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-   -   noirish Los Angeles (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=170279)

ethereal_reality Oct 30, 2012 11:16 PM

This is a bit of a mystery to me. Where in Beverly Hills was this impressive stone arched bridge?

http://imageshack.us/a/img849/8209/a...bevhillsar.jpg
ebay

I vaguely remember a bridge that led to the clubhouse at the Beverly Hills Country Club (or was it the Bel Air Country Club?)
I've been searching for a photo of that bridge to compare.
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ethereal_reality Oct 30, 2012 11:26 PM

http://imageshack.us/a/img831/2310/a...ottage1918.jpg
ebay

This is quite some 'cottage'.
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ethereal_reality Oct 30, 2012 11:40 PM

posted earlier/climbers on rock
http://imageshack.us/a/img703/7120/p...klookshuge.jpg
ebay



Eagle Rock 1928.

http://imageshack.us/a/img141/1262/a...28flickrgs.jpg
http://www.lapl.org/

I'm not sure what bridge this is either. It looks awfully skinny, even for 1928. Could it be a R.R. bridge?*

*I just noticed the brace underneath...perhaps it's not all that skinny.
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ethereal_reality Oct 30, 2012 11:54 PM

This contemporary photograph is so incredibly 'noirish', I had to post it.

http://imageshack.us/a/img547/664/aa...homasmicha.jpg
Michael Thomas Alleman

http://imageshack.us/a/img210/664/aa...homasmicha.jpg

Mr. Alleman's website
http://www.allemanphoto.com/PORTRAITS-ONE/1/

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MichaelRyerson Oct 31, 2012 1:29 AM

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8033/7...3763cd60_o.jpg
the Hollywoodland sign

Herman Schultheis.

LAPL

ethereal_reality Oct 31, 2012 3:53 AM

A fire at 653 N. Robertson in 1951. Is that the famous gay club 'Studio One' next door? I need to check my street numbers.

http://imageshack.us/a/img703/8919/l...sefire653n.jpg
ebay
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ethereal_reality Oct 31, 2012 4:21 AM

While searching for 'Studio One' I found this interesting photograph of Creswell Drugs at Robertson and Wilshire in 1940.

http://imageshack.us/a/img812/9424/aabrobatwilshire.jpg
http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...Number=4780956

That's a magnificent Coca-Cola sign (note the man on top).

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Mayor Shaw Oct 31, 2012 6:15 AM

635 Robertson
 
:previous:
It's the same place, but now goes by the name Ultra Suede 661 Robertson

http://imageshack.us/a/img401/3982/robr.png

Uploaded with ImageShack.us

ethereal_reality Oct 31, 2012 7:35 AM

:previous: It's such an odd structure. I always thought it resembled an old grain elevator/warehouse.
When I first moved to L.A. I was baffled that this strange building was a popular bar. It seemed so out of place.
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ProphetM Oct 31, 2012 3:55 PM

Here's another article about the map hoarder whose collection will be going to the LAPL:

http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2012...eased-son-wil/

His parents explain a little about him and how he came to have so many maps.

KevinW Oct 31, 2012 6:36 PM

I drive past this building alot and thought you might be interested in its history as told by BoxRec.com.

http://static.boxrec.com/wiki/thumb/...ympic_1930.JPG
Olympic Auditorium: May 21, 1930

http://static.boxrec.com/wiki/f/fb/OlyAud2.jpg
Olympic Auditorium: early 1940s?

http://static.boxrec.com/wiki/f/f6/GrandOly.jpg
The Olympic Auditorium in the 1990s

http://www.you-are-here.com/theatre/...auditorium.jpg
Olympic Auditorium today.


One of the most storied venues in boxing history, the "Grand Olympic Auditorium," located at 1801 South Grand Avenue in Los Angeles, CA, USA, opened August 5, 1925 to a crowd of jewel-clad Hollywood film stars, prominent tuxedoed citizens, and other "common" folk. (Then-World Champion Jack Dempsey earlier had shoveled the first pile of dirt for the groundbreaking ceremony.) It had been built specifically for the 1932 Olympic Games, eventually hosting weight-lifting, wrestling, and boxing for those Games.

The original seating capacity was 10,400 (this included "standing-room only" patrons). It had one huge ground floor, with the boxing ring at its center. It also had an enormous balcony that stretched diagonally away in every direction toward the roof. The boxers' dressing rooms and showers were on the southern side of the basement floor.

The Olympic had weekly boxing shows during the 1920s, '30s, and '40s -- usually on Tuesday nights. It later shifted to Thursdays during the 1950s. After the Hollywood Legion Stadium shut down in 1959, the Olympic's shows moved to Fridays and Saturdays, and ran continuously until 1980. The Olympic Auditorium ran spot shows during the early 1980s, before closing later that decade. It had lost much of its luster due to age and the decay of its surrounding neighborhood.

In the late 1980s it was refurbished extensively and its seating capacity reduced to 7,500. The arena reopened for Oscar De La Hoya's WBO super featherweight title fight against champion Jimmi Bredahl in 1994. As of early 2005, it still held boxing shows. In the summer of 2005 it was sold to a Korean-American church group, who renamed it the "Glory Vision Center." As a result, the famed building ended its long, glorious history as a boxing venue.

http://i1039.photobucket.com/albums/...269-0094-2.jpg
Manuel Ortiz (L) v Jackie Graves...1951

I had no idea this was still an active boxing venue until seven years ago. How can something like that last 75 years then get turned into a church?

ethereal_reality Oct 31, 2012 6:47 PM

:previous: Interesting post on the Olympic Auditorium KevinW.
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Jane Withers' Halloween Party circa 1948.

http://imageshack.us/a/img507/4801/a...schenjanew.jpg
http://kittypackard.com/

Happy Halloween everyone!
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Joe Gillis Oct 31, 2012 7:23 PM

Great post on the Olympic auditorium, this coming from a boxing nut

Interesting to see the pic of Jackie Graves, made famous as the boxer against whom Willie Pep allegedly won a round without throwing a punch

Not true apparently but a nice boxing myth nonetheless

jg6544 Oct 31, 2012 7:33 PM

Los Angeles Limited - 3 days Chicago-LA in the early years of the 20th Century; by the 1950s, the Super Chief (Santa Fe) made the trip in just over 39 hours and the City of Los Angeles (Union Pacific) made it in just under 41 hours. Amtrak comes nowhere close today.

rcarlton Oct 31, 2012 8:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jg6544 (Post 5886426)
Los Angeles Limited - 3 days Chicago-LA in the early years of the 20th Century; by the 1950s, the Super Chief (Santa Fe) made the trip in just over 39 hours and the City of Los Angeles (Union Pacific) made it in just under 41 hours. Amtrak comes nowhere close today.

Today: 69 hours 16 minutes!:shrug:

austlar1 Nov 1, 2012 12:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 5885888)
:previous: It's such an odd structure. I always thought it resembled an old grain elevator/warehouse.
When I first moved to L.A. I was baffled that this strange building was a popular bar. It seemed so out of place.
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I have no idea what the building was used for when first built, but by the early 1970s it was being used as a furniture factory for Phyllis Morris. The furniture was a kind of high end baroque fantasy usually involving lots of carved blond wood. They also produced some astoundingly gaudy floor and table lamps. I think the company is still in business and being run by the founder's daughter. The first gay bar in there only took up part of the space, if memory serves me correctly. It often does not.

Here is a link to the current Phyllis Morris website. Looks like their current showroom is still there next door on N. Robertson.

http://phyllismorris.com/category.php

so-cal-bear Nov 1, 2012 2:52 AM

.

Fab Fifties Fan Nov 1, 2012 4:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by austlar1 (Post 5886743)
I have no idea what the building was used for when first built, but by the early 1970s it was being used as a furniture factory for Phyllis Morris. The furniture was a kind of high end baroque fantasy usually involving lots of carved blond wood. They also produced some astoundingly gaudy floor and table lamps. I think the company is still in business and being run by the founder's daughter. The first gay bar in there only took up part of the space, if memory serves me correctly. It often does not.

Here is a link to the current Phyllis Morris website. Looks like their current showroom is still there next door on N. Robertson.

http://phyllismorris.com/category.php

Ahhhh! Phyllis Morris Creations

Back in the mid 70's, it was a right of passage for all new FIDM design students to take a field trip to her West Hollywood showroom and basque in the glow of her "Bordello Baroque" asthetic. Phyliis herself was still very much alive and in charge and would greet all who entered from her gold and fuschia throne. It was quite a sight as she was seated between two of her famous poodle lamps that had pale pink shades exactly the same color as her hair. Her hair was also approximately the same size as the shades (big,big hair!). Got to giver her credit, she made millions off of questionable taste!


~Jon Paul

Those Who Squirm! Nov 1, 2012 6:12 PM

An 172-year-old house in Santa Monica. (Discovered a marvellous trick)
 
Back in August I posted about the City-Data.com website, where you can get the recorded build dates of most buildings and houses, although there are some exceptions.

Using Google, you can query for the year of your choice to see what buildings exist, if any for a given year. For example, if you enter this into the Google search field:

site:city-data.com los angeles property valuation "Year built: 1840"

you will find this house in Santa Monica:

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8047/8...b631811d_z.jpg

And from the information given:

Year built: 1840
Effective year built: 1950

I suppose it's possible the house was entirely rebuilt in 1950, but even it it was it's still remarkable to think that a house had been standing there previously since 1840. And it doesn't look like a 1950s era house anyway, so I suspect it really might be from 1840. If anything, it looks like an old adobe house that might have once been an outbuilding on the Malibu rancho.

To search for other years, just substitute the year of your choice for 1840. Once we get back to before 1890 or so, each year may reveal only one or two buildings, or none at all. But it's astonishing how far back we can find recorded build dates.

rentatrip Nov 1, 2012 7:29 PM

FYI, many of the houses have info which is in error- I looked up the house I lived in (Hawthorne CA) It says it was from the early 50's, however the current home was built in 1993 after the old 50's building was totally demolished, but the info on the data search does not have any specifics about the demolition in 1991, Just be advised , the 1840 house , is probably long gone , where as the title deed for the property goes back as far as 1840, Many of these entries are added by small brained part time real estate hacks without any background in legal documentation and the data is not a final legal binder.
-
Quote:

Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm (Post 5887131)
Back in August I posted about the City-Data.com website, where you can get the recorded build dates of most buildings and houses, although there are some exceptions.

Using Google, you can query for the year of your choice to see what buildings exist, if any for a given year. For example, if you enter this into the Google search field:

site:city-data.com los angeles property valuation "Year built: 1840"

you will find this house in Santa Monica:

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8047/8...b631811d_z.jpg

And from the information given:

Year built: 1840
Effective year built: 1950

I suppose it's possible the house was entirely rebuilt in 1950, but even it it was it's still remarkable to think that a house had been standing there previously since 1840. And it doesn't look like a 1950s era house anyway, so I suspect it really might be from 1840. If anything, it looks like an old adobe house that might have once been an outbuilding on the Malibu rancho.

To search for other years, just substitute the year of your choice for 1840. Once we get back to before 1890 or so, each year may reveal only one or two buildings, or none at all. But it's astonishing how far back we can find recorded build dates.



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