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  #901  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2012, 2:35 AM
philopdx philopdx is offline
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Womp, womp, WOMP.

Is is always such a titanic battle against budgets for every little dag blang development, or is Portland special in this regard? Even with a $2.5 million loan locked and loaded? I don't get it.
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  #902  
Old Posted Apr 8, 2012, 11:15 PM
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MacDonald West 4-8-2012:

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  #903  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2012, 3:55 AM
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Blanchett House 4-21-2012:

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  #904  
Old Posted Apr 22, 2012, 3:56 AM
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MacDonald West 4-21-2012:

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  #905  
Old Posted May 4, 2012, 6:12 PM
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Has Old Town reached a tipping point?
Portland Business Journal by Wendy Culverwell , Business Journal staff writer
Date: Wednesday, May 2, 2012, 2:37pm PDT - Last Modified: Thursday, May 3, 2012, 10:35am PDT

http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...&ed=2012-05-02

Quote:
Is Old Town Chinatown at the tipping point?

It could be years before the question is answered with any degree of certainty. Still, investments in Old Town are adding up, hinting at a future that doesn’t rely solely on social service agencies that dot the district or its reputation for drug-related crime.

The University of Oregon moved to Old Town in 2006. Mercy Corps made Old Town its headquarters a short time later. The Portland Development Commission calls it home. The Max light rail line traverses the neighborhood.

The city of Portland teamed with affordable housing advocates to install the Bud Clark Commons residential project near Union Station. Even the train station has a new roof and a few other upgrades befitting its iconic status.

And the newcomers keep arriving...
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  #906  
Old Posted May 4, 2012, 6:15 PM
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Colleges reshape North Park Blocks
Premium content from Portland Business Journal by Wendy Culverwell , Business Journal staff writer
Date: Friday, May 4, 2012, 3:00am PDT - Last Modified: Thursday, May 3, 2012, 1:58pm PDT

http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...ks.html?page=4

Quote:
Specialty colleges are staking their futures in downtown Portland’s edgiest neighborhood.

The Oregon College of Oriental Medicine , the Pacific Northwest College of Art and Pensole Footwear Design Academy have or will soon join the University of Oregon near the North Park Blocks in the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood.

The latest arrivals will add more than 1,000 college students and hundreds of instructors and staff members to an overlooked neighborhood on downtown’s northern edge.

It’s “absolutely” good news, said Paul Verhoeven, executive director of the Portland Saturday Market and co-chair of the Old Town Chinatown Neighborhood Association’s land use committee.

...

Enter the 511 Building. Four years ago, the U.S. General Services Administration awarded the historic building to PNCA under a program that donates surplus property to schools.

The federal law enforcement agencies that used the building have slowly been moving out. When the last one leaves this year, PNCA will invest some $30 million to transform the dreary-looking structure.

PNCA will likely sell its current building in the Pearl District.

Thanks to new arrivals such as OCOM and PNCA and others, the North Park Blocks and Old Town are at a tipping point, said Scott Andrews, chairman of the Portland Development Commission and president of Melvin Mark Property Management Co. Cos.
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  #907  
Old Posted May 4, 2012, 6:17 PM
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Manley leading PNCA's Old Town charge
Portland Business Journal by Wendy Culverwell , Business Journal staff writer
Date: Thursday, May 3, 2012, 2:16pm PDT

http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...&ed=2012-05-03
Quote:
The Pacific Northwest College of Art tossed a number of pebbles in the water back in 2008. Today, the waves those pebbles launched are at the forefront of redevelopment that is reshaping Old Town Chinatown and the North Park Blocks.

Back in 2008, PNCA's scholarly President Thomas Manley and the art school's board, closed two major real estate deals, one in the Pearl District and the other in Old Town.

PNCA paid $10.5 million for the Pearl District building that serves as its anchor at 1241 N.W. Johnson St. in October. About the same time, it secured the historic U.S. Post Office building, 511 N.W. Broadway, in Old Town from the federal General Services Administration under a program that gives surplus buildings away if they’re used for educational purposes.

...

Come 2014 or thereabouts, PNCA will make the historic post office (aka 511 Building) its new home once it completes a roughly $30 million renovation. It will likely sell the Pearl District building at that point.

Once it started viewing Old Town as its future, the pieces fell into place.

PNCA already has a presence there through the Museum of Contemporary Craft, which fronts the park blocks at Northwest Davis Street. In the future, it will have student housing too, thanks to a partnership with the Powell family to develop apartments at the former Powells Technical Books, 33 N.W. Park Ave.

...
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  #908  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2012, 7:15 AM
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Am I missing something in this article? Why exactly is the project stalled? Why go so far (can't be cheap) to have cast-iron pieces reconstructed but then say that the neighborhood "isn't ready" for it yet? And how can the renovation be a catalyst for redevelopment if it can't happen until more of the parking lots are filled in?

Weirdly enough, I rode by this building today before seeing this article, and took some shots of it. They're below the article.

Also, note that the misguided plan to slap old pieces of cast iron on modern (but surely faux historic in style) buildings is still very much alive.

First cast-iron restoration project could spur more redevelopment in Old Town
POSTED: Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at 02:50 PM PT
BY: Lindsey O'Brien, DJC
Tags: Hallock and McMillan Building


Bill Larsell, a craftsman with Architectural Castings Inc., stands with one of four cast-iron columns he helped reproduce for the Hallock and McMillan Building in Portland's Old Town neighborhood. (Photo by Sam Tenney/DJC)

In November, a small cross section of Portland’s building industry gathered in a dark, smoky foundry to witness a rare execution of modern cast-iron craftsmanship.

Workers at the Silverton Foundry recreated pieces of the cast-iron facade of Portland’s oldest building. According to several of the experts working on the restoration of the Hallock and McMillan Building, it was the first time in modern history that the process was used to cast large sections of a building’s facade entirely in iron. Though many preservationists consider the project an exciting step in the right direction, the restoration is stalled until the neighborhood is developed more fully.

At the foundry, cranes swooped overhead, bringing molten iron from a tall, cylindrical furnace to custom molds that were created based on historic photographs of the 155-year-old Hallock and McMillan Building. The firms carrying out the project – Emerick Architects, Architectural Castings Inc. and Bremik Construction – all sent representatives to the Silverton Foundry to witness the unique recreation of the historic facade.

“It seemed ancient as all get-out,” said architect and cast-iron expert Bill Hawkins, who was a consultant for the project. “(The building) will once again look as it did when its architects designed and built it.”

After housing an electronics business for many years, the Hallock and McMillan Building was purchased in 2010 by John Russell, founder of Russell Development Co. He then assembled a group of experts to restore the building’s cast-iron facade with full-iron replicas.

“It’s a long process and you can’t hurry it,” Russell said. “You have to plan for six months of preparation work, but it’s absolutely worth it.”

Several experts needed nearly a year to design and prepare the molds. The Silverton Foundry then fashioned a series of cast-iron ornamental pieces and seven-foot columns to replace the originals, which were removed in the 1940s and then lost.

The casting process employed basically the same techniques that would have been used when the building was constructed in 1857, according to David Field, who owns the foundry with his brother George.

“It’s a craft that is pretty rare, and the knowledge of the foundry men is really, really critical,” said Dave Talbott, president of Architectural Castings Inc., a Portland firm that helped develop drawings and molds for the foundry. “It would be tough to do without the aggregate knowledge of these guys.”

Russell, who owns multiple cast-iron buildings in Portland’s Skidmore/Old Town Historic District, said he will not install the recently cast pieces on the Hallock and McMillan Building until the area is improved.

“The neighborhood is just not ready for it; there are too many empty parking lots,” he said.


However, this recent effort to restore the Hallock and McMillan Building, which is located at the corner of Southwest Naito Parkway and Oak Street, may influence future redevelopment of the area.

“We need to rehabilitate the resources we have left and infill the missing pieces (of the district) that right now are surface parking lots,” said Peggy Moretti, executive director of the Historic Preservation League of Oregon. The HPLO recently listed the Skidmore/Old Town district on its 2012 list of Oregon’s most endangered places.

The Hallock and McMillan Building originally had the kind of showy, cast-iron frontage that defined Portland in its early days. But many of the building’s cast-iron neighbors have been torn down, and an unclear vision for the district has stalled redevelopment.

“The whole district is in a gridlock,” Moretti said. “Tackling that poor, pathetic-looking building represents what the district used to be and can be again.”

A new Skidmore/Old Town task force is gearing up to tackle some of the district’s ongoing development issues. But Hawkins and other preservationists have already made it clear that they hope that the city’s stockpile of salvaged cast iron will be used to rebuild the Skidmore/Old Town area. The same process used for the Hallock and McMillan project could be used to recast the missing pieces.

“I hope (the project) will trigger a little renaissance for our historic district,” Hawkins said. “If the area is going to be reborn, it should be done in iron.”





And, just across the street...
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  #909  
Old Posted Jun 6, 2012, 5:43 PM
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^I'm with you on this one. That statement is a real head scratcher. I wonder why the reporter's initial reaction wasn't to question why go through the expense of creating the mold, casting the pieces, and then deciding the neighborhood hasn't come far enough to renovate the building.
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  #910  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2012, 7:13 AM
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MacDonald West 6-29-2012:







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  #911  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2012, 7:30 AM
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Blanchett House, part deux. 6-29-2012. Click for larger size.

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  #912  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2012, 3:42 PM
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The 130-year-old Harlow Block building, located at 922-738 N.W. Glisan St., is set to be renovated and re-opened as a hotel. (Photo by Sam Tenney/DJC)

Hotel to reclaim historic site in North Park Blocks
POSTED: Monday, July 23, 2012 at 02:48 PM PT
BY: Lee Fehrenbacher
Daily Journal of Commerce

http://djcoregon.com/news/2012/07/23...h-park-blocks/

Quote:
A local hotelier is looking to revive a historic hotel in downtown Portland.

Ganesh Sonpatki, the private owner of several economy hotels in Portland, is planning to renovate and re-open the long vacant Harlow Block building, at 722-738 N.W. Glisan St., as a mid-ranged priced hotel. With its opening, Sonpatki will become the latest in a long line of hoteliers at the site.

The Harlow Block was built in 1882 for entrepreneur and city of Troutdale founder Capt. John Harlow. Harlow was originally a sea captain from Maine who came to Oregon by accident in 1849 when he landed in San Francisco and his crew jumped ship to join the California Gold Rush.

Harlow had to sell his ship but ended up becoming a successful steamboat operator. Eventually he made his way up to Oregon where he established a country farm he called “Troutdale” because of the fish ponds he built on the property.

Harlow built the hotel in downtown Portland hoping to capitalize on the coming transcontinental railroad station just blocks away. He was a bit ahead of his time in his plan to include retail shop space on the ground floor of the building. Unfortunately for him, he died a year after the building’s opening from a random illness and his wife, Celeste Harlow, managed the property for many years.

In 1902, Celeste sold the building, and its name was changed to the Park Hotel. In 1907, it sold again and became the Muckle Building. The building struggled through the first part of the 19th century as it scrambled to incorporate amenities like electricity and central heating, and went through several more iterations throughout the 19th century. By the 1970s, it had become fairly worn down.

Despite being neglected, the Harlow Block has an attractive façade that features a restrained Italianate style with old, red brick masonry and arcuated fenestration. Sonpatki bought the building in 2008 with plans to renovate it, but the crashing economy delayed the project. A few years ago, however, he renovated the Downtown Value Inn near Portland State University and said the success of that project clearly indicated the economy was coming around.

“It’s been good,” Sonpatki said. “It could always be better with the economy that we have built. We’re definitely getting a lot of tourists coming in … but it’s been good and that’s what we’re trying to replicate over here.”

Sonpatki’s other hotels include the Briarwood Suites at Southeast 77th and Powell and the Banfield Value Inn at Northeast 37th and Sandy Boulevard.

A big challenge for the renovation will be modernizing the building without triggering a seismic upgrade, which wouldn’t be economically feasible as a mid-ranged hotel. Sonpatki said he originally had approval from Best Western to fly that banner at the Harlow Block but the company wanted some changes made that would have triggered seismic improvements.

“It’s hard to put a whole bunch of money into a building that small, especially with our focus not being on the high-end market,” Sonpatki said. “The plan is to make it as safe as possible but as lean as possible.”

Sonpatki is currently going through permitting for the project.

And with the Pacific Northwest College of Art’s coming renovation of the former federal post office, at 511 N.W. Broadway, just across the street and the soon-to-be construction of a new dormitory for PNCA a couple blocks away, the area around the Harlow Block is certainly primed for activity.

“It’s a great location just from the standpoint of being in the Pearl district,” Sonpatki said, “and in terms of not having a lot of hotels out there.”
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  #913  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2012, 4:41 PM
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Excellent. I've always liked that building.

A quick googling reveals Sonpatki to be the owner of a Motel 6 - hopefully this is a step up.

also:

Quote:
The applicant is seeking Historic Design Review approval for a proposal for rehabilitation work
on the Harlow Block, a Historic Landmark. The proposal includes:
• restoration of existing and altered historic storefronts to the condition demonstrated by
a 1909 photograph;
• alteration of an existing, minor, side entry door and transom, including a new canopy,
to provide an accessible entry; and
• new tenant signs within the traditional sign band of the NW Glisan Street façade, and
new building identification signs on the two side walls.
via bds.
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  #914  
Old Posted Jul 24, 2012, 6:59 PM
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I've always liked that building too and have pretty much just been waiting for it to be torn down because it has been so neglected.

I am surprised that they can get away with not doing the seismic upgrade, despite there being no change of use. It has to be un-reinforced masonry, right? Not the sort of place I'd want to be when the big one hits...
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  #915  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2012, 1:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tworivers View Post
I've always liked that building too and have pretty much just been waiting for it to be torn down because it has been so neglected.

I am surprised that they can get away with not doing the seismic upgrade, despite there being no change of use. It has to be un-reinforced masonry, right? Not the sort of place I'd want to be when the big one hits...
Then you don't want to be near most of the old buildings in downtown, there are so many buildings in the city that haven't been reinforced. I know the hotels on Broadway all un-reinforced because the renovations done to a number of those buildings were all cosmetic.

I believe the Jackson Tower is not reinforced.
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  #916  
Old Posted Jul 31, 2012, 5:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by New Madrid View Post
Excellent. I've always liked that building.

A quick googling reveals Sonpatki to be the owner of a Motel 6 - hopefully this is a step up.
Sonpatki is a fairly common name among Indians, and many hotel owners (Indian or not) get their start with cheaper buy in brands like Motel 6. There are surprisingly some nice hotels with surprisingly low-cost brands attached because the lifetime of the branding agreement can be 20 or 25 years in some cases.

Starwood Hotels, the owner of the W, Westin, Sheraton, aloft, element, Four Points, etc brands still has the Days Inn off Denney in Seattle for example. Nicest Days Inn I've ever seen. It was their first hotel, and upgrading to meet current brand standards isn't always worth it for a hotel owner if the current management contract is working out well enough.
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  #917  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2012, 9:43 AM
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Good news on the Harlow.

Aside from that, the DJC editor (or lack thereof) strikes again. I think EVERY DJC article I've read has factual errors, grammatical and spelling mistakes and/or just plain stupid statements.

From the article.....

"In 1902, Celeste sold the building, and its name was changed to the Park Hotel. In 1907, it sold again and became the Muckle Building. The building struggled through the first part of the 19th century as it scrambled to incorporate amenities like electricity and central heating, and went through several more iterations throughout the 19th century. By the 1970s, it had become fairly worn down."

Raise your hands.... who here doesn't know the 1900's were in the 20th Century?
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  #918  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2012, 1:07 AM
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^^^ I just laugh these days. I've actually considered offering my services to the DJC because you clearly don't need a journalism degree to write for them -- and I know the difference between the 19th and 20th centuries.
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  #919  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2012, 9:57 PM
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I don't remember seeing this posted before here:

Quote:

Block Buster

The "Rich Block" Aims to Make Old Town More Like the Pearl
by Joe Streckert



The corner of SW 2nd and Couch buzzes with the sound of saws and hammers. The Rich Block building has stood on the corner for over 100 years—now developers are transforming the historic space into housing units they hope will attract the kind of renter more familiar to the Pearl District than Old Town.

The challenge Old Town faces with new development like the Rich Block is whether the neighborhood can develop without excluding low-income people who currently live there. Northwest Portland has been in the process of gentrifying for decades, but Old Town has seen less of a makeover than the Pearl or Nob Hill. The Rich Block could change that.

Originally built as a railroad hotel in the early 1900s, the Block was previously occupied by homeless services nonprofit Central City Concern and, last year, the building's empty storefronts were used as a set for fantasy-cop show Grimm (they painted the windows to depict fake shops such as "Mom Jeans"). These days, the low-income blocks around the building are hedged in by the increasingly chic downtown and Pearl. Over a quarter of the 4,400 housing units in the area north of Burnside and east of 12th Avenue are either public housing (like Section 8 and publicly run single residency occupancy hotels) or low-income housing.
...continues at the Portland Mercury.
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  #920  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2012, 4:13 AM
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Speaking of shoddy journalism.... the Mercury has to the worst paper in town for covering any issue more involved than which bar has the best tots. Granted I read it every week and am glad Portland has it. They just have the ability to distill complex situations into an analysis I would expect from a college leftist, not from anyone who has lived in the world long enough to appreciate that issues are seldom so black and white. The article on the Rich Building is a perfect example of their fine work.
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