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Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Pacific West > SSP: Local Portland > Portland Suburbs and the State of Oregon

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  #321  
Old Posted Jul 8, 2011, 3:26 PM
CouvScott CouvScott is offline
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Originally Posted by 2oh1 View Post
Holy moly. Where did Vancouver find the money to afford THAT? How much of a stretch are the capping? How does that compare to the idea of capping the 405 in downtown PDX? Such a shame we can't bury or (better yet) completely remove i5 from downtown. It's sad to give up such great land along the river to that. [/tangent]. Sorry.
It's part of the CRC budget. It was explained as a pivotal part of the project for federal buy-in because it will connect downtown to the National Historic Site (Officer's Row, Fort Vancouver, the Army Barracks, Pierson Air Park and Central Park)
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  #322  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2011, 4:36 PM
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Moving from street access phase to park phase

See RFP #12-11 and all of the attached plans...

http://www.cityofvancouver.us/purcha...4&itemID=15442
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  #323  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2011, 4:12 PM
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Vancouver / Prestige Plaza / 2-5 story buildings / Proposed

Vancouver, Wash., officials approve tax break for development project

POSTED: Tuesday, August 16, 2011 at 03:11 PM PT
BY: Nick Bjork


The Vancouver, Wash., City Council on Monday evening approved a 12-year property tax exemption for the residential portion of a proposed downtown mixed-use building.

The 12-year exemption will save Vancouver-based developer Elie Kassab, owner of Prestige Development, approximately $93,000 annually over that period on his proposed $16 million Prestige Plaza development. It’s an exemption that Kassab said he needed to gain the financing required for the project.

“One of the steps I needed to secure the financing from the bank was the exemption,” Kassab said. “As soon as it is deemed legal we will move forward with the bank.”

The project Kassab is proposing consists of two identical five-story buildings with a total of 92 rental units and 11,300 square feet of ground-floor retail space. Kassab said the permits are pulled for the project and he plans to move forward with construction as soon as the Burgerville building that currently sits on the property is demolished in October.

The tax break is authorized under Washington state legislation that was initially approved in 1995. The exemption allows developers to forgo property taxes on the residential portion of a development for up to 12 years if the property is located in a designated urban center and the project helps meet housing goals.
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  #324  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2011, 4:37 PM
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Does anyone know where we could see a map of the "designated urban area" of Vancouver?
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  #325  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2011, 5:00 PM
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Designated Urban Center

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Does anyone know where we could see a map of the "designated urban area" of Vancouver?
Here is a plan adopted a few years back... Basically, page 4 shows the Urban Centers.

http://www.cityofvancouver.us/upload...PORT061807.pdf
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  #326  
Old Posted Aug 22, 2011, 3:33 PM
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http://www.columbian.com/news/2011/a...-lift-to-port/


By Zachary Kaufman
The Columbian
Construction continues Friday on a cluster of silos at the Port of Vancouver that will hold corn and soy beans shipped to the port from the country’s interior by rail and then transported by ship to China, where a rising middle class is creating demand for meat, which in turn requires feed for livestock.

It scrapes the sky, but it’s no towering office building.

Nonetheless, the new grain silo rising at the Port of Vancouver is likely the tallest structure in Clark County.

The silo, made of concrete and reinforced steel, climbs more than 300 feet — the equivalent of roughly 20 stories. “I don’t think any of the (Vancouver) downtown structures comes even close,” said Curtis Shuck, the port’s director of economic development and facilities.

The looming silo was built using the “slipform” method of construction, in which concrete is poured into a continuously ­moving form. “They actually jack it up and the whole thing rises at about one foot per hour,” Shuck said. “It’s the tallest slipform structure in North America.”

It’s also part of a larger

$72 million project launched by United Grain Corp. to boost the company’s export capacity to handle corn and soybeans. Driving United Grain’s pursuit of the project is China’s rising middle class, Shuck said. With more Chinese people eating meat, demand is high for corn and soybeans, which serve as feed grains for livestock.

The port’s elected three-member board of commissioners unanimously approved the project in January. Since then, crews have torn down two buildings at the port’s Terminal 2 — with one more to go — and have been busy erecting the slipform silo and building a storage facility comprised of 24 grain silos.

The silo, which will be used to remove debris from the loads of corn and soybean, is all but complete. Shuck said crews are now installing the machinery that will enable it to load the corn and soybeans — hauled into the port by train from other parts of the U.S. — onto ships bound for Asia.

A nearby 24-silo storage facility, which crews are now assembling, will provide an additional 60,000 metric tons of storage space for corn and soybeans, or roughly 2 million bushels.

United Grain, a subsidiary of Japanese conglomerate Mitsui Group, already ships 3 million tons of wheat from Terminal 2, about 16 percent of the country’s crop.

Its current project, to be completed in the fall of 2012, created 240 temporary construction jobs. When it’s finished, the new grain handling facility will employ a few permanent, full-time workers.

The company’s expansion into the corn-and-soybean export business provides several other benefits, Shuck said, including allowing the port to move ahead with its $150 million West Vancouver Freight Access project.

 The project aims to increase the port’s rail track from 16.9 miles to more than 44 miles, adding capacity to handle freight and increasing the speed at which cargo moves along the BNSF Railway and Union Pacific main lines. Those main lines link the Pacific Northwest to major rail hubs in Chicago and Houston.

“Faster freight and more of it means a lower cost, which means global competitiveness,” Shuck said.

Shuck said port tenant CalPortland benefits from the silo project because United Grain is purchasing all of its ready-mix concrete from CalPortland, a provider of building materials.

Perhaps the most obvious impact of the United Grain project is the fact that you can’t miss it as you trundle along West Mill Plain Boulevard through the port district.

As Shuck put it, “We’re actually modifying the Vancouver skyline.”
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  #327  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2011, 3:29 AM
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Vancouver Biomass Plant

Damewood, A., & Rice, S. (2011, September 28). Official hears arguments over proposed biomass plant: county wants to build facility in downtown Vancouver. The Columbian.

Without opening another "Vancouver" thread, I thought this was an interesting read because of the potential impact in local neighborhoods---including my own. Also, how will the plant interact Vancouver's revitalization efforts? Does Portland have any of the plants?

The question of whether a biomass plant can be built in downtown Vancouver was one that the project’s proponents, Clark County and its private partner, and the project’s opponent, the city of Vancouver, argued late into Wednesday night...more
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  #328  
Old Posted May 24, 2012, 3:28 PM
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It's a view that hasn't been seen in 104 years, but now it's also a look at Vancouver's future.

Construction crews have punched through the BNSF Railway berm due south of City Hall, offering a view from the end of Esther Street to the waterfront that's been hidden for more than a century.

Ultimately, both Esther and Grant streets will run under the tracks, and serve as the main links between Vancouver's downtown and the Columbia River waterfront.

"Anybody who works at City Hall or downtown can see a breath of fresh air here -- they can see some trees, see some water, see some blue sky," city spokeswoman Barbara Ayers said Wednesday. "When things are starting to open up, literally and figuratively, it's really exciting."

The work, headed up by Vancouver-based Nutter Construction, will continue on the BNSF tracks through the end of the year; the first stage of the city of Vancouver's $44 million waterfront construction project. City crews will start work on road construction at the start of 2013, and expect to finish by the end of the year.

BNSF trains are running on a temporary track while a new permanent berm with 13.5-feet-high bridges over Esther and Grant is completed. That temporary "shoofly" track will then be turned into a new lead track allowing access to the Port of Vancouver, Public Works spokeswoman Loretta Callahan said.

The work is all in hopes that Vancouver can land private developers ready to invest $1.3 billion for a Pearl District-esque transformation of the former Boise Cascade paper plant. A large waterfront park and extension of the Waterfront Renaissance Trail are also part of the plans.

Downtown residents and visitors should expect loud noises and vibrations from demolition and pile driving on weekdays now through July 16. The World War II murals further east along the berm will not be affected by the construction, Callahan said.

Once the roads are done, the vehicle crossings over BNSF tracks will be closed at Eighth and Jefferson streets, meaning that trains will no longer have to sound their horns there.

http://www.columbian.com/news/2012/m...ad-berm-byway/
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  #329  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2013, 10:07 PM
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They just put a brand new sign up for this two days ago. Could it be moving forward soon???

http://thewaterfrontvancouverusa.com/
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  #330  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2013, 9:09 AM
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also saw this in The Oregonian...in case anyone missed it.

Vancouver waterfront development will be shovel-ready soon, developer, investors say

Last edited by Eco_jt; Apr 27, 2013 at 9:10 AM. Reason: accidentally pasted wrong link
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  #331  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2013, 3:51 AM
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I'll believe it when I see it.
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  #332  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2013, 5:12 AM
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Looking at that rendering, wow, it's hard to imagine that there is nearly enough market demand to make such a dense development happen. In Vancouver.
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  #333  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2013, 4:38 PM
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In defense of Vancouver it has the best downtown outside of Portland's. Compared to downtown Gresham or Beaverton or Hillsboro it has somewhat of a nacent urban core centered on Estershort Park. There are several new, taller buildings including housing, a hotel conference center, and the new Miller Hull (a well known Seattle Architect) designed library which is quite nice. When the current prep work finishes they will be more connected to the river and have new parks and trails. I still wouldn't trade Portland for it, but I can see it growing into a decent place.
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  #334  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2013, 6:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tworivers View Post
Looking at that rendering, wow, it's hard to imagine that there is nearly enough market demand to make such a dense development happen. In Vancouver.

I can see maybe a few 6 story buildings going in, but not anywhere close to anything we are seeing in that rendering.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Walch View Post
In defense of Vancouver it has the best downtown outside of Portland's. Compared to downtown Gresham or Beaverton or Hillsboro it has somewhat of a nacent urban core centered on Estershort Park. There are several new, taller buildings including housing, a hotel conference center, and the new Miller Hull (a well known Seattle Architect) designed library which is quite nice. When the current prep work finishes they will be more connected to the river and have new parks and trails. I still wouldn't trade Portland for it, but I can see it growing into a decent place.


Vancouver's downtown isn't that bad at all! But as tworivers said, where's the demand?
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  #335  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2013, 8:29 PM
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I could see it working out if they did something to improve the transit connections across the river, right now it is pretty abysmal. I hope it does pan out though, the downtown area does show some promise.... if only Vancouver and greater Clark county would embrace being a part of Portland metro...
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  #336  
Old Posted Apr 28, 2013, 11:04 PM
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I actually wasn't trying to diss Vancouver at all. Their downtown has tons of potential. It just doesn't seem like Portland has all that much demand -- look at all the space left in South Waterfront -- which makes me think the rendering for Vancouver's waterfront is extremely ambitious. Even shorter buildings would be a nice addition though. Too bad the CRC plan didn't involve running MAX over a new arterial bridge from N PDX...
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  #337  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2013, 5:55 AM
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You are right. Vancouver, while having an okay small downtown is probable not able to support a collection of high rises any time soon. This especially true when Portland is fluch with big development sites (SoWa, Conway, Post Office, Lloyd, North Peral) and is only building 6 story buildings, even on SoWa waterfront.
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  #338  
Old Posted May 1, 2013, 2:08 AM
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Nice video

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  #339  
Old Posted May 1, 2013, 2:37 AM
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Well, at least they included an underpass for Amtrak and freight trains. Something I wish downtown Portland had on Naito.



I'd be surprised to see 3-4 of those building actually built, let alone the entire project.




Edit: That video was very well done.
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  #340  
Old Posted Feb 20, 2014, 3:16 AM
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The anti-oil terminal crowd, which includes developers behind a $1.3 billion Vancouver waterfront project, has been pushing the council to join the opposition. Port of Vancouver officials maintain that an oil terminal and waterfront development can coexist along the Columbia River.

Barry Cain, president of Tualatin, Ore.-based Gramor Development, has said there's zero chance the development project will happen if the oil terminal gets built.
http://www.columbian.com/news/2014/f...rminal-permit/
Well it looks like this waterfront project could be derailed by an oil terminal. I really hope that an agreement of some kind can be reached because this would be such a great move forward for downtown Vancouver.

With how much that city has grown, I hope that one day soon they realize how much a part of the Portland metro they are and look at things like light rail realistically. I also think if Vancouver added any form of light rail, Portland might have to look into some sort of an express line so that those from Vancouver wouldn't have to make local stops the entire distance.
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