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  #61  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2011, 12:26 AM
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Well guys, welcome to the worlds of LA and Chicago.
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  #62  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2011, 2:42 PM
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^ I don't know what you mean. New York has always been undercounted, and always will be. Officials just expected a better job this time.


Someone wanted some Buffalo information...

http://online.wsj.com/article/AP3119...0834e21e6.html
Census shows Buffalo continuing population decline

March 25, 2011


Quote:

The Rev. Darius Pridgen's True Bethel Baptist Church throws more community farewell parties than welcoming celebrations.

Count him among those who weren't at all surprised at census figures released this week showing Buffalo's population dropped by 10.7 percent — 31,338 people — over the past decade.

In fact, every census since 1960 has shown Buffalo losing people. The 2010 results — which put the population at 261,310, down from a 1950s peak of about 580,000 — are the second in a row showing losses nearing 11 percent.


"I'm almost surprised when someone does move in," said Pridgen, a city councilman whose district is flush with vacant houses and lots. "I always ask, 'What made you come here?'"

Ironically, Pridgen has seen his congregation grow from about 1,500 people a decade ago to about 4,000 now, an expansion he says comes when people are "looking for hope in a depressed situation."

The former industrial hub on the shore of a Great Lake, famed in song as a place to shuffle off to, now has less than half the number of people it had at in its 1950s peak, the result of a shifting economy that drained old industrial cities of jobs and the people who worked them.

In 2009, there were as many as 10,000 vacant, abandoned homes in Buffalo, where suburban sprawl and an aging population have combined with manufacturing's decline to create some of the emptiest neighborhoods in the nation, according to an analysis at the time by The Associated Press. Even banks sometimes walk away from vacant buildings, which can be ravaged by hard Lake Erie winters.

A migration from the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt isn't over, said Al Price, an associate professor of urban and regional planning at the University at Buffalo. In the latest census, Detroit saw its population plummet 25 percent over the past decade, Cleveland 17.1 percent and Pittsburgh 8.5 percent.

A study by the Buffalo Mayor's Office of Strategic Planning suggested the city's population may dip to 250,000 or lower before growth resumes.


Mayor Byron Brown said that New York's status as one of the highest-taxed states has eroded many cities' populations but that he believes property tax cuts he has advanced, along with changes pushed by Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo, could help stem the losses in the next decade.

"Buffalo is still the second-largest city in New York," he said. "That's why I've focused such attention on making Buffalo competitive."

In the meantime, some see a silver lining in a city with infrastructure to accommodate many more than it now has.

"We actually could use this to advance a new perception of Buffalo," Pridgen said, "by showing that we're not overpopulated, that we have shorter commute times, we have more green space. ... We have to use it to our advantage to attract businesses."

No one expects Buffalo's population to bounce back to its peak; the region has long recognized that the steel plants won't reopen. But Price said city leaders deserve credit for efforts toward attracting new economic development.

He points to a mammoth federal courthouse under construction downtown, a burgeoning 120-acre medical campus where $500 million in construction is under way, and billionaire Terry Pegula's recent $189 million purchase of the Buffalo Sabres.

Then there is the dogged network of community activists determined to counter perceptions that Buffalo is a dying burg, by doing everything from reaching out to investors to planting trees and gardens where houses no longer stand.

"It's not as if nothing's going on," Price said.

The annual Citybration festival, scheduled for June, is meant to showcase the city's assets to attract new people and employers and retain those already here.

"We need to be very proactive in our promotion of the city and all of its true assets," Citybration organizer Marti Gorman said.

Perhaps now more than ever.

"When the census figures speak, they speak with a very clear, cold, analytical voice," Gorman said, "so I think we need to redouble our efforts in Buffalo to let people know how wonderful a place it is and what remarkable opportunities it presents."

—Copyright 2011 Associated Press
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  #63  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2011, 2:47 PM
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http://www.nydailynews.com/opinions/..._the_ways.html

The census delivers good news for New York: Let's count the ways



The Census Bureau counted 8.175 million New Yorkers in its once-in-a-decade count last year.


BY Mitchell Moss
March 27th 2011

Quote:

Despite the debate about the results of the 2010 Census, which Mayor Bloomberg credibly argues undercounted large chunks of the city, the headline news is very good - and undermines all those pessimistic forecasts about New York City.

Case in point: Almost 10 years after the Sept. 11 attacks, when most people thought this was a city without a future, the government's official count reveals that the city continues to be a magnet for people from all over the world. People did not run away, rather they continued to flow here.

In fact, lower Manhattan in particular is surging. More than 20,000 people have moved to the general vicinity of Ground Zero over the past decade. Lower Manhattan, filled with strollers and dogs, now has more than 10 preschools and 11 public and private grade schools.

Counter to popular rhetoric, New York City is not pushing out working-class minorities. Rather, we are witnessing a remarkable flow of people within the five boroughs. Households are relocating as never before from more cramped quarters to single-family homes in Canarsie, Ridgewood, the north and east Bronx, as well as in southeast Queens.

That's one of New York City's great achievements: Since the streets are safer and the schools are better, one can live a suburban life within the five boroughs. You can own a private home, have two cars - and your property taxes are far lower than in the suburbs.

While much attention is being given to the 5% decline in the city's African-American population, this is no cause for alarm. It's the standard American cycle. As people move up the economic ladder, they often relocate to suburban areas or to the Sunbelt cities. Whites have been doing this for decades; that's why there are so few Irish strongholds left in New York City, and why the city has lost almost a million Jews over the past half century.

Some irresponsibly suggest the flow out of the five boroughs by African-Americans is a reaction to the NYPD's aggressive law enforcement methods. There is zero evidence of that; polls show race relations have improved since the Giuliani era. Rather, the outflow appears to be a result of the fact that African-Americans are finally able to take advantage of the opportunities that other groups have enjoyed.

We cannot ignore this powerful fact: The city overall is becoming more diverse, not less.

The positive news will bring growing pains. With just over 200,000 African-Americans now living in Manhattan - that's just 12% of the island's population - Rep. Charles Rangel can expect serious Latino challengers. And the heavily black and Latino Bronx, which is less than 10% white, is destined to become a political graveyard, since that borough, despite its size, no longer provides the opportunities for coalition-building across races.

Further, with more than a million Asians now living in the city, it will be time to include this significant demographic group when new lines are drawn for the City Council, Congress and the state Legislature. Until now, the Asian community was geographically split between Chinatown, Sunset Park and northeast Queens, limiting their political strength.

In short: The overall undercounting shouldn't prevent us from appreciating the evolving city in which we live. As some urban areas wither and die, New York remains more than twice as big as the country's second largest metropolis. Queens alone has more people than San Francisco and Dallas combined.

Like so many New Yorkers themselves, the city succeeds because it never stands still.

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  #64  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2011, 2:57 PM
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http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.s...0_in_nati.html

Syracuse slides to 170 in national population ranking

March 27, 2011
By Paul Riede

Quote:
While Syracuse seems to be stabilizing its population after a long decline, it has continued its slide down the list of the nation’s largest cities.

Over the last 10 years, Syracuse dropped from the 140th largest city in the country to the 170th, according to a ranking compiled by the US 2010 Census Project at Brown University.

The drop in the rankings continues a long trend. In 1900, Syracuse was the 30th largest city in the country, above such developing towns as Los Angeles, Atlanta and Seattle. Now it is far below them. With 145,170 residents, it is nestled between Torrance, Calif., and Bridgeport, Conn. While Syracuse is larger than Dayton, Ohio; Savannah, Ga; and Topeka, Kan; it is smaller than such towns as Springfield, Mass.; Sioux Falls, S.D.; and Rancho Cucamonga, Calif.

The greater Syracuse region — officially known as the metropolitan statistical area of Madison, Onondaga and Oswego counties — also fell in the rankings, although not as much as the city itself. At 662,577 residents, it ranked 108th in the country, between the Charleston, S.C., and Toledo, Ohio, regions. The Syracuse region’s ranking had been 100th in the country in 2000.

Syracuse, which remains New York’s fifth largest city, wasn’t the only town in the state to plummet in the rankings as people fled to the South and West. Buffalo dropped from No. 57 in 2000 to No. 70 in 2010. Rochester went from 77 in 2000 to 99 last year. And Yonkers declined from 93 to 116.

New York City remained by far the nation’s most populous city, with nearly 8.2 million people, towering above No. 2 Los Angeles, which had about 3.8 million.

While Syracuse’s declining ranking might be a hit to civic pride, it does not appear to have any direct economic impact, said Paul Driscoll, the city’s commissioner of neighborhood and business development. Federal grants, for example, are based in part on the number of residents in a community but not on its relative ranking.
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  #65  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2011, 2:11 PM
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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/28/ny...er=rss&emc=rss

Non-Hispanic Whites Are Now a Minority in the 23-County New York Region

By SAM ROBERTS
March 27, 2011

Quote:

For the first time, black, Hispanic and Asian residents of New York City and its suburbs are a majority of the metropolitan area’s more than 19 million residents, according to the 2010 census, released last week.

New York is the first major metropolitan area in the country outside the South or West in which non-Hispanic whites have become a minority of the population.

Some of the same dynamic that transformed New York into a majority-minority city in the 1980s also contributed to that benchmark in the 23 counties that make up the metropolitan area: New York’s five boroughs, as well as Nassau, Suffolk, Westchester, Rockland and Putnam Counties, Fairfield County in Connecticut and 12 counties in New Jersey.

In 2000, the census found that non-Hispanic whites made up 54.3 percent of the area’s population. By 2010, their share had declined to 49.6 percent.

“It reflects the way the country is going; it’s becoming more diverse,” said Andrew A. Beveridge, a sociologist at Queens College of the City University of New York. “It’s America now.”

Still, despite the proliferation of other racial and ethnic groups, the New York City area grew the slowest, by 3.1 percent, of the 10 largest metropolitan areas.

In every county except Manhattan and Brooklyn, the population of non-Hispanic whites decreased.

The black population decreased in every borough except Staten Island and in the counties closest to the city, and increased slightly in the suburbs. The number of Asian residents increased in every county in the metropolitan area, while the Hispanic population rose in every county except Manhattan.

From 2000 to 2009, the metropolitan area registered a gain of nearly 400,000 foreign-born residents, pushing their share of the population to 26 percent. Nearly three-fourths of the gain was in the suburbs. (The 2010 census did not count immigrants separately.)

“The same patterns of white — and now black — loss are occurring, with more gains of Hispanics, Asians and others,” William H. Frey, a demographer for the Brookings Institution, said.

“If anything, the white losses are less than last decade, as are the total minority gains. But it appears that both the white losses and minority gains are more concentrated in the suburbs, paving the way for a continuing urbanization of this broad suburban territory.”

Even as the New York metropolitan area has become more diverse as a whole, individual neighborhoods have remained stubbornly resistant to racial integration.

Although housing segregation declined slightly in the New York area since 2000, New York passed Detroit and Chicago to reach second place, behind Milwaukee, in a ranking by Dr. Frey of segregation of blacks and whites.

New York’s persistently high level of housing segregation results from several factors, although a number of them also prevail in other metropolitan areas where integration has increased.

“There was a very long history of strong ethnic boundaries, with a buildup of black and Hispanic — originally Puerto Rican — enclaves in large sections of the city, partly anchored by public housing,” said John R. Logan, a sociologist at Brown University and director of the US2010 Project, a research project at Brown on recent population changes. “The suburbs initially had restrictive covenants in many places, and when some older suburbs became less attractive to whites — such as Hempstead Village — they turned rapidly into minority enclaves, so the old city-versus-suburb segregation was reproduced within suburbia.”

In addition, Professor Logan said, “New York’s labor market has been strongly organized by race and ethnicity, and that may have contributed to the boundaries of where people live.”

Even when factoring in members of disparate racial and ethnic groups who share similarities in characteristics like income and education, said Professor Logan, “the differences in where people live are very stark.”
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  #66  
Old Posted Mar 31, 2011, 6:26 AM
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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/31/ny...1&ref=nyregion

Just Look at This Place. What’s Not to Love?



By JAVIER C. HERNANDEZ
March 30, 2011

Quote:

“Flabbergasting” was the word in Brooklyn. “Impossible,” newspapers in Queens claimed. “Inconceivable,” said the mayor.

In a city that likes to call itself the center of the universe, the news that New York City grew by a mere 2.1 percent over the past decade prompted an array of emotions across the five boroughs: exasperation, indifference, shame, bewilderment.

This is the city of the Yankees and Broadway, of Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty, of sky-high buildings and never-ending parks. How could the world not be rushing to its shores?

For many New Yorkers, what seems to be at stake is nothing less than the city’s supersize reputation. In a place that likes to dream big, an increase of about 167,000 people over 10 years feels anemic and, to some, embarrassing.

“It’s a feather in our cap, so to speak, being the largest city in the country,” Dan Moreland, 42, a Manhattan lawyer, said at Grand Central Terminal the other day. “It’s important that we maintain that as a matter of our own self-worth.”

Yes, the official count of 8,175,133 was an all-time high for the city for a 10-year census, and the 2.1 percent increase came at a time when other major cities were in decline — Detroit’s population, for instance, plunged an astonishing 25 percent. But never mind that: this is New York, where it does not seem so preposterous that 167,000 people could be crammed into a few No. 6 trains during rush hour.

The city, perhaps sensing its pride was at stake, has reacted angrily.

Stage one: denial. Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg cried “undercount,” saying the data crunchers at the Census Bureau had missed scores of immigrants. It seemed highly suspect, he said, that the population of Queens increased by just 1,343 people since 2000.

“Could that really be possible?” Mr. Bloomberg said. “As they say in Brooklyn: Fuhgeddaboudit.”

Stage two: defiance. Dozens of lawmakers joined Mr. Bloomberg on Sunday to demand a recount. “The numbers are dead wrong,” Senator Charles E. Schumer said. “It makes you wonder if the Census Bureau is living on a different planet.”

To be sure, more than bragging rights are at stake: the federal government factors in population when it allocates aid, and elected officials say that the city could be shortchanged by millions of dollars if the current figures stand. Population data is also used to determine how legislative lines are drawn.

But money and politics aside, the census figures seem to have done something more profound to New York, bruising the ego of a city known for egos.

When Phyllis Newman, 78, an actress and Tony Award winner, heard about the census results, she said she had three words for the federal government: “Get a life.”

“It’s more crowded than ever,” said Ms. Newman, a lifelong New Yorker who lives on the Upper West Side. “It always looks like New Year’s Eve in Times Square. That’s vitality. They made a terrible mistake.”

Based on preliminary census estimates, city officials had expected New York’s population to increase by nearly 400,000, to 8.4 million.

Joseph J. Salvo, the city’s chief demographer, said it was important to look at the numbers in context, even if they prove to be correct, which he doubts. While other cities outpaced New York in their growth rates, he noted that only one other — San Antonio — actually added more people (183,000, for a growth rate of 16 percent).

“We are still adding close to 170,000 people, and while that is below what we expected, it’s still quite formidable,” Mr. Salvo said.

Still, there are signs that after growing by 9 percent from 1990 to 2000, New York’s population boom might have begun to ease.

While the entire country grew more slowly in the past decade, the New York metropolitan area, including the suburbs, was particularly sluggish, increasing by 3.1 percent. By contrast, the metropolitan areas of Atlanta, Dallas and Houston all grew by more than 20 percent.

Historians attribute the growth in Sun Belt states to a variety of causes, including a lower cost of living, less-onerous building regulations and cheap and abundant land and housing.

The supply of housing in a city is generally a good predictor of population growth. A city can thrive financially, but it will not attract more people unless it allows robust building, economists say.

New York has added some 170,000 housing units over the last decade, compared with 200,000 in the previous decade. But according to census data, the number of people living in each unit has fallen, a trend the city disputes.

Kenneth T. Jackson, a Columbia University historian, said New York was “a city where people come, and then disperse.” He said one reason behind the lackluster numbers might have been the reluctance of New Yorkers to return census surveys. For the 2010 census, 63 percent of residents did so, up from 60 percent in 2000 but below the national average of 74 percent. Census takers are sent out to find the rest. “There’s a bunch of cantankerous types in New York,” Professor Jackson said. “Some people,” he said, would not send the survey back “if you gave them $200.”

But even for less-than-grouchy New Yorkers, the census data was enough to cause a fit. Several were adamant that the city’s image as a thriving home to artists, entrepreneurs, financiers and everyone in between would endure.

“This is still the place where legends are made and dreams come true,” said Marty Markowitz, the Brooklyn borough president. “We’re not going to take it lying down. We know we’re right.”



"It makes you wonder if the Census Bureau is living on a different planet," Senator Charles E. Schumer said.




"Could that really be possible?" Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg asked.
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  #67  
Old Posted Apr 1, 2011, 9:15 PM
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I guess I share Mr. Salvo prespective. Look, the numbers did not come out the way many believe it should (especially for Queens!!!), but, there are not many cities in this country that can match over 160K people added in 10 years. Detriot, Cleveland, Pittsburgh would be happy with just 1/10th of that number. New York is still at a record high in terms of population, not many old established cities in this country can make that claim.
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  #68  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2011, 2:01 PM
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i cleaned up all of the stupid vs. trolling in this thread.

stay on topic or go find a new forum to join.
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  #69  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2011, 2:30 PM
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http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/...%28NY+Local%29

Once-desolate Brooklyn waterfront neighborhoods see population boom in 2011 census numbers



BY Erin Durkin
April 4th 2011

Quote:

More and more residents are flocking to Brooklyn's waterfront, new census data show.

While the feds found only a tiny increase in Brooklyn's population overall, blocks along the waterfront from Williamsburg down to Sunset Park saw big spikes, with some spots doubling or tripling in population since 2000.

The growth came as vast swaths of the waterfront - once booming industrial areas, but long closed off - have been opened to residential development.

"Where bodies were dumped, you now see mothers pushing strollers," said Richard Hanley, director of the Center for the Study of the Brooklyn Waterfront at City Tech.

"It has to do with finally discovering a way to use this area after 30 years of [it] being depressed and abandoned."

In one seven-block stretch along the East River in northern Williamsburg, the population surged 126%, with more than 1,000 new residents moving in.

Among them is Kevin Hector, 26, who last month moved into a North Sixth St. apartment built atop what was once a railway terminal. Growing up on Williamsburg's south side, he said he never imagined living on the waterfront.

"You couldn't even pass through here. It was just factories," he said. "It's more sophisticated, more nice, clean [now] ... I love it here."

Khaled Salem, 46, who moved into the Palmer's Dock development three years ago, said the clearest sign of the boom has been more people packed onto the subway for his daily commute to his doorman job in Manhattan. At first, he'd sometimes have to let one train go by before boarding; now he often has to wait for two or more.

"People are coming, more and more every day," he said. "I think all of Manhattan is coming here."


There was an even bigger jump in DUMBO, where the population more than tripled in the last 10 years as warehouse after warehouse was turned into high-end condos.

"It's like SoHo on steroids," said Elaine Pedlar, 45, a fashion designer who moved into a converted warehouse building in 1999.

"It was really empty. It was undiscovered," she said. "I was the first person to occupy that building. ... It just kept snowballing."

The influx has some drawbacks - speeding up gentrification and pushing rents up in nearby areas.

Parks and affordable housing that the city promised when it allowed waterfront towers in Williamsburg and Greenpoint have been slow to arrive, and advocates recently warned that an estimated 1,200 people are in immediate danger of being forced out of their homes in those neighborhoods.

Richie Torres, 38, had to move out of DUMBO seven years ago when his rent tripled, after he'd lived in the neighborhood since the late 1980s.

"I used to work around the corner at a spring factory. I used to make springs. They used to make Bibles there," he recalled, pointing out neighboring buildings on Front and Washington Sts. "That used to be a candy factory."

The area was also so unsafe and desolate, Torres said, that "after 2 o'clock we couldn't be standing here. It was that bad. It went from nothing to something."

While long-abandoned industrial areas have been turned into residential meccas, city officials have continued to encourage industry in areas like Red Hook and Sunset Park.

In Red Hook, new residents live side by side with a container port and a beverage distributor, causing occasional clashes. Still, people have continued to flock to the water, with a 29% jump in population around the Columbia St. waterfront area.

Resident Brian McCormick said good schools, lower crime, and the new Brooklyn Bridge Park have drawn people to the neighborhood - but some things never change.

"People are still surprised when they cross over the BQE. You see this hulk of the city - is that Manhattan?" he said. "It's so visually powerful and iconic on the waterfront."

City officials - who recently unveiled a plan to open up even more of the waterfront to a mix of homes, parks, and manufacturing and shipping - said there will be increasing growth in coming years.

"We're in the midst of its transformation at this point," said Brooklyn City Planning Director Purnima Kapur. "It's definitely not the end of it."
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  #70  
Old Posted Apr 7, 2011, 4:48 PM
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Census Workers Unable to Access 'Housing Underworld,' Some Say


http://www.wnyc.org/articles/wnyc-ne...aphic-reality/

Quote:
As the city plans to challenge what it says are low census numbers by showing that many of the thousands of vacancies – namely in Brooklyn and Queens – were in fact occupied homes, some residents in those areas spoke of an impenetrable "housing underworld" that census workers could not reach.

Officials appeared blind sided last month when Census 2010 figures placed the city’s population at 8.175 million rather than the 8.4 million count consistent with earlier estimates, which puts millions of dollars in federal funding for New York City at risk. Senator Chuck Schumer called the figure "baffling" and Mayor Michael Bloomberg said it "doesn't make sense at all."

Through the bureau's Count Question Resolution process, Bloomberg plans to challenge the census data, and a number of housing advocates and community groups -- some of which stand to lose funding from a low census count -- seem to think workers were unable to reach some residents.

.....
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  #71  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2011, 12:37 AM
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nice job BK..hopefully the southside of Chicago can say the same in the next decade or two
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  #72  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2011, 2:12 PM
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http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/...s_hirises.html

Census proves be nothing but towers of babble as officials seemed to miss Manhattan hi-rises



Yves Vilus, Executive Director of the Erasmus Neighborhood Federation, says 'The Census is wrong.'



Owners of the Pistilli Grand Manor in Queens would not allow Census takers to speak with residents.



BY Erica Pearson, Barbara Ross and Greg B. Smith
April 17th 2011

Quote:

Since 2000, Manhattanites have watched one giant residential tower after another sprout from SoHo to Harlem.

Yet, the Census Bureau claims some of the borough's most densely packed neighborhoods - the upper West Side, the upper East Side, the West Village and Gramercy - lost thousands of housing units in the last 10 years.

"That's crazy," said City Councilwoman Gail Brewer, who represents the bustling upper West Side. "It doesn't make any sense to me, like the rest of the census."

The mystery of the disappearing housing is just one aspect of the bureau's 2010 official count that has been called into question.

The Daily News found:

-Doormen at some buildings in Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan admit they didn't allow census takers in to count people or units.

-Residents in immigrant neighborhoods say many new arrivals - legal or not - ducked census takers and weren't counted.

-The Census labeled as "vacant" hundreds of units that were still under construction because they "looked inhabitable."

"The numbers are dead wrong and it makes you wonder if the Census Bureau is living on a different planet," Sen. Chuck Schumer said, calling the claim that Queens - the borough of immigrants - grew by just 1,300 people in 10 years "absurd."

Last month, the bureau pegged the city's population at 8.17 million. Three months earlier, the bureau pegged it at 8.4 million.

The official count released March 24 also claimed there were 81,000 more vacant housing units in New York, a 45% jump.

The day it was released, Mayor Bloomberg vowed to challenge the count. That fight is more than rhetorical: The final numbers help determine how much federal money the city gets for programs like affordable housing.

The bureau counts people and housing units; if the people numbers are too low or the vacant units too high, the city loses cash.

Overall, the bureau says Manhattan gained nearly 50,000 housing units, due mostly to thousands of new luxury condos in lower Manhattan and the newly rezoned far West Side.

Still, it claims the upper West Side lost 2,835 housing units, the upper East Side lost 1,450, the West Village lost 488 and Gramercy lost 324.

Do the permits lie?

The Census Bureau also claims all four neighborhoods experienced a big jump in vacant units, spiking 57% on the upper West Side and 28% on the upper East Side.

That's also puzzling since the city granted 75 new construction permits on the upper East and West Sides between 2005 and 2010, records show.

Upper West Siders say they can't believe the numbers because they've seen local schools become more crowded, lines in local stores lengthen and parking spaces disappear.
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  #73  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2011, 4:44 AM
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http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/29/ny...l?ref=nyregion

Slower Racial Change Found in Census of City

By SAM ROBERTS
July 28, 2011

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New York City edged a baby step closer to racial equilibrium in the last decade, according to census results released this month.

As a result, according to the 2010 census, the city was 33 percent non-Hispanic white, 29 percent Hispanic, 23 percent black and 13 percent Asian. In 2000, the city’s makeup was 35 percent non-Hispanic white, 27 percent Hispanic, 25 percent black and 10 percent Asian.
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  #74  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2011, 1:26 PM
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http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/...ine_nabes.html

Asian boom in Brooklyn along N-lline neighborhoods in Brooklyn, Census data shows



Dyker Heights, Borough Park and Bensonhurst have all seen an increase in the Asian population over the last ten years.


BY Katie Nelson
September 15th 2011

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The newest Census data shows that Brooklyn's Asian population is spiking - not only in the longtime stronghold of Sunset Park - but also east into Dyker Heights, Borough Park and Bensonhurst along the transit route.

The intensity of the demographic shift is "stunning," said Steve Chung, head of the United Chinese Association of Brooklyn, which has headquarters right next to the Bay Parkway N subway stop in Bensonhurst. "It seems like every month it changes because Bensonhurst is an ideal place to raise a family," Chung said.
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  #75  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2012, 11:35 AM
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Census rejects NYC count appeal
Decision could cost New York City millions



'It is unfortunate no mechanism exists to rectify the errors we identified,' the city’s Planning Commissioner Amanda Burden said.


By Reuven Blau
April 2, 2012

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In a decision that could cost the city millions, the Census Bureau has rejected an appeal that argued the official count missed more than 50,000 residents of Brooklyn and Queens. The Bloomberg administration said that the bureau’s 2010 count overlooked people in Astoria and Jackson Heights in Queens and Bay Ridge and Bensonhurst in Brooklyn.

In 2010, the Census Bureau said the city population had increased by 166,855 to 8,175,133 over the past decade. City officials argued the real count was closer to 8.4 million.

City officials blamed the rejection on technical problems with the complicated federal appeals process. They noted the bureau tally made no sense because the number of homes and apartments in the city had spiked by 170,000 since 2002 — more than the total Census official resident increase of 160,000.
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  #76  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2012, 5:03 AM
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Population Growth in New York City Is Outpacing 2010 Census, 2011 Estimates Show

By SAM ROBERTS
April 5, 2012


Quote:
New York City gained nearly 70,000 residents in the 15 months ended July 1, 2011, almost matching the growth of the 1990s, when an influx of foreigners set annual records, according to census estimates released on Wednesday. The apparent population rebound resulted from a combination of continued immigration and higher birthrates among the newcomers, along with fewer New Yorkers leaving the city.

The estimates also appeared to indicate faster growth than had been suggested by the 2010 census, which recorded gains of only 175,000 for the entire decade and a decline from 2009 population estimates. City officials insisted that the 2010 figures undercounted about 50,000 people in Brooklyn and Queens, but their challenge was rejected last week.

In the estimates by the Census Bureau for July 1, 2011, the biggest gains were recorded in Brooklyn and Queens. Brooklyn had gained nearly 28,000 people since April 1, 2010, and Queens had gained more than 17,000. Those gains, combined with increases in every other borough, boosted the city’s population by 69,777, to 8,244,910. Even the population of the Bronx grew at a faster rate than did the populations of Nassau or Suffolk Counties. Brooklyn was the fastest-growing borough.

The city gained more people than the counties that include Dallas, Miami and San Diego in the Sun Belt, and nearly as many as Maricopa County, which includes Phoenix and has often been ranked as the fastest-growing county in the United States. The one-year gain of nearly 60,000 people, from July 1, 2010, to July 1, 2011, was higher than most annual estimates in the 2000s, and higher than the average annual increase of about 17,000 in the previous decade, comparing the 2000 and 2010 censuses.

Over all, the population of the New York metropolitan area increased by nearly 119,000. The area ranked fourth in gains nationally, behind Dallas, Houston and Washington, and ahead of Los Angeles and Miami.
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  #77  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2012, 11:16 PM
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I'm just waiting for NYC to succeed Mexico City by population. We're almost there.
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  #78  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2012, 4:13 PM
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Originally Posted by jd3189 View Post
I'm just waiting for NYC to succeed Mexico City by population. We're almost there.
City boundaries mean little though as they are defined by politics. What is the population of metropolitan Mexico City compared to the NYC MSA?
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  #79  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2012, 4:19 PM
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Originally Posted by aquablue View Post
City boundaries mean little though as they are defined by politics. What is the population of metropolitan Mexico City compared to the NYC MSA?
There's no such thing as officially derived "metropolitan area" in Mexico, so it's a difficult question. Mexican Census figures are notoriously bad too.

I think the general estimate is that about 25 million people live in the greater region, though that number would probably be lower if you're not counting places like Toluca and the like which aren't really commutable to DF but still part of an unbroken sprawl of development.
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  #80  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2012, 6:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquablue View Post
City boundaries mean little though as they are defined by politics. What is the population of metropolitan Mexico City compared to the NYC MSA?
In Wikipedia, they put it as this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of..._by_population

Rank Metropolitan area Country Population Area (km2) Population Density (People/km2)
1 Tokyo Japan 32,450,000 8,014 4,049
2 Seoul South Korea 20,550,000 5,076 4,048
3 Mexico City[3] Mexico 20,450,000 7,346 2,784
4 New York[4] United States 19,750,000 17,884 1,104
5 Mumbai India 19,200,000 2,350 8,170
6 Jakarta Indonesia 18,900,000 5,100 3,706
7 São Paulo Brazil 18,850,000 8,479 2,223
8 Delhi India 18,600,000 3,182 5,845
9 Osaka-Kobe-Kyoto Japan 17,375,000 6,930 2,507
10 Shanghai China 16,650,000 5,177 3,216

The numbers are close to that of real life and measure the metropolitan areas.
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