HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForumSkyscraper Posters
     
Welcome to the SkyscraperPage Forum

Since 1999, the SkyscraperPage Forum has been one of the most active skyscraper enthusiast communities on the web. The global membership discusses development news and construction activity on projects from around the world, alongside discussions on urban design, architecture, transportation and many other topics. Welcome!

You are currently browsing as a guest. Register with the SkyscraperPage Forum and join this growing community of skyscraper enthusiasts. Registering has benefits such as fewer ads, the ability to post messages, private messaging and more.

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions

Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 10:00 PM
M II A II R II K's Avatar
M II A II R II K M II A II R II K is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Toronto
Posts: 34,270
Philly Brings Elevated Park Plans into Focus

Philly Brings Elevated Park Plans into Focus


April 6, 2012

By Tyler Silvestro

Read More: http://blog.archpaper.com/wordpress/archives/36248

Quote:
Philly is one step closer to creating an elevated park on an abandoned rail viaduct. Studio Bryan Hanes and Urban Engineers, two firms collaborating on the design of the SEPTA Spur phase of Philadelphia’s Reading Viaduct, have released new images of the reclaimed railway that bring the proposal into focus. The Spur represents a significant step in realizing the vision of the elevated park with a primary entrance from Broad Street that rises from grade to the elevated rail line. The first phase stops just shy, however, of the wider, more programmable space on the main Viaduct.

As a development teaser, the Spur will serve as a crucial component of fundraising efforts by park advocates, Viaduct Greene and the Reading Viaduct Project, and the design’s reception could represent a make-or-break opportunity to complete the larger project. According to Bryan Hanes in an article from HiddenCity, “We have been working to maintain the industrial character of the space while finding the appropriate balance between program elements and the simple pleasure of being up off the ground in an awe-inspiring place.” Funded primarily by the William Penn Foundation and the Poor Richards Charitable Trust, the Spur will make up just 9% of the total area of the proposed park.

.....













__________________
ASDFGHJK
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 10:15 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 5,045
The Reading Viaduct Park will be a real game changer for the Callowhill Neighborhood which has just started to see new development and revitalization of this once industrial neighborhood. I'm really happy about this; Phase 1 of the Viaduct park could start as early as this year . The city has been in talks with Reading International about buying the rest of the Viaduct. Recently Reading has cleared some tracks from their portion of the Viaduct. Could they be ready to sell it?

Some other renders of the proposed Phase 1 of the park.











Link to those Renders
http://www.uwishunu.com/2012/04/beho...rk-in-the-sky/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 3:55 AM
volguus zildrohar's Avatar
volguus zildrohar volguus zildrohar is offline
RIP Dr. Spengler
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: The City Of Philadelphia
Posts: 15,337
I wonder how that's going to affect the urbex crowd.

The mere presence of that park will be transformational for that neighborhood. Right now it's off most people's radar. It's out of the way, has no mass destinations and isn't really a thoroughfare in any way. I'd wager that visitors would be surprised to note the presence of an occupied neighborhood there.

If/when the 'SEPTA' spur section is completed it would lead to the beginning of something new for the viaduct project - real public pressure, particularly if the NID finds its way back to life for the neighborhood. We shall see but consider me hopeful.
__________________
je suis phillytrax sur FLICKR, y'all
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted May 11, 2012, 3:05 PM
Pablo O'Higgins Pablo O'Higgins is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1
The NID was defeated because the majority of residents and business owners petitioned City Council to oppose a 7% property tax increase to pay for the maintenance of the Viaduct Park. Let the supporters of the park do some fundraising. Better yet selective demolition of portions of the Viaduct will be far better for the neighborhood and keeping in Philadelphia's character by creating green squares rather than imitating of NYC.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted May 11, 2012, 8:28 PM
Nexis4Jersey's Avatar
Nexis4Jersey Nexis4Jersey is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: In the Pascack Valley
Posts: 1,696
Quote:
Originally Posted by volguus zildrohar View Post
I wonder how that's going to affect the urbex crowd.

The mere presence of that park will be transformational for that neighborhood. Right now it's off most people's radar. It's out of the way, has no mass destinations and isn't really a thoroughfare in any way. I'd wager that visitors would be surprised to note the presence of an occupied neighborhood there.

If/when the 'SEPTA' spur section is completed it would lead to the beginning of something new for the viaduct project - real public pressure, particularly if the NID finds its way back to life for the neighborhood. We shall see but consider me hopeful.
You mean the Trolley Bypass tunnel?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted May 11, 2012, 8:41 PM
Baronvonellis Baronvonellis is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 424
I don't think these elevated parks make much sense in areas that aren't already really vibrant and built out. In the picture it shows the viaduct next to a huge parking lot. Why not just tear down the viaduct and build a park on the surface level where the parking lot is. I would think a regular and larger park would get more use that an elevated park.
The only reason it works in Manhattan is that there's no land to build parks so that's the only place they could put a park. I'm not sure that the high line park in Chicago that they want to build would be used that much either.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted May 11, 2012, 9:27 PM
Parkway's Avatar
Parkway Parkway is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 429
I'm with baron on this one. I don't think there is sufficient density around the viaduct yet and compounding the issue the segment north of Spring Garden is surrounded by public housing on 3 sides.

That being said there is no reason it couldn't succeed in the future I just don't think that right now it is a good use of city money.
__________________
"It's like a giant ball of peanut butter with a stick of Dynamite in the middle."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #8  
Old Posted May 11, 2012, 10:06 PM
ardecila's Avatar
ardecila ardecila is offline
vertical
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: unconventionally bicoastal
Posts: 10,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baronvonellis View Post
I'm not sure that the high line park in Chicago that they want to build would be used that much either.
The Bloomingdale Trail is just that - a grade-separated urban trail that allows for cyclists, runners, and pedestrians to do their thing. It's all about transportation and exercise, not repose or whatever it is people do on the High Line. I think it would be remarkably successful if it provides a convenient link between Blue Line stations at Damen and Western, and neighborhoods further west like Humboldt Park and Hermosa.

Bloomingdale won't have the fancy, expensive manicured landscapes that the High Line does - they are landscaping the Trail, but the goal is to make it as low-maintenance as possible, set it and forget it, low-cost.

Besides, have you walked the Bloomingdale Trail? It's not the Meatpacking District, but it's entirely built-out except for city owned parcels slated to become access-point parks. The surrounding neighborhoods are already thriving and dense.

I'm not familiar with Philly, so I can't say what the effect of the Reading project will be. From the renderings, it looks far more like the High Line than the Bloomingdale Trail - manicured landscapes, fancy lighting/furniture, art installations, etc. They're expecting people to visit because it's a unique destination, not because it's a convenient place for recreation. I don't know the surrounding areas well enough to say whether that strategy will work or not.
__________________
la forme d'une ville change plus vite, hélas! que le coeur d'un mortel...

Last edited by ardecila; May 12, 2012 at 8:47 AM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #9  
Old Posted May 11, 2012, 10:30 PM
volguus zildrohar's Avatar
volguus zildrohar volguus zildrohar is offline
RIP Dr. Spengler
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: The City Of Philadelphia
Posts: 15,337
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
I'm not familiar with Philly, so I can't say what the effect of the Reading project will be. From the renderings, it looks far more like the High Line than the Bloomingdale Trail - manicured landscapes, fancy lighting/furniture, art installations, etc. They're expecting people to visit because it's a unique destination, not because it's a convenient place for recreation. I don't know the surrounding areas well enough to say whether that strategy will work or not.
The area around the viaduct is more or less the industrial hinterlands of downtown, the warehouse district.

There is no wide-ranging draw in the neighborhood - nothing there that will pull in daytrippers or tourists and the project is just far enough off of the beaten path to not have enough gravity on its own, I believe. Pablo correctly notes that it may indeed be better to go in another direction instead of hopping on the bandwagon. What makes this case different is that the amenity is seen as a catalyst for kickstarting revitalization instead of being a result of it. If a decade ago the neighborhood took off the way Northern Liberties has this would be a moot point - the project very likely would have already been completed a few years ago.

Using public money or assessing a special tax at this time - with the pressing issues city government has on its plate now - is not the way the way to go right now. This project, to some degree, is going to happen but it's gotten traction five years too late and that is going to show in the finished product - right place, wrong time.
__________________
je suis phillytrax sur FLICKR, y'all
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #10  
Old Posted May 12, 2012, 1:41 AM
Jelly Roll Jelly Roll is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: NJ/NYC
Posts: 1,267
Quote:
Originally Posted by volguus zildrohar View Post
This project, to some degree, is going to happen but it's gotten traction five years too late and that is going to show in the finished product - right place, wrong time.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #11  
Old Posted May 12, 2012, 2:13 AM
Capsule F Capsule F is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: 16th and green
Posts: 1,681
I think you folks would be surprised the draw the neighborhood has at night, truly an exciting place with a big city vibe. The bars int he area are packed constantly and new apartment development makes this area ripe. I have to disagree that this would not be practical. This may be the most exciting neighborhood in Philly atm for development.
__________________
New York is the greatest city in the world, but Philadelphia is the greatest city in America. - Collin Colsher
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #12  
Old Posted May 12, 2012, 5:31 AM
hammersklavier's Avatar
hammersklavier hammersklavier is offline
The Hammer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Polis Philou Adelfou
Posts: 4,046
The neighborhood in question (fortunately) weathered the past half-century while keeping its industrial-building vibe intact. Now what is needed is redevelopment of the several surface lots as well as open-air substation in the area.

While a quiet area, 13th St. is home to two major local food destinations: Cafe Loft and the Prohibition Taproom. The revamped Trestle Inn at 11th and Callowhill is another major draw, as is the Institute further north (at 12th and Green, I think)--the area is fast becoming a draw with or without a Reading Viaduct. Galleries and performing arts centers litter the area. The vibe here is, I think, a lot like Chelsea back in the days when the High Line was just a gleam in the Friends' eyes*.

IMO the Viaduct is a key historic asset but one obsolete w/r/t its original purpose. It's actually quite perfect for developing an elevated park--in some ways, even more so than the High Line (a significant distance to the west of the 8th Ave. line). I favor landbanking it (mowing it periodically) until the organizations mature and start building their own pilot projects and funding bases--again, a la the Friends.
___________
* Except for the politics. Oh, God, the politics. Chinatown is the next neighborhood south, and it has an imperial complex. It's long eyed Callowhill for expansion** while the loft-dwellers attracted to the postindustrial vibe have fought back. BTW the NID thing became a Center City-v-Chinatown thing. Center City may have lost that battle, but they are far from losing the war.
** While ignoring the fields of empty lots between 7th and 8th St. and along the south side of Vine west of 12th.
__________________
CCME | CtL | Hidden City

Who knows but that, on the lower levels, I speak for you?’ (Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man)
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
   
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 1:01 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.