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-   -   Your city's Jewish community (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=225217)

Docere Oct 3, 2016 4:01 PM

Your city's Jewish community
 
Where is the Jewish community concentrated in your city? Is it concentrated in a certain "favored quarter" or is it rather dispersed across the metro area?

A good example of the former is Cleveland, where virtually all live in a cluster of eastern suburbs. San Francisco seems to be an example of the latter - there's a large Jewish population in the Bay Area, but I can't think of a specifically "Jewish" suburb.

Shana Tova to all those who celebrate.

JManc Oct 3, 2016 4:07 PM

Houston: traditionally, they were concentrated in the Meyerland area but became more dispersed throughout the metro.

Crawford Oct 3, 2016 4:16 PM

Uh, NYC, where do I start...

There's a Jewish presence almost everywhere in the tri-state area, but largest concentration, by far, is Brooklyn.

Are we talking Secular or Orthodox here? In the NYC metro, makes a big difference.

On the one hand you have places like Manhattan, Syosset, Scarsdale, Livingston (the stereotypical secular, educated, upper middle class "Seinfeld", "Woody Allen" New York Jew), but the majority of Jewish neighborhoods in the region are highly religious and have nothing to do with the stereotype.

Biggest Jewish neighborhood is probably Borough Park, Brooklyn. Most Jewish suburbs are probably Kiryas Joel, Monsey, New Square, and Lakewood. Most upscale suburbs in the region have at least some (secular) Jewish presence; Orthodox neighborhoods are numerous throughout NY and NJ (but none in CT).

brickell Oct 3, 2016 6:01 PM

Del Boca Vista... Obvoiusly

dave8721 Oct 3, 2016 6:02 PM

South Florida (estimated Jewish population ~500,000):
-Miami Beach in general but especially the old Jewish community in Mid-Beach (centered around 41st ST). Miami Beach has had 16 Jewish mayors.
-Aventura
-Broward County in general. Home to almost half of South Florida's Jews.
-Boca Raton/Delray Beach in Palm Beach County.

Centropolis Oct 3, 2016 6:04 PM

i live in an orthodox jewish neighborhood, between several temples, etc, so there is a lot of foot traffic in my area for being a 1930s-1950s era neighborhood (it's mostly 1930s). it's immediately adjacent to the central spine of the favored quarter, and adjacent to a very heavily chinese and southeast asian business district. heavily jewish neighborhoods in metro st. louis follow the north edge of the favored quarter straight west, kosher delis/etc concentrated in these inner and middle ring suburbs. things dispurse further west than that and you certainly wont find orthodox areas further out.

i've noticed that the heavier-than-average foot traffic (for an inner ring suburb) seems to extend to all week, not just saturday.

Steely Dan Oct 3, 2016 6:05 PM

for the largest communities of jews in chicagoland, start in west rogers park, lincolnwood, and skokie, and from there go up the northshore burbs where wealthier jews moved to, particularly glencoe and highland park.

so it generally follows a "favored quarter" model, though there are other "outlier" jewish communties as well, such as down in hyde park on the south side.

Docere Oct 3, 2016 6:31 PM

In Toronto, the "old" Jewish neighborhood was located west of downtown, centered along College St., around Spadina Ave. and Bathurst St., which included Kensington Market and was near the garment industry on Spadina. In the postwar years, the Jewish community began moving en masse up Bathurst, into the wealthy district of Forest Hill and the suburb of North York. In the 80s and 90s, the new suburb of Thornhill took off which today has the highest concentration of Jews.

Basically, Bathurst St., from St. Clair Ave. to past Highway 7, has a very visible Jewish presence.

The vast majority of Jews live in the northern "favored quarter" (particularly the western edge of it near Bathurst) or in the heart of the city. Very few live in the eastern or western suburbs.

Centropolis Oct 3, 2016 6:49 PM

this map is sideways for some odd reason, but i live smack dab in the middle of this eruv, in university city. the bottom is skinker, which is the st. louis city limits on the eastern edge. below the I-170 line is mostly pre-war.

edit: fixed to east-west. skinker is to the right.

http://w3.chabad.org/media/images/797/GAZZ7977495.jpg
w3.chabad.org

Centropolis Oct 3, 2016 6:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Docere (Post 7581717)
Where is the Jewish community concentrated in your city? Is it concentrated in a certain "favored quarter" or is it rather dispersed across the metro area?

A good example of the former is Cleveland, where virtually all live in a cluster of eastern suburbs. San Francisco seems to be an example of the latter - there's a large Jewish population in the Bay Area, but I can't think of a specifically "Jewish" suburb.

Shana Tova to all those who celebrate.

i think cleveland and st. louis geographically share a lot of characteristics in the way they are spacially arranged, if not architecturally, and this is no exception.

10023 Oct 3, 2016 7:09 PM

Historically in London (before WW2) it was Whitechapel in the East End, but that was a slum. Now it's north London (particularly Barnet), and the stands at White Hart Lane.

Docere Oct 3, 2016 7:10 PM

Going up Bathurst, I'd say it looks like:

Forest Hill (St. Clair/Eglinton): Long-established, affluent and generally more liberal Jews. Mansions, neo-Tudor homes, some apartments.

Lawrence/Wilson area: Orthodox Jews. Some apartments, modest postwar bungalows have been largely replaced by large custom-built homes.

Sheppard/Finch/Steeles area: Russian Jews, the elderly. A lot of big apartments.

Thornhill: Orthodox, Russians, Israelis. Few "liberal" Jews. Middle class to quite wealthy. Very new suburbia.

Outside of this core area there's also:

Bayview-York Mills: Wealthy large lot postwar suburbia, mix of ethnicities. Large non-Orthodox Jewish population as well as a growing number of Asian immigrants.

Annex and Yorkville: Affluent urban professionals and "creative class" types. Sizable secular Jewish population.

austlar1 Oct 3, 2016 8:15 PM

Dallas-Fort Worth area now has about 60,000 Jewish residents. Around 50,000 live on the Dallas side of the metroplex. The original Jewish residential area was probably just south of downtown, but during the period between WW1 and WW2 Jews began to locate in the neighborhoods north/northeast of downtown. Post WW2 saw the Hillcrest neighborhood become heavily Jewish, while the wealthiest Jews lived in nearby University Park or even in Highland Park. Jewish residents continue to live in those closer-in parts of North Dallas, but lots of Jews also moved further north into newer subdivisions. Today there are fairly large numbers of Jews living in far-north Dallas, Addison, Richardson, and even up in Plano. Some of these enclaves are probably closely associated with certain congregations, but I lack information to provide specifics.

The much smaller Fort Worth Jewish community originally settled on the near south side of town. In Post WW2 Fort Worth, Jews tended to live in the southwest part of the city in areas like Park Hill, Colonial CC area, TCU, Westcliff, Tanglewood, Overton Park, etc. There is also a fairly small Jewish population in Arlington and the northeastern suburbs closer to DFW airport.

Docere Oct 3, 2016 8:24 PM

As a general rule, in the Northeast and Midwest (as well as Toronto and Montreal in Canada), there were large Jewish immigrant populations a century ago.

In the South and West - DC, Florida, California etc. - Jewish populations are not usually the product of direct immigration, and were greatly outnumbered by domestic migration. Hence only a small minority of Jews in L.A., say, can trace their roots to Boyle Heights, for example.

In Britain, meanwhile, the Jewish population is much more concentrated in London nowadays than it was in the early 20th century. Manchester, Leeds and to some extent Glasgow had good sized Jewish populations.

LosAngelesSportsFan Oct 3, 2016 8:41 PM

Hmm for LA i would say mostly spread out but 2 distinct concentrations stick out. I believe LA is the third, fourth or fifth largest Jewish city in the world depending on the source you look at with roughly 700,000 population.

1) Persian Jews / Jews on the West side / Beverly Hills

2) Traditional Jews in mid city / Fairfax area

Docere Oct 3, 2016 8:44 PM

^ More spread out than say, Baltimore, Cleveland or Detroit, but L.A. probably has the most geographically concentrated Jewish population of any Western U.S. city.

Crawford Oct 3, 2016 9:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LosAngelesSportsFan (Post 7582130)
Hmm for LA i would say mostly spread out but 2 distinct concentrations stick out. I believe LA is the third, fourth or fifth largest Jewish city in the world depending on the source you look at with roughly 700,000 population.

1) Persian Jews / Jews on the West side / Beverly Hills

2) Traditional Jews in mid city / Fairfax area

Encino also has a big, visible Jewish community.

LosAngelesSportsFan Oct 3, 2016 9:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Docere (Post 7582136)
^ More spread out than say, Baltimore, Cleveland or Detroit, but L.A. probably has the most geographically concentrated Jewish population of any Western U.S. city.

Thats true, i guess what i was trying to get at is that there are Jews settled all over LA but the true concentrations were in those two areas (and Encino / Tarzana as pointed out after my post)

austlar1 Oct 3, 2016 9:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LosAngelesSportsFan (Post 7582130)
Hmm for LA i would say mostly spread out but 2 distinct concentrations stick out. I believe LA is the third, fourth or fifth largest Jewish city in the world depending on the source you look at with roughly 700,000 population.

1) Persian Jews / Jews on the West side / Beverly Hills

2) Traditional Jews in mid city / Fairfax area

Lots and lots of non- Iranian LA Jews also living in Hollywood Hills/Silver Lake/Los Feliz, Bev.Hills, Westwood, Brentwood, Palisades, Malibu, and Santa Monica/Venice. My sister's congregation, University Synagogue in Brentwood, is not especially Iranian. Most of my nephews' Santa Monica Jewish friends also do not have Iranian/Jewish background. Most are from show biz related or UCLA families. Also there are probably upwards of 150,000 Jews, many of them Iranian, living in SF Valley in places like Encino, Tarzana, West Hills, West Lake Hills, etc.

MayDay Oct 4, 2016 1:08 AM

As mentioned, Cleveland's Jewish community is primarily in the eastern suburbs - the Orthodox community is primarily in the inner ring (Cleveland Heights and Shaker Heights); the further east you go, the more the population skews to Reform/secular. The community's roots go way back - quite a few of the now-historically Black church structures located closer to downtown were originally built as Jewish houses of Worship.


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