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  #7821  
Old Posted May 16, 2012, 11:17 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I would like to know more about this particular photo. The info. might have been in one of the links you provided but I missed it.
I am especially curious about this extra wide street.
I have seen the photo before, but the source of this particular photo is unknown other than it is a repost from another area of the "Skyscraper" Forum. It just says 1925 Police Cars. Unfortunately, there are no other source references. Look at this page and you should find it.http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...86986&page=116

All photos are from that page and everything is dated "1925."



From one of the latest posts for that thread entitled: "Evolution through time of Los Angeles California"http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...86986&page=173

Last edited by BifRayRock; May 17, 2012 at 12:15 AM.
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  #7822  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 12:22 AM
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  #7823  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 12:28 AM
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Rufus Brown was a BRAVE man.
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  #7824  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 12:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
sopas: After poking around a bit this morning--well, more than a bit (it's a rainy day here in NY)--I found that the Ralphs in Tension was the one at 3465 W. 6th St.... which is the well-known and still-extant Chapman Park Market. It turns out that the Chapman building on the north side of 6th between Alexandria and Kenmore was a Ralphs in 1949.
I guess I owe you a burger at the Apple Pan. I've always liked their hickory burgers. I haven't been there in a number of years now, though.


Wikipedia
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  #7825  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 12:55 AM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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jericl cat

Sometime in the '80s, I think it was, New York City began using new manhole covers, many still in place, which caused some xenophobic comment at the time... including my own, I suppose. It didn't really bother me that the city bought the lids from overseas--but I wondered why it couldn't have stipulated in the contract that they not read "MADE IN INDIA." Only recently have I noticed that L.A. has their own versions. Not sure when they first appeared.




sopas: Neither have I. Next time I'm out there, I'll call you to collect that hickory burger.
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  #7826  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 1:18 AM
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High Tower Drive 1931. Garages below....apartments above....via elevator.



from my original post dated May 2010 (along with contemporary photos of the High Tower elevator).
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=1229

___



I accidentally came across a modern day equivalent of the High Tower elevator.

At first I noticed what looks like a bluish bridge crossing Silverwood Terrace (I've circled it in red).


google aerial




below: In this closer view, the mystery 'bridge' doesn't cross Silverwood Terrace after all....it traverses private property.


google aerial detail



So I grabbed a 'google observation car' and headed down Silverwood Terrace. I came across this tiny garage at 1750 Silverwood Terrace.


google street view


and just to the right of the garage is this separate entrance...


google street view


..at the base of this vertigo inducing elevator!




Pretty amazing isn't it. I was flabbergasted!

Wasn't there an easier way to reach this property? -like a road at the top-
Also, who plots out these ridiculous parcels of land?

___

Last edited by ethereal_reality; May 17, 2012 at 5:39 AM.
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  #7827  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 1:56 AM
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Here's an interesting, and quite romantic, description of the old High Tower apartments.


http://www.michaelconnelly.com.au/photo_echotower.html
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  #7828  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 5:17 AM
fhammon fhammon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
High Tower Drive 1931. Garages below....apartments above....via elevator.

This is very, very cool
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  #7829  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 5:28 AM
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Indeed it is! and it's still in use fhammon.
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  #7830  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 5:34 AM
fhammon fhammon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
This place is quite cute. Notice the 'open' sign shaped like a pig.


google street view
If truth be told, I'm more of a Los Angeles Pueblo-file than a Noirist but I've found a happy home here because I dearly love Old Los Angeles and there's more Noir here now, today than a long gone crumbling adobe village to enjoy. I can mostly only visit the old pueblo of Los Angeles in books and faded photos.

I brought up the subject of Nicks Cafe at 1300 North Spring Street across from the old train yard now called The Cornfield.
The sign at Nicks says since 1948. I think I have proof of that little building from 1924. Lookie here. Here's a photo from (supposedly) 1924 showing the old train yard with the footbridge. I've drawn an arrow mid-photo pointing to the Nick's building followed by a modern Google photo of the same area with a crude arrow pointing to the same little building - I think:


http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics25/00032359.jpg corn field 1924




I've also drawn in a crude caricature in the top distance of a water wheel to show approximately where water was drawn for the pueblo from the Los Angeles River via that method to feed the Zanja Madre or "Mother Ditch" to supply water to the village around the 1860s, being at higher ground, and have drawn thin black lines showing two routes the Zanja took over the years. The first being an open ditch running downhill more or less cutting straight across The Cornfield (probably inaccurate) and another enclosed in brick and buried up against the steep western slope which has recently been rediscovered and partially excavated and now stands revealed as a monument of sorts in the Cornfield Park.



http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics20/00009662.jpg

It ultimately dumped water into a large brick and mortar cistern in the central Los Angeles Plaza where the band stand is now located seen to the far right in the first photo with the Plaza Church to the far left. Other ditches carried the rest of the water elsewhere as needed.


http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1337231855130



http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search...=1337231463910



Further reading on the Zanja Madre:
http://waterandpower.org/museum/Zanj...ueduct%29.html

Last edited by fhammon; May 17, 2012 at 6:22 AM.
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  #7831  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 5:44 AM
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- I think: You're right.
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  #7832  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 9:02 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I've never noticed so many palm trees...they're lined up like soldiers.
Above the Ambassador, facing North on Vermont, ca. '40 Another view of soldier-palms?




Interesting obit for Dick Whittington who passed away in '85 at 89 years of age.: http://articles.latimes.com/1985-04-...ngeles-theater Has a photo been posted of the man and his plane?

"In a career that lasted nearly 60 years Whittington, among other things, devised a mobile laboratory that made possible the transmission of the first photos of the Rose Bowl football game directly from the stadium to newspapers and wire services in the Midwest and East, captured the spectacle of the 1932 Olympics and the early air races that emanated from Mines Field, now Los Angeles International Airport, and sold sports and news photos to newspapers that their own cameramen had missed."


Last edited by BifRayRock; May 17, 2012 at 9:15 AM.
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  #7833  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 10:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Here's an interesting, and quite romantic, description of the old High Tower apartments.


http://www.michaelconnelly.com.au/photo_echotower.html
The High Tower Apartments have a noir connection, too. They figure prominently in Robert Altman's 1973 remake of Raymond Chandler's The Long Good Bye with Elliott Gould assaying an extra laid-back Phillip Marlowe. They stand in as Marlowe's residence with the camera tracking through the property several times with the requiste kooky neighbors, his cat coming and going through an open window and a crew of baddies appearing at his door to deliver a noir beating. And yes, the elevator's featured too.
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  #7834  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 10:32 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post

LAPL
Main and 7th, 1933
All of that water can ruin your whole day. Where's my umbrella?

North Hollywood apparently had more than its fair share too. According to the Museum of the San Fernando Valley, 1938 was a banner year. http://museumsanfernandovalley.blogs...hollywood.html





Colfax Ave bridge washout:
http://www.americassuburb.com


Yet, even though there seems to have been more than enough to go around on some days, it was never enough.

From the LA Times: June 18, 1911 LA Aqueduct:





Sylmar, November 5, 1913, Eureka!




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  #7835  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 10:40 AM
westcork westcork is offline
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I am not sure if this place has ever been mentioned here. It's the Santa Fe Hospital in Boyle Heights. Built in 1904 and rebuilt in 1924. Now Linda Vista Community Hospital.

Boyle Heights History Blog


Card Cow


Railway Surgery
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  #7836  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 1:25 PM
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An article I read yesterday about the future of the Linda Vista Community Hospital: http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow...192911064.html
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  #7837  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 3:25 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
That shot was taken from the retaining wall of the Union Station tracks, which overlooked Aliso Street (now overlooking the 101 freeway and El Monte Busway/San Bernardino Fwy. carpool lanes).

In fact, there's a photo posted on here with a locomotive that broke through it... here, from the LA Times archive:

. . . . .
Here's an aerial image of Union Station from 1940. That retaining wall is near the upper right-hand corner, where the curved ramp for the roof parking is. The old postcard photo was taken from there. The MWD headquarters building now occupies that site.

USC Archive
I remember that ramp. The MWD building was built in the late 1990s.
Undated photo

LAPL
A different angle and a different date. A '61 aerial looking NE- where some of the Noir veneer is wearing thin.
http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...olNumber=60302

Hope no one minds, but here is a '24 aerial of the former Salt Lake Station in East LA, awfully close to the LA River. http://photos.lapl.org



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  #7838  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 4:07 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
jericl cat

. . . . Only recently have I noticed that L.A. has their own versions. Not sure when they first appeared.
Thank you for touching on this subject. Concern in the US regarding foreign made sewer covers had been voiced in the late '80s. Here is an article from 1990: http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...g=1069,1462217 Do you suppose US Foundries are still responsible for the structural steel used in buildings, bridges and rail systems? Several books and blogs have been written on the subject of manhole/sewer covers. (e.g., http://www.magney.org/photofiles/Man...LosAngeles.htm and http://www.amazon.com/Manhole-Covers.../dp/0870931687)

Manhole cover theft is evidently a problem throughout the civilized world and that does not include dropping one on a foot. http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jan...nhole-20120124http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2011/...s-in-alhambra/


http://www.magney.org/photofiles/Man...lyHills-CA.htm

During the Second Great War, when iron was in short supply, Los Angeles, among other cities, employed wooden manhole covers. These were probably much easier to carve than their metal counterparts.

"Wooden manhole cover in Los Angeles County, California, circa 1942. Colonel Carl H. Reeves, superintendent of the Los Angeles County, California, Maintenance Department, lifting a wooden manhole cover into place. Treated to resist termites and decay, each wooden cover saved 500 pounds of metal and could be manufactured without the use of extensive fabricating equipment. A War Production Board (WPB) order prohibited the use of iron and steel for manhole covers."





http://www.sewerhistory.org/grfx/com...mhcvrhist3.htm

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  #7839  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 6:25 PM
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MichaelRyerson MichaelRyerson is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
Thank you for touching on this subject. Concern in the US regarding foreign made sewer covers had been voiced in the late '80s. Here is an article from 1990: http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...g=1069,1462217 Do you suppose US Foundries are still responsible for the structural steel used in buildings, bridges and rail systems? Several books and blogs have been written on the subject of manhole/sewer covers. (e.g., http://www.magney.org/photofiles/Man...LosAngeles.htm and http://www.amazon.com/Manhole-Covers.../dp/0870931687)

Manhole cover theft is evidently a problem throughout the civilized world and that does not include dropping one on a foot. http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jan...nhole-20120124http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2011/...s-in-alhambra/


http://www.magney.org/photofiles/Man...lyHills-CA.htm

During the Second Great War, when iron was in short supply, Los Angeles, among other cities, employed wooden manhole covers. These were probably much easier to carve than their metal counterparts.

"Wooden manhole cover in Los Angeles County, California, circa 1942. Colonel Carl H. Reeves, superintendent of the Los Angeles County, California, Maintenance Department, lifting a wooden manhole cover into place. Treated to resist termites and decay, each wooden cover saved 500 pounds of metal and could be manufactured without the use of extensive fabricating equipment. A War Production Board (WPB) order prohibited the use of iron and steel for manhole covers."





http://www.sewerhistory.org/grfx/com...mhcvrhist3.htm

'each...cover saved 500 pounds of metal'?? How? Manhole covers are seriously heavy but still, they can be moved by one man with a long-handled hook and some elbow grease. Are they suggesting manhole covers weighed 500 pounds?
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  #7840  
Old Posted May 17, 2012, 6:49 PM
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Look at this amazing remnant of an old stone wall in the 1400 block of North Broadway.


google street view
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