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  #61  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 2:41 AM
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Major hospital expansions in Portland slows

Friday, April 9, 2010
Hospital building boom nears end
Kaiser’s new hospital last of major projects
Portland Business Journal - by Courtney Sherwood Business Journal staff writer

Steel workers will place the final beam on the skeleton of the Portland area’s largest construction project on April 12.

Topping off Kaiser Permanente’s $359 million Hillsboro hospital marks a key milestone for Kaiser, which has invited Washington County leaders to watch as the 36-foot beam is hoisted to the fourth floor roof of the patient tower. The Westside Medical Center is scheduled to open in 2013.

It’s likely the last big hospital project the metro area will see for years. Oregon hospitals, which have spent more than $1.5 billion on construction and expansion over the past half decade, are scaling back on ambitious projects to instead build networks of much smaller clinics.

That includes Kaiser.

In addition to building a number of hospitals in California in recent years, Kaiser spent $300 million on recent upgrades to its Sunnyside Medical Center.

But medical office buildings costing $10 million to $60 million will dominate its construction spending over the next 10 years, said Willy Paul, director for design and construction in Kaiser’s Northwest region.

Kaiser’s also eyeing Southwest Washington, Oregon City and sites near its new Hillsboro hospital as it considers where to build its next clinic.

Other hospital groups are making similar shifts in their capital plans.

“Most of our construction work right now, from a patient care perspective, is in primary care clinics,” said Gary Walker, spokesman for Providence Health & Services.

Providence Portland Medical Center opened its $204 million, 11-story cancer center in 2008. It has several smaller capital projects underway at its metro area hospitals.

Now it’s looking to build primary care clinics in Fishers Landing, near Camas, Wash., and in the Bethany area of Beaverton.

Adventist Health, which owns a hospital and 20 clinics in Southeast Portland, likewise plans to open more clinics within its footprint.

“We’re finding that there are still communities that don’t have good access to primary care,” said spokeswoman Judy Leach. “Our capital plans are driven by community need.”

The focus on smaller medical offices marks a shift for the region’s major health care organizations, which had been on a building spree.

Big projects have included construction of the $300 million Legacy Salmon Creek hospital in Vancouver, Wash., the $204 million Providence Portland Cancer Center, and Adventist Medical Center’s just-completed $105 million 180,000-square-foot Pavilion expansion. Legacy Health System expects to open its $250 million Children’s Hospital at Emanuel in 2011.

The shift to building smaller clinics comes just as national health reform has boosted the emphasis on primary care. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act rewards medical systems that can tackle complex health problems while keeping patients out of the hospital.

Mark Richardson, dean of Oregon Health & Science University’s School of Medicine, expects that reform will encourage less hospital construction and more hospital mergers — such as the pending merger of Vancouver-based Southwest Washington Health System with PeaceHealth of Bellevue, Wash.

Large systems that offer a wide array of physician services and medical facilities will fare best under government programs that reward coordinated care, Richardson said.

A recent hike in Oregon hospital taxes may also affect how medical groups choose to grow. In 2009, the state Legislature raised the tax on hospital revenue from 0.63 percent to 3 percent, with hospital support, to increase the number of poor adults who could enroll in the Oregon Health Plan. Non-hospital clinics might avoid the tax.

Hospital officials say the shift from big buildings to smaller clinics was not spurred by legislation or economic forces.

“It reflects the natural cycle of growth and expansion,” said Kaiser’s Paul.

csherwood@bizjournals.com | 503-219-3420

http://portland.bizjournals.com/port...12/story4.html
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  #62  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 2:47 AM
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Friday, April 9, 2010
Precision stock soars as aircraft sector rallies
Portland Business Journal - by Erik Siemers Business Journal staff writer

Shares of Precision Castparts Corp. have spent the last week on the verge of $130, the highest point in nearly two years thanks to an improved outlook from aircraft manufacturers.

Portland-based Precision Castparts makes critical components used mostly in aircraft manufacturing and energy markets, such as for industrial gas turbines.

But despite being one of Oregon’s two Fortune 500 companies, Precision Castparts stock price wasn’t spared by the dismal economy.

As the market imploded in October 2008, the company’s shares fell below $50 and stayed below $100 for nearly a year.

But its fortune on Wall Street is often tied directly to the performance of its largest customers, including aircraft manufacturers such as Chicago-based Boeing Co.

That explains why Precision Castparts shares began their climb around March 19, the same day Boeing announced plans to ramp up production on the 777s and 747s it builds in Everett, Wash.

Precision Castparts has more than $7 million worth of components on each Boeing 747-8 and more than $5 million in both the 787 and 747-400 models.

Since that announcement, the company’s shares have jumped from $119 to $126 as of Tuesday.

“In the past, say, 90 days, there’s been a pretty distinct about-face in the attitude and outlook for the commercial widebody (aircraft) market,” said J.B. Groh, an analyst with Lake Oswego-based D.A. Davidson & Co. “It wasn’t too long ago that we were talking about more production cuts.”

The reversal in fortune led to some favorable notes from Wall Street analysts, further leading to the surge in Precision Castparts shares.

Goldman Sachs analyst Noah Poponak on March 29 upgraded the company’s shares from “neutral” to “buy” status with a 12-month price target of $153. That would surpass the company’s all-time high of $151 reached in December 2007.

In his note, Poponak said Precision Castparts will see dual benefit as customers stop paring down inventories and ramp up manufacturing.

On Monday, Peter Arment, an analyst with Greenwich, Conn.-based Broadpoint AmTech, issued a note reaffirming his existing “buy” rating, with an even higher $160 price target.

Precision Castparts CEO Mark Donegan, speaking March 9 at the J.P. Morgan, Transportation & Defense Conference, said the company is well-positioned in the aerospace sector.

“We continue to gain traction, gain share,” he said. “As programs like 787, the 747-8, come in and get moved to production we’ve got a very, very strong position, unlike anything we’ve had in the past.”

esiemers@bizjournals.com | 503-219-3418

http://portland.bizjournals.com/port...ml?t=printable
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  #63  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 2:53 AM
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Friday, April 9, 2010
ODS boosts revenue and members; profits next
Insurer becomes a major player after expanding ,into traditional health plans
Portland Business Journal - by Courtney Sherwood Business Journal staff writer

In less than two years, The ODS Cos. has quietly hired 350 workers, boosted revenue more than 50 percent, and added more than 100,000 members. Now the Portland-based health insurance company, which just completed a $30 million investment in new technology, expects profits to grow as well.

Its $84 million 2009 profit was down about 8 percent from the year before. Revenue over the same period, however, climbed 45 percent to $1.6 billion, said controller Dave Evans.

CEO Robert Gootee attributed the lower profit to higher-than-expected medical claims and to spending on infrastructure.

That spending, largely on new technology, is now coming to an end.

And as ODS adjusts its underwriting to better align with claims, profits should swell.

New underwriting standards will likely mean rate increases for some ODS members, but Gootee said rates will not go up across the board.

Though best-known for its dental plans, ODS has become a major player in the health insurance business.

In addition to being a major provider of self-insured medical benefits to large employers, it’s increasingly offering more traditional health insurance plans.

ODS doubled to 12,000 the number of people in its individual insurance program last year.

It now provides medical benefits to 264,810 people.

A 2008 bid to provide pharmacy benefits for uninsured and under-insured Oregonians also significantly boosted ODS’ pharmacy membership by 100,000 in the past year, to 626,090.

Rod Cruickshank, president of The Partners Group, a Portland benefits consultant, applauded ODS for its continued efforts to grow and diversify.

“They are not a one-trick pony,” Cruickshank said. “When they go and expand a business, they’ve thought it through.”

Yet the insurer’s successful bid to insure Oregon school district employees has generated some criticism.

The school employees’ contract, awarded by the Oregon Employers Benefit Board in 2008, placed ODS alongside Providence Health Plan and Kaiser Permanente as the insurance choices available to roughly 160,000 employees and retirees in Oregon’s 217 school districts.

The program brought 96,000 people to ODS’ rolls in late 2008, and about 35,000 more in 2009, spurring a number of one-time administrative expenses. Those costs will be recouped over the life of the four-year contract, Gootee said.

More importantly, ODS underestimated the number of medical claims that school employees would make, contributing to a $20 million underwriting loss across the teachers contract and similar insurance plans in the same business segment.

Under terms of the Oregon Employers Benefit Board contract, ODS will have to absorb that miscalculation for 2009, but will be able to adjust 2010 rates upwards to cover higher anticipated costs.

Higher-than-average expenses and underwriting losses are both common in the first year of new contracts, Cruickshank said.

Rates are adjusted by groups under state law, so an underwriting loss in one group will not affect what ODS charges other clients.

Gootee said that the Oregon Employers Benefit Board contract was “tremendous and wonderful” for ODS, despite the scrutiny it has brought to the insurer.

Roughly 80 percent of the health plans that ODS administers are for large self-insured employers. It collects a fee for running these programs, but the employers pay the actual costs of care.

“If you’re in the self-insured business, you’re not in the risk business at all,” Cruickshank said.

But underwriting traditional policies, such as the Oregon Employers Benefit Board, brings risk into the equation. Insurers must estimate how much care their members will demand, and if the estimates are off they risk a loss.

As ODS continues to grow, it will increasingly have to grapple with those risks — but that’s the business, Cruickshank said.

“Just because you have a loss on one book of business doesn’t mean you won’t recover from it.”

csherwood@bizjournals.com | 503-219-3420

http://portland.bizjournals.com/port...ml?t=printable
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  #64  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 7:29 AM
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I work at Ohsu, currently we're undergoing construction in the main hospital building. Just last month our new hospital lobby opened - it's beautiful! But currently they're working on the exterior of the main hospital building, renovating specific unit(s), and renovating elevators.

Here's some info on the road construction that is being done to provide this exterior work:

Campus Dr, Sam Jackson road work this wknd
Campus Drive

Saturday, April 10, 8 a.m.–1 p.m., Campus Drive between Dock 5 (hospital first-floor dock) and Kohler Pavilion

Temporary traffic controls and pedestrian facilities will be installed this Saturday on the upper portion of SW Campus Drive this Saturday in preparation for the next phase of work on the outside of OHSU Hospital. The affected part of Campus Drive will be reduced to one lane of traffic, but emergency vehicle access will be maintained; watch for flaggers and be ready for delays of up to five minutes.

Those temporary controls and facilities to be installed this Saturday will be in place for about six months. The sidewalk and bike lane on SW Campus Drive will be closed between the School of Dentistry 6th floor entrance and the Tram elevator. Instead you’ll find a temporary, protected walkway, pedestrian detour signage and concrete barricades. You’ll also see a temporary crosswalk and traffic-control signage next to Dock 16 (Kohler Pavilion dock).

Update added April 8:

Sam Jackson Park Road

Saturday–Sunday, April 10–11, 6 a.m.–4 p.m., Sam Jackson Road

The city’s Bureau of Transportation will do crosswalk and lane striping this weekend. Expect intermittent single-lane closures on SW Sam Jackson Park Road between Terwilliger and US Veterans Hospital Road. Emergency vehicle access will be maintained; watch for flaggers and be ready for delays of up to (another) five minutes. Crosswalks may be closed to pedestrian traffic. TriMet bus stops will remain open.
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  #65  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2010, 6:40 PM
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Intel will build a new $4 billion 'D1X' plant in Hillsboro, likely the largest capital project in Oregon's history, and upgrade two other factories. Arizona will also see upgrades to two factories -- together, the projects will create 6,000+ construction jobs (mostly in Oregon), and 800+ research jobs (also mostly in Oregon).



http://www.oregonlive.com/business/i...nvest_bil.html
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  #66  
Old Posted Jan 7, 2011, 7:55 PM
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Portland ranked top 10 for real estate investment

POSTED: Thursday, January 6, 2011 at 03:33 PM PT
BY: Nick Bjork, DJC


While proposed projects are still having trouble coming to realization, Portland’s commercial real estate investments market is starting the heat up.

In its annual forecast, the national commercial real estate firm Grubb & Ellis has ranked Portland in the top 10 cities in the U.S. for investment opportunities over the next five years in the office, retail and industrial real estate markets.

Portland, with one of the nation’s lowest central business district office vacancy rates at 10 percent, ranked third out of nearly 50 cities for office real estate investment opportunities over the next five years, according to Grubb & Ellis. Only New York and Washington, D.C., ranked higher than Portland.

Portland ranked fifth for retail real estate investment opportunities in the same forecast. Portland trailed Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco respectively in retail. Additionally, Portland ranked ninth for industrial real estate investment opportunity.

Potential for investment opportunity for each property class was determined by ranking 13 property, economic and demographic variables in each city on a scale of 0 to 100 and adding the totals.
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  #67  
Old Posted Jan 9, 2011, 8:22 AM
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Originally Posted by tworivers View Post

Portland ranked top 10 for real estate investment

POSTED: Thursday, January 6, 2011 at 03:33 PM PT
BY: Nick Bjork, DJC


While proposed projects are still having trouble coming to realization, Portland’s commercial real estate investments market is starting the heat up.

In its annual forecast, the national commercial real estate firm Grubb & Ellis has ranked Portland in the top 10 cities in the U.S. for investment opportunities over the next five years in the office, retail and industrial real estate markets.

Portland, with one of the nation’s lowest central business district office vacancy rates at 10 percent, ranked third out of nearly 50 cities for office real estate investment opportunities over the next five years, according to Grubb & Ellis. Only New York and Washington, D.C., ranked higher than Portland.

Portland ranked fifth for retail real estate investment opportunities in the same forecast. Portland trailed Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco respectively in retail. Additionally, Portland ranked ninth for industrial real estate investment opportunity.

Potential for investment opportunity for each property class was determined by ranking 13 property, economic and demographic variables in each city on a scale of 0 to 100 and adding the totals.
I'll be more inclined to say how awesome our real estate climate is when PAW gets out of the ground.
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  #68  
Old Posted Feb 18, 2011, 7:26 PM
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I thought there was a thread for this building, but I can't find it...


Cathy Cheney | Portland Business Journal

An expansion of North Portland’s Legacy Children’s Hospital should be finished in early 2012.

Read more: Legacy Children’s Hospital on schedule | Portland Business Journal

Legacy Children’s Hospital on schedule
Premium content from Portland Business Journal - by Andy Giegerich
Date: Friday, February 18, 2011, 3:00am PST

Legacy Emanuel’s expansion of Children’s Hospital continues on schedule.

The new $242 million hospital is slated to open in early 2012. All but $25 million of the 333,000-square-foot project will come from debt financing and various Legacy operating income sources. The hospital collected $3 million from its own employees as part of its capital campaign drive.

Legacy’s project gives it a running start on Doernbecher Children’s Hospital, which is owned and operated by Oregon Health and Science University. While OHSU will commit $150 million toward a potential expansion, it lost its bid for a $100 million federal grant in December to Ohio State University and has put its plans on hold.

“Our relationship with Legacy is very collegial and professional,” said Dr. H. Stacy Nicholson, Doernbecher’s physician-in-chief. “We also compete with them on quite a few things. I think there’s a healthy competition there, and as an American capitalist, I’m OK with that.”

The new Legacy facility won’t greatly expand the system’s children’s care capacity. The current facility employs 145 pediatric physicians and surgical specialists. It cares for more than 100,000 children per year.

However, Carla Harris, Children’s Hospital chief administrative officer, projected that revenue from Legacy’s child care services will rise by 3 percent in 2012.

Research indicates that children’s hospitals deliver a solid economic impact to their communities. A 2007 Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center study found that the Ohio facility generates $1.25 for every dollar it spends on patient care and research.

The hospital’s total annual economic impact of $2.72 billion grew at three times the rate of Cincinnati’s overall economic growth rate between 2002 and 2007.

“If I’m a banker and someone wants to borrow money for a business venture or for a hospital, there’s no doubt in my mind which has the lowest uncertainty of cash flow,” said Duncan Kretovich, a Portland State University associate professor of finance. “Unfortunately, there’s an endless supply of sick children, and the cash flow associated with treating children’s illnesses are certain.”

Legacy’s expanded nine-floor facility will feature:

• Inpatient services, an emergency department, a children’s day surgery center and a surgical short-stay unit.

• A children’s emergency department with 22 rooms, including four rooms for critical and resuscitative care.

• A pediatric intensive care unit with 24 private rooms.

• A neonatal intensive care unit with 45 private rooms, including six rooms that will accommodate twins.

• Ninety-six private inpatient acute care rooms.

• Expansive windows that offer wide glimpses of the Cascades, Willamette River and downtown Portland.

• A new 425-car parking structure.

Other features will include sofa beds that allow family members to sleep in patients’ rooms, kitchens on every floor, a movie and gaming lounge, spaces specifically for teenage patients and classrooms.

“Right now, we have a vintage 1980s hospital,” Harris said. “We’re building a green hospital that gives every child a window to the outside.”

While Legacy’s moves could give it more competitive muscle, Harris emphasized that Legacy is not looking to steal business from Doernbecher. Neither facility has the capacity to serve its current patients.

Legacy is also a community-based nonprofit with a primary caregiving mission. OHSU is considered more of an academic research facility.

Doernbecher, which handles more than 165,000 outpatient visits and employs 350 pediatric physicians, wants to add 232,000 square feet to the caregiver’s Southwest Portland campus. The extra room would expand care for mothers, babies and infants while allowing other OHSU specialists to co-opt existing Doernbecher facilities.

Doernbecher’s board and other officials continue to study the hospital’s funding options.
Fast Facts

Legacy Children’s Hospital is at 2801 N. Gantenbein Ave.

agiegerich@bizjournals.com | 503-219-3419


http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...-schedule.html
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  #69  
Old Posted Feb 18, 2011, 7:30 PM
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Hospital construction slows in 2011
Premium content from Portland Business Journal - by Andy Giegerich
Date: Friday, February 18, 2011, 3:00am PST

Despite dramatic patient demand increases through the next decade, Portland-area hospitals are expected to launch few construction projects in 2011.

As a result, the region’s major health care capital projects will come from ongoing work such as Legacy Emanuel’s $242 million children’s hospital renovation and Kaiser Permanente’s $344 million Westside Medical Center.

The lack of big-time activity continues the health construction slowdown that lasted throughout 2010. Oregon hospitals continue to spend their capital dollars judiciously after pouring more than $1.5 billion into construction and expansion projects between 2005 and 2010.

While 2011 activity is expected to double over last year, Oregon’s total projected construction starts are only expected to fill 643,000 square feet, compared to 1.48 million in 2009.

“While large-capital hospital spends have slowed, we continue to focus on projects that will keep us up to date with current technologies, like imaging equipment for cardiac catheterization labs,” said Bryce Helgerson, Legacy Emanuel’s vice president for hospital operations. “Those can often range in the millions of dollars.”

Nationally, McGraw-Hill Construction Research & Analytics, of Bedford, Mass., projects health care construction will increase by 6 percent in 2011, outperforming the overall nonresidential construction market.

Health industry analysts hope more facilities will arrive soon. As Baby Boomers become senior citizens, hospitals will need to address expected increased capacity needs over the next decade. The Pew Research Center projects that by 2030, 18 percent of the nation’s population will be older than 65. Just 13 percent of Americans fit that description today.

Between Jan. 1 and 2030, 10,000 Baby Boomers will turn 65 each day.

“We’re generally concerned about the aging population and the expanded number of folks entering the health care system” through health reform measures, said Sean Kolmer, deputy administrator of Oregon’s Health Policy and Research office. “Our goal is to do more on the preventive side ... to reduce the number of people going into hospitals, as well as coordinate care better.”

Yet 73 percent of hospitals nationally delayed making capital investments in 2010, according to the American Hospital Association. Another 67 percent reported that they’ve not stated or continued capital projects since the recession began in 2008.

“While we’re seeing new clinics and facility improvements, the overall assumption is that utilization will rise, and people will need more services.” said Dale Woodin, executive director of the Chicago-based American Society for Health Care Engineering.

Area hospitals and health systems are remaining quiet about any future expansions. At the same time, some continue to seek property. In October, Salem Hospital purchased the former Oregon School for the Blind, in Salem, for $6 million. Kaiser Foundation Health Plan paid $6.4 million in December for Northeast Airport Way laboratory space.

Bellevue, Wash.-based Peace Health, after purchasing Southwest Washington Medical Center, bought 75 acres in North Clark County last month. And Providence Health and Services-Oregon continues to sit on a 20-acre parcel it purchased early last year in Vancouver.

Portland-based Providence paid $16.1 million for the property. Some 15,000 Providence members live in Clark County.

“You’ll know when we’re ready” to develop the parcel, said Providence spokesman Gary Walker.
Health-care construction weaker than other sectors

Legacy Emanuel’s children’s hospital work by no means indicates that health care construction is as strong as work in other sectors.

Growth in several key construction fields will dwarf 2011’s projected 6 percent increase in health care construction spending, according to McGraw-Hill Construction Research & Analytics, of Bedford, Mass. The researcher predicts that:

• Single-family housing starts, in terms of dollars, will climb 27 percent.

• Multifamily housing will rise 24 percent in dollars and 23 percent in units.

• Commercial building starts — stores, warehouses, offices and hotels — will increase by 16 percent. However, the upward swing follows a three-year decline in which starts dropped by 62 percent in dollar terms.

• The institutional building market, which includes schools construction, will drop by 1 percent, meaning the sector will have dropped for three straight years. Public works construction will also drop by 1 percent.

• Manufacturing building starts will increase 9 percent in terms of dollars and 11 percent in square feet.

Kim Kennedy, McGraw Hill’s manager of forecasting, said health care reform could pose the biggest issues to potential industry construction. Reform is expected to take full-on effect in three years.

“What will the courts do? What will the states do?” Kennedy said in an e-mail. “Will states continue to move forward quickly enough to meet 2014 deadlines? The passage of the legislation went far to settle the market, but the lingering questions remain a drag. Uncertainty is never good for the big capital investment that construction requires.”

agiegerich@bizjournals.com | 503-219-3419


http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...s-in-2011.html
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  #70  
Old Posted Feb 19, 2011, 5:51 AM
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Legacy is also a community-based nonprofit with a primary caregiving mission.

http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...-schedule.html
I thought Legacy is for profit?
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  #71  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2011, 8:46 PM
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A friend of mine mentioned a small Providence Hospital will be built in Vancouver off 192nd ave. She claimed a sign has been posted on some property somewhere near Union High School and the new Costco. I wasn't able to find anything via a google search.


Anyone heard of this?
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  #72  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2011, 2:07 AM
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Real Estate Roundup
Portland Business Journal - by Wendy Culverwell
Friday, July 29, 2011, 3:00am PDT

Nike Inc. expanded its footprint at an office park adjacent to its Washington County campus. The footwear and apparel giant signed a 65-month lease for 26,000 square feet at Woodside Corporate Park, boosting its presence to nearly 260,000 square feet. Nike is the property’s largest tenant with more than 425 employees posted there.

The expansion boosts the occupancy rate of the 13-office complex to 95 percent.

http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...e-roundup.html
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  #73  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2011, 3:39 AM
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I'll be more inclined to say how awesome our real estate climate is when PAW gets out of the ground.
While that will be awesome, a great indicator otherwise is to just see how much office space at the lower tiers stays available. Lots of companies don't need a ton of class a office space but take it up because they can keep their call center at that site for the short term. In the long term, companies that are growing need more than just Class A space, which is good for everyone.
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  #74  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2012, 3:23 PM
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This must really piss off the Cascade Policy Institute!

Study: Oregon No. 2 fastest-growing economy
Portland Business Journal by Suzanne Stevens, Web editor
Date: Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 1:40pm PDT

http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...&ed=2012-06-12

Quote:
Oregon was among the hardest-hit states during the recession, with an unemployment rate that peaked at 11.6 percent in mid-2009. The state is now, however, one of the fastest to bounce back.

An analysis by MSNBC's 24/7 Wall St. blog found that Oregon's economy was the second-fastest growing among the states in 2011, behind North Dakota.

Spurring Oregon to the top tier was 2011 GDP growth of 4.7 percent, three times that of the U.S. economy. Growth in the durable goods manufacturing industry — which includes high-tech companies such as Intel Corp. — led the way, with an increase of 3.94 percent, second in the nation.

Other more recent economic variables indicate Oregon's upward momentum is continuing in 2012. Among them, May unemployment was 8.4 percent, marking the third consecutive month that seasonally adjusted payroll employment grew; and the University of Oregon Index of Economic Indicators increased in April, continuing a trend of growth that began last summer.

Rounding out the top five fast-growing states were West Virginia, Texas and Alaska.
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Old Posted Aug 27, 2012, 3:16 AM
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Salesforce.com bringing hundreds of software jobs to Portland area ...

http://www.oregonlive.com/silicon-fo...ajor_oreg.html
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  #76  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2012, 3:21 AM
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Portland in top 10 nationally for job growth ...

http://www.oregonlive.com/money/inde...among_top.html
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  #77  
Old Posted Aug 27, 2012, 5:20 AM
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Salesforce.com bringing hundreds of software jobs to Portland area ...

http://www.oregonlive.com/silicon-fo...ajor_oreg.html
That seems like really good news. SalesForce is a strong company with a lot of revenue streams. This should be good news for the region.
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  #78  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2012, 12:52 AM
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MarkDaMan MarkDaMan is offline
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Knight gift of $125 million launches lofty heart-health goals for Oregon Health & Science University
Published: Monday, September 17, 2012, 6:56 PM Updated: Monday, September 17, 2012, 9:20 PM
By Nick Budnick, The Oregonian

http://www.oregonlive.com/health/ind...hes_lofty.html

Quote:
The biggest-ever gift to Oregon Health & Science University could launch the university into the country's top tier of cardiovascular research centers.

A $125 million gift from Nike co-founder Phil Knight and his wife, Penny, announced Monday creates an entity so new it doesn't have an address yet. The OHSU Cardiovascular Institute is not a building, but a plan to bring together surgeons, scientists and industry to break new ground in cardiovascular health.

Much like the Knight donation to OHSU did for cancer research four year ago, leaders hope the money will lead to revolutionary molecular-level advances in protecting against strokes, clogged arteries and high blood pressure.

The mortality rate for cardiovascular disease has dropped 50 percent in the last 50 years, but "we have another 50 percent to go," said Dr. Albert Starr, co-director of the new venture.

The gift is the largest in OHSU's history, said university president Joe Robertson. Though details are still to be worked out, the $125 million will be used to lure big-name scientific talent, increase the number of clinical trials of new pharmaceuticals and devices, and lure additional corporate and government funding needed to push scientific discoveries from the laboratory into real-world uses.

"There is a huge gap" between basic science and clinical medicine at OHSU, "and we want to bridge that gap," Starr said after the announcement.

Starr, a prominent heart surgeon who pioneered the first mechanical heart valve in 1969, spent the past year strategizing for the new institute with Dr. Sanjiv Kaul, head of OHSU's division of cardiovascular medicine. While he's known for his work in medical devices, Starr said the new institute will give molecular biology equal status in advancing cardiovascular health.

Kaul, who will co-direct the institute, cited an effort to curb the rate and size of strokes that has been headed by neuroimmunologist Mary Stenzel-Poore, OHSU's associate dean for research. The idea is to perfect a medicine for patients before they undergo surgeries with a high risk of stroke, such as heart bypass. The approach has undergone some animal tests, but the new funding could purchase imaging equipment to improve testing, and eventually bring a new medicine to clinical trials on patients, Kaul said.

The money will also fund research into the role the immune system and inflammation play in the hardening of arteries and high blood pressure, as well as how a type of molecule produced by the brain can be used to better protect the heart.

In 2008 the Knights $100 million helped turn what was then the OHSU Cancer Center – racked then with management problems and loss of scientific talent – into a growing research powerhouse, the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute.

Cancer researcher Brian Druker, who is now director of the Knight Cancer Institute, said Knight consulted him on OHSU's proposal for the gift before approving it. He said the institute will likely boost work on cancer as well, since the two will use similar approaches in developing new treatments.

Money, he said, "doesn't cure disease, people do but when you put the best people together and give what they need to succeed against the biggest challenges, anything is possible."

In announcing the gift, OHSU made no secret of its desire to play in the major leagues of cardiovascular research with the likes of the Mayo Clinic and Duke University.

"We would like to be one of the top five institutions in the country," Starr said.

-- Nick Budnick
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  #79  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2013, 6:17 AM
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Salesforce picks Hillsboro for big Oregon outpost

By Mike Rogoway, The Oregonian OregonLive.com
on February 25, 2013 at 2:10 PM, updated February 26, 2013 at 1:47 PM

Andrew Theen/Oregonian

http://www.oregonlive.com/silicon-fo...l#incart_river

Quote:
Salesforce.com said this morning that its new Oregon offices will be in Hillsboro, choosing the suburbs over Portland for a major operational hub.
The rapidly growing San Francisco company went looking for an expansion site last year and picked Oregon over Salt Lake City. Salesforce said this morning that it also considered Denver and Austin.

Portland is the nexus of Oregon's software economy, with a hive of busy startups clustered around the Pearl District and downtown. Still, Salesforce's decision to pick Hillsboro was no surprise.

Public agency correspondence reviewed by The Oregonian last summer indicated that Salesforce strongly preferred Washington County, though Portland made a pitch to bring the company to the city -- and former Mayor Sam Adams attended at least one of the company's recruiting events in the Pearl District.

Salesforce vice president Monika Fahlbusch said this morning that the company chose a 100,000-square-foot site in Hillsboro -- in an office built 13 years ago for design software company Synopsys -- because it can be customized to meet Salesforce's needs, and because the building has enough space to accommodate growth...

...Oregon provided Salesforce a $1.45 million subsidy to lure it to the state...
Salesforce promised to employ at least 205 and pay them an average wage of at least $67,000 annually in exchange for the grant, 150 percent of the Oregon average.
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  #80  
Old Posted Feb 28, 2013, 7:55 AM
RED_PDXer RED_PDXer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by downtownpdx View Post
Salesforce picks Hillsboro for big Oregon outpost

By Mike Rogoway, The Oregonian OregonLive.com
on February 25, 2013 at 2:10 PM, updated February 26, 2013 at 1:47 PM

Andrew Theen/Oregonian

http://www.oregonlive.com/silicon-fo...l#incart_river
ugh.. is this really the case? new businesses have a hard time locating in downtown Portland? what's wrong here..
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