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  #141  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2012, 7:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Steelcowboy View Post
Well April 18th came and went and I haven't heard peep about that cargo flight to Germany. Is that still happening or was it an idea that never took off. I didn notice heavy UPS activity at the old terminal (former PEI air hangar). Any news about these topics? UPS, CARGOJET

Steelcowboy
I work at the airport (fedex) so Im keeping an eye out for the 767...As far as UPS goes they are still piggy-backing on Puros 727 (for now at least)...I saw three of their containers being loaded on there just last night...they are most likely trucking in a lot of freight as well...as they have a strong ground focus.
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  #142  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2012, 7:30 PM
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I found this on the GMIA's site... I guess the flight was today : http://www.cyqm.ca/en/home/aboutus/n...cetakesof.aspx

First trans-Atlantic direct non-stop cargo service takes off from Greater Moncton to Germany

April 25, 2012
DIEPPE – The Greater Moncton International Airport (GMIA), as the Air Cargo Logistics Centre of Excellence for Atlantic Canada, is pleased to announce the inaugural trans-Atlantic cargo flight that will take place today with Cargojet in partnership with Cologne-Bonn Airport. This represents an economic partnership that will enhance economic cooperation between the two airports and the regions they serve through the development of markets that are mutually beneficial for the airport businesses.

Another objective is to build on a relationship of cooperation between the two airports to create opportunities together in an open and cooperative manner to increase economic prosperity; and to develop joint projects and events to foster the development of international cargo links/business.

“Today’s flight represents the first step towards this region’s prosperity as the Air Cargo Logistics Centre of Excellence for Atlantic Canada. Extending the runway to 10,000 feet and developing an air cargo village/complex is the catalyst to drive the air cargo component within the supply chain. Being a trans-shipment airport for cargo represents a great opportunity for exporters from the region to access European markets for time sensitive goods. Our airport is the gateway portal for importers to reach the North American market cost effectively”, says Rob Robichaud, CEO of the GMIA.

-----
The "same" appears on FA: http://flightaware.com/live/flight/CJT1891
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  #143  
Old Posted Apr 25, 2012, 10:19 PM
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I went out to the airport just after 11:00am. I forgot my "real" camera, so I only had the cell phone, and I had to shoot through the chain link...





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  #144  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2012, 12:56 AM
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Nice pics, that 767 looks like a beast.

One question - part of the cargo for the return flights from Europe is supposed to be motor vehicles (specifically the Ford Mondeo). How would they offload a car from that plane?
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  #145  
Old Posted Apr 26, 2012, 11:04 AM
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There is a much better picture on the cover of this mornings paper. They must have an all-access pass.
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  #146  
Old Posted Apr 27, 2012, 5:31 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post


Nice pics, that 767 looks like a beast.

One question - part of the cargo for the return flights from Europe is supposed to be motor vehicles (specifically the Ford Mondeo). How would they offload a car from that plane?
I would assume they unload and load it like they would freight pallets. There is a large cargo door just aft of the door you see open in the picture.
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  #147  
Old Posted May 11, 2012, 11:33 AM
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Halifax airport authority had a record yearMay 10, 2012 - 5:10pm By THE CHRONICLE HERALD Share on facebookShare on twitterShare on linkedinMore Sharing Services
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.Share on emailShare on print.It was a very good year for the Halifax International Airport Authority in 2011.

“We had our busiest year for passenger traffic, increased our cargo activity, completed several capital improvement projects and delivered a positive bottom line,” Tom Ruth, the authority’s president and chief executive officer, said in a news release Thursday.

The authority operates Halifax Robert L. Stanfield International Airport.

Overall passenger traffic increased by 2½ per cent last year to 3,594,164 passengers, up from 3,508,153 in 2010.

Last year’s numbers accounted for more than half of all the air passengers in Atlantic Canada.

All air traffic sectors recorded year-over-year growth last year compared with 2010, with transborder traffic (non-stop to the United States) up 10.8 per cent, international traffic 9.1 per cent higher and Canadian domestic traffic posting a 0.7 per cent hike.

The airport processed 29,263 metric tonnes of cargo last year, an increase of slightly less than three per cent from the 28,450 metric tonnes processed in 2010.

The authority generated $51.1 million in operating revenues last year, up from $47.3 million in 2010, and collected $26.8 million in airport improvement fees compared with $19.7 million in 2010.

Total revenues in 2011 were $77.9 million, an increase from $67 million in 2010, while total expenses last year were $74.4 million compared with $65.4 million in 2010.

The $3.4 million in revenues that exceeded expenses are being reinvested in airport operations and development.

The authority invested $21.8 million in its capital improvement program last year, including completion of the airfield restoration program, the first phase of site preparation to extend the main runway to 3,150 metres from 2,640 metres and preliminary work on its commercial development strategy.

The strategy will help shape the development of the airport property from the terminal building to Highway 102.

Airports Council International inducted the airport into its new Director General’s Roll of Excellence last year — one of only 14 airports so honoured.

Halifax Stanfield was recertified last year as ASQ Assured, the industry’s global seal of approval for superior service, and earned two Airport Service Quality Awards — third-best airport in the world for overall customer satisfaction for airports under five million passengers and third-best airport in North America regardless of size.

The latest figures available from 2010 show Halifax Stanfield International Airport is worth over $1.25 billion to the provincial economy on an annual basis.

(business@herald.ca)

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  #148  
Old Posted May 12, 2012, 2:22 PM
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This is the link for the .pdf of the most recent (2011) annual report for the GMIA.

http://www.cyqm.ca/site/media/gmia/G...nualReport.pdf

It has been another successful and profitable year for the airport:

- passenger volumes were up 5% to 579,329
- cargo volumes were up 1% to 23,035 tonnes
- revenues exceeded expenses by $2.4M

The airport authority expects passenger load to exceed 600,000 in 2012. They also expect a substantial increase in cargo traffic this year as well.
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  #149  
Old Posted May 16, 2012, 3:24 PM
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St. John's International Airport to Double in Size


St. John's International Airport will double in size over the next 8 years. The Airport Authority held its annual meeting last evening in St. John's. Chair Darlene Whelan says the airport will add some 200-thousand square feet of new airport terminal space to accommodate the province's growing economy.

A record 1.4-million passengers passed through the airport in 2011, more than any other year on record. By 2020 it's predicted that some 1.9-million will pass through the airport terminals.

The airport will double in size by 2020, with some 200-thousand square feet being added to both the east and west ends of the existing building. More terminals, plane space, baggage and passenger areas will be added.

Starting in June, construction will begin on a new airport access road that will replace the road that has been used to enter the airport for decades. The new road will be built further up Portugal Cove road, and will bring visiting traffic to the east end of the airport for access. The existing road will be used for employee and truck traffic only.

She says this year people in the area will begin to notice changes in the airport parking lots as well as the construction of the new airport access road.

The installation of the $26-million CAT 3 ILS landing system will begin in July, and once complete will eliminate fog as a flight canceller for 70-thousand passengers annually.

As the province's oil sector continues to flow and expand, it's expected that all helicopter traffic to and from offshore oil rigs could end up passing through the airport to depart and arrive, instead of using the existing Cougar base now.

Construction and upgrades at the airport are not expected to disrupt airport operations in 2012, however delays and disruptions for travellers are expected to begin in 2013. Whelan says the long term benefits of the airport upgrades will outweigh the short term delays that are expected next year.

She says the current building is designed for 900-thousand people per year, a huge increase from the 1990s. Whelan says the renovations have been designed using a 'conservative approach'.
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  #150  
Old Posted May 25, 2012, 1:49 PM
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Flight Bathurst - Wabush

Airport officials have been meeting with a highly interested transporter to do the liaison between the two. According to them, this could become a reality this summer.

As the brunswick mines closes and lays off people, I predict this flight will be farelly busy.
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  #151  
Old Posted May 30, 2012, 11:12 AM
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from CBC

Ganong calls for one main international airport
Business man says three main airports compete more than they co-operate
CBC News Posted: May 29, 2012 5:35 PM AT Last Updated: May 29, 2012 8:56 PM AT

One of New Brunswick's most prominent businessmen said Tuesday morning that New Brunswick should have one main, international airport.

David Ganong, attending a Rotary Club of Moncton meeting, said given its location and infrastructure, Moncton's airport would be the perfect choice.

Ganong suggests Saint John and Fredericton could still have airports for regional flights.

Ganong said centralizing the airport is an easy way to boost the economy.

Right now, Ganong said, the three airports compete more than they co-operate, duplicating some of the same services.

"We have to be more co-operative than competitive I think," he said.

Ganong said a decision should be made to make, “one of them the international” airport.

"To build an economy, to build business you've got to have people easily (able to) move in and out of the area and it's by air these days," he said.

Ganong, who helps run his family's 139-year-old chocolate company said growing his business has always relied on easy access to travel but said, right now, New Brunswick has too many choices.

He said new Brunswick has a lot to gain by following Nova Scotia's model of only one international airport.

"Air connects are really important I think to building the economy, to being able to fly to London, or fly to Calgary from New Brunswick," he said, "And those things really don't work well as they do for Halifax and other centres. I think those are some tough decisions we need to be talking about."

Not surprisingly Ganong's suggestion, of Moncton having the only international airport in the province, sits well with Moncton Mayor George LeBlanc.

"We are a transportation centre and a transportation hub. Not just for New Brunswick, but recognized to be so for the Maritime provinces," LeBlanc said, "So it seems to me there's a lot of logic to that.

Close to 600,000 passengers passed through Moncton's airport last year compared to 275,000 at Fredericton’s airport and about 220,000 in Saint John.

The CEO for Saint John's airport, Bernie LeBlanc, said the benefits of just one international airport would be marginal.

"You may get one additional destination, you might get larger aircrafts, but you'd probably might lose on frequency because we have very good frequency from Saint John, Fredericton and Moncton to Toronto, Montreal and Halifax," he said.

Ganong argues those flight duplications limit other direct destinations from opening up.

He said in a province with just over 700,000 people, there's no need for three international airports.

Personal note - I agree that all three cities should maintain airports and all three should have frequent and convenient connections to Halifax, Montreal and Toronto. I think though that a persuasive arguement could be made to limit flights to western Canada and internationally to a single facility.....
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Last edited by MonctonRad; May 30, 2012 at 11:58 AM.
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  #152  
Old Posted May 30, 2012, 5:20 PM
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I think all we are competing for are a few U.S. regional flights. It's not like we will be flying to London or Tokyo direct anytime soon. The airlines control the business, not the airports in small markets. $100 a barrel oil doesn't help dreams of point to point international flights in New Brunswick. I can't see the 787 changing that fact either regardless of Boeings PR. Only Halifax with it's 3.5 million passenger number can attract the airlines in the maritimes. They have going for them a seaport with cruise ships, large population and alot of government and universities. Its ironic that New Brunswick cities are split. Saint John has the port, Fredericton has the government and Moncton has the population. I understand what Mr. Ganong is saying but in reality, how many flights are we talking about here? Two, maybe three if we are lucky? Chicago?.... Boston?.... Philly maybe?

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  #153  
Old Posted May 30, 2012, 7:16 PM
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I think all we are competing for are a few U.S. regional flights. It's not like we will be flying to London or Tokyo direct anytime soon. The airlines control the business, not the airports in small markets. $100 a barrel oil doesn't help dreams of point to point international flights in New Brunswick. I can't see the 787 changing that fact either regardless of Boeings PR. Only Halifax with it's 3.5 million passenger number can attract the airlines in the maritimes. They have going for them a seaport with cruise ships, large population and alot of government and universities. Its ironic that New Brunswick cities are split. Saint John has the port, Fredericton has the government and Moncton has the population. I understand what Mr. Ganong is saying but in reality, how many flights are we talking about here? Two, maybe three if we are lucky? Chicago?.... Boston?.... Philly maybe?
The funny part about this is that if you imagine the Maritimes as one province, we are doing pretty good to have one large major airport with several smaller airports, we are not that much different than Quebec or Ontario.

Imagine Moncton/Sydney/Charlottetown etc. are equivalent to Quebec City and Montreal is equivalent to Halifax. Most people fly or drive to Montreal to make connections elsewhere. The Drive from Fredericton to Moncton's airport is not much different than the drive from Dieppe to Stanfield (approx. 2 hours).

Air Canada even offers a Halifax Commuter Pass:
http://cms1.bigsanto.com/cms/uploade...flightpass.pdf
http://www.aircanada.com/flightpasses

Maybe if they could get some competition on those routes it would be as cheap as flying from Halifax to St. John's.
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  #154  
Old Posted May 30, 2012, 7:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Sunnybrae View Post


I think all we are competing for are a few U.S. regional flights. It's not like we will be flying to London or Tokyo direct anytime soon. The airlines control the business, not the airports in small markets. $100 a barrel oil doesn't help dreams of point to point international flights in New Brunswick. I can't see the 787 changing that fact either regardless of Boeings PR. Only Halifax with it's 3.5 million passenger number can attract the airlines in the maritimes. They have going for them a seaport with cruise ships, large population and alot of government and universities. Its ironic that New Brunswick cities are split. Saint John has the port, Fredericton has the government and Moncton has the population. I understand what Mr. Ganong is saying but in reality, how many flights are we talking about here? Two, maybe three if we are lucky? Chicago?.... Boston?.... Philly maybe?
I agree. A single dominant NB airport won't compete with Halifax, but there could be an expanded offering of destinations, both domestic and international.

I would suggest new routes to St. John's, Quebec City, Calgary, Boston, Orlando (year round), Chicago and possibly Paris (thanks to the Acadians).

That would be about it.......
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  #155  
Old Posted May 30, 2012, 8:16 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
I agree. A single dominant NB airport won't compete with Halifax, but there could be an expanded offering of destinations, both domestic and international.

I would suggest new routes to St. John's, Quebec City, Calgary, Boston, Orlando (year round), Chicago and possibly Paris (thanks to the Acadians).

That would be about it.......
St. John's I could see, Calgary, Boston and especially Chicago are iffy.

Quebec City and Year-round to Orlando are never gonna happen.

A Paris charter would all depend on the world economy. They tried Moncton before and failed and then moved to Halifax and even that wasn't successful. Even Quebec City was unsuccessful.

If Moncton were to obtain any of those routes I don't think its going to matter whether or not Saint John or Fredericton are considered International.
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  #156  
Old Posted May 30, 2012, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
I agree. A single dominant NB airport won't compete with Halifax, but there could be an expanded offering of destinations, both domestic and international.

I would suggest new routes to St. John's, Quebec City, Calgary, Boston, Orlando (year round), Chicago and possibly Paris (thanks to the Acadians).

That would be about it.......
My comment was directed at international destinations only. As far as domestic is concerned, Air Canada, Westjet and to a lesser extent Porter know the numbers. They already have loads of data on where passengers are going and when and how frequently. If pax are there and yields are there and aircraft are available, I think the airlines would give a direct flight a go to whatever destination. Remember that the business pax are the bread and butter of the major airlines. Vacationers are seat fillers more or less and are very price sensitive. Leisure airlines cater more to vacationers and those airlines come and go with the season.

I think I am very lucky to live in Moncton and have an airport here that connects to three major hubs (Toronto, Montreal and Newark) and I would say the hub of Atlantic Canada, Halifax. Those hubs connect me to most of the planet. We can't say we are not well served. As for cargo operations, thats another story.
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  #157  
Old Posted May 31, 2012, 12:06 AM
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St. John's I could see, Calgary, Boston and especially Chicago are iffy.

Quebec City and Year-round to Orlando are never gonna happen.

A Paris charter would all depend on the world economy. They tried Moncton before and failed and then moved to Halifax and even that wasn't successful. Even Quebec City was unsuccessful.

If Moncton were to obtain any of those routes I don't think its going to matter whether or not Saint John or Fredericton are considered International.
St. John's would definitely work. Moncton used to have a CanJet flight to St. John's before the airline tanked. It was popular. I would like to see WestJet or Porter do it.

Quebec City could work. Again, the Acadian population would support it.

There are enough north shorers working out in Alberta that a direct run to Calgary or Edmonton might be feasable.

Boston would work better for Moncton than it would for SJ or Freddy. It's just far enough away that driving there is inconvenient.

I agree that Orlando(year round), Chicago and Paris would be long shots.
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  #158  
Old Posted May 31, 2012, 1:58 AM
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St. John's would definitely work. Moncton used to have a CanJet flight to St. John's before the airline tanked. It was popular. I would like to see WestJet or Porter do it.

Quebec City could work. Again, the Acadian population would support it.

There are enough north shorers working out in Alberta that a direct run to Calgary or Edmonton might be feasable.

Boston would work better for Moncton than it would for SJ or Freddy. It's just far enough away that driving there is inconvenient.

I agree that Orlando(year round), Chicago and Paris would be long shots.
I'm not sure why they don't fly to St. John's if the pax are there. I could see Westjet doing YYZ-YQM-YYT-YQM-YYZ. Maybe a 737 is too much aircraft and the yeilds are not there. Aircraft routing is very complex. Having it parked somewhere doing nothing is not an option. Porter even have less of an option given aircraft availability. As for Jazz, they could do the same as Westjet with a smaller plane but again, yeilds must not be there. Citing an airline that went only charter (Canjet) is probably not the best business case.

Quebec City, have no idea what the numbers are. I do know one guy who flies out of there twice a year on business to here through Montreal.

Flying out west, well, its a long stage length. Your better off as an airline going through a hub. You can offer more frequencies, get better yields and utilize your aircraft and crews more efficiently. Plus my own personal opinion, being stuck in a metal tube for five or six hours in a smaller type aircraft blows.

I'm not sure if Boston is a hub for any of the major US airlines. I know Delta use to have a mini hub there. If business traffic demanded a Oneworld or Skyteam member flying into New Brunswick, then I could see a flight. Would probably make more sence out of JFK though.
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  #159  
Old Posted May 31, 2012, 2:34 AM
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I'm not sure why they don't fly to St. John's if the pax are there. I could see Westjet doing YYZ-YQM-YYT-YQM-YYZ. Maybe a 737 is too much aircraft and the yeilds are not there. Aircraft routing is very complex. Having it parked somewhere doing nothing is not an option. Porter even have less of an option given aircraft availability. As for Jazz, they could do the same as Westjet with a smaller plane but again, yeilds must not be there. Citing an airline that went only charter (Canjet) is probably not the best business case.
A long time ago, CanJet was a scheduled carrier too. It was then that they had the St. John's-Moncton route. WestJet will soon be getting the same turboprops as Porter. I could see either of them using this plane on a St. John's-Moncton-Toronto route.
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  #160  
Old Posted Jun 1, 2012, 3:36 PM
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from CBC

New Brunswick airports losing traffic to United States
CBC News Posted: Jun 1, 2012 7:43 AM AT Last Updated: Jun 1, 2012 10:32 AM AT

The Atlantic Canada Airports Association says it is losing nearly half of its passenger business seeking trips to the United States to airports outside of Canada.

The industry group, which met in Fredericton on Thursday, said the loss of business to U.S. airports is costing provincial airports a lot of money and the chance to attract new airlines.

New Brunswick travellers have made the trip to airports, such as in Bangor, Me., for years to catch flights at a fraction of the cost of Canadian ticket prices.

Bernie LeBlanc, the chief executive officer of the Saint John Airport Authority, said a recent study showed they were losing as many as 40,000 passengers a year who flew out of the United States.

"We have a $20 passenger fee, so that's something we're not getting for any departing passenger and parking revenue we're not getting,” he said.

The loss of 40,000 passengers is significant for New Brunswick airports.

Saint John had roughly 227,000 passengers use the facility in 2010. Meanwhile, almost 600,000 passengers used the Moncton airport and 275,000 people passed through the Fredericton airport.

High ticket costs
LeBlanc said the high cost of air fares in Canada also prevents airports from attracting new airlines.

"Why would we want to go to Canada when we can establish ourselves in Bangor and still get the Canadian passengers and not have to pay the same amount of fees,” he said.

David Innes, the chief executive officer of the Fredericton airport, said taxes and fees imposed by various levels of government are to blame for the high cost of Canadian air fares.

"The governments in Canada are taking a billion dollars a year out of the air transportation system. That money has to come from somewhere,” Innes said.

“It's coming basically from the consumers. We want governments to — and it's all three levels of governments — to review their taxation as it affects flying in Canada."

Innes said money lost from lower fees would be recouped from revenue gained from the thousands of passengers who now drive to American airports.

Earlier this week, David Ganong, chairman of Ganong Bros., said New Brunswick should have one main, international airport.

The businessman said Moncton’s airport would be the ideal pick for the main New Brunswick international airport. He said Saint John and Fredericton would still offer regional flights.

Ganong said centralizing the airport is an easy way to boost the economy. He told a business audience on Tuesday the three airports compete more than they co-operate and they duplicate some of the same services.

Personal note - this is more of a problem for Freddy and SJ just because of proximity to the border, but this situation affects all of us. My brother-in-law lives in Halifax and when he and his family went to Orlando last winter, even he chose to fly out of Bangor for the cost savings. For him this was a 7 hour drive!
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