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  #81  
Old Posted Mar 7, 2012, 3:09 PM
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Looks a lot like what Dubai will look like.
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  #82  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2012, 3:56 PM
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Retro-Future NYC: What New York Could Have Become


May 31st, 2012

Read More: http://weburbanist.com/2012/05/31/re...d-have-become/

Quote:
What would New York have looked like, if the futuristic visions of innovative thinkers in the late-19th to mid-20th century had become reality? Midtown Manhattan could have been enclosed within a dome, as imagined by Buckminster Fuller. The Hudson River could have an enormous bridge with towers that reach hundreds of feet into the air. And of course there’s personal aircraft involved. Oobject shares some of the most outrageous and intriguing of these predictions.

.....



Nuke-Proof Underground New York






Colossal Hudson Bridge






Depression-era aesthetics crash into wild fantasies of New York in 1980, with massive 16-lane highways, vertical architecture full of terraces and lots of inexplicable ‘high-tech’ equipment.






Elevated Railway System Leading to Lady Liberty






Buckminster Fuller’s Geodesic Dome

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  #83  
Old Posted Jun 2, 2012, 6:10 PM
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Chongquing Twin Towers x2 620m


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  #84  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2012, 5:53 PM
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Building Smarter Cities…In the Year 2060


06/29/2012

Read More: http://www.cnu.org/cnu-salons/2012/0...0%A6-year-2060

Quote:
.....

These huge nebulous buildings house 40,000 people, as well as offices, recreational areas, and transportation hubs. They spread across acres of the city, hovering over green spaces like a web. My first reaction to this piece of architecture was fear. This “flat tower” concept reminded me of Le Corbusier’s City of Tomorrow and more terrifyingly (since they were actually built), American public housing failures like Cabrini Green in Chicago and Pruitt Igoe in St. Louis. This is all very ironic because the architect defends his design by saying, “the conventional skyscraper model- a tower surrounded by green space- leads to the isolation of communities from one another. A greenbelt area under the building would encourage communities to interact.”

- Visions are great, don’t get me wrong. They are better than great, they are necessary. Without vision, change is not possible and it is very clear to accommodate the enormous growth of cities into the year 2060 we will certainly need it. However, sometimes visions go bad – like Le Corbusier’s and the modernism movement that followed. But this is where John Powell’s famous quote, “the only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing” pops into my head. And then the fear sets in. This “visionary” idea by Schirr-Bonnan, will no doubt have the same segregation and community-killing effects that modernist architecture did. These mixed-use webs separate people from their built environment at an inhumane scale and create public spaces that are unclaimed and unsupervised.

.....








The LO2P Recycling Center (Image: Bryan Christie in Popular Science, July 2012)

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  #85  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2012, 2:31 AM
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http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

Ted Givens, an architect with Hong Kong's 10Design created this prototype for a tornado-safe home. Hydraulic levers pull the Kevlar-coated house into the ground when high-velocity winds pass by. The high-tech structure's roof then locks so water and wind can't enter. Once the weather clears, the house unfolds and residents resume normal life.






http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

Flying first class takes on a new meaning with this house, conceived by Switzerland-based designer Timon Sager. Durable cables suspend the living space in the air. With multiple decks, a state-of-the-art entertainment center and a luxury bedroom, the flying house has everything you could want.








http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

The heat of California was a definite consideration for Korean designer Christopher Daniel who came up with this roll-like home concept. Designed for arid environments, the house is secured with a carbon fiber truss frame and has a hydraulic powered automatic door. The upper half of the door opens overhead and the lower part unfolds onto the ground. Depending on the amount of sun, residents can make skylights and windows less or more transparent. Curtains and bookshelves act as dividers in the rooms.








http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

Imagine looking out your hotel window at a school of fish. A design concept by Deep Ocean Technology in Poland, includes an underwater area that would allow guest to do just that. The 11,000 square foot space would sit 33 feet below the surface of the water. Additional features include a diving center, open terraces above water and a spa. For safety the disc-shaped dwelling is can be detached from the main structure and used as a lifeboat.






http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

Population growth and consequent crowding can leave little room to live in big cities. But Jason Lubutkah of Jason David Designs in New York City has an idea: Why not build houses that cantilever across city streets, using up space that would otherwise be wasted? The homes would be constructed off site and then raised to their new location.






http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

Inspired by a child’s loom toy, the woven facade of this mixed-use building is designed for passive energy use. Prefabricated units lock together to form apartments.The overhang of each unit provides shade. Easy—and very quick—to build, the structure arrives from a factory in dozens of parts. Once on site, the pieces are hoisted into place. The concept was designed by Meridian105 Architects of Denver, Colorado.








http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

Look once and you’ll see a hill. Look again and you’ll see an entryway into that hill. Patkau Architects in Vancouver, Canada conceived of these underground dwellings. Tucked into grassy mounds, the small homes blend with the landscape and provide a minimal-footprint approach to living while attending to basic needs.






http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

Designed by Royal Haskoning Architechten in Nijmegen, Netherlands, this transparent home concept was designed for lunar living. It has no stairs, since the moon's low-gravity would allow residents to float or bound from one level to the next. The house has enormous rotating shades that regulate the extreme temperatures of outer space. An underground bunker is also included in the design, just in case a dangerous solar storm should arise






http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

Designed by New York City’s Victor Vetterlein, this POD house is completely computer-controlled in order to maximize energy efficiency and comfort. Every inch of its exterior surface acts as a solar energy collector. A wind-powered elevator and water-treatment plant are included and the rooftop collects rainwater that is stored in holding tanks. Natural air-flow is provided via vents that residents operate themselves.






http://www.forbes.com/pictures/elfk4...gallerycontent

Living in cities is rarely a green experience but San Francisco-based designer Joanna Borek-Clement has come up with a sky-scraping solution. The neuron-like collection of towers she designed would reach elevations of 1,600-feet and would be inter-dependent, each structure supporting the others. People would reach the amphitheaters, pools, fields and parks via elevators from the street. The design was conceived with Tokyo in mind.

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  #86  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2012, 7:25 PM
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http://zombiesafehouse.wordpress.com/z1573/

The Eiffel Tower adapts to provide all basic human needs with a wind turbine, rain water collection, vertical farming,
and electric legs forbidding any zombie to climb the tower.








http://zombiesafehouse.wordpress.com/z1611/

The Oil Silo Home reuses abandoned Oil Silos to create a self-sufficient, zombie proof multi-family complex.







http://zombiesafehouse.wordpress.com/z1672/

The Zoasis living complex provides zombie incineration to produce energy, a vertical farm and aquaponics system for fine dining,
a driving range facing zombie infested land, and hybrid airships connecting families of the zonation worldwide.








http://zombiesafehouse.wordpress.com/z1622/

The Submersible Z House allows tenants to live a luxurious life uninterrupted, with a built-in greenhouse,
fish farm, tidal powered turbines constructed of razor blades, and a fully-armed luxurious escape
pod for backup.








http://www.archdaily.com/310542/arch...28ArchDaily%29

New York Cityvision context envision a New York City as Heritage Site, protected from the elements with a barrier-wall.


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  #87  
Old Posted Dec 22, 2012, 11:40 PM
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^^^ Yep, an example of "crazy shit that might never happen". I know the whole point of the thread but I couldn't resist.
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  #88  
Old Posted Mar 18, 2013, 6:48 PM
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9 Crazy Skyscrapers That Will Shape The Skylines Of The Future

Read More: http://www.fastcoexist.com/1681603/9...-of-the-future

Quote:
Imagine a skyscraper that floats. Or one that slowly rebuilds the polar ice caps. These concept towers all find bizarre ways to house everyone who is moving to cities--but they’re a lot more than just places to live.

As the world’s population moves into cities in the coming decades, tall buildings will become ever more important. Each year, eVolo Magazine challenges architects to predict what that skyscraper-filled future will look like. Since its launch in 2006, the Skyscraper Competition has attracted over 5,000 entries. As eVolo explains, the entries all manage to "challenge the way we understand vertical architecture and its relationship with the natural and built environments."

.....



Created by Derek Pirozzi, the first-place-winning Polar Umbrella arctic skyscraper is a floating metropolis outfitted with ecological habitats, renewable power stations, a thermal skin, and most importantly, a system that "regenerates the ice caps using harvest chambers that freeze the ocean water."






The Phobia Skyscraper, created by Darius Maïkoff and Elodie Godo, took second place. The skyscraper, "a new form of modular suburban residential development," is made out of recycled materials. Stacked prefab units are grouped around green spaces, which have common areas outfitted with displays that broadcast messages for the community. The structure is designed to be located over Petite Ceinture, an old industrial site in Paris.






The Light Park Floating Skyscraper, designed by Ting Xu and Yiming Chen, took third place in the competition. In order to preserve green space on the ground, this skyscraper hovers in the sky with help from a helium-filled balloon and solar-powered propellers. Solar panels and water collectors cover the structure.






Designed by Antonio Ares Sainz, Joaquin Rodriguez Nuñez, and Konstantino Tousidonis Rial, Nomad: Terraforming Mars won an honorable mention for a concept that sees "nomad factories" on Mars using local minerals to seed the planet with the greenhouse gases that make Earth so lush. In other words, the project would make it hospitable for humans to live on Mars.






The Volcano Skyscraper, an honorable mention, consists of a structure on top of Mexico’s Popocatepetl Volcano that harnesses lava and other debris to create energy. The project was created by Jing Hao, Zhanou Zhang, Xingyue Chen, Jiangyue Han, and Shuo Zhou.






Symbiocity is essentially a prison skyscraper featuring plants, green spaces, renewable energy generation, and vertical farms. The inmates grow their own food, get paid for work, and are charged for accommodations. The project, an honorable mention, was created by Khem Aikwanich and Nigel Westbrook.






The Urban Earth Worm skyscraper, created by Lee Seungsoo, is inspired by--you guessed it--the earthworm. The worm-like structure harbors tubes filled with soil, trees, and plants, while an energy station near the bottom of the worm processes the city’s trash into energy.






This Shanghai skyscraper collects and purifies rainwater and river water--a solution to the city’s lack of groundwater and polluted water supplies. An underground structure collects and cleans rainwater, which is pumped upward to the tower’s green roof. The honorable mention was created by Zhang Zhiyang and Liu Chunyao.






An underground space in an abandoned Chinese coalfield is transformed in this project into a horizontal skyscraper. A vertical miner elevator (already in existence) is used to transport residents, while a vertical tube brings fresh air to the underground spaces. The project, an honorable mention, was dreamed up by Liangpeng Chen, Yating Chen, Lida Huang, Gaoyan Wu, and Lin Yuan.

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  #89  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2013, 6:29 PM
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A Super-Luxe Pad for Retired Popes

Read More: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/des...ed-popes/5068/

Project: http://www.1week1project.org/en/2013...11-ciao-papam/

Quote:
.....

Does the church owe him a retirement home on a lush Mediterranean island? Should it release him gently into the sunny pastures of Tuscany, where he will live on nuts and blood oranges and sleep in quiet dells with the deer until the Creator finally rings his number? Or how about a super-swanky retirement home custom-suited for all his papal needs?

- That's what 1Week1Project has imagined with these hilarious renderings of Benedict's future crash pad, which is shaped like a halo and seems to glow from within. The members of the "spontaneous architecture" group, who are based in Santiago and Paris, produced these designs as part of an effort to imagine new building projects for each week in 2013.

- They write: Since leaving the vatican on february 28th, 85 year old benedict XVI lives in castello gandolfo, located 30 km away from rome. for his spiritual retreat, 1week1project proposes a house sitting on a roof close to piazza della rotonda. reinterpreting the halo's symbolic shape, the dwelling is organized around an atrium (central garden or courtyard) and offers a 360° view. the building will provide benedict XVI the necessary seclusion for praying, preserving a relationship with the surrounding world.

.....


















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  #90  
Old Posted Apr 6, 2013, 6:53 PM
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In The Future We Will All Live In Photosynthetic French Sea Pods

Read More: http://www.popsci.com/technology/art...warning-system

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....

In anticipation of a far wetter world, French architecture firm Sitbon Architectes designed this pod concept for a habitable, eco-friendly phytoplankton farm in the Indian Ocean.

- Phytoplankton are microscopic organisms that form the foundation of the aquatic food chain. They use chlorophyll to turn sunlight into energy, absorb carbon dioxide and produce oxygen like land plants. They can have explosive population growth, known as a bloom, expanding over hundreds of square kilometers in the ocean.

- Moored to the ocean floor, the farm, called Bloom, would be a 5-story, partially-submerged center where scientists could live and grow phytoplankton, reducing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and releasing oxygen. In the process, it could serve as an alert system for rising waters in the event of a tsunami.

.....








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Old Posted Jun 7, 2013, 6:04 PM
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5 Imaginative Buildings That Breathe Pollution And Clean The Air

Read More: http://www.fastcoexist.com/1682151/5...lean-the-air#1

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.....

Over the past few months, five teams at University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate Design School have been imagining buildings that act as "urban lungs," alongside their traditional functions. The brief asked the students to consider a specific site--an unused plot of land near Manhattan’s Holland Tunnel. The area has heavy traffic--much of it idling for long periods--and the air is thick with pollutants.

.....



Hydroponic farms on the roof absorb CO2. Ductwork in the cladding takes in particulate matter. And precast concrete panels, treated with titanium dioxide, deal with NO2 (another pollutant) and capture water.







Shaped a bit like a seashell, Urban Oasis "seeks to be carbon negative and scrub CO2…while acting as a beacon for progressive change required to combat global warming," according to Arman Hosseini and Sam Rosen. It does this by pulling wind through tubes in the structure itself, cleaning pollutants using filtration beds.







This design, from Michael Buckley, Daniel Greenspan, and Ryan Koella, focuses not only on immediate pollution, but also on greenhouse gases from landfills outside the city. The team would divert organic waste to make both biogas and biochar (a way to sequester carbon). Then, they would draw up air from the street, so that "passers-by are directly exposed to the functioning system."







Probably the most outlandish of the five, this design from Jinglu Li and Jayson Potter is fully modular: you add and pull parts away, depending on air quality at the time. The idea of the "pixel cloud" is to maximize surface area and capture as much pollution as possible. The air is driven downwards and heated in pressure tanks, breaking down the CO2. Steam then escapes and envelopes the building in a fog--hence "the cloud."







Formula (A)lgae is a building surrounded by algae tubes (a bit like this one). Air drifts up from the street, following walkways to the top, where it is captured and fed into the gunk. Through photosynthesis, the algae multiplies, producing biomass that can be burned for energy. The project was conceived by William Bintzer and Sisi Xi.


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Old Posted Mar 6, 2014, 7:57 PM
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Rethinking Urbanism Through Vertical Cities

Read More: http://sourceable.net/rethinking-urb...rtical-cities/

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.....

In recent years, urban planners and architects around the world have been developing ideas and creating different solutions to approach the challenge of high-density urbanisation, and the concept of the vertical city has become a very popular one.

.....



The Mirador building concept, by MVRDV






FLIP/CITY concept






Aerial view of different FLIP/CITY clusters inserted in Shanghai’s cityscape






FLIP/CITY – Cross sections of one possible city-cluster






FLIP/CITY – Detail of long section






FLIP/CITY – View from inside a city cluster

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Old Posted Mar 14, 2014, 6:29 PM
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Old Posted Jul 20, 2014, 8:36 PM
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The Future Architecture Designs are Poetry for Human Living Tomorrow

Read More: http://www.architectureadmirers.com/...ving-tomorrow/

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Future architecture designs are original perspective of the future living and sense of seeing things ahead. That means visionary look in what is coming on the roots of existing. The great architect Franc Lloyd Wright has this power of predicting harmonious designs and urban planning and his visions are not just beautiful pieces of architecture, but buildings that are in favor of people’s needs and desires.

Hypnotic Bridges – designed by NEXT Architects as a pedestrian footbridge over the Dragon King Harbour River in China.






Rotating Skyscrapers – imagined by Dynamic Architecture’s David Fisher for the next amazing architecture of Dubai.

Video Link





Invisible Architecture – this fiction design is by New York based firm stpmj and is planned to be build of wood and mirror film by the idea of creating blur perceptual boundary.






Sweaters for Skyscrapers – this is an idea for Burj Khalifa to be covered with sock-like cover that would be super- lightweight, reflective and semi-transparent material by the OP-EN. This way the tower will reflect as a massive mirror.






Wooden skyscrapers – as the tallest wooden building is planned to be built in Stockholm’s city center by the C.F. Moller.



.....
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Old Posted Jul 21, 2014, 5:16 AM
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Spiral escalator

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Originally Posted by WMrapids View Post
I like the 1925 one. I also love the spiral escalator!
The malls in San Fran and Vegas have spiral escalators.
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Old Posted Jul 27, 2014, 8:13 PM
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Sweaters for Skyscrapers – this is an idea for Burj Khalifa to be covered with sock-like cover that would be super- lightweight, reflective and semi-transparent material by the OP-EN. This way the tower will reflect as a massive mirror.

I thought we were trying to make our giant glass skyscrapers less like massive mirrors. God help anyone living within a mile of this thing.
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Old Posted Aug 4, 2014, 2:28 PM
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FLOATING CITIES: IS THE OCEAN HUMANITY’S NEXT FRONTIER?

Read More: http://www.factor-tech.com/future-ci...next-frontier/

Quote:
Floating cities are nothing new. In the early 1960s, Buckminster Fuller designed a city – Triton – that was intended to float off the coast of Tokyo Bay. It was later considered but never commissioned by the US government.

“Three-quarters of our planet Earth is covered with water, most of which may float organic cities,” Fuller explains in his book Critical Path. “Floating cities pay no rent to landlords. They are situated on the water, which they desalinate and recirculate in many useful and non-polluting ways.” --- Fifty years on, with heavy pollution causing climate change and rising sea levels, Fuller’s floating city concept is being seriously considered as an antidote to those problems.

.....



With almost 20% of the world’s population living in China, it is no surprise that the People’s Republic is one of the keenest countries to translate Fuller’s idea into a modern reality.






The Seasteading Institute aims to take the idea of floating cities even further, creating communities that have political autonomy whilst existing under the sovereignty of a host state. They are currently in discussions with several potential host countries and are aiming to establish their first seastead by 2020.






It’s hard to categorise Freedom Ship International at first. On one hand, the intended MO of continually moving around the world, mooring off the coast of different ports for weeks at a time would suggest it to be a rather large boat.

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Old Posted Aug 8, 2014, 4:31 PM
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How An Architect Who Has Never Left North Korea Imagines The Future

Read More: http://io9.com/architect-who-has-nev...e-f-1617758452

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North Korea's architecture is truly fascinating, influenced by the need to rebuild Pyongyang in the wake of the Korean War and the nation's relative isolation. What happens when an architect who has never been outside North Korea designs futuristic buildings to accommodate tourists visiting their country?

Koryo Tours has been bringing travelers to North Korea since 1993 and promotes cultural exchange between North Korea and other countries. Koryo Tours founder Nick Bonner recently commissioned an architect to create a series of designs imagining how a future North Korea might accommodate a huge influx of tourists. The images are part of the Golden Lion-winning Korean Pavilion at the Venice Biennale and are on show until November.

.....



Mountain Conical Hotels, with ski runs in the pipes connecting the buildings






Hotel for the port city Nampo






A pedestrian bridge would let travelers walk through the mist of the Diamond Mountains






An "Aerial Hotel" that allows guests to enjoy views of nature






A tree-shaped hotel at Mount Kumgang






Villas overlooking a waterfall near Mount Kumgang






A guest house inspired by a bird's nest








A flying residence for holidays on the go

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Old Posted Aug 9, 2014, 1:45 AM
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^How strange! A 90s revision of 70s pop sci-fi?
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2014, 2:52 PM
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Forget Vertical Farms, This Is a Vertical Rice Paddy/Fish Nursery/Transit Center/Nuclear Plant

Read More: http://www.citylab.com/design/2014/0...-plant/376051/

Quote:
In the surreal future envisioned by Studio Cachoua Torres Camilletti, your rice and fish will not come from the land and sea, but from the sky. They've whipped up plans for a monstrous skyscraper that would grow both these staple foods, as well as harvest wind energy, provide mass transit, filter gray water, and about 100 other things.

- The Mexico City-based firm's extremely mixed-used building—now on the shortlist at the 2014 World Architecture Festival—is composed of of a pair of twisted towers that seem to want to attack each other. They're prevented from doing so, thankfully, by struts and bridges protruding in a tangled network from their bodies. One tower's side is a huge sheet of glass, the other's a green wall dripping with flowers.

- Rice terraces have an important semiotic and symbolic significance in the culture of countries such as china and the philippines, and they are cultivated by the need to sow seeds vertically. throughout history, they have been carved by hand into mountains high above the sea as emphasized contours with built-in irrigation systems. in addition to the formal beauty of these spaces, they are a living example of the respectful change of nature by humans, who do not pose any environmental aggression, and are ultimately both respectful of nature and of man. studio CTC finds such richness of the meanings and interactions that it was decided that rice should be the crop of choice for the skyscraper.

- Aside from the agricultural facilities and fish farms, the towers would also provide space for offices, housing, and "lifestyle amenities." But that's boring. Let's turn back to all the sustainable details included in the crazy, full schematic: recycling center. "Algae facade." Train or bus system inside at least one of the bridges. A dozen-or-so wind turbines. And naturally, the whole structure would run on an (arguably not-green) nuclear plant in the underground garage.

.....


















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