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Old Posted Aug 29, 2018, 4:11 PM
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Emily Pulitzer recruiting renowned architects to redevelop Olive Street

By Jacob Barker St. Louis Post-Dispatch

link to story

Quote:
ST. LOUIS • Leveraging her connections to some of the architecture world’s biggest names, Emily Rauh Pulitzer and two partners are recruiting “internationally significant architects” for a $30 million housing development near Grand Center’s theaters and museums.
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Pulitzer, whose family’s company formerly owned the Post-Dispatch, is a noted arts patron with an affinity for contemporary art. She built the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, a private art museum in Grand Center. Trampe led the rehab of the 1930s-era Continental Life Building, a 25-story Art Deco skyscraper near the corner of Olive Street and North Grand Boulevard.

Plans for the Olive Street project call for first building four model homes, each designed by “very different architects” from around the world, Trampe said. Prospective buyers would pick from those designs when they purchase a lot. Eventually, the team hopes to end up with designs from as many as a dozen different architects.

Though the architects are internationally renowned, Trampe said the homes wouldn’t be out of reach for middle-income buyers. They hope to offer new homes in the $400,000 range and build a neighborhood that attracts people who “really want to be part of something different.”
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Scattered throughout the development will be various amenities — a fountain, a playground, a vegetable garden. They also plan to utilize the still-standing Henry L. Wolfner Memorial Library for the Blind, on the National Register of Historic Places but vacant for years. Plans call for turning it into a clubhouse with health and exercise equipment. St. Louis-based architecture firm Axi:Ome is designing the Wolfner building rehab.
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The red-brick, Italian Renaissance Wolfner Library was constructed in 1898, originally as a telephone exchange for the Bell Telephone Company. The library for the blind opened in 1938 and was the first of its kind in the U.S. By 1940, it housed more Braille and talking books than any other library except the Library of Congress. It was named for Dr. Henry Wolfner, an eye doctor in St. Louis who died in 1935.
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Pulitzer plan for celebrated housing architecture moves ahead

By Jacob Barker St. Louis Post-Dispatch

link to story

Quote:
...The trio hopes to begin construction in the spring. They have already recruited renowned Mexican architect Tatiana Bilbao and her Tatiana Bilbao Estudio for the project and plan to bring on more internationally acclaimed architects to design houses for the block.


Some concept renders on the architect's website:http://www.axi-ome.net/index.php?/pr...redevelopment/.

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