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-   -   Rose Quarter Redevelopment (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=152548)

65MAX Nov 21, 2009 8:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Okstate (Post 4571187)
.... which would have a trickle down effect/affect? ....

Effect is a noun, as in, you can have an effect on something.
Affect is a verb, as in, you can affect something.

twofiftyfive Nov 22, 2009 12:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 65MAX (Post 4571318)
Effect is a noun

Except when it's a verb.

Quote:

Affect is a verb
Except when it's a noun.

Delaney Nov 22, 2009 7:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 65MAX (Post 4571318)
Effect is a noun, as in, you can have an effect on something.
Affect is a verb, as in, you can affect something.

oh no...oh...........no..................

urbanlife Nov 22, 2009 8:04 AM

So what effect does all this have with the Rose Quarter?

65MAX Nov 22, 2009 10:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by twofiftyfive (Post 4571600)
Except when it's a verb.

Except when it's a noun.

Congrats on finding two obscure exceptions to the rule. But the "verb" effect is just the verbification of a noun, kinda the same way Scozzafava became a verb. The "noun" affect is just the shortening of affectation by psychologists.

But for normal people, affect is a verb and effect is a noun. Of course, I keep forgetting that most people here are not normal. My bad for trying to help people know the difference.

65MAX Nov 22, 2009 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by urbanlife (Post 4572005)
So what effect does all this have with the Rose Quarter?

None, but at least you used "effect" correctly. You could have also said, "How does all of this affect the Rose Quarter?"

urbanlife Nov 22, 2009 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 65MAX (Post 4572086)
None, but at least you used "effect" correctly. You could have also said, "How does all of this affect the Rose Quarter?"

:haha: I am going to bed.

tworivers Jan 9, 2010 1:40 AM

New renderings of the Trailblazers' Jumptown proposal.

http://www.imaginejumptown.com/wp-co.../vmc_two_l.jpg

http://www.imaginejumptown.com/wp-co...mc_three_l.jpg

http://www.imaginejumptown.com/wp-co...vmc_four_l.jpg

http://www.imaginejumptown.com/wp-co.../vmc_one_l.jpg

More here.

I have to say... if they can pull it off it looks intriguing. Particularly the added density, the new tower designs, and what appears to be the promising relationship of the project to Weidler.

On the other hand, I don't get the whole development pictured on the PPS site at all...

pdxtraveler Jan 9, 2010 6:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tworivers (Post 4641683)
New renderings of the Trailblazers' Jumptown proposal.

I have to say... if they can pull it off it looks intriguing. Particularly the added density, the new tower designs, and what appears to be the promising relationship of the project to Weidler.

On the other hand, I don't get the whole development pictured on the PPS site at all...

I love that first rendering of the whole district including the PPS part!! Of course in this economic environment it is quite a dream.

RoseCtyRoks Jan 9, 2010 9:53 AM

:previous: This could be quite the win-win development. If the timing is right, and all the pieces come together, even a scaled-down version of this could really catch on with people throughout the metro area. Potential new businesses could sprout up close to, and even several blocks from the area, with a lot of draw this area would see the first few years. Then add in the urban growth that we'll see the next 5-10 years, and success should continue.

With the Convention Center Hotel canned, I would think a 250 rm Hotel could do well because of events at Jumptown, Pro Sports, as well as the C. Center. I think this area would be a great way for Nike to show off it's local roots here, and adding a great deal of community flavor and spirit to an area that can be, well, DEAD---will liven up this part of town, no matter the season, weather, or time of day. (OR even if the Blazers are hot or not!)

New Madrid Jan 9, 2010 10:33 AM

I wonder if that section is accurate when it says "community fitness center/trailblazers & winterhawks practice facility." Relocating the Blazers' practice facility would be huge. (and fantastic, imo)

edit: one nice touch I see in this design is the better incorporation of the waterfront area directly in front of the MC. Providing that the new development is, as is shown, not so high that it blocks much light/views of the sky and sunsets from within the coliseum, I think that filling in that area does a nice job of both making use of some nice river frontage and incorporating the coliseum so it's not just sitting on the edge of the whole thing.

NJD Jan 9, 2010 5:21 PM

^ ... and the waterfront area is un-thought out. The RR should be cut and cover right next to Interstate in order to get rid of 2 curves right next to the Steel Bridge vastly increasing up rail speed. With the RR under the new development you can have a full public parkland waterfront.

Also, the waterfront "old Red Lion" site and grain silos is the proposed site for an HSR terminal since the Steel Bridge has too tight of curves for HSR service to get to Union Station. The plan also does not take into account that the PPS megablock is the preferred sight for a future stadium.

Other than those small critiques I hope something actually starts happening to our bulldozing blunder of a wasteland.

bvpcvm Jan 9, 2010 6:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NJD (Post 4642339)
since the Steel Bridge has too tight of curves for HSR service to get to Union Station

where did you hear that? why would the curves make any difference to HSR? obviously HSR wouldn't be going around those curves at any significant speed, it would move just like regular passenger rail approaching the station.

Okstate Jan 9, 2010 7:08 PM

One thing is for sure imo. This decade will be marked by eastside development close to the river.

urbanlife Jan 10, 2010 8:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bvpcvm (Post 4642403)
where did you hear that? why would the curves make any difference to HSR? obviously HSR wouldn't be going around those curves at any significant speed, it would move just like regular passenger rail approaching the station.

Actually I remember hearing that as well when there was talk about relocating the train station and selling off the old train station. Its current path slows down the train tremendously and adds time to the trips, as well as creates a tax on the structure of the steel bridge.

When Portland gets high speed rail, we will be getting a new train station out of it and it will be on the east side near the Rose Garden.

puerco Jan 10, 2010 2:59 PM

Back in the mid to late '60's there were big plans for that area also. It was called 'Coliseum Gardens' and the renderings posted around the property looked like an Eastside Portland Center. Lots of high rise apartments and office/retail buildings. The only thing to come from that was the Calaroga Terrace. Hopefully 40 years later this will become a reality.

RoseCtyRoks Mar 11, 2010 10:45 AM

Looking past the coliseum
Redoing the arena is just first step for Rose Quarter

http://www.portlandtribune.com/news/...26380514582900

By Jim Redden
The Portland Tribune, Mar 11, 2010

As the Portland City Council moves closer to deciding the fate of Memorial Coliseum, two larger questions are starting to loom – what to do with the rest of the Rose Quarter and how to pay for all the improvements that the city and other interests would like to see.

By the end of May, the council is scheduled to pick a development team to overhaul the coliseum. Most City Hall observers expect the nod to go to the Portland Trail Blazers organization, which proposes maintaining the coliseum as a sports and entertainment arena. But the Blazers’ plan still faces competition from other proposals that would remake the coliseum into an athletic or arts-oriented facility.

After the council makes its decision, a new process starts to plan the redevelopment of the property surrounding the coliseum, the Rose Garden, the Blazers’ office building and two city-owned parking garages. Most observers also believe the Blazers have the edge in the second process as well. That is largely because the Blazers already have presented a concept for revitalizing the Rose Quarter as a lively entertainment district dubbed JumpTown.

“We see our plan for the coliseum as key for JumpTown, and JumpTown as the way to revitalize the entire area,” says J.E. Isaac, the Blazers’ senior vice president of business affairs.

Advocates for rival plans – the Memorial Arts & Recreation Center (MARC) and the Veterans Memorial Arts & Athletic Center – also say their developments would ignite a broader renewal of the surrounding area, although they have not yet prepared even preliminary concepts for the Rose Quarter.

But regardless of what the council decides to do with the coliseum and Rose Quarter, no one is sure how much all the work will cost and who will pay for it. One of the biggest questions is where the city will find the money to upgrade the coliseum – which it owns – and to build the street, sidewalk, water and sewer improvements that will be needed in the Rose Quarter. Depending on the scope of the projects, such work could easily cost hundreds of millions of dollars.

An obvious source of money is urban renewal funds, the same city financing source that helped spur growth in the Pearl District and South Waterfront area, at least before the economy slowed down. In fact, the Portland Development Commission is overseeing a planning process that could pump $18.5 million or more into new redevelopment projects in North and Northeast Portland. It would add six parcels of property – including the Rose Quarter – to the existing Interstate Corridor Urban Renewal Area, which has already helped fund such projects as the Interstate MAX line and the New Columbia housing development.

But there is already intense competition for the money. An existing advisory committee has identified nearly $90 million in priority projects that do not include the Rose Quarter. The Overlook Neighborhood Association wants the PDC to build promised mixed-use developments along the Interstate MAX line. Portland Community College is looking to partner with the PDC to redevelop portions of North Killingsworth Avenue near the Cascade Campus. And community activists want more affordable housing and money to help longtime residents stay in their homes.

“In the end, it has to be win-win for everyone,” says Roy Jay, head of Portland’s African American Chamber of Commerce. Jay also sits on a 23-member citizen committee advising the North Northeast Economic Development Initiative.

eric cantona Mar 11, 2010 5:58 PM

one alternate to "corporate town": http://www.actionsportsnw.com/

urbanlife Mar 11, 2010 8:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eric cantona (Post 4741053)
one alternate to "corporate town": http://www.actionsportsnw.com/

This might actually be the best idea I have seen for this district...shame the city will probably end up picking the crappy corporate idea.

crow Mar 11, 2010 8:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by urbanlife (Post 4741351)
This might actually be the best idea I have seen for this district...shame the city will probably end up picking the crappy corporate idea.

i agree - this one looks way better. The buildings are more streamlined and less bulky and awkward. The part that is lacking though this is bridging Interstate and really making something of the river - it could even tie in with a sports like theme to it...river taxi, bike and skate rental etc.


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