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-   -   Speech pattern and typographical variations across Canada (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=209368)

GlassCity Feb 11, 2014 3:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwoldtimer (Post 6446078)
Why would anyone pronounce a word starting with "T" followed by a vowel as "ch"? That's not even English!

I say "Toronto" but I also say "doanchu" as in don't you.

freeweed Feb 11, 2014 4:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwoldtimer (Post 6446078)
Why would anyone pronounce a word starting with "T" followed by a vowel as "ch"? That's not even English!

...

You're implying that English is:

A) phonetic, and
B) consistent across all dialects?

:haha::haha::haha:

SignalHillHiker Feb 11, 2014 4:11 PM

Trawno.

Vorkuta Feb 11, 2014 4:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acajack (Post 6424687)
Definitely Acadian.

Really? I didn't get that. It was too slow and unmangled, to my ear. :D

This is more what I'm used to:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAkiNQqD1Ds

kwoldtimer Feb 11, 2014 4:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by freeweed (Post 6446577)
...

You're implying that English is:

A) phonetic, and
B) consistent across all dialects?

:haha::haha::haha:

I struggle with the idea that a "T" followed by an "o" could end up being pronounced as "ch" in English. Seems more like a speech impediment to me.

Xelebes Feb 11, 2014 4:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwoldtimer (Post 6446078)
Why would anyone pronounce a word starting with "T" followed by a vowel as "ch"? That's not even English!

Many words have the postalveolar fricative intrusion. It mostly has to do with the alveolar or palatal approximant that follows the t.

Chruck
Chractor
Chrap
Inchrusion
Chraditional
Doe-ncha
Woodencha
Chrawna

esquire Feb 11, 2014 4:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwoldtimer (Post 6446600)
I struggle with the idea that a "T" followed by an "o" could end up being pronounced as "ch" in English. Seems more like a speech impediment to me.

There are a lot of idiosyncracies in English pronounciation. Think of how many people say they're going to the "grow-shree store" even though there's no logical connection between the spelling of "grocery" and that pronunciation. It's just one of those things.

kwoldtimer Feb 11, 2014 4:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Xelebes (Post 6446608)
Many words have the postalveolar fricative intrusion. It mostly has to do with the alveolar approximant or the palatal approximant that follows the t.

Chruck
Chractor
Chrap
Inchrusion
Chraditional
Doe-ncha

Well, none of those involve a "T" followed by an "O" but in any event only the last one is something I have ever heard coming from an English speaker's mouth. I can think of examples where a "T" takes on the "CH" sound when it follows a long "U", for example (cringe) "Chyousday/Chewsday".

Where do people say "chruck" and "chractor" - I really want to avoid it! :D

SpongeG Feb 11, 2014 4:34 PM

cape bretoners, newfies and pei'ers all have distinct accents, i hear a lot of them out here in alberta

i noticed people in SW ontario have a weird accent, they sounded a bit like people from minnesota to my BC ears

kwoldtimer Feb 11, 2014 4:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SpongeG (Post 6446626)
cape bretoners, newfies and pei'ers all have distinct accents, i hear a lot of them out here in alberta

i noticed people in SW ontario have a weird accent, they sounded a bit like people from minnesota to my BC ears

When I lived in the States, I was occasionally asked if I was from Minnesota.

Acajack Feb 11, 2014 4:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vorkuta (Post 6446591)
Really? I didn't get that. It was too slow and unmangled, to my ear. :D

This is more what I'm used to:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AAkiNQqD1Ds

He's got some anglo intonations for sure from living in Alberta, but it's unmistakably Acadian. Just a different level of language of course from high schoolers at MM in Dieppe.

His name "Landry" is also a dead giveaway!

EDIT: He appears to be from SE NB. He was CAO for the town of Bouctouche and is a graduate of the U de M.

Vorkuta Feb 11, 2014 4:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acajack (Post 6446634)
EDIT: He appears to be from SE NB. He was CAO for the town of Bouctouche and is a graduate of the U de M.

Well there you go. To me he sounds like an anglophone (or Acadian, for that matter) doing his best to speak BETTER French.

Acajack Feb 11, 2014 4:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vorkuta (Post 6446658)
Well there you go. To me he sounds like an anglophone (or Acadian, for that matter) doing his best to speak BETTER French.

Out of curiosity, are you Acadian yourself?

Xelebes Feb 11, 2014 4:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwoldtimer (Post 6446625)
Well, none of those involve a "T" followed by an "O" but in any event only the last one is something I have ever heard coming from an English speaker's mouth. I can think of examples where a "T" takes on the "CH" sound when it follows a long "U", for example (cringe) "Chyousday/Chewsday".

Where do people say "chruck" and "chractor" - I really want to avoid it! :D

Well, realise that the o is being elided in "Toronto". We say chruck and chractor here.

RWin Feb 11, 2014 5:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwoldtimer (Post 6446629)
When I lived in the States, I was occasionally asked if I was from Minnesota.

Similar experience talking to a guy from Colorado once - he was surprised that we sounded like him. Usually Americans don't know I'm from Canada unless I have to show ID from something. But then again most of my travel has been in the western states.

samne Feb 11, 2014 5:35 PM

LOL at the Toronto youth accent and pretty accurate and it is rediculous.

I think "guy" is the funniest and most unique thing from Toronto.

Common words-Flip, Frig, Guy, Bro, Crazy

"Guy maaan thats craaazy Bro!"

GlassCity Feb 11, 2014 5:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by samne (Post 6446728)
LOL at the Toronto youth accent and pretty accurate and it is rediculous.

I think "guy" is the funniest and most unique thing from Toronto.

Common words-Flip, Frig, Guy, Bro, Crazy

"Guy maaan thats craaazy Bro!"

Guy is common among youth in Vancouver too, particularly Surrey. I never realised bro or crazy weren't common words everywhere.

freeweed Feb 11, 2014 5:59 PM

One day you'll realize that your guy is now your buddy. And your buddy is now your friend.

GlassCity Feb 11, 2014 6:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by freeweed (Post 6446770)
One day you'll realize that your guy is now your buddy. And your buddy is now your friend.

Way say buddy a lot, it too originated in the Indian community in Surrey. But we actually use it regularly, as opposed to guy which you only really say jokingly.

MolsonExport Feb 11, 2014 6:06 PM

Bumbaclot


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