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  #161  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 7:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serenade View Post
I know. You would think wiser heads would prevail 50 years later but some things never change.
yes, because paying homage to the team's original uniforms on its 50th anniversary makes houston uncultured. i think your interpretation of what "culture" entails is out of sync with the rest of society.
     
     
  #162  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 7:56 PM
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I love how forumers on SSP consistently miss the in-depth argument related comments, but latch onto the misguided ones. Once again, another Houston backer's reasoning fell on deaf ears... *sigh*
     
     
  #163  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 7:57 PM
TarHeelJ TarHeelJ is offline
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Originally Posted by Serenade View Post
Think about it for a second. Naming your first professional sports franchise after a gun. And commemorating it in full in 2012 with a big gun on your jersey.
I was thinking more about ingorant comments like yours. They serve no purpose other than to piss people off.
     
     
  #164  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 8:04 PM
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I think that the New England Patriots should be renamed the New England Palefaces.
     
     
  #165  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 8:51 PM
Buckeye Native 001 Buckeye Native 001 is offline
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SSP in a nutshell: 1 part reasonable discussion, 2 parts bullshit.
     
     
  #166  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 8:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Buckeye Native 001 View Post
Every forum in a nutshell: 1 part reasonable discussion, 2 parts bullshit.
There I fixed that for you.
     
     
  #167  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 9:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Private Dick View Post
I think that the New England Patriots should be renamed the New England Palefaces.
certainly offensive to the british.
     
     
  #168  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 10:14 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
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Originally Posted by novawolverine View Post
I don't think you can combine all three of those regions and put it above Southern California. If you do that, you might as well extend BosWash down to Atlanta.
I agree that SoCal is more continuously filled in than the Great Lakes, but there's nowhere near the gap in development in the Great Lakes as exists between NoVa, the Carolinas and Atlanta. The Toronto-Buffalo-Detroit/Windsor-Toledo-Cleveland-Pittsburgh horn is pretty much continuously developed all the way around Lake Erie with no gaps between the metropolitan areas (Toledo and Cleveland will even share a congressional district after the 2010 redistricting). Likewise, the Chicago-Milwaukee super-metro(?) is pretty continuously developed. Chicago and Milwaukee have a similar relationship as NYC and Philadelphia, just with two smaller cities.

This is why I always thought a Great Lakes rail system made more sense than just about anywhere in the country outside of BosWash. Far more sense than the high-speed waste of money that they want to build in Florida...
     
     
  #169  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 10:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orderlychaos View Post
The state frequently interferes with local Austin policies and issues.
In what ways does the state interfere in Austin's issues?
     
     
  #170  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ch.G, Ch.G View Post
Houston's mayor is a lesbian. You don't get much more visible than that.



Huh? The state has more jurisdiction over certain issues than municipal governments. That's not an "uneducated stereotype"; it's fact. If the state rejects federal funding for healthcare, it's not like Austin can supersede that decision. If the state bans gay marriage or civil unions, Houston can't declare itself exempt.
What does the state have to do with what attitudes, cultures, and politics are in Houston? If policies are to be changed, you'd have to elect someone who can change them not run and hide from them.

Almost every major city in Texas is trending in that direction. Most voted FOR Obama in 2008.

Either way what the state does, or says, has little effect of what happens in Houston. Last I checked we have the largest Medical Center in the world and vibrant bohemian/alternative districts in the city. Who cares what Austin thinks...be your own person.
     
     
  #171  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 10:40 PM
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the state of texas holds tremendous influence over its residents' lives in the form of the justice system, worker's rights, marriage law, taxes, education, the death penalty and so on.
     
     
  #172  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 10:40 PM
novawolverine novawolverine is offline
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Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
I agree that SoCal is more continuously filled in than the Great Lakes, but there's nowhere near the gap in development in the Great Lakes as exists between NoVa, the Carolinas and Atlanta. The Toronto-Buffalo-Detroit/Windsor-Toledo-Cleveland-Pittsburgh horn is pretty much continuously developed all the way around Lake Erie with no gaps between the metropolitan areas (Toledo and Cleveland will even share a congressional district after the 2010 redistricting). Likewise, the Chicago-Milwaukee super-metro(?) is pretty continuously developed. Chicago and Milwaukee have a similar relationship as NYC and Philadelphia, just with two smaller cities.

This is why I always thought a Great Lakes rail system made more sense than just about anywhere in the country outside of BosWash. Far more sense than the high-speed waste of money that they want to build in Florida...
Using the The Great Lakes example, you could already combine Richmond into BosWash corridor and then there's a similar gap between Richmond and Raleigh. With Lake Erie, there is a gap between London and Windsor, and I'd lump in London with the GTA before Detroit-Windsor, btw. I think rail could definitely work for passenger travel in the midwest, but it just goes to show that the megalopolis in the northeast isn't just large population centers near one another; there's a lot of inter-connectivity in other areas that has developed over a long period of time. I don't even like consolidating all of the metro's on the east coast, but my main point is that SoCal is more comparable to NYC-Philly than it is to the Great Lakes Megalopolis.
     
     
  #173  
Old Posted Apr 9, 2012, 11:56 PM
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Originally Posted by TarHeelJ View Post
So you don't think that this same thing happens in every other large metro? I'm using Atlanta as an example because I'm most familiar with it, but it obviously applies to many other cities as well. The suburbs didn't simply appear out of nowhere. They were towns/cities that predated the city of Atlanta by many years and they grew along with the city, eventually growing together. It doesn't matter that Boston is 400 years old and Atlanta is 200, a very similar thing happened in both places.
Sorry to harp on this TarHeelJ, but I think what people want to point out is that there are often no clear delineations between where one metro ends and another begins in the Northeast, whereas there's nothing else around Houston to confuse the borders. 60 miles from the center of Houston is still very much metro Houston, as there are no other cities in the area 60 miles out could be part of.

The Providence MSA starts less than 10 miles south of the city of Boston's municipal borders (Easton, MA). Not the MSA's borders, mind you, but 10 miles south of the City of Boston and you're technically not in the Boston metro anymore.

The Hartford MSA starts less than 15 miles west of the city of Providence's municipal borders (the CT state line).

The Springfield MSA starts exactly 10 miles north of the city of Hartford's municipal borders (Longmeadow, MA).

10 miles outside of Houston's admittedly massive municipal borders is what, downtown Pearland? Sugar Land? Certainly not an entirely different MSA.

Yeah, New England and the Northeast sprawl. But because of the age of the region, there are so many more established towns and cities that clearly demarcating where one metro ends and another begins used to be done on a per municipality basis, not county basis (to prevent, for example, Easton being part of the Providence MSA instead of Boston).
     
     
  #174  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 12:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn View Post
Sorry to harp on this TarHeelJ, but I think what people want to point out is that there are often no clear delineations between where one metro ends and another begins in the Northeast, whereas there's nothing else around Houston to confuse the borders. 60 miles from the center of Houston is still very much metro Houston, as there are no other cities in the area 60 miles out could be part of.

The Providence MSA starts less than 10 miles south of the city of Boston's municipal borders (Easton, MA). Not the MSA's borders, mind you, but 10 miles south of the City of Boston and you're technically not in the Boston metro anymore.

The Hartford MSA starts less than 15 miles west of the city of Providence's municipal borders (the CT state line).

The Springfield MSA starts exactly 10 miles north of the city of Hartford's municipal borders (Longmeadow, MA).

10 miles outside of Houston's admittedly massive municipal borders is what, downtown Pearland? Sugar Land? Certainly not an entirely different MSA.

Yeah, New England and the Northeast sprawl. But because of the age of the region, there are so many more established towns and cities that clearly demarcating where one metro ends and another begins used to be done on a per municipality basis, not county basis (to prevent, for example, Easton being part of the Providence MSA instead of Boston).
Agreed:

It doesn't matter if county lines for the Houston MSA extend further out.



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  #175  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Serenade View Post
Those arguments trying to defend Houston's "culture" are laughable. This is the same city that originally named its baseball team after a gun and proudly wears a jersey with a huge graphic of said gun. Stay classy, Houston.
I don't think team outfits are a tool most cultural respecting and loving people would ever use as a measure as to how cultural a city is. Sounds more like a suburban tee-shirt store lover kind of thing.
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  #176  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 2:00 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
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Originally Posted by novawolverine View Post
I think rail could definitely work for passenger travel in the midwest, but it just goes to show that the megalopolis in the northeast isn't just large population centers near one another; there's a lot of inter-connectivity in other areas that has developed over a long period of time. I don't even like consolidating all of the metro's on the east coast, but my main point is that SoCal is more comparable to NYC-Philly than it is to the Great Lakes Megalopolis.
Yeah, I agree. BosWash's coordinating of transportation infrastructure is light years ahead of any other region in the country and even that doesn't come pain free. I was just reading the NYT article about how Gov. Christie's decision to kill the new Hudson River tunnel project was more a political calculation than fears about cost overruns as he initially claimed. That was to be a vital core piece of infrastructure for the Northeast Corridor.

Anyway, this is completely off topic (aren't you all sick of talking about Houston yet? kidding) but I think the logical next step for that type of coordination to spread would be to the Great Lakes. I think SoCal kinda "cheats" because it is all already under the jurisdiction of California and even down to the county level the governments aren't very fragmented. In the northeast you're coordinating among well over half a dozen states and in the Great Lakes you'd be coordinating across nearly half a dozen states plus at least one province in a different country.
     
     
  #177  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 3:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Serenade View Post
Think about it for a second. Naming your first professional sports franchise after a gun. And commemorating it in full in 2012 with a big gun on your jersey.


What does the name of a baseball team have to do with the price of anything?
     
     
  #178  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 5:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reverberation View Post
Agreed:

It doesn't matter if county lines for the Houston MSA extend further out.



These maps also show how much more constrained Philadelphia's MSA is: a large northeastern swipe on the Philly map is part of New York's MSA, and Reading (to the northwest) is its own MSA. As is Wilmington. Granted, both are small MSAs, but both are clearly independent from Philadelphia.

By contrast, there is no bleed from Houston to another city. Not even Galveston (which historically had the best claim for a second city in the region).
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  #179  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 8:22 PM
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^ The Lehigh Valley with over 800K in population too... which is part of the Philly media market, yet is its own MSA... and the same distance from Philly as Galveston is to Houston... as I stated a page or two back... have we beaten this dead horse yet?
     
     
  #180  
Old Posted Apr 10, 2012, 8:29 PM
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Originally Posted by all of the trash View Post
Houston is also the most diverse metro now, outdoing NY and LA, as much as it pains SSP to admit.
Houston has things going for it, but just stop. I've been there several times and it isn't even close to being as diverse as NYC and I couldn't care less about numbers. Houston doesn't pass the eye test.

LA probably, but I'm not sure.
     
     
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