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  #221  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2009, 2:34 AM
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So when does the rest of it open?
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  #222  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2009, 4:13 AM
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NYGuy...those pictures, especially the nighttime ones, were fucking beautiful. Actually though, I can't wait 'til the initial hype is over and it becomes less of a mob scene and more of a quiet park atmosphere. Then it will really be absorbed into the fabric of this unbelieveable city.
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  #223  
Old Posted Jul 6, 2009, 5:52 AM
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Looks unreal!
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  #224  
Old Posted Jul 14, 2009, 10:31 PM
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http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2009/07..._for_nude.html

Standard Hotel Calls for Nude Photos



7/14/09

By now anybody who has visited the High Line (especially at night) has probably heard about, or seen, the sex show that goes on nightly through the windows of the towering Standard Hotel. Of course, this is what hotelier André Balazs intended all along (how else to explain the transparent shower dividers?), and he's no doubt been thrilled by all the coverage (or lack thereof). Evidence of his delight comes today from the Standard Hotel's blog, where management is not only encouraging public sex acts, but is actually asking for evidence. They're asking for photos of sex in the Standard's rooms, like this racy Purple magazine shoot (NSFW). They almost make it sound arty:

Now, we're asking YOU, our Stan D'elovely amateur pornographers to send in your most erotic photos shot at The Standard, New York. You can email them to us, or you can upload them directly to our Facebook page by tagging the pictures The Standard, New York. Whatever you do, just make sure the shots are HOT and that you get them to us in whichever way you can. It's all about sex all the time, and you're our star. C** on over.

Like we said, almost arty.

http://www.standardhotels.com/los-an...e/stan-d-arde/
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  #225  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2009, 8:18 AM
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High Line envy in Philadelphia



MICHAEL BRYANT /Inquirer Staff Photographer
A steel staircase at Gansevoort Avenue is the southernmost entrance to New York’s High Line. The elevated park provides a viewing platform that can be used to take in the theater of the street. Builders — helped by a budget of $150 million — removed the old rails, excavated down to the concrete bed, and added plantings, benches, and chaise longues.


from here: http://www.philly.com/inquirer/magazine/51003302.html

Changing Skyline: Reinventing a railroad

By Inga Saffron
Philadelphia Inquirer Architecture Critic
15 JUL 2009

NEW YORK - As America busily transforms itself into Information Nation, we've rediscovered the tough beauty of our old downtown manufacturing buildings. Their light-saturated, industrial-age interiors are intensely coveted by the creative class. So then, where's the love for the monumental structures that supported those churning workshops - the grain elevators, coal chutes, and elevated rail lines that were the 20th century's equivalent of the great cathedrals and aqueducts?

The recent restoration and reinvention of New York's High Line should go a long way toward opening people's eyes to the potential of those industrial relics. Built in the 1930s to supply the meatpackers and manufacturers on Manhattan's West Side, the abandoned rail line has just been repurposed as a glorious elevated park that offers a delightful new way to experience the city.

Traditionally, city parks have been envisioned as serene enclosures, cocooning us from the hubbub of urban life. The new High Line park does the opposite: It provides a viewing platform to take in the theater of the street.

The park, which should be a model for Philadelphia's unloved Reading Viaduct in the Loft District, also serves as an auxiliary stage on which to try out new dramas. Although the first nine blocks of New York's ribbon park went public only in June, the shifting garden path - designed by Philadelphia's James Corner, along with New York's Diller, Scofidio + Renfro - already is one of Manhattan's hottest tickets.

Set in the heart of Chelsea's art and design district, the High Line plays host to a daily style parade from the nearby galleries and fashion houses. With its array of sustainable, IPE wood chaise longues, diving-board-style benches, and cafe tables, the scene is part poolside, part office-worker's respite. The first week alone, about 70,000 people clattered up the park's steel staircases, which begin at Gansevoort Street, just east of 10th Avenue.

The four entrances were cut into the bed of the existing structure, and all were intentionally designed as narrow slits that constrict views of the park. As a result, you don't merely emerge onto the surface, you burst into a 360-degree vortex of open sky. The long-distance views extend to the southern tip of Manhattan, but there are also more intimate glimpses into the meatpacking district's surviving cobblestone lanes.

The unusual perch is key to the High Line's charm. You can certainly get a dramatic view of Manhattan's streets from the Empire State Building, but that's like watching a movie play out on your iPhone in comparison to the High Line's IMAX experience. As Corner observed during a recent walk, the park "is primarily an instrument to see the city."

Corner, who chairs the University of Pennsylvania's landscape architecture department (and is a finalist for the city's Pier 11 park design), beat out several well-known architects for the High Line commission in 2004 largely because his design recognized that the derelict structure could be a neutral ground - uniting nature and the industrial city. Essentially, Corner and his New York-based Field Operations were proposing to refine what the High Line had already become.

During the two decades that the structure sat vacant, it had evolved into a dense meadow that was almost primal in its wildness. Thick grasses and weed trees obscured its railroad past. Because such wide-open spaces are rare in Manhattan, the rusting structure became a favorite with urban explorers.

When developers began lobbying New York officials for demolition in the late 1990s, its admirers launched a campaign to make people appreciate the industrial stray. They enlisted the noted photographer Joel Sternfeld to document the High Line's unusual beauty. His images revealed a romantic, ever-changing ghost street wending its way silently above Chelsea's hectic art scene.

Those photographs proved more powerful than the High Line's fans ever imagined. Instead of demanding demolition, developers began pushing into Chelsea with glittering condos designed by some of architecture's biggest names. New York officials did a quick about-face and asked the High Line's admirers to start raising money for a city park.

They provided Corner's team with an astounding $150 million to pour into the project, which eventually will snake up 10th Avenue and wrap around the West Side rail yards before concluding at 34th Street, a block from Penn Station.

The money has been well spent. About half went into refurbishing the riveted steel structure, which runs mid-block in many places and tunnels through existing buildings. Initially there was some thought of incorporating the weeds and steel rails, but Corner chose to excavate down to the concrete bed and re-create the meadow.

While Corner's High Line landscape looks as if it has been sown by the wind, it is really a constructed garden whose plantings were carefully chosen by Dutch horticulturist Piet Oudolf to evoke a more colorful, more sculptural version of a wild meadow. Plants with shapely, ornamental seed pods were favored, and the list includes such familiar species as Andropogon grass, liriope, astilbe, begonia, and flowering quince, along with river birches and sumac trees.

Corner wanted the plantings to look as if they had sprouted randomly, so he designed paving planks that taper at the ends, creating narrow openings that mimic the cracks of the rail bed. Sections of rail were also reinstalled, giving the impression of having always been there. Meanwhile, Corner's furniture designs riff on nature's resilience: His park benches are a continuation of the pavers. They rise from the surface, just as the park's design emerged out of the wild landscape. Chaise longues roll along the rails as freight trains once did.

Because the High Line is so linear, Corner struggled to keep the park itself from feeling like a bowling alley. The path intentionally bobs and weaves, opening up unexpected perspectives on surrounding buildings, like the fluttering white glass sails on Frank Gehry's IAC offices and Jean Nouvel's gridded, blue-glass condos on 11th Avenue.

As with a natural landscape, the experience changes as you move through it. There's a boggy area here, a small forest there, then suddenly a man-made intrusion rears up. One of the most dramatic is Polshek Partnership Architects' 265-foot-tall Standard hotel, which aggressively straddles the old freight bed. Farther on, you come to Diller, Scofidio's amphitheater, which offers a wide-screen view of the passing traffic on 10th Avenue - and makes it as riveting as a Broadway show.

Unlike the waterfront paths that have become popular in New York and Philadelphia, the High Line is not a recreation trail where pedestrians are forced to dodge bikes and joggers. It's conceived as a refuge for the old-fashioned flaneur, a place to stroll, people-watch, or just do nothing.

In Philadelphia, a like-minded group of urban explorers has been advocating for a local version of the High Line on the Reading Viaduct, which runs from Vine to Brown Street, shifting eastward from 11th to Ninth. Unfortunately, Chinatown leaders have loudly opposed the idea, arguing - like the New York developers - that the viaduct should be torn down to create land for housing.

Forget the huge cost of demolishing the viaduct - estimated at $35 million. Losing the noble stone structure would actually strip Philadelphia's Loft District of a potentially valuable amenity and make it a less distinctive place to live. As the High Line shows: Leave it and they will come.

Contact architecture critic Inga Saffron at 215-854-2213 or isaffron@phillynews.com.
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  #226  
Old Posted Jul 19, 2009, 5:09 PM
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In Philadelphia, a like-minded group of urban explorers has been advocating for a local version of the High Line on the Reading Viaduct, which runs from Vine to Brown Street, shifting eastward from 11th to Ninth. Unfortunately, Chinatown leaders have loudly opposed the idea, arguing - like the New York developers - that the viaduct should be torn down to create land for housing.

Forget the huge cost of demolishing the viaduct - estimated at $35 million. Losing the noble stone structure would actually strip Philadelphia's Loft District of a potentially valuable amenity and make it a less distinctive place to live. As the High Line shows: Leave it and they will come.
It would be interesting to see how the Philadelphia development would turn out. There are a lot of cities with proposed likeminded developments.
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  #227  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2009, 1:23 PM
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http://curbed.com/archives/2009/07/2...r_revealed.php

West Chelsea Gold Rush Redux: High Line Tower Revealed



Monday, July 20, 2009, by Pete

[Renderings via Lee Harris Pomeroy Architects.]

Now that the High Line has become this summer's big hit, get ready for more new construction to pop up on the open spaces that abut the rails. A big one is called the High Line Tower, a mixed-use proposal designed by Lee Harris Pomeroy Architects for Tenth Avenue between 28th and 29th Streets (UPDATE: Gates Merkulova Architects also created this dream factory). It would rise on both sides of the High Line and include a 13-story hotel and 23-story condo, with a "through-block shopping arcade" beneath the old rails to connect the combined lots.] A previous plan from 2006 by Kevin Kennon Architects (no longer visible at their website) has also been preserved at Wired New York. Pick your favorite!

The owner of the site, Heby Realty Corp., has bargained for some development rights from a property further south along the High Line. One little lot at the corner of West 29th has been vacated, but so far there's no sign of much activity. This block has another biggie in the works, the 620-unit Avalon West Chelsea that was stalled but, according to the DOB, is now seeing new life. With the next segment of the High Line stretching up to 30th Street set to open in late 2010, folks are advised to check out the trestle-top views as early as possible. And enjoy the open vistas while they last.

http://www.lhparch.com/project.aspx?cat=1&id=7

___








The Gates Merkulova Architects website has many more renderings including this shot of the arcade beneath the High Line

http://www.gmarch.com/High%20Line/index_HighLine.html









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  #228  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2009, 1:50 AM
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Extended blog post with plenty of pictures from the High Line at Daily Kos:
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2009/7...(a-photo-diary)
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  #229  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2009, 4:29 AM
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Friends and lovers on the High Line...

Ed Yourdon













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  #230  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2009, 11:52 PM
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.

Last edited by NYguy; Aug 19, 2009 at 12:13 AM.
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  #231  
Old Posted Aug 21, 2009, 3:19 PM
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http://curbed.com/archives/2009/08/2...ytiny_trim.php

High Line Hardship Building Gets a Teeny-Tiny Trim



Friday, August 21, 2009, by Lockhart

Above, the original, semi-mind-blowing design for 437 West 13th Street, an office tower slated to rise just north of the Standard Hotel, astride the High Line. Back in February, the developers, the Romanoff family, applied for a hardship zoning variance to build to this height—215 feet, in point of fact—asserting that building so close to the High Line would prevent them from taking full advantage of the site. Oh suurrre, said critics, who see the High Line as a developer's wet dream.

The Board of Standards and appeals will finally hear the variance case next month, and in advance of that, the Romanoffs have made a few tiny trims to the project: they'll cut the height a whopping 14 feet, down to 201 feet. The minuscule cantilever out over the High Line—see it there? That little ledge?—will be eliminated, as will a basement. Whether that'll be enough to get this baby approved, we'll find out next month.








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  #232  
Old Posted Aug 25, 2009, 12:56 PM
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/08252009...er__186393.htm

EYEFUL TOWER!
NEW DRAW IN NAKED CITY



RISQUÉ BUSINESS: More people are flocking to the High Line's Standard hotel as word spreads
of X-rated sights like these gals cavorting behind floor-to-ceiling windows.


By AMBER SUTHERLAND and LACHLAN CARTWRIGHT
August 25, 2009


More people are flocking to the High Line's Standard hotel as word spreads of X-rated sights like these gals cavorting behind floor-to-ceiling windows.

The city might want to rename its newest park the "Thigh Line."

Thrill-seekers yesterday flocked to the Meatpacking District's newly christened High Line urban paradise to catch a glimpse of the free skin show playing out in the massive windows at The Standard hotel, which straddles the park.

"It's a little peep show -- but instead of being on 42nd Street, it's down here at the High Line," said Andre Landeros Michel, 34, a Chelsea designer who regularly ventures over to view randy Standard guests having sex in front of the massive floor-to-ceiling windows in full view of the park.

A Parks Department worker said that plenty of people come to the park, built on the old elevated train tracks, specifically to watch the erotic exhibitionism.

"I think it's healthy and fun -- it's flirtatious," said Harlem resident Aaron Lipman, 34, a media research analyst who works near the park.

"It's like 'Wild Kingdom,' " added Lipman, who came to peer up at the windows with pal Jillian Andersen, 26.

But, as The Post reported yesterday, the hotel's X-rated windows are drawing ire from families and local business people who are sick of the nightly sexcapades and porn shoots on display.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn called The Standard on the carpet, calling the alleged window action "unacceptable."

Yesterday, hotel officials -- who had bluntly encouraged the raunchy behavior, boasting on the inn's Web site that "it's all about sex, all the time" -- said they will try to be more sensitive.

"We will make a concerted effort to remind guests of the transparency of the guest windows," management said in a statement.

The Standard also sent a conciliatory letter to Quinn, sources said.

"We are encouraged by the action they have taken," Quinn said yesterday, adding that she will continue to "monitor the situation."

But voyeuristic New Yorkers think the show should go on.

"We saw two feet pressed against the glass in an apparent attempt to get better leverage," said sightseer Lipman. "Our curiosity is piqued -- but it hasn't yet been satisfied. We'll come back."

Added Andersen: "If you didn't want to be seen you'd draw the curtains."
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  #233  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2009, 5:19 AM
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http://www.nypost.com/seven/08252009...er__186393.htm

EYEFUL TOWER!
NEW DRAW IN NAKED CITY



RISQUÉ BUSINESS: More people are flocking to the High Line's Standard hotel as word spreads
of X-rated sights like these gals cavorting behind floor-to-ceiling windows.


By AMBER SUTHERLAND and LACHLAN CARTWRIGHT
August 25, 2009

More High Line getting attention for the wrong (or right, depending on your POV ) reasons...


http://travel.latimes.com/daily-deal...eep-show-5189/

Hotel-room peep shows draw gawkers to Manhattan’s High Line park



At the Meatpacking District’s new High Line park, visitors of late are getting more than leafy respite. People at a hotel towering over this abandoned railway track turned urban green space have been, unintentionally or not, putting on a show for those watching below.

“Guests at the Standard Hotel keep failing to close the curtains as they frolic naked in front of their rooms’ floor-to-ceiling windows, which can easily be viewed from the High Line park below,” reported the Associated Press.

The X-rated window displays now draw people to the park specifically for the “erotic exhibitionism,” according to the New York Post, whose report “Eyeful Tower!” wins the award for most creative headline associated with this story, in my opinion.

In response to condemnation by a City Council member, the hotel stated earlier this week that it will remind guests of the windows’ transparency, but the Post’s article this morning about “Inn Decency” conveyed that at least some at the 337-room hotel were actually aiming for this kind of attention. “We don’t discourage it. In actual fact, we encourage it,” a bellhop reportedly said of the bare-all practices, which apparently, in the past, have involved hotel staff members.

A walk in the park is free, but a stay in one of the hotel’s rooms-with-a-view-to-impose start at $320 per night, pre-tax.

— Susan Derby, Special to the Los Angeles Times
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  #234  
Old Posted Sep 2, 2009, 11:14 PM
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http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/25/ga...er=rss&emc=rss

‘West Side Story’ Amid the Laundry


IMPROVISATION On a recent evening, Elizabeth Soychak performed jazz standards
from Patty Heffley’s West 20th Street fire escape, just yards away from the High Line park,
which Ms. Heffley has turned into the site of her ad-hoc Renegade Cabaret.


By PENELOPE GREEN
June 24, 2009



Video Link



Video Link



Video Link
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  #235  
Old Posted Sep 8, 2009, 10:44 PM
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http://nypost.com/p/news/business/ge...tOvL6FJkKHpJRM

Getting their glass in gear



September 8, 2009


IF you're a High Line stroller baffled by the unfinished project at 450 W. 14th St., which straddles the wildly popular new park, you're not alone.

We were curious, too, having written nearly three months ago that curtain-wall glass would soon adorn the 15-story structure that's now a steel skeleton. So far, no glass.

High Line-goers might want to see naked people, like the ones who sometimes strut their stuff in the Standard Hotel's transparent windows, as The Post reported -- but a naked building?

We wondered if owner CB Developers was having some kind of trouble completing the boutique office and retail mini-tower. The answer seems to be happily no. The delay has to do with a partial stop-work order issued by the Buildings Dept. on Aug. 3 over lack of a sidewalk shed at ground level. The order forbade any work above 40 feet.

But the situation was a bit more complicated than most, as the Parks Dept. was also drawn into discussions. It's all been worked out, says CB principal Charles Blaichman; a new shed will be installed this week and that should lift the stop-work order, he said.

He said the façade glass, which is now in storage, should start going up after a few more weeks of steel and concrete work.


Two of the project's 10 office floors were already leased to Helmut Lang. Newmark Knight Frank's Brian Waterman, the office leasing agent, said a "hard" deal for two more floors is in place for a tenant he wouldn't identify, and a lease is out for another floor.

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  #236  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2009, 3:21 PM
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9/13, a walk from the southern terminus to the northern:







End of the Line:































^ suddenly, I'm hungry for carrots.





















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  #237  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2009, 3:28 PM
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Turning an old elevated ROW into a walkable area is simply genius.
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  #238  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2009, 10:50 PM
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Looks amazing... Soo, are the rail lines going or staying on it... I thought I saw in an earlier post on this thread that they were removing them but in the pics it looks like they're still there... I'm usually against picking up rails but overall looks great.
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  #239  
Old Posted Sep 19, 2009, 11:54 PM
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Looks amazing... Soo, are the rail lines going or staying on it... I thought I saw in an earlier post on this thread that they were removing them but in the pics it looks like they're still there.
They rails were removed early on, the site cleaned, and the rails returned. One of the greatest public additions to Manhattan in decades, along with the BPC and Hudson River promenades.

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  #240  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2009, 11:36 PM
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http://curbed.com/archives/2009/10/1..._explosion.php

HL23 Adds Metal to Glass, Resulting in Minor Brain Explosion



Monday, October 12, 2009, by Pete


When we got a first peek of the molded metal panels planned for avant-garde architect Neil Denari's HL23 in West Chelsea we were warned by the NMDA crew that the mock-ups weren't a true visual representation of what would rise above the High Line. Now there is glass as well as flashy sheets of stainless going up at West 23rd Street and close inspection shows some subtle changes.

In the mock-up each panel had the same swoopy indent at dead center, but now the panels are varied, with the indents off-set and moving across the panels, giving the east face a jolt of energy. The inset side windows appear pretty much the same, but look like they've been set a bit deeper into the metal facade. One thing we hadn't paid much attention to before is how intimately the lordly HL23 meets the High Line down below.

Old maps and photos of the High Line show a little spur on the west side of the tracks running from West 21st Street up to and just beyond West 23rd Street, ending right at the front door of HL23. Some plans for Phase II of the elevated park, set to open about one year from now, show a glassed-in elevator rising to meet that spur on the sidewalk where HL23, the High Line and West 23rd Street come together. Up above the rails a big tilted expanse of fritted glass looms over what is designed to be a major entry point to the High Line. That could make life interesting for the folks who take up residence in the full floor condos down low. And, depending on what goes on inside HL23, it could be a load of fun for High Liners, too.

And what to make of the business side of the building? HL23 isn't being built just for our gawking, after all. StreetEasy reports four units in contract, and get a load of this. A new listing for an $18 million penthouse triplex recently popped up on the market. An observant Curbed tipster writes:

I've been watching 515 W 23rd since it broke ground... and now it seems like the builder decided to totally re-arrange the top 3 floors and create a Triplex Penthouse… for just $18,000,000. Originally the plans called for a duplex penthouse only, and a full-floor residence below that one. Wonder why they decided to go this route instead of sticking with their original plan?

Because these days luxury is out but super luxury is in! Plus, there's still time to separate/divide as buyers see fit. Holler at it, Kanye.





Render showing HL23 overhanging the High Line.


The same, only, you know, REAL.


Looking north from the High Line at West 20th Street to the newly-glassed HL23.








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