the workers who clean planes and handle baggage at the airport, and their employer, the multinational company Servisair/GlobeGround, are meeting a federal conciliator Thursday.

Union spokesman Mike Clegg said a sympathy walkout by the pre-boarding screeners, who are in the same union "would actually paralyze the airport."

The deadline is 2 p.m. on Dec. 24.

The union, which represents 500 people, has served the company with a strike notice. After that, "we had a pretty good meeting with the company with regards to bargaining. We are quite optimistic we'll get a deal, hopefully before Christmas Day," Clegg said.

Company spokeswoman Zdenka Buric said Servisair/Globe Ground is eager to avoid a walkout.

"Right now, what we are really trying to focus on is continuing with the negotiations and coming to a resolution so that no services will be affected."

Seniority is one of the major issues.

The potential problem in Vancouver is one of two Christmas transportation strikes looming on Thursday.

Servisair/GlobeGround provides airport services all over the world, including Winnipeg and Montreal, its website says.

On Monday, District Lodge 140 members at Trudeau Airport (formerly Dorval) in Montreal voted 66 per cent in favour of a new contract with Servisair/GlobeGround.

murman
Dec 22, 2005, 9:20 PM
Vancouver faces possible Xmas airport strike

Last Updated Thu, 22 Dec 2005 12:35:02 EST
CBC News

Vancouver International Airport could be shut down by a strike just before Christmas, although both sides are hoping for a deal before the Christmas Eve deadline.

District Lodge 140 of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, which represents the workers who clean planes and handle baggage at the airport, and their employer, the multinational company Servisair/GlobeGround, are meeting a federal conciliator Thursday.

Union spokesman Mike Clegg said a sympathy walkout by the pre-boarding screeners, who are in the same union "would actually paralyze the airport."

The deadline is 2 p.m. on Dec. 24.

The union, which represents 500 people, has served the company with a strike notice. After that, "we had a pretty good meeting with the company with regards to bargaining. We are quite optimistic we'll get a deal, hopefully before Christmas Day," Clegg said.

Company spokeswoman Zdenka Buric said Servisair/Globe Ground is eager to avoid a walkout.

"Right now, what we are really trying to focus on is continuing with the negotiations and coming to a resolution so that no services will be affected."

Seniority is one of the major issues.

The potential problem in Vancouver is one of two Christmas transportation strikes looming on Thursday.

Servisair/GlobeGround provides airport services all over the world, including Winnipeg and Montreal, its website says.

On Monday, District Lodge 140 members at Trudeau Airport (formerly Dorval) in Montreal voted 66 per cent in favour of a new contract with Servisair/GlobeGround.

Just goes to prove what I've always suspected: the real pronunciation for union isn't "yoon'yun", it's "pack of pathetic little looser grinches that'll be the first with their backs to the wall when the revolution comes"

(with gratitude to the Hitchhiker's Guide for the last bit of my diatribe)

mezzanine
Dec 30, 2005, 6:54 AM
Personally, i'm hoping for 1) a direct scheduled conection to paris 2) more fights to central/south america (JAL already has a NRT-YVR-MEX flight). 3) the expansion of harmony to have more national presence.
Also the new planned harmony routes to china are promising....

Delirium
Dec 31, 2005, 1:52 PM
found this on pcl's website.
model showing the west chevron expansion

http://www.pcl.com/media/files/Projects/22_BC_Region/2200428_1_300.jpg

i was at yvr over the holidays and was surprised to see how fast they're moving with construction. the link building is already u/c.

SSLL
Dec 31, 2005, 2:50 PM
What a funny shape! Which terminal is that?^ I think more international flights would be good too. For the logo, I say lose the leaf too...

mezzanine
Dec 31, 2005, 5:26 PM
^ that would be an addition to the intl terminal. you can see the domestic terminal in the background, and the fairmont would be to the left of the photo.

MistyMountainHop
Jan 13, 2006, 12:32 AM
From the YVR website:

January 5, 2006 - 15:30 PM

VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AUTHORITY'S CREDIT RATING AMONG THE BEST IN THE WORLD

Standard and Poor's Raises Credit and Senior Unsecured Debt Ratings

Standard & Poor's announced today that Vancouver International Airport Authority's credit and senior unsecured debt ratings have been raised to "AA" from "AA Low," making YVR one of only four airports in the world with such a high designation.

"The new ratings reflect our strong financial management and our successful approach in developing YVR as an economic generator for the province and Canada's Pacific gateway," said Larry Berg, President and CEO, Vancouver International Airport Authority.

Standard & Poor's based the upgrade on the Airport Authority's "very strong business and financial profiles," and history of conservative financial management. Despite the turbulent times the aviation industry experienced in recent years, such as September 11, 2001, and the SARS crisis, the Airport Authority managed to maintain strong credit metrics, said Standard & Poor's, adding that the upgraded ratings reflect confidence in the Airport Authority and the expectation that its "financial profile will remain robust."

The Airport Authority's "AA" rating is shared with three other airports: Los Angeles International Airport, Oklahoma City Airport (Will Rogers World Airport) and A�roports de Paris.

About Vancouver International Airport Authority
The Airport Authority is a community-based, not-for-profit organization that operates Vancouver International Airport (YVR). The second largest international passenger gateway on North America's West Coast, YVR expects to welcome 16.9 million passengers in 2006. The Airport Authority is undertaking a $1.0-billion capital program that will ensure the airport meets the growing demand for air travel, and continues to be developed as a premier global gateway and economic generator for British Columbia.

-YVR-

For more information:
Media Relations
Vancouver International Airport Authority
604.880.9815

phesto
Jan 17, 2006, 6:13 PM
Another Strong Year Ahead For YVR
By LARRY BERG, President and Chief Executive Officer

Coming off a record year, the Airport Authority is preparing for another year of growth in 2006, with passenger traffic forecasted to total 16.9 million and new opportunities arising. At YVR we’re particularly well positioned geographically and strategically—to take advantage of these opportunities.

Heading into the New Year, we will focus on Building the Gateway constructing the infrastructure to meet growing demand, working to seize new opportunities resulting from Canada’s recently liberalized air policy, working to further liberalize Canada’s international air policy with a focus on secondary markets, employing innovative passenger facilitation initiatives, and completing a 20-year airport development plan.

In the coming year, we’ll continue construction of the International Terminal’s new wing, the Link Building, related expansion projects and the airport portion of the Canada Line, so we’re prepared to handle increased passenger traffic.

In addition to capitalizing on the Open Skies agreement with the United States and the new bilateral air transport agreement with China, our priorities in 2006 will include the pursuit of new bilaterals with Singapore, Malaysia, France and the United Arab Emirates, and the conclusion of China’s Approved Destination Status for Canada. We’re pleased that Ottawa is working toward more liberal air transport agreements, and we’ll work to keep the momentum
going.

To make the journey smoother for our passengers, we will continue to work with government agencies and airline partners for full implementation of existing simplified travel solutions, and look for new ways to expedite passengers through processing at YVR.

We’re already an industry leader when it comes to the use of self-service check-in kiosks, and we’re continuing to deploy them in off-airport locations, such as downtown hotels and the convention centre, making it easier for passengers to check in, and easing congestion at the airport.

Also in 2006, we’ll be undertaking consulting with stakeholders on the first draft of our long-term Master Plan covering 2007-2027. The draft will follow more than a year of consultations with community groups, industry, government, airport users and Sea Island employees. It will outline future terminal, runway and transportation development plans that we will undertake over the next two decades to ensure that YVR remains an economic generator, serving all British Columbians.

On a celebratory note, YVR will reach the ripe old age of 75 in 2006. Three-quarters of the way to the century mark, YVR has truly become a premier global gateway, and is rated among the world’s best. That’s not bad for an airport that in its opening year served only about 3,000 passengers, most of them on Vancouver sightseeing tours—now that’s Auld Lang Syne.

------------------------------------

16.9 million seems realistic for 2006, if a bit modest. That would be a 500k increase, or same as '05.

Now to reach 33 million by 2027, you would need 800k per year...

MistyMountainHop
Jan 18, 2006, 2:06 AM
^ There will be a huge increase for 2010.

phesto
Jan 18, 2006, 2:30 AM
^That's true, but the huge annual increase in passengers expected for the year 2010 won't be sustained in the years following. In other words, the Olympics will be positive for passenger numbers in the years following 2010, but won't be anywhere near the increase in that one year.

The passenger projection targets that have been quoted by Berg:

2006- 16.9 million
2010- 21 million
2027- 33 million
2044- 45 million

You can see after 2010, assuming we see a constant increase, that it would take a ~700k increase per year (currently 6%) to meet those targets- not altogether that large, but it would have to be sustained growth over 30 years...

tayser
Jan 18, 2006, 2:33 AM
Another likely route that has been mentioned by Qantas (for ~2008) is YVR-MEL with the 787.


it'll most likely be under the new Jetstar International (Qantas' LCC) banner - the first 12 or 13 787s are going to this new international wing:

http://boeingmedia.com/imageView.cfm?id=14273&ResID=4

Jetstar is Tullamarine-based (and parent Qantas is Mascot-based) if they can eventually make that daily year-round then awesome, re: A380, that'll probably fly from Sydney direct to Van then probably on to Toronto, it's conceivable Jetstar International might fly Melbourne-Vancouver-Montreal as well with both the Sydney and Melbourne flights leaving so as they can co-ordinate landing in Vancouver and allow pax to change planes to get over to Ontario/Quebec.

incidently I'm looking at the possibility of flying on the new YVR-SFO-SYD-MEL Qantarse service in August (with BA LHR-YUL, then WJ YYZ-YVR), I'll score a decent amount of Frequent flier points that way :haha:

SSLL
Jan 18, 2006, 9:35 PM
^Interesting. What's the point of having a Jetstar International? Are the fares going to be lower than what Qantas would charge?

phesto
Jan 26, 2006, 6:06 PM
Some news on the first AC routing to take advantage of 5th freedom rights under the new Canada-US bilateral agreement. Could have some future implications for YVR-SYD.

Air Canada files to fly Los Angeles-Sydney non-stop

MONTREAL, Jan. 25 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada today announced that as a
result of new market opportunities presented by the recently expanded Open
Skies Agreement for Canada and the United States, the airline will apply to
Canadian and Australian authorities to commence daily Toronto-Los Angeles-
Sydney service. Flights would commence during the first half of 2007 with the
delivery of Air Canada's new Boeing 777 fleet featuring industry-leading
lie-flat suites in the Executive First cabin and personal entertainment
systems at each customer's seat throughout the aircraft. Air Canada already
operates between the U.S. and Australia on its Vancouver-Honolulu-Sydney
service using existing route authorities.

With an elapsed westbound time of 21 hours and 15 minutes, Air Canada's
Toronto-Sydney flights via Los Angeles would offer the fastest elapsed time of
any airline from eastern Canada to Australia, shaving three and a half hours
off current Air Canada routings and also offering one-stop service from all
business markets across Canada. The daily flights would serve Canadian,
American and Australian consumers as well as freight forwarders, seeking
convenient and competitive air transportation between Canada and Australia,
the United States and Australia, and Canada and the United States. Air Canada
plans to work with its Star Alliance partners, Air New Zealand, United
Airlines and US Airways, through schedule coordination and codeshare services
to offer customers increased choice and convenience.

"The recently concluded Open Skies Agreement for Canada and the United
States opens new opportunities for Air Canada to enhance service for consumers
and business in Canada, the United States and international markets,
such as Australia," said Ben Smith, Vice President, Network Planning.
"We look forward to working with Canadian and Australian authorities to derive
maximum benefits for our customers in all three countries. Air Canada has long
advocated the further liberalization of our shared skies so that we can better link
our expanded North American network to our growing international network,
and further capitalize on our cooperative agreements with our commercial partners.

In addition to offering all our customers faster access to and from Australia,
same plane service from our main hub in Toronto will raise the bar in premium
in-flight comfort using our new 777 fleet."

The Toronto-originating flights would be timed to offer convenient
connection possibilities in Los Angeles to and from Montreal, Edmonton,
Calgary and Vancouver, as well as to and from points throughout the United
States via Los Angeles on flights operated by Air Canada's Star Alliance
partners, United Airlines and US Airways.

An Open Skies Agreement for Canada and the United States was concluded
November 10, 2005. The agreement comes into effect September 2006. In
addition to providing for more choice and competitive pricing for consumers,
the agreement allows for carriers of each country to carry passengers via the
other country to third countries, referred to as "fifth freedom" rights, such
as Air Canada proposing to serve Australia via the United States.

MistyMountainHop
Jan 28, 2006, 1:59 AM
From the Janury 2006 YVR E-Newsletter:

Keeping You Up-to-Date On Construction At YVR

The face of YVR is changing. As passenger numbers continue to rise, highlighting the need for expanded facilities, our major expansion projects have kicked into full swing.

Our largest project, a $420-million, nine-gate expansion to the International Terminal, is also on schedule, with the steel frame already set. Phase One, opening in spring 2007, will add four gates, two of which will accommodate the new Airbus A380.

Construction of a five-story building that will adjoin the International and Domestic terminals is also well under way. Aptly called the Link Building, it will provide increased international check-in capacity, passenger screening, additional baggage systems and office space. When completed in summer 2007, the five-storey building will be connected to the Canada Line via a covered walkway, and will serve as a central hub for passengers travelling through YVR. To complete the construction, the regular concourse connecting the two terminals has been sectioned off. A special corridor has been built to connect the two terminals.

Those commuting to and from YVR will be pleased to know that construction on the airport portion of the Canada Line has begun on Sea Island near the Arthur Laing Bridge. The current activity includes site grading, utility relocation and test piling activities associated with the construction of foundations for the new Middle Arm Bridge. Construction of the airport segment of the Line includes building 1.9 km of elevated guideway and 1.7 km of at-grade guideway, bridge construction, partial reconstruction of the North Service Road, construction of the Templeton overpass and associated roadways, and construction of three Canada Line stations.

Last year, YVR served 16.4 million passengers; in 2006 the Airport Authority anticipates a record 16.9 million.


President's Perspective

ANOTHER STRONG YEAR AHEAD FOR YVR

Coming off a record year, the Airport Authority is preparing for another year of growth in 2006, with passenger traffic forecasted to total 16.9 million and new opportunities arising. At YVR we're particularly well-positioned- geographically and strategically- to take advantage of these opportunities.

This year, we will focus on Building the Gateway- constructing the infrastructure to meet growing demand, working to seize new opportunities resulting from Canada's recently liberalized air policy, working to further liberalize Canada's international air policy with a focus on secondary markets, employing innovative passenger facilitation initiatives, and completing a 20-year airport development plan.

We'll continue construction of the International Terminal's new wing, the Link Building, related expansion projects and the airport portion of Canada Line, so we're prepared to handle increased passenger traffic.

In addition to capitalizing on the Open Skies agreement with the United States and the new bilateral air transport agreement with China, our priorities in 2006 will include the pursuit of new bilaterals with Singapore, Malaysia, France and the United Arab Emirates, and the conclusion of China's Approved Destination Status for Canada. We're pleased that Ottawa is working toward more liberal air transport agreements, and we'll work to keep the momentum going.

To make the journey smoother for our passengers, we will continue to work with government agencies and airline partners for full implementation of existing simplified travel solutions, and look for new ways to expedite passengers through processing at YVR. We're already an industry leader when it comes to the use of self-service check-in kiosks, and we're continuing to deploy them in off-airport locations, such as downtown hotels and the convention centre, making it easier for passengers to check in, and easing congestion at the airport.

Also in 2006, we'll be undertaking consulting with stakeholders on the first draft of our long-term Master Plan covering 2007-2027. The draft will follow more than a year of consultations with community groups, industry, government, airport users and Sea Island employees. It will outline future terminal, runway and transportation development plans that we will undertake over the next two decades to ensure that YVR remains an economic generator, serving all British Columbians.

On a celebratory note, YVR will reach the ripe old age of 75 in 2006. Three-quarters of the way to the century mark, YVR has truly become a premier global gateway, and is rated among the world's best. That's not bad for an airport that in its opening year served only about 3,000 passengers, most of them on Vancouver sightseeing tours- now that's Auld Lang Syne.


Canada Line Open House At YVR

The Canada Line Project is inviting the public to an Open House at YVR to learn more about the airport portion of the rapid transit line.

Where: International Terminal East Concourse (Departures Level 3), near the Fairmont Vancouver Airport Hotel

When: 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m., Thursday, February 9, 2006

Visitors will be able to learn more about preliminary station design and track alignment. The public will also have the opportunity to ask project partners questions about the line and provide feedback on the preliminary design options.

In addition, the Airport Authority will have information on long-term planning being undertaken that will guide airport development to 2027.


Relief For The Harried Traveller

Stuck waiting for a connecting flight? Frequent travellers often spend as many hours getting to their destination as at the destination itself. We know that interrupting your life and your responsibilities can be stressful, so we want your time at YVR to be as enjoyable and useful as possible.

YVR's innovative retail programs can help you finish off those last minute items on your to do list. Still needing to polish your report before your presentation in New York? Visit one of our premier lounges and catch up on business. Need a suit pressed in a hurry? Drop by our in-house dry cleaners.

We want passengers to have fun, too. For those who like to shop, YVR does not disappoint. In addition to our award-winning boutiques, YVR features a variety of retail carts throughout the terminals.

"The product offerings appeal to the changing wants and needs of the consumer and allow us to test the market," says Teresa D'Alessandro, Retail Leasing Representative. "Retail carts are a great opportunity for enterprising, small business operators to showcase their unique products in an exciting airport environment."

YVR boasts 16 retail carts with a wide range of products, including a treat for Fido at Aeropet, the perfect accessory for your next meeting from Charmed Designs, or a toy for your nephew at Toyland. Stop by Envy Me Body Solutions to pick up Air Flight Gel, a unique aromatherapy product that helps promote healthy circulation- perfect for long flights across the Pacific. The carts, designed with the savvy shopper in mind, all sell "value-priced" products.

"We're always looking for better ways to satisfy the needs of people who come to this airport," says Christopher Gilliland, Manager, Retail Sales and Service Programs. "It is important that we provide value for money and make the shopping experience at YVR a memorable one."

excel
Jan 28, 2006, 2:20 AM
^Thanks for the updates!

MistyMountainHop
Jan 28, 2006, 6:50 AM
^ No problem.


200th post!

excel
Jan 28, 2006, 10:17 AM
^Congradulations. when i made that post it was my 300th.

phesto
Feb 15, 2006, 12:18 AM
Interesting move by Harmony- although this route is already 28x daily w/AC and WJ.

Vancouver, BC, February 8, 2006: Vancouver-based Harmony Airways is pleased to announce it is adding a new route between Vancouver and Calgary starting May 14th.

Harmony will operate three flights each day (two on Saturdays) on a schedule timed to link Calgarians with Asia Pacific connecting through Vancouver.

Partner carriers Japan Airlines and China Eastern will connect travelers with flights from Vancouver to Asia. The new Calgary - Vancouver connection compliments the existing Toronto - Vancouver link already in place.

"Harmony recognizes the tremendous demand from cities such as Tokyo and Shanghai for destinations like Calgary and the Rockies. Alternately, Calgarians want easy connections to Asia", said Gary Collins, President and CEO, Harmony Airways. "We're making the link between Asia Pacific and North America using Vancouver as the gateway."

The launch of Calgary Vancouver is the next step in Harmony's North America to Asia strategy.

"Calgary has become an important part of Harmony's network. We introduced service to Honolulu and Maui last year, have since expanded the Maui service to operate year round and are now offering daily service to the West Coast," said Collins. "Calgarians have taken to Harmony's unique combination of service, schedule, and price on our Hawaii routes. I think they will enjoy the same experience and value flying Harmony to Vancouver and beyond, to Asia."

Harmony Airways is an industry leader in full-service, competitive air travel. Aimed at exceeding customer expectations, Harmony economy class provides a choice of complimentary hot meals, beverages, comfortable leg room and in-flight movies. On the Vancouver Calgary run, a light snack will be served. Harmonyone business class is available on all routes.

officedweller
Feb 21, 2006, 8:34 PM
Canada Line Station info:

http://www.canadaline.ca/pubConsCurrent.asp

Coldrsx
Feb 21, 2006, 8:37 PM
harmony should become the next westjet...

phesto
Feb 21, 2006, 10:02 PM
The YVR station looks good. I like the 'green' wall, and the park extension (or 'mini park').

There's a different rendering of the link building on the first presentation board. I think YVR will look pretty damn good when this is all complete.

What's the deal with YVR 3? Is it going to be the deciding factor for future terminal expansion?

twoNeurons
Feb 21, 2006, 10:04 PM
Wow... those renderings look amazing. And I'm starting to see more and more the logic in making it a single guideway. If you're a tourist going to Vancouver, it's SUPER EASY to both FIND the skytrain and to know which direction to GO. It's only for the very last station, so I don't see any problems with not enough trains/capacity and it's a much simpler layout in a maze of roads and stuff. That station model looks awesome... much like the rest of what YVR does.

Also, YVR3 being deferred and the at-grade section are making sense too.

Thoughts?

Knave
Feb 21, 2006, 10:14 PM
harmony should become the next westjet...

Howso?

Their cost structure is too high to compete with WestJet on an on-par basis. I think their current operation suits them well.... but there's rumors going around that they're not doing too well; since they're privately owned (like Jetsgo was), nobody knows for sure. Just rumors....

officedweller
Feb 21, 2006, 11:45 PM
The single platform really simplifies the access to the station, although a centre platform could have been easily accessed from the end of the platform without overpasses or underpasses - but that would have required the station to be farther from the terminals (i.e. the end of the platform would have had to line up with the international terminal walkway).

I am concerned about how short the patforms are though.

WRT YVR 3
- the north-south taxiway is only required for the YVR3 terminal expansion location since it creates the longest taxiing distance.
- any terminal on the south side would require a secondary peoplemover system to be implemented since you can't extend from YVR4.
so my money's on the terminal expansion being at YVR3.

phesto
Feb 22, 2006, 1:08 AM
^In the long term, the North-south taxiway might become a necessity regardless of whether or not YVR 3 is the next terminal expansion option. It would all depend on how much traffic increases, and how they decide to expand the runway system.

From a couple weeks back- WJ is bringing back YVR-YHM, Also starting YEG-YXX:

WestJet Announces Spring Schedule Enhancements

FEB 9, 2006 - 10:55 ET

CALGARY, ALBERTA--(CCNMatthews - Feb. 9, 2006) - WestJet (TSX:WJA) today announced numerous schedule enhancements, including new non-stop routes and increased frequencies between cities across Canada.

WestJet will introduce new non-stop service between the following cities:

- Vancouver and Hamilton, daily non-stop service (beginning May 1, 2006)

- Toronto and St. John's, daily non-stop service (beginning May 1, 2006)

- Edmonton and Abbotsford, daily non-stop service (beginning April 23, 2006)

- Calgary and Halifax, daily non-stop service (seasonal, May 1 to October 28, 2006)

- Toronto and Victoria, daily non-stop service (seasonal, May 12 to October 28, 2006)

With effective dates beginning March 21 through to May 1, 2006, WestJet will also increase the number of departures between cities in its existing route network as follows:

- Service between Toronto and Calgary increases to seven non-stop flights per day

- Service between Toronto and Vancouver increases to five non-stop flights per day

- Service between Toronto and Edmonton increases to four non-stop flights per day

- Service between Toronto and Halifax increases to four non-stop flight per day

- Service between Vancouver and Winnipeg increases to three non-stop flights per day

- Service between Toronto and Thunder Bay increases to three non-stop flights per day

- Service between Calgary and Hamilton increases to three non-stop flights per day

- Service between Toronto and Moncton increases to two non-stop flights per week

- Service between Vancouver and Montreal increases to two non-stop flights every business day

- Service between Toronto and Charlottetown increases to daily non-stop service

Sean Durfy, WestJet's Executive Vice-President of Marketing and Sales, commented today: "We are pleased to respond to our guests' requests for more non-stop flights across our Canadian network. These additions will serve both business travellers and those enjoying summer vacations on Canada's most modern and comfortable fleet. We're also continuing our successful service to Hawaii throughout the summer, with three weekly flights to Maui and four weekly flights to Honolulu from Vancouver.

"In a recent Leger Marketing survey, WestJet was viewed as the Canadian airline that offers flyers the best value for dollar paid. More than twice as many respondents surveyed gave WestJet top scores as compared to our major competitor, and we're confident our schedule changes will continue to make us their preferred airline."

With these additions and further enhancements to its 2006 spring schedule, WestJet will operate approximately 1,975 weekly departures.

WestJet is Canada's leading low-fare airline offering scheduled service throughout its 34-city North American network. Named Canada's most respected corporation for customer service in 2005, WestJet pioneered low-cost high-value flying in Canada. With increased legroom and leather seats on its modern fleet of Boeing Next-Generation 737 aircraft, and live seatback television provided by Bell ExpressVu on the majority of its fleet, WestJet strives to be the number one choice for travellers.

officedweller
Feb 22, 2006, 1:38 AM
On second thought, the curvature of the pedestrian bridge to the Link Building suggests that the tail track cold be extended.....

mr.x
Feb 22, 2006, 2:06 AM
is it just me or is the YVR Terminus platform longer than Bridgeport and the other stations?

natelox
Feb 22, 2006, 2:53 AM
The design looks very good, but not quite as good as the original plan. Looking at the elevations, why did they draw footings? Shouldn't the airport be built on end-bearing piles? If an earthquake hits, the ground there is subject to liquifaction, and any soil-bearing capacity will dissapear and the building will essentially dissapear.

mezzanine
Feb 24, 2006, 3:23 PM
. but there's rumors going around that they're not doing too well; since they're privately owned (like Jetsgo was), nobody knows for sure. Just rumors....

I hope they'll do well - they seem to get great reviews on skytrax. I think they are aiming for a transpacific strategy. I think they applied for some of the new Chinese routes to YVR, hopefully they'll be lucrative as they come online.

privatejet
Feb 24, 2006, 3:45 PM
It should be remembered that Harmony is backed by Dr. David Ho -which represents some very serious money as opposed to Jetsgo and serial failure Leblanc.

excel
Feb 25, 2006, 1:27 AM
Random news, but Air North will now be handling Harmony aircraft on the ground at YVR. Starting sometime next month.

JBinCalgary
Feb 25, 2006, 1:45 AM
westjet is really pulling it together.

Edmonchuck
Feb 26, 2006, 11:46 PM
(...)as opposed to Jetsgo and serial failure Leblanc.


Rumor mill has it this dolt is trying again...

Edmonchuck
Feb 26, 2006, 11:46 PM
double - mods please delete.

MistyMountainHop
Mar 1, 2006, 1:44 AM
Some articles from the YVR newsletter:

Expanding Our Connections

Summer is the busiest period at YVR. As such, the Airport Authority is pleased to announce the following enhancements to our schedule and the addition of new non-stop routes:

Beijing - between July and October, increased service to 9 times per week on Air China
Belfast - between June and October, weekly nonstop service on Zoom
Cardiff - between June and October, weekly nonstop service on Zoom
Hamilton - beginning May 1, daily service on WestJet
Hanover - between June and October, Condor will offer weekly service via Halifax
London - from May to October, increased service to 13 times per week on British Airways
Paris - between June and October, weekly one-stop service, via Calgary, on Zoom
Sydney - beginning in June, three flights per week, via San Francisco, on Qantas
Washington - between June and September, daily service on United
Travellers will also be pleased to know that flights to Toronto and Winnipeg will be increasing this spring.


Taking Take-out To New Heights

You've worked a long day and are now facing a five hour flight to Toronto. Exhausted and hungry, you're desperate for a good meal. With YVR's Food on the Fly program, now you can take whatever you crave onboard with you.

Imagine boarding the plane and tucking into a California Spring Salad from Milestone's- with crumbled goat cheese, fresh strawberries, red onions and spicy-glazed pecans, your day suddenly got a whole lot sweeter. Craving Japanese? Stop by Hanami Japanese Restaurant or Wok N' Roll and pick up a bento box with gyozas, a green salad, sushi and teriyaki chicken. In the mood for a hamburger and fries? Pick up White Spot's famed hamburger platter with its signature triple-o sauce at Medallist Bar & Grill.

With most domestic flights offering limited or no in-flight meal service, YVR's Food on the Fly program offers travellers the opportunity to take meals directly on the plane. Home to more than 25 restaurants and fast food outlets, YVR passengers are sure to find something to suit every taste and budget. Menu items span a vast array of options, from sandwiches, wraps and quesadillas, to fruit smoothies and light breakfasts. Taking an early morning flight to Calgary? Stop by Starbucks and pick up a latte and scone, or grab the quintessentially Canadian "Double Double" (coffee with cream and sugar) along with a maple-glazed doughnut from Tim Hortons.

YVR's award-winning selection of restaurants offers items you've come to love and know. YVR's branded concepts offer the same pricing as other Greater Vancouver locations. Visit your favourite YVR restaurant and ask for it to go - your meal will be packaged in an easy-to-carry, transparent, travel-friendly bag. Choose from anything on the menu to suit your special dietary needs.


Gateway To The Games

Fresh from the Olympic Games in Torino, Italy, Vancouver Mayor Sam Sullivan and VANOC chief executive officer, John Furlong, arrived at YVR last night bringing with them the official Olympic flag.

Despite exhaustion from their long journey home, the two enthusiastically greeted the eagerly awaiting crowd of about 100 people at the Haida Gwaii. Dressed in red and white, and waving Canadian flags, patriots of all ages lit up the terminal with excitement in anticipation of seeing the Olympic flag unfurled, and catching a glimpse of the Olympic torch.

As Vancouver gets set to host the event, now just four years away, preparations have kicked into high gear. As the Gateway to the Games, YVR will play a critical role in bringing the world to British Columbia.

Looking ahead, our plans include expanding our successful check-in kiosk program to more off-site locations, including the athlete's village, to ensure efficient passenger processing and convenience.

Our $1.0-billion capital program is also on track, with the Canada Line expected to be completed by late 2009, providing passengers with an economical and convenient method of travelling between downtown Vancouver, Richmond City Centre, and Vancouver International Airport.

The first phase of the nine-gate expansion to the International Terminal is also under way. When the project is completed in 2009, YVR will be able to accommodate the newer, larger planes of the future, and the 21 million passengers expected by 2010.

Coldrsx
Mar 1, 2006, 1:48 AM
love the zoom flights and the onboard food idea.

phesto
Mar 8, 2006, 5:07 PM
YVR's summer schedule is up. Here's a summary that was posted on another site:

International: (not all, just adjusted frequencies)

-JL YVR-NRT a 10x weekly flight
-AC YVR-LHR 2x daily
-KLM YVR-AMS 5x weekly
-BA is moving to 13 fights/wk each with 744
-Air China will be 9 flights/week
-China Eastern daily
-Korean to five/wk
-EVA to five per week
-LTU to 3/wk
-LH i heard will be 9 flights with 2 flights being Condor 767
-Condor will also begin Hannover -Vancouver
-TS will begin Munich
-Zoom will begin CDG
-QF YVR-SYD 3x weekly (July and August)
-CX YVR-HKG to 18x weekly (beginning august)

Transborder:

Air Canada's Summer Sched.
SEA - 6 daily Dash 8-300's (think that may be less frequent)
PDX - 5 daily Dash 8-300's
SFO - 3 daily A319's
LAX - 3 daily A320's and 2 daily A319's
SAN - 1 daily CRJ-705
LAS - 1 daily A319
JFK - 2 daily A319's (one additional flight)
ANC - 1 daily A319

Alaska's Summer Sched.
SEA - 10 daily Dash 8-Q200's and 1 daily 737-700
PDX - 4 daily Dash 8-Q200's
ANC - 1 daily 737-700
SFO - 2 daily MD-80's and 1 daily 737-700
LAX - 4 daily 737-400's, 1 daily 737-700, and 1 daily 737-900
SAN - 1 daily MD-80
LAS - 1 daily 737-700

Delta's Summer Sched.
SLC - 2 daily CRJ-100/200 and 1 daily 737-800 (738 replaces the 733)
ATL - 1 daily 757-200 (was a 738 on select winter days)

American's Summer Sched.
DFW - 3 daily 757-200's (usually a mix of MD's and 757's)

Continental's Summer Sched.
IAH - 2 daily 737-300 and 1 daily 737-700 (usually 2 daily flights)
EWR - 1 daily 737-700

Northwest's Summer Sched.
MSP - 3 daily A320's (usually a few 757's during the summer)
DTW - 1 daily A320

United's Summer Sched.
DEN - 2 daily 319's, 1 daily 320 and 1 daily 737-300 (return has 1 less flight)
ORD - 3 daily 319's and 1 daily 320 (return has 1 more flight)
SFO - 3 daily 319's and 1 daily 320
IAD - 1 daily 319 (new flight)

America West/US Airways Summer Sched.
PHX - 2 daily A319's
LAS - 6 weekly CRJ-900 and 1 weekly CRJ-100/200 (usually has a 319)

phesto
Mar 24, 2006, 11:22 PM
Update:

March 2006

New Wing Takes Shape
http://www.yvr.ca/authority/images/airmail/Crew.jpg

YVR recently celebrated an important milestone with the completion of the structural steel framework for the International Terminal expansion- quite a feat when you consider 3,750 metric tonnes of steel were erected.

To commemorate the occasion, Bob Cowan, Senior Vice President, Engineering, hosted a ceremony recognizing the outstanding efforts involved in meeting this challenge. Through the teamwork of several different groups, YVR was able to meet its goal. The team included: Empire Iron Works, PCL, the general contractor, Stantec, the lead architectural firm, structural engineers Bush Bohlman, and the YVR Project Management team headed by Ray Zibrik.

The largest project of the Airport Authority's $1.0-billion capital program, the $420-million, nine-gate expansion is progressing on time and on budget. By spring 2007, phase one of the International Terminal expansion will be completed, adding four gates, two of which will be able to accommodate the new Airbus A380.


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President's Perspective


FROM TORINO TO YVR: MANAGING PEAKS OF OLYMPIC PROPORTIONS

The Torino Olympics have come and gone, and what spectacular Games they were, with Canada's athletes winning more medals in more events than ever before. Behind the celebration of athleticism was a team of organizers working tirelessly to make the splendour look effortless.

One of the Torino 2006 Olympic Organizing Committee's tasks was planning for athletes' and spectators' smooth passage through the airport. A key member of YVR's management team was in Torino to learn from the Italians' experience with passenger facilitation, and bring the learnings home to B.C., not only for 2010, but also for all major events that might cause an influx of passengers at YVR.

Typically, airports are not well equipped to handle unusually large swells of passengers over a short period of time. All airports experience busy times when more passengers than usual will need to use the terminals- in the industry we call these "peaks" - and airport operators strive to manage peaks by reducing them wherever possible.

The peak at the end of the Olympic Games is unavoidable, as athletes and spectators who arrived at different times for different events tend to depart in a condensed period of time following the closing ceremonies.

Here at YVR we deal with large peaks, the most significant of which occurs from approximately 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. This peak is driven by flight banks at major Asian and European mega-hubs, and by the key windows of time for passengers in Eastern North America to depart to or get home from YVR before or after flying across the Pacific via the Vancouver gateway.

Vancouver is a beautiful city with a strong tourism industry, and we are a popular port of call for Alaska cruises. This also contributes to our peaks, which naturally go up during cruise season and the summer months.

During peak periods, YVR generally operates at capacity. The advantage of dealing with such peaks is that we've long recognized the need to have processes and systems in place to deal with large influxes of passengers, and we've worked hard to prepare our airport to handle them smoothly.

One of the ways we've managed peaks is through innovations in airport technology and processes to simplify the passenger experience, including our use of self-service check-in kiosks both at the airport and off site, cruise ship on-board check-in, and border programs like CANPASS Air and NEXUS Air.

We call this series of programs designed to get passengers quickly and efficiently through the airport YVR FasTrack, and we're always working to expand our initiatives.

The future of simplified passenger travel is off-airport passenger and baggage check-in, and it's a technology we're already testing. Following the conclusion of the World Junior Hockey Tournament in Vancouver in January, 140 players from the Russian, Finnish, Swiss and Norwegian teams were checked in along with their baggage at three separate hotels. Baggage tags and boarding passes were distributed in advance, meaning the players didn't have to haul their bulky hockey bags through the airport.

With our experience and innovation in simplifying passenger travel, and the invaluable insight we'll gain from Torino, we're well on our way to a smooth journey in 2010, when YVR will represent both a starting place and a homecoming for many an Olympic dream.

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Passengers Rate YVR Among The Best


YVR's commitment to delivering unparalleled customer service has been recognized, yet again.

In a recent survey, passengers rated YVR among the best airports in the world for customer satisfaction.

For the eighth consecutive year, YVR placed among the top 10 airports for customer satisfaction in the 2005 AETRA survey of international airports. YVR was rated No. 4 overall in the Americas and No. 6 in the world in our size category of 15 to 25 million passengers per year. This year, we also earned the distinction of second place in the Most Improved Airport category.

The AETRA survey measures satisfaction levels in various customer service areas including: airport services and facilities, efficiency of check-in staff and waiting time at check-in, availability of directional signage and flight information screens, and overall airport environment, such as ambience and airport cleanliness.

AETRA distributed more than 100,000 questionnaires at 66 airports worldwide. Our rating reaffirms YVR's position among the world's premier airports and are a testament to the efforts of both our employees and business partners.

AETRA, formerly known as IATA, provides a customer satisfaction benchmarking program for many of the world's leading airports, including London Heathrow, Amsterdam, Hong Kong, Singapore and Dubai. For further information on the program, and highlights from the 2005 survey, click here.

theUSUALsuspect
Apr 6, 2006, 3:45 PM
Existing facilities pushed to capacity by heavy demand

Bruce Constantineau, Vancouver Sun
Published: Thursday, April 06, 2006

Vancouver International Airport will need a new $1-billion terminal by 2015 and a third runway -- worth "hundreds of millions of dollars" -- by 2025 as surging passenger traffic pushes existing facilities to full capacity, airport authority president Larry Berg said Wednesday.

That's on top of an estimated $1 billion the airport expects to spend over the next four years on the Canada Line, gate expansions to the international terminal, a new structure linking the domestic and international terminals and associated improvements.

So airport improvement fees that have raised close to $600 million since 1993, will remain a fact of life for the foreseeable future, Berg said after a Vancouver Board of Trade speech.

"If we don't add this infrastructure improvement, airlines will just go to other West Coast airports," he said in an interview.

Vancouver airport had a record 16.4 million passengers last year and Berg expects about 23 million passengers will use the airport in 2015, with growth expected to come from several global markets -- including North America, Europe and Asia.

Berg said the airport authority has the financial capacity now to borrow the money needed for the future capital projects. He noted Standard and Poor's credit rating agency recently raised the authority's credit rating to AA, making it one of just four airports in the world to achieve that rating -- along with Los Angeles International, Aeroports de Paris and Oklahoma City airports.

Details of the airport authority's future development plans will be outlined in the first draft of a long-term plan the authority expects to release later this spring.

Berg said the airport will add nine new gates by 2010, giving it a total of 62. But the airport will need 11 more gates by 2015 and 14 more by 2023, creating the need for a new $1-billion terminal by as early as 2015.
"Our plan will be to develop a flexible facility that could be built in phases as needed," he said.

The authority will recommend the new terminal be located to the east of the existing international terminal and be served directly by a Canada Line station.

Before a new runway is built in 2025, the airport plans to build two new taxiways to get the maximum use of its existing runways. A north-south taxiway will connect the western ends of the two runways and in 2014, the airport wants to build an elevated taxiway that will cross over Grant McConachie Way and the Canada Line.

Berg said an underground taxiway isn't practical for Sea Island so an elevated facility was the obvious option.

"Elevated taxiways are quite common now and not much more expensive to build than conventional taxiways," he said.

Berg said there are two options for a future third runway -- build it along the foreshore or build it south of the existing south runway.

He said there are cost and environmental concerns with the foreshore option but it has received significant support from the public because it moves noise farther away from residential areas. The south runway option was not as popular because it moves noise closer to some Richmond neighbourhoods, Berg said, and the exact cost of either option has not been determined.

"It depends, but when you start talking runways, you're into hundreds of millions of dollars," he said.

Berg said there are no plans to increase the airport improvement fee, which was introduced in 1993 to finance capital improvements.

"But as long as we're in this major construction mode for the foreseeable future, it's my expectation [the fee] will continue to be in place," he said.
The fee -- expected to generate about $70 million this year -- adds $5 to the cost of a flight to a B.C. or Yukon destination, $10 for North America and Hawaii, and $15 for destinations outside North America.

Berg said a new economic impact study has determined that Vancouver International Airport accounts for 26,700 direct jobs and generates $6.8 billion in total economic output. He said the numbers have grown modestly in the past five years, despite a downturn in the aviation industry caused by 9/11, SARS and record-high fuel prices.

The study said positive factors boosting airport activity since 2000 include a 15-per-cent increase in overseas flights, continuing construction projects, growth in air cargo business, growth of WestJet and other domestic carriers and expansion of retail services.