HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum.

Since 1999, SkyscraperPage.com's forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web.  The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics.  SkyscraperPage.com also features unique skyscraper diagrams, a database of construction activity, and publishes popular skyscraper posters.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > My City Photos

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2012, 4:26 AM
geomorph geomorph is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 501
San Francisco - Mission Bay - Mission Creek Channel

Mission Bay is a neighborhood within San Francisco's 7-mile by 7-mile city limits. It is located on the Eastern side of the city along the San Francisco Bay waterfront and is on flat terrain composed of bay fill. Touching its edge on the North side is the Embarcadero, while the rest of the North and West sides are contained by South of Market, from which this area was created; to the South is Dogpatch. It is a new neighborhood with few historic structures; most of it is a master-planned development that replaces a huge railyard associated with the piers and formerly active area of bayside freight and commerce. Nearly every building that exists today did not exist 12 years ago, and many blocks of future projects await to be carved out of the acres of surface parking lots that serve the nearby baseball stadium temporarily (if 12+ years can be considered temporary!) At full build-out, the area will be composed of medium-to-high density housing (about half the projects) and a university satellite campus and hospital and corporate offices. Neighborhood retail will be featured in select ground-floor locations of residential buildings as well. A scattering of public buildings (library, senior center, school, police and fire) are also part of the mix along with bayfront and block parks. Only about 30% of the area has been completed so far; the medium-rise blocks dominated by solid horizontal massing and occasional higher buildings are typical of what is to come to the development as a whole, rather than highrises. Although the projects are mostly modern and of good quality, they tend to be bland. Considered as a whole, the area has the potential to be a forgettable monotone of massing if this trend continues. A wider variety of forms should be considered so that it does not become a giant 300-acre missed opportunity.

This thread focuses on the sliver of land along Mission Creek Channel, a manmade waterway about 1/2 mile long in the location of a small creekbed that led to the bay. The channel is on the Northern side of the development and its Northern bank is nearly at full build-out (in contrast to the rest of the site). This part of Mission Bay is dominated by residential buildings.

China Basin Park:
At the mouth of where Mission Creek Channel meets China Basin - part of San Francisco Bay - is this small shorefront park that relates to the baseball stadium on the other side of the channel.







Lefty O'Doul Bridge:
Originally called the China Basin Bridge when it opened in 1932, this is one of the few historic features in the area and provides a crossing for vehicles and pedestrians over Mission Creek Channel. The baseball stadium's lighting banks and stand support structures reverentially echo the bridge's material and structure.





AT&T Park:
Opened in 2000 as Pacific Bell Park, this modern baseball stadium for the San Francisco Giants takes its design cues from the nearby brick warehouses and metal bridges of the vicinity's heritage. Its location is considered by many as the Southern end of South Beach (a sub-neighborhood of South of Market) or the Southern end of the Embarcadero. However, being on the bank of Mission Creek Channel, I include it here.

































King Street:
This wide boulevard forms the Northwestern border of the neighborhood and features several blocks of the T-line light rail that connects the area to the downtown areas and some other parts of the city. It runs in front of AT&T Park; across the street in this block are a mix of historic and modern brick building facades that inspired or were inspired by the baseball stadium.











The Beacon:
This large condo complex also features a grocery store, bowling alley, and various small streetside retail and dining along its King Street side.













North shore of Mission Creek Channel:
This area is primarily residential and is arranged in an area that is basically 4 large blocks along the shore by 2 blocks deep. Only half of one of the blocks is vacant in this nearly built-out section of the neighborhood. The shore features another small historic bridge (the light rail crosses the channel on it) and a linear pedestrian greenway that opens to a small block park midway along its length. Together, the park spaces are part of Mission Creek Park which will eventually surround the shore of the channel.











































































































Mission Creek Park active recreation area:
The park widens in an area beneath a few freeway overpasses that isolate one more residential complex from the others at the end of the channel.





















Houseboats:
These are docked on the South side of the channel and predate the current developments.





Mission Creek Park:
The parcel of this park that has been completed on the South side of the channel is currently a lonely pioneer whose small pavilion is awaiting new adjoining residential projects to start construction.













All photographs taken in 2011 by geomorph.

Last edited by geomorph; Apr 28, 2014 at 6:21 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2012, 4:52 AM
peanut gallery's Avatar
peanut gallery peanut gallery is offline
Only Mostly Dead
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Marin
Posts: 4,738
Nice tour of AT&T. I look forward to seeing the rest.

Quote:
Although the projects are mostly modern and of good quality, they tend to be bland. Considered as a whole, the area has the potential to be a forgettable monotone of massing if this trend continues. A wider variety of forms should be considered so that it does not become a giant 300-acre missed opportunity.
I couldn't agree more. I tend to focus on the need for more variance in height, but it's the overall sameness in massing that could be a problem south of the channel. Everything tends to fill the block at a similar height and squared shape. A few tall and skinny buildings or just having more buildings of various sizes sharing blocks would help. The Giants' development (Mission Rock) promises to have a lot more variety of shapes and sizes, which will help a lot. And to be fair, most of the uniquely shaped lots are in the yet to be built northwest corner of MB. And Salesforce.com will make a big difference too. It's definitely a work in progress.
__________________
My other car is a Dakota Creek Advanced Multihull Design.

Tiburon Miami 1 Miami 2 Ye Olde San Francisco SF: Canyons, waterfront... SF: South FiDi SF: South Park
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2012, 5:07 AM
bigcubfan bigcubfan is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 536
With pitchers and catchers reporting this weekend, perfect timing for this thread.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2012, 6:10 AM
OhioGuy OhioGuy is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: DC
Posts: 6,523
Thanks for the great tour!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2012, 3:11 PM
KKDowning's Avatar
KKDowning KKDowning is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Berlin
Posts: 38
Thanks a lot for this fantastic tour. Looks very liveable.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2012, 4:24 PM
SLO's Avatar
SLO SLO is offline
Still Ill
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Arroyo Grande, California
Posts: 3,241
Great thread. Its still a little sterile, but looks like it has great amenities for residents. Should liven up over the upcoming years.
__________________
Does the body rule the mind or does the mind rule the body..............I dunno
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2012, 5:43 PM
Kingofthehill's Avatar
Kingofthehill Kingofthehill is offline
International
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Berlin
Posts: 3,860
I already think it already is forgettable. Areas built from scratch (as well as those that are significant redevelopments of waterfronts, train yards, and industrial areas) usually miss the mark with regards to character, block sizes, interestingness, vibrancy, and, from the look of Mission Bay (I visit Mission Creek Park whenever I am in SF), quality of architecture. Same with NoMa in DC, Downtown Miami, Long Island City in NYC, HafenCity in Hamburg, Bjørvika in Oslo, etc. And the European ones actually have good, noteworthy architecture - something you can't say for their American counterparts. Portland, however, did it right with the Pearl District. Hopefully, though, these things will straighten themselves out as the areas come into their own.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2012, 5:40 AM
xzmattzx's Avatar
xzmattzx xzmattzx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Wilmington, DE
Posts: 3,958
Nice pictures. I enjoy your San Francisco neighborhood threads. After my trip there last year, I am interested in seeing more of the city, since it seemed like every neighborhood had its own little story to tell (you could make the case for that in every city and its neighborhoods in the country, but that doesn't dilute the fact here). You are supplying a look at each corner of the city, which allows me to see what I missed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingofthehill View Post
I already think it already is forgettable. Areas built from scratch (as well as those that are significant redevelopments of waterfronts, train yards, and industrial areas) usually miss the mark with regards to character, block sizes, interestingness, vibrancy, and, from the look of Mission Bay (I visit Mission Creek Park whenever I am in SF), quality of architecture. Same with NoMa in DC, Downtown Miami, Long Island City in NYC, HafenCity in Hamburg, Bjørvika in Oslo, etc. And the European ones actually have good, noteworthy architecture - something you can't say for their American counterparts. Portland, however, did it right with the Pearl District. Hopefully, though, these things will straighten themselves out as the areas come into their own.
Agreed, I always think that these mass-produced turn-of-the-millennium neighborhoods are too new and too homogeneous. If I had a say in something like this, I would import unwanted/derelict/for sale older strucutres and transport them to the new neighborhood to give some different flair and a sense of history to the place. Farmhouses that are threatened with demolition as they stand in the way of subdivisions would be a nice thing to ass as single-family housing, or converted to a bar or restaurant.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2012, 8:25 PM
novaCJ novaCJ is offline
Stuck in the Suburbs
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Northern Virginia (DC Suburbs)
Posts: 343
While some of the architecture may seem a bit bland, some of what I see here is quite distinctive. I do agree about the massing though, it would be nice to see more variation in height and types of structures. As with anything though, I think with time, it will straighten itself out and lend itself more character and activity. Anything when built new is sterile, character comes with time.

Great tour, I was mostly unaware of this area myself
__________________
"The pessimist complains about the wind. The optimist expects it to change. The realist adjusts the sails."
-William A. Ward
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted Mar 15, 2012, 2:02 AM
geomorph geomorph is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 501
xzmatt, I like your idea for importing some threatened historic buildings to integrate in areas like this. Unfortunately they just lost an oppurtunity for this recently, as a small old warehouse on the edge of the development was just demolished!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted Mar 17, 2012, 9:21 PM
Yankeebiscuitfan's Avatar
Yankeebiscuitfan Yankeebiscuitfan is offline
Dutch Biscuit fan
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Somewhere in the South of the Netherlands
Posts: 350
Great shots.

AT&T Park is the best MLB stadium I have been to by far.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2012, 9:44 PM
Coldrsx's Avatar
Coldrsx Coldrsx is online now
Community Guy
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Edmonton
Posts: 38,857
Great tour thanks. Interesting mix of well conceived public realm and quite a bit of pretty brutal stuff.
__________________
"The destructive effects of automobiles are much less a cause than a symptom of our incompetence at city building" - Jane Jacobs 1961ish

Wake me up when I can see skyscrapers
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #13  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2012, 3:04 AM
geomorph geomorph is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 501
Yes, it seems like some of the future projects will have some more interesting design details, and perhaps a greater variety of massing as well.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #14  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2012, 6:03 PM
rriojas71 rriojas71 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 107
I like the fact that they are putting housing and other amenitites into an area that had been overlooked and forgotten, but this area feels like an anomaly compared to the neighborhoods it's sandwiched in between... I feel like it could be anytown USA right now and the only thing worthwhile in the area is AT&T park and the old bridge. It's so out of step with the rest of SF and the streets look barren and lifeless. Like other have mentioned it's too sterile and bland for me.

I do like the fact that the it has become the hotspot for the BioMed industry and it is a vast improvement to what it once was.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #15  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2012, 10:29 PM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is online now
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 14,542
Nice photos. I just stayed in this neighbourhood last week.

I pretty much agree with what others have said. It's sort of interesting but very sterile -- not the sort of neighbourhood I'd choose to live in. It was also pretty cold and windy since it's right on the water. However, there's a decent mix of stuff nearby, okay transit service, and the bridges are interesting.
__________________
flickr
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #16  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2012, 11:02 PM
stepper77's Avatar
stepper77 stepper77 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: East Bay
Posts: 2,246
The creek makes for a great place to kayak! Nice photos, thanks!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #17  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2012, 5:42 PM
giovanni sasso's Avatar
giovanni sasso giovanni sasso is offline
furified freestyle
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: philadelphia, pa
Posts: 12,309
guess my impression that this place was pretty sterile looking was not very original. great photos of it, though, and i absolutely love at&t park. it and pnc park in pittsburgh are my 1a and 1b favorites.
__________________
phillyskyline.commauleofamerica.com
a matter of life and death, just like a etch-a-sketch
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #18  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 3:15 AM
insanenuyawka insanenuyawka is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 81
What a bucolic neighborhood! Is it expensive?
It almost seem like an urban design utopia...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #19  
Old Posted Sep 27, 2012, 2:06 AM
geomorph geomorph is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 501
There is not much new to add but here are a few pictures taken this past summer (a year after the original thread photos) that show the backside of one of the housing complexes featured previously; a large abstract mural was painted on what had been a blank wall facing the train tracks (Caltrain commuter rail).



Reply With Quote
     
     
  #20  
Old Posted Sep 29, 2012, 8:56 PM
mSeattle's Avatar
mSeattle mSeattle is offline
Socialism 4 Extreme Rich?
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: here
Posts: 8,790
Very nice renewed area.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Photography Forums > My City Photos
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:49 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.