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Old Posted Oct 29, 2017, 12:15 AM
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Capsicum Capsicum is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Docere View Post
The US also counts people with roots in the Middle East and North Africa as "white." Also many filling out "Latin American" in the Canadian census would likely be classified as white and Hispanic in the US (since race and Hispanic origin are separate questions).
It seems there's a similar classification scheme according to Stats Canada:

"In contrast, in accordance with employment equity definitions, persons who reported 'Latin American' and 'White,' 'Arab' and 'White,' or 'West Asian' and 'White' have been excluded from the visible minority population. Likewise, persons who reported 'Latin American,' 'Arab' or 'West Asian' and who provided a European write-in response such as 'French' have been excluded from the visible minority population as well. These persons are included in the 'Not a visible minority' category. However, persons who reported 'Latin American,' 'Arab' or 'West Asian' and a non-European write-in response are included in the visible minority population. For example, respondents who checked 'Latin American' and wrote in 'Peruvian' are included in the 'Latin American' count. Respondents who reported 'Arab' and wrote in 'Lebanese' are included in the 'Arab' count. Respondents who reported 'West Asian' and wrote in 'Afghan' are included in the 'West Asian' count."

http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-re...016006-eng.cfm

So, overall then, if you look at white (regardless of Hispanic or not) Americans, and white Canadians, both numbers as a share of the population are in the low 70s %.

I think it's fair to say that Canada and the US now have currently roughly equivalent racial diversity (just that in Canada's case, the non-whites are proportionally more Asian and aboriginal, and in the American case, the non-whites are mostly black, and non-white Hispanics).

Unlike for most of the two countries' histories, where it could be said that the US was more racially diverse (about 10-20% non-European descent, mostly African American), and Canada had typically less than 10%, and usually less than 5% non-European descent), now the two countries have converged in the 21st century.
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