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  #161  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2008, 2:07 PM
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Thanks for that correction Plinko. I don't know why the original photographer posted it as City Hall. Oh well, it's a nice opportunity to see a beautiful building that we're not that familiar with.
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  #162  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 1:49 PM
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A Very Merry Christmas and a Happy Holiday Season Everyone

Salt Lake City - Christmas tree being lifted up onto the outdoor balcony of City Hall

by mag3737

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  #163  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 3:03 PM
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antinimby:

Yes, I have seen NY muni bldg in person. Individually the pieces are all very nice, but they don't fit together well at all. The shaft is far too wide for the spire, for example.

As for Singer, I agree it is excellent. I didn't say Beaux Arts *can't* produce good skyscrapers, only that is difficult to do so. The architect of the Singer was a very talented fellow.
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  #164  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2008, 6:58 PM
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If I had to rank them...

1. Philadelphia
2. Milwaukee
3. New York
4. Salt Lake City
5. Buffalo

Speaking of art-deco, the city hall of Columbus, Ohio is fairly art-deco and very well done too:


Meanwhile, Cincinnati's city hall is kind of similar to Salt Lake City's with the turrets and everything:


Cleveland's is just a good ol' fashioned American public building, could just as easily look like a Museum or a Train Station:
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  #165  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2009, 6:56 AM
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I just knew that this would be a nice one. Santa Barbara is one of my favorite towns.

City Hall - Santa Barbara, California

by Emil Cenzato
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  #166  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2009, 8:51 AM
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I really like Columbus' city hall. It's a very well done piece of the style.

I also liked the roof of the old Detroit City Hall. Unfortunately, it quickly became way too small for a city busting at the seams:


WSU Virtual Motor City Collection


WSU Virtual Motor City Collection

And, it looked even better when finally cleaned of soot.


WSU Virtual Motor City Collection

I think the tower left a lot to be desired, though.

Grand Rapids old city hall was a stunner. It was a Richardsonian Romanesque in style:


WSU Virtual Motor City Collection
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Last edited by LMich; Jan 3, 2009 at 9:22 AM.
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  #167  
Old Posted Jan 5, 2009, 6:36 AM
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Is it demolished now?
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  #168  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2009, 4:31 PM
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City Hall - Sacramento, California

by K.W. Hectaman

Clocktower detail

by Papa Mikey

Details

by pixelflex

New City Hall Annex, directly in back of historical City Hall

by ARamos

Last edited by delts145; Jan 11, 2009 at 4:45 PM.
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  #169  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2009, 5:00 PM
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Metro Salt Lake City - Small Town American Beauty, Newly restored City Hall - American Fork, Utah


afdailyphoto


afdailyphoto

American Fork Canyon, Indicative of American Fork's slice of Salt Lake City's beautiful urban scenery

by Willie Holdman

The restored belfry will soon be placed on the new roof of the reconstructed City Hall.


City restores details of building's small-town past

By Susan Whitney
Deseret Morning News


In the application for the National Register of Historic Places, the American Fork City Hall is described as having a "provincial yet earnest manner." These days, Juel Belmont can't remember exactly who wrote those words. The City Hall made it onto the National Register back in 1994, so the application was prepared a dozen years ago, and several people helped write it. Over the years, lots of folks have worked to save the building.


Belmont says Wilson Martin may have been the one to notice the building presents itself in a "provincial yet earnest manner." Or it may have been Roger Roper who wrote those words.
But most likely, Belmont says, she herself wrote them. "Because buildings are speaking to me all the time," she says.
Of course buildings do go silent once they are torn down — and Belmont can recite a list of historic buildings in American Fork whose voices she will never hear again. The Carnegie Library, the LDS Tithing Office, Chipman's Mercantile, the old high school ... "I've certainly lost a lot more than I've saved," she says.

This summer, however, she can celebrate. The restored City Hall will reopen in a month or so. It is the largest success to date for the American Fork Historic Preservation Commission.
The Salt Lake firm of Cooper Roberts Simonsen Architects is in charge of the restoration, and architect Allen Roberts recently showed the Deseret Morning News through the building. Roberts says the cost is coming in at less than $1 million. He notes that, at $100 a square foot, the restoration costs significantly less than new construction of a comparable building.


The hall was well worth saving, Roberts says. "It was built in 1903 and is probably one of the oldest continuously used city halls in the state."
The City Hall sits just north of Main Street, next to the 1894 Harrington School. The old Community Presbyterian Church is across the way. This part of town has been the ecclesiastic and government center since the 1850s, when American Fork was first farmed and platted. Juel Belmont is the chairwoman of the American Fork Historic Preservation Commission. Church and government often shared offices in the small towns of the Utah Territory. (That must have made life easier for people like Leonard Harrington, who served simultaneously for 29 years as American Fork's mayor, postmaster and LDS bishop.) After Utah became a state in 1896, even small cities and counties built separate structures for their government offices.
The blueprints for the 2 1/2-story American Fork City Hall were drawn up by James Pulley, for which he charged $50. The building measures 50 feet by 50 feet. The east and west sides are identical, framed by Romanesque arches. The foundation is made of limestone, and the walls are masonry, faced in red brick. When it was first built, the hip roof sported a belfry with Queen Anne trimmings.
Beginning in 1916, the building was painted white. It was sandblasted in 1977, which restored its original color but also removed a portion of the brick, leaving it open to more rapid weathering. At that time, too, mortar was repaired with caulking.
In 1959, the belfry was removed. Some say it had to go so air conditioning could be installed. Roberts says another reason the belfry may have been removed is that belfries are heavy and the roof may have been starting to sag. Interior remodelings in 1959 and 1977 further obscured the original features. Several original doors and windows were removed. Other windows were covered or painted shut.
Still, the City Hall is structurally sound for a building of its period, Roberts adds. When the restoration began, he found no cracks in the walls or foundations. The original stairs were still in good condition, as were the newel posts. The majority of the original windows were still in place. Some of the windows on the second floor had been blocked. Renovators took down the false ceilings and restored it to one big room. This restoration includes seismic upgrades, a renovated secondary staircase and a new roof, designed to support the belfry. The 1977 caulking has been replaced with limestone mortar. Windows have been restored. The restoration has resulted in a building that is 467 percent better insulated, according to the architects.
Contractors took down the false ceilings and discovered that much of the original tin ceiling was still in place. They discovered patches of the original paint, in dark Victorian gold and black, and they found a deep green, as well — probably from the '20s, Belmont speculates. The bell tower's original tin finial was found in the attic, and carpenters used it to design a replica.
Roberts believes people will say "wow" when they first walk into the upper floor. For as long as anyone can remember, the square second floor was divided into tiny offices with low ceilings. Now it is one big room again, with more than 20 tall windows and with bead board and millworked moldings and other pretty details.
The City Council will meet in this room, which can hold at least 100 people. The space will also be used for small concerts and receptions. In addition, the American Fork Arts Council, which will have offices on the first floor, will use the second floor for classes.
Belmont can't help but think everyone who stands in this sunny, high-ceilinged space will hear a whisper from the past. If they don't, there is always the bell. If they hear nothing else, people will hear the bell.
When the belfry was taken down, the Daughters of Utah Pioneers were given the bell, and they placed it in a park. Under their bylaws, Belmont says, they can't give the bell back to the city, but they can allow it to be placed in a new location. Thus in a week or so, the newly constructed replica of the belfry will go atop the City Hall, and the old bell will be placed inside and will ring once again.
Kim Raff, Deseret Morning NewsA craftsman works on one of the Victorian Romanesque windows at American Fork City Hall. A new generation will mark its days with that bell, just as Belmont's mother's generation did. Belmont says her mother, Lois Peters Andersen, told of listening for the bell every morning as she walked to school. If the bell rang before she got to the river, she knew she'd be late.
Belmont's mother passed away this June. So Belmont is especially glad today's schoolchildren will be able to know the City Hall and its bell and its charm. She will think of her mother on the day City Hall reopens — new again, after 103 years.

Sources: Utah History Encyclopedia

Last edited by delts145; Jan 11, 2009 at 5:28 PM.
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  #170  
Old Posted Jan 11, 2009, 9:55 PM
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Peoria City Hall



(above image from wikimedia.org)



(image from www.illinois-history.gov)



(above image from wikimedia.org)



(above images from img.groundspeak.com/waymarking)

Last edited by PEORIA; May 26, 2009 at 4:42 AM. Reason: Image links needed fixing
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  #171  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2009, 3:03 AM
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Buffalo City Hall





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  #172  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2009, 3:55 PM
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There truly are some amazing city halls around the country. That is one thing I like to do when I visit other cities is to go see city hall. I of course of a little biased to Salt Lake City's, considering it's going to be my future office and all. I also love Philly's, it is a site to behold in person and it feels like it really is the heart of the city when you are near it.
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  #173  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2009, 5:29 AM
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I dunno what it is but Peoria's City Hall just does it for me. I love it!
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  #174  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2009, 5:41 AM
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I like the color of the stone allot that was used for Peoria. Also the detail work on the stone is very attractive.
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  #175  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2009, 6:46 AM
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Philly's is the ebst hands down. Buffalo's is wonderful. I like dallas's modern building. Since I just saw it, Peoria's trumps the small city hall category.
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  #176  
Old Posted May 8, 2009, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stevena07 View Post
Salt Lake City and County Building

I went on a tour of the C&C building with my housemates on Saturday for "Celebrate the City."

Best Pictures toward the end



The building was originally constructed by free masons between 1891 and 1894 to house offices for the city and county of Salt Lake and replace the Salt Lake City Council Hall and Salt Lake County Courthouse, both erected in the 1860s.


First Floor-




Construction of the building was riddled with controversy. During the late 1800s and early 1900s the City and County Building was the symbol of non-Mormon citizens' open defiance of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.



It was designed to rival the Salt Lake Temple as the city's architectural centerpiece. It is even thought that the building's clock tower and statues were designed to mimic the temple's spires and statue of the angel Moroni. Construction began in February on State Street at about 100 South.





For nebulous reasons, construction was halted that November after only the foundation had been laid. The mostly non-Mormon city council questioned the buildings plans which had been completed during the People's Party reign, and wavered on how to proceed. The LDS church, via its mouthpiece the Deseret News, complained that the Liberals were wasting taxpayer money.



Ultimately, the original plans and site for the building were scrapped and the whole project was moved to the building's current location at Washington Square. The Deseret News claimed this move served the City Council, which owned property around the site and would profit from increased land values. Nonetheless construction on new plans began by late 1891. The cornerstone was laid July 25, 1892.






The architectural firm of Monheim, Bird, and Proudfoot designed the Richardsonian Romanesque building. Henry Monheim, a local architect since the 1870s, and George W. Bird and Willis T. Proudfoot of Wichita, Kansas established the firm in 1891 specifically to design the building. Their firm won a building design contest against fourteen other submissions.





The building was monstrously over budget. Estimated by the firm at $350,000, the winning contractor bid $377,978, but by the building's dedication on December 28, 1894, it had cost nearly $900,000. Complicating matters was the Panic of 1893 which cut Salt Lake City and County revenues nearly in half. As a result of this, plans for large stained glass windows for the building were discarded.



Although now used exclusively by Salt Lake City government, the building originally served many functions. Salt Lake County offices called the structure home until the 1980s when the County elected to build a new complex at 21st South and State Street.



The building served as Utah's Capitol from when statehood was granted in 1896 until the present Utah State Capitol was completed in 1915. The Salt Lake City and County building also housed Salt Lake's first public library and contained courtrooms, including one that condemned organizer Joe Hill to death amid international attention in 1914.

Basement/ Base Isolators



From 1973 to 1989 the building was exhaustively renovated and repaired with an eye toward historical accuracy. This was done in concert with a seismic upgrade called base isolation that placed the weak sandstone structure on a foundation of steel and rubber to better protect it from earthquake damage.



The Building was the first in the world to use Base isolators.



Old foundations


This tunnel is used to bring the heating, air conditioning, water ect to the building. All utilities are located across the street at the City Library. Tunnel is also used to take prisoners back and forth.


Second Floor-













Matheson Court House, across the street








The City Library, and towards the University of Utah.






The north side features a depiction of the Dominguez-Escalante Expedition which entered Utah in 1776 and named many of the state's physical features. Gargoyles, eagles, sea monsters, beehives, Masonic icons, suns, and other symbols dot the building's rich exterior.













Mayors Office






A amazingly detailed safe.




FourthFloor-











The Salt Lake City and County Building's central clock tower is topped with a statue of Columbia and rises 256 feet (78 m) from the ground. The building's primary axis runs north-south, and large entrances mark each cardinal direction. On the south wing (over the Mayor's office) is a bronze statue of the goddess Justice.

Fifth Floor-














The Salt Lake City Mascot, The Hippogriff




Skyline Shots from the building.






Inside the Clock Tower.


Wasatch Mountains, sorry my friends head got in the way




Quote:
Originally Posted by stevena07 View Post
More photos from today of the outside























Its interesting that 222 S Main manages to stay hidden at most angles.
Pic by Stevena07
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  #177  
Old Posted May 11, 2009, 1:36 AM
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Mmm, the interior just doesn't do it for me. Those are some interesting views from the roof though.
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  #178  
Old Posted May 11, 2009, 2:07 AM
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Philly's still my favorite. Nice that it's been fixed up - when I was living there in the late 80s the hallways stank of urine.

Buffalo is also great.

Boston City Hall is a fascinating building with a horrible relationship to the surrounding city. The worst thing about it in my opinion is the three story brick wall separating it from Congress Street and Quincy Market. The City Hall Plaza is based on some wonderful Italian squares but is unusable most of the year because of the climate (the wind blowing in from the Harbor will cut right through you in the winter).
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  #179  
Old Posted May 11, 2009, 1:15 PM
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Very interesting thread. Thanks to all of the contributers.

Favorite: Philadelphia (ok, I'm biased. So sue me. )

Least Favorite: New Orleans. Has all of the charm of a warehouse and a bad warehouse at that.

I also enjoyed Sacramento's and Salt Lake City's.

BTW, here is a picture of Philadelphia's Old City Hall built in 1791, used prior to the construction of the Second Empire structure at Broad and Market. It was actually home to the Supreme Court until 1800.


Photo Credit: Wikipedia
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  #180  
Old Posted May 15, 2009, 7:28 PM
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