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  #301  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2012, 5:02 PM
Mr. Walch Mr. Walch is offline
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I felt the same. If it was left up to a majority vote everything would have a gable on it. I believe that that part of the article refers to different project on Mississippi next to Pistils Nursery. I think the Payne pictured is by GBD (?). Still bad, just not effecting the project pictured.
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  #302  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2012, 5:22 PM
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Here's the full article. Fosler's comment that he "had restyled the project to look more traditional than modern, adding wood siding, white window trim and cornices" made me feel sick. This is the same guy who designed the "Freedom Center" in the pearl. I think it might be time for me to move to a city.

Also, that building (the Payne) is going up on Mississippi, not Williams.

Boise building boom has North Portland neighborhood edgy, developers moving cautiously
Published: Monday, February 13, 2012, 3:30 PM Updated: Monday, February 13, 2012, 4:28 PM
Cornelius Swart, Special to The Oregonian


A wall of windows presented by the new Albert Apartments as viewed from adjacent houses along Northeast Cleveland Avenue. With more four-story buildings on the way, resident concerns about privacy are once again on the rise.

As the market for urban rental apartments continues to grow, a batch of midrise projects is moving forward in sections of the Boise neighborhood along North Williams and North Mississippi avenues.

Developers appear to be moving cautiously in a neighborhood with a history of fighting over design and scale.

Developer Jack Menashe’s new 84-unit apartment building, formerly called The Rachel, at North Williams and Mason Street has been meeting criticism for months. At 350 feet in length, the building would take up the entire block, and neighbors have consistently complained that it’s too large. Adjacent property owners say the building’s windows will look down at single-family houses and they literally don’t want it in their backyards.

About 45 neighbors joined a Jan. 31 meeting with the Boise Neighborhood Association, Menashe and architects Trish Nixon and Greg Mitchell to discuss the project.

Association co-chairman Ted Buehler said neighbors wanted to see the building broken up into two buildings and for top floors to be set back. Menashe indicated that if the building were broken up, it might need to be even taller to make economic sense. While Menashe and the association haven’t reached a compromise, the groups will continue to meet.

The neighborhood has a history of contention over midrise, mixed-use projects. In 2005, The Mississippi Avenue Lofts near Skidmore Street sparked a divisive, yearlong public battle over size and design. In 2006, similar concerns arose out of Kirisu International’s Japanese garden and mixed-use project proposed for the corner of North Mississippi Avenue and Shaver Street. It eventually collapsed. In 2009, the Boise Neighborhood Association unsuccessfully fought Menashe’s other project on North Williams, the 84-unit Albert Apartments, all the way to the Portland Design Commission.

Buehler believes the Williams conflicts stem from the area’s unique zone, known as EXd. The zone is intended to accommodate commercial uses, but also allows housing.

“This is the only area of the city where you have this EXd zone back to back with residents,” Buehler said. “So you get a wall of apartments right up against single-family homes.”

Kay Newell, longtime neighborhood activist and owner of Sunlan Lighting on Mississippi, is also a member of the association. She waved off criticism that recent developments were unwanted or unforeseen.

“The city zoned this area in the 1990s for four-story buildings,” Newell said in reference to the Albina Community Plan, which had its own lengthy public input process. “Many of the people who are complaining now weren’t around when it (the planning process) happened and some who were didn’t understand what it meant.”

Newell believes urbanization is the product of decisions made decades ago to fight metropolitan sprawl.

Developers appear to be cautiously engaging the neighborhood association all the same.

The meetings between Menashe and the association recently attracted architect Agustin Enriquez of the firm GBD Architects. Enriquez approached Buehler about his new project, The Payne Apartments. The project, developed by Payne Apartments LLC, is a five-story, 19- to 21-unit building with 1,300 square feet of ground-floor retail, at 3703-3709 N. Williams Ave.

Enriquez has had another informal meeting with the association, but those working on the project have been otherwise tight-lipped. Calls to the firm were not returned. When asked about the details of the development, Heather Guthrie, an attorney and registered agent for Payne Apartments LLC, said she had “no comment.”

Meanwhile, a new 25-unit, four-story apartment building is planned for 3807 N. Mississippi Ave. The building, developed by WDC Properties and called The Miss, will be about 100 feet long and 45 feet deep, with no on-site car parking, 1.5 bike parking spaces per unit, and one retail and one live/work space on the ground floor.

Manager Rich Grimes declined to comment on the project.

“Generally speaking, we don’t like to talk about our projects,” Grimes said. “We like to fly under the radar.”

The development’s architect, Steve Fosler, however said he’d met twice with the Boise Neighborhood Association and based on their input had restyled the project to look more traditional than modern, adding wood siding, white window trim and cornices.

The association and Fosler plan to meet again in the coming weeks. Both Fosler and association members say meetings have gone smoothly.

The project's developers, however, have withdrawn its initial Type II development application and reapplied through the Community Design Standards process, which has stricter design criteria but requires less public involvement.

More community news on our North Portland blog
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  #303  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2012, 5:52 PM
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These posts on the Mercury blog are very much worth reading:

http://blogtown.portlandmercury.com/...rtment-complex

http://blogtown.portlandmercury.com/...north-williams

Kudos to Sarah Mirk for at least doing some digging into the sad history of Williams. Of course, this does nothing to change my desire for a massive increase in density all across Portland, including Williams and especially MLK.

1962, NW corner of Williams and Russell:


1972, looking north from just south of Knott:
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  #304  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 12:07 AM
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For reference, I took these shots today.

Future site of the Payne, Miss/Failing. It'll be on both lots north of Pistils.


And the 4-story dvlpt site on Williams/Mason that Boise is protesting.
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  #305  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 12:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tworivers View Post
1962, NW corner of Williams and Russell

1972, looking north from just south of Knott
Oh, come on. What is that, if not progress? Look how congested it was in 1962! By 1972, they'd cleared out all that traffic - it's a driver's paradise!
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  #306  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 4:23 AM
Mr. Walch Mr. Walch is offline
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PS According to the Oregonian The Payne is on Williams: "The project, developed by Payne Apartments LLC, is a five-story, 19- to 21-unit building with 1,300 square feet of ground-floor retail, at 3703-3709 N. Williams Ave." The image also says the corner of Williams and Beech. I am only nit-picking because I want to think that this one will be built as proposed and not have a gabled roof added to it like Fosler's Miss building on Mississippi.
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  #307  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 5:41 AM
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Mr. Walch, thanks for catching my error. If the Payne is at Williams and Beech it must be the one well under construction...

Oh, and bvpcvm, good point
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  #308  
Old Posted Feb 16, 2012, 9:15 PM
zilfondel zilfondel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tworivers View Post
For reference, I took these shots today.

Future site of the Payne, Miss/Failing. It'll be on both lots north of Pistils.
Actually, its kind of tough to imagine a 4-story building next to Pistils. Kind of an odd neighbor for a chicken coop. I cannot believe the magnitude of change that's happened along Mississippi... especially considering that there has been no development even 1/2 a block from the street. The city must really have restricted zoning in the area to the area along the main street only.

Unfortunately, that will also limit the kind of density Portland needs to grow.
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  #309  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2012, 6:39 AM
eeldip eeldip is offline
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its R2.5 off of mississippi, and there have been many duplexes and corner lot subdivides among the single family homes. the williams/vancouver couplet is only a few blocks east, and interstate a few blocks west.

these two streets will very quickly resemble belmont/hawthorne/division in terms of density. perhaps a bit denser, as there are more undeveloped lots.
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  #310  
Old Posted Mar 20, 2012, 3:55 PM
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PCC Development News


Hoffman Construction was awarded a $40 million contract for upcoming projects at Portland Community College's Cascade campus in North Portland.(Rendering courtesy of THA Architecture)

Portland Community College awards contract for renovation and expansion
POSTED: Monday, March 19, 2012 at 01:40 PM PT
Daily Journal of Commerce BY: Lindsey O'Brien
Tags: Hoffman Construction, Portland Community College

With more than 20,000 students on its Cascade campus throughout the year, Portland Community College has a strong presence in the Humboldt neighborhood. And its footprint is about to grow even larger.

PCC’s board of directors last week awarded a $40 million contract to Hoffman Construction for a major renovation and addition. Construction is set to begin at the end of the year.

The campus stretches along five blocks of North Killingsworth Street, which is otherwise dotted with cafes and modest-sized businesses. THA Architecture has worked with the college on a campus redevelopment plan since 2009, and the upcoming transformation is expected to add a more urban feel and activate the neighborhood, according to project architect Nick Hodges.

The project is entering the schematic design phase, and Hoffman Construction will provide input now that it has won the construction manager-general contractor project.

“There are a lot of challenges out there at Cascade,” said Bart Eberwein, executive vice president of Hoffman Construction. “It’s an urban campus; construction will displace really valuable parking; and it’s important that we’re taking care of the students, who are there for an education, not to listen to jackhammers.”

Plans call for construction of a 220-stall, underground parking garage, but the attendant excavation and safety challenges will require more attention before that plan is finalized. Alternatively, the college considered building a garage with approximately 300 stalls, but community members were not thrilled that it would become one of the tallest buildings in the neighborhood.

“We’ve had many, many discussions, and are excited to move forward with a plan that will help us reduce single-occupancy vehicles and meet some of our sustainability goals,” said Linda Degman, associate director of PCC’s bond program.

In 2008, Portland voters approved a $374 million bond measure – $60 million is going into the Cascade campus redevelopment. Hoffman failed to win three previous PCC bond projects.

“We stepped up to the plate three times and whiffed, but this was the final opportunity and we got lucky,” Eberwein said.

For its Cascade proposal, Hoffman strove to maximize MWESB partnerships and emphasize the company’s past successes on projects with complex parking challenges, including the Brewery Blocks. Hoffman will partner with two minority-owned general contracting companies – Pacificmark Construction and Boanerges Group – for the CM-GC contract lasting three and a half years.

“We are totally stoked over here,” said Sharon Maxwell-Hendricks, CEO of Boanerges Group.

Maxwell-Hendricks, a graduate of the Cascade Skill Center’s construction trades program, was thrilled last summer when her company was selected to remodel three classrooms on the campus where she learned the trade.

The upcoming PCC project will be the largest Boanerges Group has undertaken, as well as its first CM-GC contract. Maxwell-Hendricks is anticipating the project will prove a significant boon to her company on many levels. Not only will she learn overall CM-GC procedures, but the project will provide a major boost in revenue and allow her to hire three or four new office staffers.

“For me, this is personal – I was born and raised in this community; I went to a church that was on that property when the college bought it; I’m a PCC alumna,” she said. “This is an opportunity I’ve been working toward for a very long time.”

The first phase of construction will include three new structures – a 45,000-square-foot academic building, a 37,000-square-foot student center and the parking garage. Two more phases are expected, according to Hodges.

Removal of the existing student center, construction of a new plaza, and extensive renovations to the library, student services building and technical education building are in earlier stages of planning, however.

http://djcoregon.com/news/2012/03/19...ig-renovation/
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  #311  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2012, 11:37 PM
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Prescott Apartments to break ground with new 115 unit building along North Portland's Interstate Avenue
Published: Monday, April 02, 2012, 2:50 PM Updated: Monday, April 02, 2012, 4:04 PM
By Cornelius Swart, The Oregonian

With Portland's tight rental housing market continuing to push new construction projects, Sierra Construction of Washington has announced it will break ground on the 155-unit Prescott Apartments on North Interstate Avenue and Prescott Street on Wednesday, April 4.

The $29 million project will have 98,000 square feet of studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments and 9,500 square feet of ground floor retail space. The U-shaped building will be five stories with one six-story wing along Interstate. It will sit directly across from the Prescott Street MAX light-rail stop. The building will have 111 parking stalls.

Developer Prescott Apartments LLC expects units to rent from $900 to $1,800 a month, depending on the size.

The building joins a handful of mid-rise buildings in the corridor including, the subsidized Killingsworth Station project completed last year.

Suzy Tangen of Sierra Construction believes the area is well positioned for continued growth.

"We think it’s an underserved market," Tangen said. "It's right on the light rail line in an attractive, upcoming neighborhood. It's only three stops from the downtown core."

The company is also building a New Seasons Market about a mile to the east on North Williams Avenue.

Sierra originally bought the block bordered by Interstate, Prescott, Skidmore Street and Maryland Avenue in 2008, shortly before the collapse of the real estate market. The land was subsequently sold to Prescott Apartments LCC. A group of single-family homes that occupied the block were used as practice houses for Portland Fire and Rescue in 2009.

The building should be complete in early 2014.

Find more community news on our North Portland blog.

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/i...o_break_g.html
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  #312  
Old Posted May 4, 2012, 4:08 AM
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With so much going on up on Williams, this may have already have been mentioned, if not: Four stories of apts at Williams and Beech.
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  #313  
Old Posted May 5, 2012, 8:53 PM
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Originally Posted by bvpcvm View Post
With so much going on up on Williams, this may have already have been mentioned, if not: Four stories of apts at Williams and Beech.
Nice, another step in filling in that dead area at the NW end of the Fremont Bridge. It seems like with the easy access to NW Portland and downtown via the Fremont it should be a gimme to get that area filled in.
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  #314  
Old Posted May 7, 2012, 1:32 AM
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While it's certainly welcomed, it would be nice to have some retail at the corner.
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  #315  
Old Posted May 8, 2012, 11:13 PM
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Who knows, ground floor live-work can lead to retail/offices.
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  #316  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2012, 8:57 PM
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University of Portland expansion

I don't think this has really been covered before. Probably nothing going to happen for quite a long time, but probably should be in its own category.

University of Portland will expand toward the river under proposed plan

Quote:
A proposed new master plan, presented to University Park neighbors Monday, will allow the University of Portland to develop 35 acres it purchased in 2008 on a Superfund site -- and eventually buy 45 more.

The plan, which the university will submit to the City Council next week, would allow the 111-year-old university to significantly increase its student body, double its on-campus housing and build new athletic facilities, including a baseball stadium.

pic from Oregonlive.com

More:

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/i...d_will_ex.html
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  #317  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2012, 10:41 PM
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So are those the 35 acres? Under the bluff, along the river?
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  #318  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2012, 3:43 AM
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Interstate neighborhood sees burst of development
POSTED: Tuesday, June 26, 2012 at 01:11 PM PT
Daily Journal of Commerce BY: Reed Jackson
Tags: Interstate

http://djcoregon.com/news/2012/06/26...f-development/

Quote:
Sara King likes what she sees when she looks at neighborhoods around North Interstate Avenue, an area that she says is ready to “pop” with development.

“I think this is Interstate’s time,” said King, a neighborhood development manager at the Portland Development Commission. “I see many opportunities for bringing new services to these neighborhoods, and I’m really excited to see all of these projects going in.”

Several commercial and residential developments are taking shape along the Interstate corridor between Northeast Columbia Boulevard and Broadway. Some of the projects, like the Prescott Apartments, have been years in the making.

The recent development push is a result of several of factors, according to King, including momentum created by PDC programs related to the Interstate Corridor Urban Renewal Area. She also cites developers increased ability to gain financing, as well as the success of non-URA corridors like North Mississippi Avenue and Northeast Alberta Street, which have seen increased rents.

“Certainly Williams, Mississippi and Alberta are still strong commercial corridors, but that’s all moving to North Portland now,” King said. “This could emerge as the ‘20-minute neighborhood’ the city envisioned when it put in the URA.”

When the Interstate URA was put in place in 2000, many anticipated that development would come quickly. Those expectations increased in 2004, when the $350 million MAX light-rail yellow line was constructed along the avenue. But compared to Northeast Mississippi Avenue, which saw rapid development after the MAX line was constructed, the Interstate Corridor seemed to move in slow motion.

The makeup of Interstate Avenue could have had something to do with the lag, King said. Unlike neighborhoods around Southeast Hawthorne Street and North Mississippi Avenue, Interstate neighborhoods do not have old buildings bunched together. Instead, they have pockets of buildings spread out in a configuration similar to that along Southeast Division Street. That makes seeing cumulative effects of development more difficult. But the PDC has tried to remedy this problem.

During the past 12 years, for example, the PDC has managed to attract business developers with Interstate programs like the Store Front Improvement Program, which currently has an enrollment of nine businesses. As those businesses have completed projects, more developers have started looking at the area and at the program.

Low rents and improved financing also helped spur recent development along Interstate. As areas along North Mississippi Avenue and Northeast Alberta Street have seen success, property taxes and rents in those areas have gone up. As a result, the Interstate Corridor provides a more cost-efficient way to be near a major transit center.

Local developer Jim Winkler believes his project, Killingsworth Station, also helped contribute to the growth by bringing in new businesses.

“I think you’re seeing a community develop, organized around a commonality for creativity and an importance of environmental stewardship,” Winkler said. “Businesses like organic grocery stores and bike shops have come to the area to serve that community.”

Winkler said Interstate’s recent growth has benefited from his and other developers’ ability to obtain the financing they need to move their projects forward.

Late last year, Killingsworth Station, with the help of the PDC, was completed after eight years of funding difficulties; all 57 condos of the complex are now full. The $26 million Prescott Apartments, which will have 155 units and 9,500 square feet of retail space, broke ground in April after four years of delays. And construction on the long-delayed Jarrett Street Lofts, which will have 100 units and 2,000 square feet of retail, is expected to begin this month.

“We’re definitely reaching a turning point in the neighborhood,” said Brendan Lawrence, development manager for the Prescott Apartments. “Enough projects have come along to act as a catalyst for other development.”

A new apartment complex designed by Ankrom Moisan Associated Architects is obtaining permits to be built at 5118 N. Interstate Ave. Like the Prescott Apartments and the Jarrett Street Lofts, these apartments will be built without the assistance of the PDC.

“We’re seeing projects that don’t need PDC’s help; that’s the goal,” King said. “They’re helping to bring momentum to the street.”

For residents in the area, the increase in development has been a long time coming, according to Tom Kilbane, a member of the Overlook Neighborhood Association

“We have been watching and waiting for this to happen for some time,” he said. “Everyone I talk to is overwhelmingly excited for it.”
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  #319  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2012, 8:59 PM
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New Seasons on Williams appears to have broken ground.
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  #320  
Old Posted Jul 3, 2012, 4:30 PM
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A $7 million renovation project planned in the St. Johns neighborhood will convert John's Tavern into a three-story hotel. (Rendering courtesy of Ankrom Moisan Associated Architects)


Hotel planned for St. Johns neighborhood
POSTED: Monday, July 2, 2012 at 03:32 PM PT
BY: Reed Jackson Daily Journal of Commerce

http://djcoregon.com/news/2012/07/02...-neighborhood/

Quote:
The St. Johns neighborhood’s isolated location gives it the feel of a small town – one without certain amenities.

One is lodging; the nearest hotel is miles away. But a $7 million project will soon change that. John’s Tavern, on North Lombard Street, will be converted into a hotel, and that could spark more projects, according to Risa Davis, a St. Johns resident who is spearheading the building’s transformation with her husband, Bret.

“If there is something great going on right in the center of downtown, it’s going to bloom out,” she said. “This is a total community project.”

Risa Davis, who works in real estate and served on the Architectural Heritage Center’s board for five years, and Bret have a written agreement to purchase the 108-year-old property and are hoping to return it to its former prestige. The building once was a three-story community landmark called the Central Hotel.

But Davis said that for some unknown reason, two floors were removed in 1939. And the property has since frustrated neighborhood residents. In fact, last year police were called to John’s Tavern more than any other bar in Portland, according to Davis.

A renovation of the property, which sits next to St. Johns Plaza, will make the neighborhood much safer, said Jeff Bissonnette, president of the St. Johns Main Street Coalition.

“St. Johns has always struggled with a reputation that it might have some troubled spots,” he said. “Having a hotel there will change the dynamic around the plaza and make it a place that people really feel is accessible 24/7.”

The building will regain two floors and be renamed the Central Hotel. A restaurant and a lobby will replace the tavern on the bottom floor; a total of 36 rooms will fill the upper two floors.

Pacific Crest Construction, the company behind many McMenamins projects, will build a dining area on the roof, where visitors will be able to view the Willamette River and the St. Johns Bridge.

Development in the area has been steady, according to Bissonnette, since the Portland Development Commission launched its Main Street Program there in 2009 to revitalize the city’s old commercial districts.

However, even though businesses have slowly entered the neighborhood, most are small. And many developers continue to question the benefits of developing property in St. Johns, Bissonnette said. However, the Central Hotel will be the biggest project in the area in years; it could help change developers’ perceptions, he added.

“It becomes a landmark in that it’s definitely a significant and ambitious project that shows that St. Johns is worth the investment,” Bissonnette said. “Lots of potential investors looking at St. Johns just need a landmark to say, ‘Yep, other people are, so I will too.’ ”

As it stands now, the property is considered an eyesore by much of the community. Even simply replacing the building’s two outer facades – the project’s first phase – could help spur development in the area, Risa Davis said.

“It’s like when a guy is always complaining to his wife because she never cleans the house, so he decides to bring home a bouquet of flowers,” she said. “She puts the bouquet on the table and notices the clutter on the table, so she cleans it. Then she notices the clutter on the ground around the table and cleans that.”

Both Davis and Bissonnette said they want the project developed in a way that suits the neighborhood. In other words, they do not want the hotel to look like a condo building in the Pearl District or a loft complex on North Mississippi Avenue. Rather, they want the hotel, as well as any other future development nearby, to match the historic, rustic appearance of other buildings in St. Johns.

“St. Johns has a history of being a strong community and one that is economically diverse,” Bissonnette said. “We’re trying to make sure that history is honored with any kind of economic development going on.”

Davis expects construction to start sometime late this year or early 2013 and finish in spring 2014. The project was designed by Ankrom Moisan Associated Architects.
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